ANTH (ANTH)

ANTH 102. Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology. 3 Units.

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

ANTH 103. Introduction to Human Evolution. 3 Units.

Physical, cultural, and technological evolution of humans. The systematic interrelationships between humans, culture, and environment.

ANTH 107. Archaeology: An Introduction. 3 Units.

Basic archaeological concepts are discussed followed by a review of human cultural and biological evolution from the earliest times through development of state organized societies. Geographical scope is worldwide with special attention given to ecological and cultural relationships affecting human societies through time.

ANTH 202. Archaeology of Eastern North America. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the archaeology and prehistory of the eastern woodlands of North America. Course material will focus on the archaeological record of native societies living east of the Mississippi River from the first arrivals at the end of the Pleistocene up to the coming of Europeans. Specific topics for discussion include late Pleistocene settlement, hunter-gatherer environmental adaptations, the origin of food production, and the development of ranked societies.

ANTH 215. Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women's health, and children at risk).

ANTH 225. Evolution. 3 Units.

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory. Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.

ANTH 233. Introduction to Jewish Folklore. 3 Units.

Exploration of a variety of genres, research methods and interpretations of Jewish folklore, from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on how Jewish folk traditions and culture give us access to the spirit and mentality of the many different generations of the Jewish ethnic group, illuminating its past and informing the direction of its future development. Offered as ANTH 233, RLGN 233, and JDST 233. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 300. International Project Field Work: Uganda, Global Health. 1 Unit.

Field trip to Uganda for design teams associated with ENGR 397/ANTH 303 and the Global Health Design Collaborative. Participation by instructor consent. A course fee will be assessed to cover travel and on-the-ground expenses. Offered as ENGR 350U and ANTH 300.

ANTH 302. Darwinian Medicine. 3 Units.

Darwinian medicine deals with evolutionary aspects of modern human disease. It applies the concepts and methods of evolutionary biology to the question of why we are vulnerable to disease. Darwinian (or evolutionary) medicine proposes several general hypotheses about disease causation including disease as evolutionary legacy and design compromise, the result of a novel environment, a consequence of genetic adaptation, the result of infectious organisms' evolutionary adaptations, and disease symptoms as manifestation of defense mechanisms. It proposes that evolutionary ideas can explain, help to prevent and perhaps help to treat some diseases. This course presents the basic logic of Darwinian medicine and evaluates hypotheses about specific diseases that illustrate each of the hypotheses about disease causation. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103. Offered as ANTH 302 and ANTH 402.

ANTH 303. Interdisciplinary Solutions to Global Health Issues. 3 Units.

This unique course brings together the expertise of engineers and social scientists to address global health issues through a combination of classroom-based learning and experiential learning through team-based design projects and field-based community assessments. Students will experience the process of engineering design by participating in teams organized around solutions to real-world health problems in the developing world. Methods from social sciences will be practiced and brought to bear in the process, including assessment of global health needs, and evaluation of success of interventions. Students will study and discuss current key issues in global health, and ethics surrounding health care, disparity, methods of intervention, and develop skills in how to define and frame problems and communicate effectively across disciplines. The course is organized around ongoing projects that seek to design technical solutions to global health issues, with a focus on Uganda. The teams will also work and learn with students and faculty of Biomedical Engineering and Social Sciences at Makerere University of Kampala (MUK), Uganda. Examples of interactions with MUK will include discussion of common readings, peer-review, and joint planning, implementation, and review of fieldwork. Students enrolled in ANTH 303/ ENGR 397 are eligible to travel to Uganda to participate in project activities over Spring Break. Travelers must be enrolled in ENGR 350U. This course is an approved SAGES Departmental Seminar. A student in the Case School of Engineering may use this course to meet an Engineering Core Breadth requirement, either in place of ENGL 398 and ENGR 398, or as a Social Science course (ANTH 303 cross-list). No student may count the course to satisfy both of these requirements. Offered as ANTH 303 and ENGR 397. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 305. Child Policy. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to issues in public policy that impact children and families. Local, state, and federal child policy will be considered, and topics will include, for example, policies related to child poverty, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and children's physical and mental health. Students will learn how policy is developed, how research informs policy and vice versa, and a framework for analyzing social policy. Recommended preparation: One social sciences course or consent. Offered as ANTH 305, CHST 301, and POSC 382A.

ANTH 306. The Anthropology of Childhood and the Family. 3 Units.

Child-rearing patterns and the family as an institution, using evidence from Western and non-Western cultures. Human universals and cultural variation, the experience of childhood and recent changes in the American family. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 306 and ANTH 406.

ANTH 307. Experiential Learning in Child Policy. 3 Units.

Focus on state and federal legislative policy impacting children, youth, and families. Course includes an experiential learning component at the state or federal level and a travel experience to either Columbus, OH or Washington, DC to learn firsthand how policy is formed. Students may take this course twice for credit. Offered as ANTH 307 and CHST 302.

ANTH 308. Child Policy Externship. 3 Units.

Externships offered through CHST 398/ANTH 308 give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as public health, including behavioral health, education. juvenile justice, childcare and/or child welfare. Students apply for the externships, and selected students are placed in local public or nonprofit agencies with a policy focus. Each student develops an individualized learning plan in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty and the supervisor in the agency. CHST 398/ANTH 308 is a 3 credit-hour course and may be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours. Offered as CHST 398 and ANTH 308. Prereq: CHST 301.

ANTH 310. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Units.

This is an introduction to the core concepts, theories and methodologies that form the study of language from an anthropological point of view. The course provides exposure to current issues in linguistic anthropological research and reviews some of the foundational topics of research past, highlighting the contributions of linguistics to anthropology and social science. Topics to be explored include: 1) an overview of the study of language (language structure and patterns, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, meaning and linguistic relativity, cross-language comparison, and non-verbal communication); 2) doing linguistic anthropology "on the ground" (an intro to the laboratory and field techniques of linguistic anthropology); 3) the study of language as function and social action (language and social structure speech acts and events, verbal art, language and emotion); and 4) the study of language/discourse and power (language in politics, medicine, and law). Offered as ANTH 310 and ANTH 410.

ANTH 312. Ethnography of Southeast Asia. 3 Units.

This course examines the people and cultures of Southeast Asia from an anthropological perspective. From a starting place of the local people we will explore important aspects of life in this region such as agriculture, religion, health, medicine, nation-building, ethnic identity, art, and technology. Additionally, we will examine and question the ideas, traditions, and scholarly modes of study that brought this geographical area together as a region. Offered as ANTH 312 and ANTH 412. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 314. Cultures of the United States. 3 Units.

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin. Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.

ANTH 316. Current Global Health Events. 3 Units.

This course will introduce students to an anthropological approach to understanding disease, illness, sickness and suffering in a global health context. The course will expose students to biological, socio-cultural, historical, political-economic, and epidemiological assessments of the disease and illness states. Students will be asked to bring a critical focus to the use of ethnographic, population-based, and clinical approaches to addresses global health problems. Additionally students will learn about the key organizations, institutions, and commercial enterprises that come to play in the assessment, prioritizing, and treatment of these health issues. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: ANTH 102 and ANTH 215.

ANTH 319. Introduction to Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences. 3 Units.

Statistical description (central tendency, variation, correlation, etc.) and statistical evaluation (two sample comparisons, regression, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics). Developing an understanding of statistical inference, particularly on proper usage of statistical methods. Examples from the social sciences. Cannot be used to meet the A&S Humanities and Social Sciences requirement. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201, STAT 201R, or PSCL 282. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement. Prereq: Major in Anthropology.

ANTH 321. Methods in Archaeology. 3 Units.

This course reviews the basic methods and techniques used in modern anthropological archaeology. Topics to be discussed include the nature of the archaeological record, research design, techniques of field archaeology, methods of laboratory analysis, museum archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and cultural interpretation. Prereq: ANTH 107.

ANTH 323. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture. 3 Units.

This course will examine the biological and cultural impact of AIDS in different societies around the world. Topics include: the origin and evolution of the virus, the evolutionary implications of the epidemic, routes of transmission, a historical comparison of AIDS to other epidemics in human history, current worldwide prevalences of AIDS, and cultural responses to the epidemic. Special emphasis will be placed on the long-term biological and social consequences of the epidemic. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 105. Offered as ANTH 323 and ANTH 423.

ANTH 324. Field Methods in Archaeology. 3 - 4 Units.

This field course is designed to give the student a comprehensive introduction to archaeological field work. All participants will be introduced to the methods of archaeological survey, techniques of hand excavation, artifact identification, and the preparation of field notes and documentation. In large measure this is a "learning through doing" course which is supplemented by formal and informal lectures and discussions about archaeological methods and regional prehistory. The course will take place from Monday through Friday at an archaeological site in northeast Ohio. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the field site and must bring a sack lunch. All participants will receive a field manual which will provide detailed information on the course and techniques of field work.

ANTH 325. Economic Anthropology. 3 Units.

Economic anthropology is a sub-field of anthropology that examines how people in modern and non-modern societies produce, distribute, exchange, and consume goods, services, and other valued resources. The sub-field seeks to understand how cultures, including our own, organize and structure these activities through institutions, rituals, and beliefs systems. However, unlike the formal approach of the field of economics, the in-depth methods of economic anthropology concentrate on day-to-day experiences of what the economic means, how this is defined, and what we can learn about human behavior through it. This course will introduce students to economic anthropology and some of the major questions and challenges this field addresses. The history of this sub-field, how it relates to economic sociology, and areas where economic anthropology and traditional economics overlap, will also be explored. This class does not present economic anthropology and modern economics as adversaries, instead how and why they are fundamentally different orientations with often seemingly little in common. On this backdrop, this class will survey a number of different topics, including: health commodification; gift exchange; commodity chains; the history of money and debt; why objects have value; how people make ends meet; rational vs. non-rational decision-making; behavioral economic experiments conducted in other cultures; development economics, and why some objects and services have prices while others do not. Offered as ANTH 325 and ANTH 425.

ANTH 326. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health. 3 Units.

This course explores the relationship between social inequality and the distribution of health and illness across class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and national boundaries. Class readings drawn from critical anthropological approaches to the study of health emphasize the fundamental importance of power relations and economic constraints in explaining patterns of disease. The course critically examines the nature of Western biomedicine and inequality in the delivery of health services. Special consideration is given to political economic analysis of health issues in the developing world such as AIDS, hunger, reproductive health, and primary health care provision. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215. Offered as ANTH 326 and ANTH 426.

ANTH 327. Ancient Cultures of the Ohio Region. 3 Units.

This course surveys the archaeology of Native American cultures in the Great Lakes region from ca. 10,000 B.C. to A.D. 1700. The geographic scope of this course is the upper Midwest, southern Ontario, and the St. Lawrence Valley with a focus on the Ohio region. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107. Offered as ANTH 327 and ANTH 427.

ANTH 328. Medical Anthropology and Public Health. 3 Units.

Anthropology has a longstanding relationship with the field of public health, which dates back to before the flourishing of medical anthropology as a subfield. Direct participation of medical anthropologists in public health research and practice continues to grow. This course explores the intersection of medical anthropology and public health from the perspective of anthropological history, theory, and methods. Course topics include: the history of anthropological work in public health, medical anthropology theory as a guide to anthropological public health research, and anthropological methods and approaches to public health work. Case studies from around the world will be employed throughout the course. Offered as ANTH 328 and ANTH 428.

ANTH 329. Anthropological Perspectives of Migration and Health. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of anthropological perspectives on transnational migration and health. We will focus particularly on health and health care issues concerning refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants. This course will focus on the following topics: the physical and mental health consequences of forced migration; refugee trauma; the intersection of health care and immigration policies; immigration and health care access and utilization. Readings and coursework will consider the sociocultural, political, and economic factors that contribute to migrant health disparities. We will also address issues of medical pluralism among transnational migrants and critically examine the concept of cultural competence in clinical settings. Class readings will comprise a variety of theoretical and ethnographic literature within anthropology and closely related disciplines, drawing on cases from across the globe and in cross-cultural comparison. The class will use lectures, readings, and class discussions to explore these relevant issues in migration and health, with the opportunity to engage in hands on ethnographic work with refugees locally. Offered as ANTH 329 and ANTH 429.

ANTH 331. The Most Ancient Near East. 3 Units.

The Near East, archaeologically, is the most intensely researched area in the world. The research, spanning 150 years, reveals a continuous record of human adaptation spanning two million years, five human species, multiple major environmental changes, and shifts in human adaptive strategies from nomadic hunting and gathering to sedentary village agriculture and the emergence of urban centers "civilization." The archaeological record of this extraordinary period beginning two million years ago until about 4000 BC is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the human response to social and ecological changes. The course examines how the emergence of sedentary settlements, surplus food production, population growth, interregional trade, and social-economically stratified societies fundamentally changed the human condition. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107.

ANTH 333. Roots of Ancient India: Archaeology of South Asia. 3 Units.

Archaeological discoveries in South Asia (modern India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal) reveal a continuous record of human habitation from almost two million years ago until the present. Early human populations in the region encountered dramatically changing ecological conditions resulting in various cultural adaptations over this long period. Beginning with the earliest hunter-gatherer populations, archaeological data reveal a diversity of cultural changes/adaptations in South Asia resulting in the indigenous development of sedentary agricultural societies coexisting with hunters and gatherers, and with pastoral nomadic groups interacting over diverse econiches. These cultural developments resulted in the formation of the Harappan (Indus Valley) culture - a unique, ancient (2600-1300 BC) Old World civilization. Archaeological data indicate this Harappan culture provided basic fundamental cultural traits that evolved into the culturally Early Historic Indian Tradition. Special attention is given to theoretical controversies surrounding the cultural continuity issue in South Asian culture history and its significance for understanding Old World archaeology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107.

ANTH 335. Illegal Drugs and Society. 3 Units.

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use. Offered as ANTH 335 and ANTH 435.

ANTH 337. Comparative Medical Systems. 3 Units.

This course considers the world's major medical systems. Foci include professional and folk medical systems of Asia and South Asia, North and South America, Europe and the Mediterranean, including the Christian and Islamic medical traditions. Attention is paid to medical origins and the relationship of popular to professional medicines. The examination of each medical tradition includes consideration of its psychological medicine and system of medical ethics. Recommended preparation: ANTH 215. Offered as ANTH 337 and ANTH 437.

ANTH 338. Maternal Health: Anthropological Perspectives on Reproductive Practices and Health Policy. 3 Units.

The reproductive process is shared by humans as biological beings. However, the experience of pregnancy and childbirth is also dependent on the cultural, social, political, historical, and political-economic setting. This course frames issues in reproductive health by looking at the complex issues associated with maternal health and mortality world-wide. After reviewing biomedical perspectives on reproductive processes this course will focus on childbirth and pregnancy as the process and ritual by which societies welcome new members. This course will review ethnomedical concepts; discuss the interaction between local, national, and global agendas shaping reproductive practices; and conclude with anthropological critiques of reproductive health initiatives. Offered as ANTH 338 and ANTH 438.

ANTH 339. Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Units.

This is a course on applying ethnographic research methods in the social sciences. Ethnographic research seeks to understand and describe the experiences of research participants (i.e. subjects) through becoming involved in their daily lives. Findings from ethnography are generated through systematic observation within the natural context in which behavior occurs (i.e. fieldwork). Unlike methods that emphasize detachment, distance, and objectivity, ethnography involves developing knowledge by becoming an ad hoc member of the group(s) one is studying. The principal techniques of ethnography, "participant-observation" and "In-depth open ended interviewing," require actively engaging the research process. This class will explore ethnographic research techniques, as well as other qualitative research methods. In addition to addressing how such methods make claims about social phenomena, this class will also explore more practical topics such as: developing questions, entering the field, establishing rapport, taking and managing field notes, coding data, and data analysis. Lectures, readings, and class discussion will be complimented by assignments using techniques. Offered as ANTH 339 and ANTH 439. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 340. Cultures of the World: Study Abroad. 3 Units.

ANTH 340 is a vehicle to allow anthropology courses taken during study abroad that have a primary focus on the culture of a specific society or geographic area to be accepted as equivalent to a CWRU course that meets the CAS Global and Cultural Diversity requirement. In order to be accepted as equivalent to ANTH 340 a course must (a) be taught in a department of anthropology or by an anthropologist in an allied department; and (b) cover the breadth of a culture. Courses focusing on one aspect of a society (economics, political structure, history, etc.) cannot be accepted as equivalent to ANTH 340. In order to verify that a course meets these requirements students must submit a course description and syllabus for the course to the Chair, Department of Anthropology. If a syllabus is not available in advance of the course, approval will be contingent on review of the course syllabus. This course will fulfill the CAS Global and Cultural Diversity requirement, as well as meet the geographic area requirement for Anthropology majors and minors. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 347. Cultural Ecology: An Epistemological Approach to Environmental Sustainability. 3 Units.

This course provides the understanding that the realm of human culture is where both the cause and cure of nearly all contemporary environmental sustainability challenges are found. This is because culture is the medium through which humans as living systems perceive, interpret, and act upon their environment. Through understanding principles that guide living systems and applying them to human/nature interaction in diverse cultures throughout the world, students develop an ecological epistemology, or way of knowing nature. This leads to more effective advocacy for environmental sustainability and an increasing depth in interaction with nature, particularly in the domains of aesthetics and the sacred. Offered as ANTH 347 and ANTH 447. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 349. Cultures of Latin America. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is to consider cultural diversity and social inequality in contemporary Latin America from an anthropological perspective. A variety of aspects related to ethnicity, religion, music, gender, social movements, cuisine, urban spaces, violence, and ecology are considered in addition to current economic and political issues. These topics will be analyzed in relation to Latin America's complex historical and social formation and its identity representations. The course takes under consideration various case studies in which not just local communities but also perceptions of national institutions and practices will be analyzed from pluralistic approaches (provided by either Latin American and non-Latin American researchers) that combine fieldwork, interviews and life experiences with textual and media sources. Special attention will be paid to contemporary global issues affecting Latin America. Offered as ANTH 349 and ANTH 449. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 350. Culture, Science and Identity. 3 Units.

This course in the Cultural Studies of Science focuses on the ways in which social identities are constructed and imagined in contemporary and historical sciences and medicines. In particular, the course will consider gender, ethnic, "racial," class and age identities as these are (re)constructed over time in medical and natural scientific discourses across professional cultures. Attention is paid to the means by which notions of normality and abnormality and category specificity are created and altered and to the dynamics of discursive formations. The course also considers the social and medical consequences of specific constructions of biology in general and with respect to specific identities and social classifications. Offered as ANTH 350 and ANTH 450.

ANTH 353. Chinese Culture and Society. 3 Units.

Focuses on Chinese cultural and social institutions during the Maoist and post-Maoist eras. Topics include ideology, economics, politics, religion, family life, and popular culture. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 353 and ANTH 453. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 354. Health and Healing in East Asia. 3 Units.

This course examines the illness experiences and the healing practices in East Asia. After introducing the anthropological approaches to the study of medicine, this course will explore the practices of ethnomedicine and biomedicine, mental health, family planning and reproductive health, the experience of aging and care giving, infectious disease, environmental health, and biotechnology. By delving into the illness experiences and the healing practices in East Asia, the course will discuss issues related to medical pluralism, health inequality, biological citizenship, social stigmatization, and bioethics. Offered as ANTH 354 and ANTH 454. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 359. Introduction to International Health. 3 Units.

Critical health problems and needs in developing countries. Prevalence of infectious disease, malnutrition, chronic disease, injury control. Examines strategies for improvement of health in less developed countries. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 359 and ANTH 459.

ANTH 360. Global Politics of Fertility, Family Planning, and Population Control. 3 Units.

This course offers an anthropological examination of fertility behaviors around the world. In particular, it explores various historical, cultural, socioeconomic, political, and technological factors contributing to reproductive activities. After introducing the anthropological approaches to the study of fertility, the course will delve into the ways to regulate fertility in historical and contemporary times, various factors contributing to fertility change, state intervention in reproduction through voluntary and coercive family planning programs, and new reproductive technologies and ethical concerns surrounding assisted reproduction and abortion. Offered as ANTH 360, ANTH 460 and WGST 360.

ANTH 361. Urban Health. 3 Units.

This course provides an anthropological perspective on the most important health problems facing urban population around the world. Special attention will be given to an examination of disparities in health among urban residents based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, and nationality. Offered as ANTH 361 and ANTH 461.

ANTH 362. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology. 3 Units.

A critical examination of anthropological thought in England, France and the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the way authors formulate questions that motivate anthropological discourse, on the way central concepts are formulated and applied and on the controversies and debates that result. Readings are drawn from influential texts by prominent contemporary anthropologists. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 362 and ANTH 462.

ANTH 365. Gender and Sex Differences: Cross-cultural Perspective. 3 Units.

Gender roles and sex differences throughout the life cycle considered from a cross-cultural perspective. Major approaches to explaining sex roles discussed in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures. Offered as ANTH 365, ANTH 465 and WGST 365. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 366. Population Change: Problems and Solutions. 3 Units.

The course examines population processes and their social consequences from an anthropological perspective. It introduces basic concepts and theories of population studies and demonstrates the ways in which anthropological research contributes to our understanding of population issues. We will explore questions such as: How has world population changed in history? How does a population age or grow younger? What are the factors affecting population health? Why do people migrate? And what are the policy implications of population change? We will examine the sociocultural, economic, political, and ecological factors contributing to population processes, such as factors affecting childbearing decisions, cultural context of sex-selective abortion, various caregiving arrangements for the elderly, and policy responses to population change. We will explore these issues with cases from across the world, with a special focus on China, the world's most populous country with the most massive family-planning program in modern human history. Offered as ANTH 366 and ANTH 466.

ANTH 367. Topics in Evolutionary Biology. 3 Units.

The focus for this course on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, molecular evolution. ANAT/ANTH/EEPS/PHIL/PHOL 467/BIOL 468 will require a longer, more sophisticated term paper, and additional class presentation. Offered as ANTH 367, BIOL 368, EEPS 367, PHIL 367, ANAT 467, ANTH 467, BIOL 468, EEPS 467, PHIL 467 and PHOL 467. Prereq: ANTH 225 or equivalent.

ANTH 368. Evolutionary Biology Capstone. 3 Units.

This course focuses on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology that will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, molecular evolution. Students will participate in discussions and lead class seminars on evolutionary topics and in collaboration with an advisor or advisors, select a topic for a research paper or project. Each student will write a major research report or complete a major project and will make a public presentation of her/his findings. Offered as ANTH 368, BIOL 369, and PHIL 368. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: ANTH 225, BIOL 225, EEPS 225, HSTY 225, PHIL 225 or its equivalent or permission of instructor.

ANTH 370. Field Seminar in Paleoanthropology. 12 Units.

Paleoanthropology is the study of human physical and cultural evolution based on fossils and cultural remains from ancient geological times. These fossils and cultural remains are collected by conducting fieldwork in various parts of the world where geological phenomena have exposed fossiliferous sedimentary windows from the deep past. Hence, fieldwork is one of the major backbones of paleoanthropology. This course is designed for advanced undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing higher degrees in paleoanthropology, human paleobiology, evolutionary biology, or other related disciplines. This course introduces students to the principles and methods of paleontological fieldwork in real time. It introduces students to paleoanthropological fieldwork from locating fossiliferous areas based on aerial photo interpretations to survey methodology; from methods of systematic excavation, fossil collection and documentation in the field, to curation and preparation of fossil specimens in laboratories; from conducting scientific analyses in laboratory environments to subsequently publishing the results in peer-reviewed journals. Recommended preparation: ANTH 377. Prereq: ANTH 103 and ANTH 375.

ANTH 371. Culture, Behavior, and Person: Psychological Anthropology. 3 Units.

Cross-cultural perspectives on personality, human development, individual variability, cognition, deviant behavior, and the role of the individual in his/her society. Classic and contemporary anthropological writings on Western and non-Western societies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 371 and ANTH 471.

ANTH 372. Anthropological Approaches to Religion. 3 Units.

The development of, and current approaches to, comparative religion from an anthropological perspective. Topics include witchcraft, ritual, myth, healing, religious language and symbolism, religion and gender, religious experience, the nature of the sacred, religion and social change, altered states of consciousness, and evil. Using material from a wide range of world cultures, critical assessment is made of conventional distinctions such as those between rational/irrational, natural/supernatural, magic/religion, and primitive/civilized. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 372, RLGN 372 and ANTH 472.

ANTH 375. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence. 3 Units.

This course will survey the biological and behavioral changes that occurred in the hominid lineage during the past five million years. In addition to a thorough review of the fossil evidence for human evolution, students will develop the theoretical framework in evolutionary biology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 377, BIOL 225. Offered as ANAT 375, ANTH 375, ANAT 475 and ANTH 475. Prereq: ANTH 103.

ANTH 376. Topics in the Anthropology of Health and Medicine. 3 Units.

Special topics of interest, such as the biology of human adaptability; the ecology of the human life cycle health delivery systems; transcultural psychiatry; nutrition, health, and disease; paleoepidemiology; and population anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103. Offered as ANTH 376 and ANTH 476.

ANTH 377. Human Osteology. 4 Units.

This course for upper division undergraduates and graduate students will review the following topics: human skeletal development and identification; and forensic identification (skeletal aging, sex identification and population affiliation). Offered as ANAT 377, ANTH 377, ANAT 477 and ANTH 477.

ANTH 378. Reproductive Health: An Evolutionary Perspective. 3 Units.

This course provides students with an evolutionary perspective on the factors influencing human reproductive health, including reproductive biology, ecology, and various aspects of natural human fertility. Our focus will be on variation in human reproduction in mostly non-western populations. Recommended preparation for ANTH 378: ANTH 103. Offered as ANTH 378 and ANTH 478. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

ANTH 379. Topics in Cultural and Social Anthropology. 3 Units.

Special topics of interest across the range of social and cultural anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 379 and ANTH 479.

ANTH 380. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology I. 1 - 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the student will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107 and permission of department, and prior permission of Department of Archaeology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

ANTH 381. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology II. 1 - 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the student will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107 and permission of department, and prior permission of Department of Archaeology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

ANTH 382. Anthropological and Ecological Perspectives on Preserving and Restoring the Natural World. 3 Units.

Now that the environmentally deleterious effects of modern Western culture on the natural world have reached major proportions it has become crucial to explore innovative solutions to this dilemma. In this course novel perspectives derived from the intersection of anthropology and ecology are discussed. The primary perspective focused upon is the understanding that human culture and the natural world in which it is embedded are essentially communicative, or semiotic processes, which thrive upon diverse interaction and feedback. Preserving and restoring the Natural World thus shifts from protecting individual species and particular cultural practices to enhancing the communicative matrix of life and multiple cultural views of the environment. Through this understanding, students will learn to apply a more elegant, effective, and aesthetically pleasing perspective to the challenging environmental issues facing our contemporary world. An in-depth examination of the North American Prairie, along with a comparison of influences on the landscape by indigenous and modern Western Culture will serve as the particular region of focus. Offered as ANTH 382 and ANTH 482. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

ANTH 388. Globalization, Development and Underdevelopment: Anthropological Perspective. 3 Units.

This course examines both theoretical and practical perspectives on globalization and economic development in the "Third World." From "Dependency," "Modernization," and "World System" theory to post-structuralist critiques of development discourse, the class seeks to provide a framework for understanding current debates on development and globalization. The "neoliberal monologue" that dominates the contemporary development enterprise is critically examined in the context of growing global inequality. Special consideration is given to the roles of international agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the "development industry." The course also focuses on the contribution of anthropologists to development theory and practice with emphasis on the impact of development on the health of the poor and survival of indigenous cultures. Opportunities for professional anthropologists in the development field are reviewed. Offered as ANTH 388 and ANTH 488. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 391. Honors Tutorial. 3 Units.

Prereq: Acceptance into Honors Program.

ANTH 392. Honors Tutorial. 3 Units.

Prereq: Acceptance into Honors Program.

ANTH 396. Undergraduate Research in Evolutionary Biology. 3 Units.

Students propose and conduct guided research on an aspect of evolutionary biology. The research will be sponsored and supervised by a member of the CASE faculty or other qualified professional. A written report must be submitted to the Evolutionary Biology Steering Committee before credit is granted. Offered as ANTH 396, BIOL 396, EEPS 396, and PHIL 396. Prereq: ANTH 225 or equivalent.

ANTH 398. Anthropology SAGES Capstone. 3 Units.

Supervised original research on a topic in anthropology, culminating in a written report and a public presentation. The research project may be in the form of an independent research project, a literature review, or some other original project with anthropological significance. The project must be approved and supervised by faculty. Group research projects are acceptable, but a plan which clearly identifies the distinct and substantial role of each participant must be approved by the supervising faculty. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Major in Anthropology.

ANTH 398C. Child Policy Externship and Capstone. 3 Units.

Externships offered through CHST/ANTH/PSCL 398C give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as public health, including behavioral health, education, juvenile justice, childcare and/or child welfare. Students apply for the externships, and selected students are placed in local public or nonprofit agencies with a policy focus. Each student develops an individualized learning plan in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty and the supervisor in the agency. Offered as CHST 398C, ANTH 398C, and PSCL 398C. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: CHST 301.

ANTH 399. Independent Study. 1 - 6 Units.

Students may propose topics for independent reading and research.

ANTH 402. Darwinian Medicine. 3 Units.

Darwinian medicine deals with evolutionary aspects of modern human disease. It applies the concepts and methods of evolutionary biology to the question of why we are vulnerable to disease. Darwinian (or evolutionary) medicine proposes several general hypotheses about disease causation including disease as evolutionary legacy and design compromise, the result of a novel environment, a consequence of genetic adaptation, the result of infectious organisms' evolutionary adaptations, and disease symptoms as manifestation of defense mechanisms. It proposes that evolutionary ideas can explain, help to prevent and perhaps help to treat some diseases. This course presents the basic logic of Darwinian medicine and evaluates hypotheses about specific diseases that illustrate each of the hypotheses about disease causation. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103. Offered as ANTH 302 and ANTH 402.

ANTH 406. The Anthropology of Childhood and the Family. 3 Units.

Child-rearing patterns and the family as an institution, using evidence from Western and non-Western cultures. Human universals and cultural variation, the experience of childhood and recent changes in the American family. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 306 and ANTH 406.

ANTH 410. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Units.

This is an introduction to the core concepts, theories and methodologies that form the study of language from an anthropological point of view. The course provides exposure to current issues in linguistic anthropological research and reviews some of the foundational topics of research past, highlighting the contributions of linguistics to anthropology and social science. Topics to be explored include: 1) an overview of the study of language (language structure and patterns, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, meaning and linguistic relativity, cross-language comparison, and non-verbal communication); 2) doing linguistic anthropology "on the ground" (an intro to the laboratory and field techniques of linguistic anthropology); 3) the study of language as function and social action (language and social structure speech acts and events, verbal art, language and emotion); and 4) the study of language/discourse and power (language in politics, medicine, and law). Offered as ANTH 310 and ANTH 410.

ANTH 412. Ethnography of Southeast Asia. 3 Units.

This course examines the people and cultures of Southeast Asia from an anthropological perspective. From a starting place of the local people we will explore important aspects of life in this region such as agriculture, religion, health, medicine, nation-building, ethnic identity, art, and technology. Additionally, we will examine and question the ideas, traditions, and scholarly modes of study that brought this geographical area together as a region. Offered as ANTH 312 and ANTH 412. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 414. Cultures of the United States. 3 Units.

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin. Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.

ANTH 423. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture. 3 Units.

This course will examine the biological and cultural impact of AIDS in different societies around the world. Topics include: the origin and evolution of the virus, the evolutionary implications of the epidemic, routes of transmission, a historical comparison of AIDS to other epidemics in human history, current worldwide prevalences of AIDS, and cultural responses to the epidemic. Special emphasis will be placed on the long-term biological and social consequences of the epidemic. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 105. Offered as ANTH 323 and ANTH 423.

ANTH 425. Economic Anthropology. 3 Units.

Economic anthropology is a sub-field of anthropology that examines how people in modern and non-modern societies produce, distribute, exchange, and consume goods, services, and other valued resources. The sub-field seeks to understand how cultures, including our own, organize and structure these activities through institutions, rituals, and beliefs systems. However, unlike the formal approach of the field of economics, the in-depth methods of economic anthropology concentrate on day-to-day experiences of what the economic means, how this is defined, and what we can learn about human behavior through it. This course will introduce students to economic anthropology and some of the major questions and challenges this field addresses. The history of this sub-field, how it relates to economic sociology, and areas where economic anthropology and traditional economics overlap, will also be explored. This class does not present economic anthropology and modern economics as adversaries, instead how and why they are fundamentally different orientations with often seemingly little in common. On this backdrop, this class will survey a number of different topics, including: health commodification; gift exchange; commodity chains; the history of money and debt; why objects have value; how people make ends meet; rational vs. non-rational decision-making; behavioral economic experiments conducted in other cultures; development economics, and why some objects and services have prices while others do not. Offered as ANTH 325 and ANTH 425.

ANTH 426. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health. 3 Units.

This course explores the relationship between social inequality and the distribution of health and illness across class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and national boundaries. Class readings drawn from critical anthropological approaches to the study of health emphasize the fundamental importance of power relations and economic constraints in explaining patterns of disease. The course critically examines the nature of Western biomedicine and inequality in the delivery of health services. Special consideration is given to political economic analysis of health issues in the developing world such as AIDS, hunger, reproductive health, and primary health care provision. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215. Offered as ANTH 326 and ANTH 426.

ANTH 427. Ancient Cultures of the Ohio Region. 3 Units.

This course surveys the archaeology of Native American cultures in the Great Lakes region from ca. 10,000 B.C. to A.D. 1700. The geographic scope of this course is the upper Midwest, southern Ontario, and the St. Lawrence Valley with a focus on the Ohio region. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107. Offered as ANTH 327 and ANTH 427.

ANTH 428. Medical Anthropology and Public Health. 3 Units.

Anthropology has a longstanding relationship with the field of public health, which dates back to before the flourishing of medical anthropology as a subfield. Direct participation of medical anthropologists in public health research and practice continues to grow. This course explores the intersection of medical anthropology and public health from the perspective of anthropological history, theory, and methods. Course topics include: the history of anthropological work in public health, medical anthropology theory as a guide to anthropological public health research, and anthropological methods and approaches to public health work. Case studies from around the world will be employed throughout the course. Offered as ANTH 328 and ANTH 428.

ANTH 429. Anthropological Perspectives of Migration and Health. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of anthropological perspectives on transnational migration and health. We will focus particularly on health and health care issues concerning refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants. This course will focus on the following topics: the physical and mental health consequences of forced migration; refugee trauma; the intersection of health care and immigration policies; immigration and health care access and utilization. Readings and coursework will consider the sociocultural, political, and economic factors that contribute to migrant health disparities. We will also address issues of medical pluralism among transnational migrants and critically examine the concept of cultural competence in clinical settings. Class readings will comprise a variety of theoretical and ethnographic literature within anthropology and closely related disciplines, drawing on cases from across the globe and in cross-cultural comparison. The class will use lectures, readings, and class discussions to explore these relevant issues in migration and health, with the opportunity to engage in hands on ethnographic work with refugees locally. Offered as ANTH 329 and ANTH 429.

ANTH 435. Illegal Drugs and Society. 3 Units.

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by the history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a bio-medical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use. Offered as ANTH 335 and ANTH 435.

ANTH 437. Comparative Medical Systems. 3 Units.

This course considers the world's major medical systems. Foci include professional and folk medical systems of Asia and South Asia, North and South America, Europe and the Mediterranean, including the Christian and Islamic medical traditions. Attention is paid to medical origins and the relationship of popular to professional medicines. The examination of each medical tradition includes consideration of its psychological medicine and system of medical ethics. Recommended preparation: ANTH 215. Offered as ANTH 337 and ANTH 437.

ANTH 438. Maternal Health: Anthropological Perspectives on Reproductive Practices and Health Policy. 3 Units.

The reproductive process is shared by humans as biological beings. However, the experience of pregnancy and childbirth is also dependent on the cultural, social, political, historical, and political-economic setting. This course frames issues in reproductive health by looking at the complex issues associated with maternal health and mortality world-wide. After reviewing biomedical perspectives on reproductive processes this course will focus on childbirth and pregnancy as the process and ritual by which societies welcome new members. This course will review ethnomedical concepts; discuss the interaction between local, national, and global agendas shaping reproductive practices; and conclude with anthropological critiques of reproductive health initiatives. Offered as ANTH 338 and ANTH 438.

ANTH 439. Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Units.

This is a course on applying ethnographic research methods in the social sciences. Ethnographic research seeks to understand and describe the experiences of research participants (i.e. subjects) through becoming involved in their daily lives. Findings from ethnography are generated through systematic observation within the natural context in which behavior occurs (i.e. fieldwork). Unlike methods that emphasize detachment, distance, and objectivity, ethnography involves developing knowledge by becoming an ad hoc member of the group(s) one is studying. The principal techniques of ethnography, "participant-observation" and "In-depth open ended interviewing," require actively engaging the research process. This class will explore ethnographic research techniques, as well as other qualitative research methods. In addition to addressing how such methods make claims about social phenomena, this class will also explore more practical topics such as: developing questions, entering the field, establishing rapport, taking and managing field notes, coding data, and data analysis. Lectures, readings, and class discussion will be complimented by assignments using techniques. Offered as ANTH 339 and ANTH 439.

ANTH 447. Cultural Ecology: An Epistemological Approach to Environmental Sustainability. 3 Units.

This course provides the understanding that the realm of human culture is where both the cause and cure of nearly all contemporary environmental sustainability challenges are found. This is because culture is the medium through which humans as living systems perceive, interpret, and act upon their environment. Through understanding principles that guide living systems and applying them to human/nature interaction in diverse cultures throughout the world, students develop an ecological epistemology, or way of knowing nature. This leads to more effective advocacy for environmental sustainability and an increasing depth in interaction with nature, particularly in the domains of aesthetics and the sacred. Offered as ANTH 347 and ANTH 447. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

ANTH 449. Cultures of Latin America. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is to consider cultural diversity and social inequality in contemporary Latin America from an anthropological perspective. A variety of aspects related to ethnicity, religion, music, gender, social movements, cuisine, urban spaces, violence, and ecology are considered in addition to current economic and political issues. These topics will be analyzed in relation to Latin America's complex historical and social formation and its identity representations. The course takes under consideration various case studies in which not just local communities but also perceptions of national institutions and practices will be analyzed from pluralistic approaches (provided by either Latin American and non-Latin American researchers) that combine fieldwork, interviews and life experiences with textual and media sources. Special attention will be paid to contemporary global issues affecting Latin America. Offered as ANTH 349 and ANTH 449. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 450. Culture, Science and Identity. 3 Units.

This course in the Cultural Studies of Science focuses on the ways in which social identities are constructed and imagined in contemporary and historical sciences and medicines. In particular, the course will consider gender, ethnic, "racial," class and age identities as these are (re)constructed over time in medical and natural scientific discourses across professional cultures. Attention is paid to the means by which notions of normality and abnormality and category specificity are created and altered and to the dynamics of discursive formations. The course also considers the social and medical consequences of specific constructions of biology in general and with respect to specific identities and social classifications. Offered as ANTH 350 and ANTH 450.

ANTH 453. Chinese Culture and Society. 3 Units.

Focuses on Chinese cultural and social institutions during the Maoist and post-Maoist eras. Topics include ideology, economics, politics, religion, family life, and popular culture. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 353 and ANTH 453. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ANTH 454. Health and Healing in East Asia. 3 Units.

This course examines the illness experiences and the healing practices in East Asia. After introducing the anthropological approaches to the study of medicine, this course will explore the practices of ethnomedicine and biomedicine, mental health, family planning and reproductive health, the experience of aging and care giving, infectious disease, environmental health, and biotechnology. By delving into the illness experiences and the healing practices in East Asia, the course will discuss issues related to medical pluralism, health inequality, biological citizenship, social stigmatization, and bioethics. Offered as ANTH 354 and ANTH 454. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ANTH 459. Introduction to International Health. 3 Units.

Critical health problems and needs in developing countries. Prevalence of infectious disease, malnutrition, chronic disease, injury control. Examines strategies for improvement of health in less developed countries. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 359 and ANTH 459.

ANTH 460. Global Politics of Fertility, Family Planning, and Population Control. 3 Units.

This course offers an anthropological examination of fertility behaviors around the world. In particular, it explores various historical, cultural, socioeconomic, political, and technological factors contributing to reproductive activities. After introducing the anthropological approaches to the study of fertility, the course will delve into the ways to regulate fertility in historical and contemporary times, various factors contributing to fertility change, state intervention in reproduction through voluntary and coercive family planning programs, and new reproductive technologies and ethical concerns surrounding assisted reproduction and abortion. Offered as ANTH 360, ANTH 460 and WGST 360. Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ANTH 461. Urban Health. 3 Units.

This course provides an anthropological perspective on the most important health problems facing urban population around the world. Special attention will be given to an examination of disparities in health among urban residents based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, and nationality. Offered as ANTH 361 and ANTH 461.

ANTH 462. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology. 3 Units.

A critical examination of anthropological thought in England, France and the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the way authors formulate questions that motivate anthropological discourse, on the way central concepts are formulated and applied and on the controversies and debates that result. Readings are drawn from influential texts by prominent contemporary anthropologists. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 362 and ANTH 462.

ANTH 465. Gender and Sex Differences: Cross-cultural Perspective. 3 Units.

Gender roles and sex differences throughout the life cycle considered from a cross-cultural perspective. Major approaches to explaining sex roles discussed in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures. Offered as ANTH 365, ANTH 465 and WGST 365.

ANTH 466. Population Change: Problems and Solutions. 3 Units.

The course examines population processes and their social consequences from an anthropological perspective. It introduces basic concepts and theories of population studies and demonstrates the ways in which anthropological research contributes to our understanding of population issues. We will explore questions such as: How has world population changed in history? How does a population age or grow younger? What are the factors affecting population health? Why do people migrate? And what are the policy implications of population change? We will examine the sociocultural, economic, political, and ecological factors contributing to population processes, such as factors affecting childbearing decisions, cultural context of sex-selective abortion, various caregiving arrangements for the elderly, and policy responses to population change. We will explore these issues with cases from across the world, with a special focus on China, the world's most populous country with the most massive family-planning program in modern human history. Offered as ANTH 366 and ANTH 466. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ANTH 467. Topics in Evolutionary Biology. 3 Units.

The focus for this course on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, molecular evolution. ANAT/ANTH/EEPS/PHIL/PHOL 467/BIOL 468 will require a longer, more sophisticated term paper, and additional class presentation. Offered as ANTH 367, BIOL 368, EEPS 367, PHIL 367, ANAT 467, ANTH 467, BIOL 468, EEPS 467, PHIL 467 and PHOL 467.

ANTH 471. Culture, Behavior, and Person: Psychological Anthropology. 3 Units.

Cross-cultural perspectives on personality, human development, individual variability, cognition, deviant behavior, and the role of the individual in his/her society. Classic and contemporary anthropological writings on Western and non-Western societies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 371 and ANTH 471.

ANTH 472. Anthropological Approaches to Religion. 3 Units.

The development of, and current approaches to, comparative religion from an anthropological perspective. Topics include witchcraft, ritual, myth, healing, religious language and symbolism, religion and gender, religious experience, the nature of the sacred, religion and social change, altered states of consciousness, and evil. Using material from a wide range of world cultures, critical assessment is made of conventional distinctions such as those between rational/irrational, natural/supernatural, magic/religion, and primitive/civilized. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 372, RLGN 372 and ANTH 472.

ANTH 475. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence. 3 Units.

This course will survey the biological and behavioral changes that occurred in the hominid lineage during the past five million years. In addition to a thorough review of the fossil evidence for human evolution, students will develop the theoretical framework in evolutionary biology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 377, BIOL 225. Offered as ANAT 375, ANTH 375, ANAT 475 and ANTH 475. Prereq: ANTH 103.

ANTH 476. Topics in the Anthropology of Health and Medicine. 3 Units.

Special topics of interest, such as the biology of human adaptability; the ecology of the human life cycle health delivery systems; transcultural psychiatry; nutrition, health, and disease; paleoepidemiology; and population anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103. Offered as ANTH 376 and ANTH 476.

ANTH 477. Human Osteology. 4 Units.

This course for upper division undergraduates and graduate students will review the following topics: human skeletal development and identification; and forensic identification (skeletal aging, sex identification and population affiliation). Offered as ANAT 377, ANTH 377, ANAT 477 and ANTH 477.

ANTH 478. Reproductive Health: An Evolutionary Perspective. 3 Units.

This course provides students with an evolutionary perspective on the factors influencing human reproductive health, including reproductive biology, ecology, and various aspects of natural human fertility. Our focus will be on variation in human reproduction in mostly non-western populations. Recommended preparation for ANTH 378: ANTH 103. Offered as ANTH 378 and ANTH 478. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

ANTH 479. Topics in Cultural and Social Anthropology. 3 Units.

Special topics of interest across the range of social and cultural anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 379 and ANTH 479.

ANTH 480. Medical Anthropology and Global Health I. 3 Units.

The first in a sequence of two graduate core courses in medical anthropology and global health. This course focuses on foundational concepts and theories in medical anthropology, as well as topical areas which have been central to the development of the field. Prereq: Graduate Standing in Anthropology.

ANTH 481. Medical Anthropology and Global Health II. 3 Units.

The second in a sequence of two graduate core courses in medical anthropology and global health. This course focuses on the application of medical anthropology theory and methods to the study of global health. Recommended preparation: ANTH 480. Prereq: Graduate Standing in Anthropology.

ANTH 482. Anthropological and Ecological Perspectives on Preserving and Restoring the Natural World. 3 Units.

Now that the environmentally deleterious effects of modern Western culture on the natural world have reached major proportions it has become crucial to explore innovative solutions to this dilemma. In this course novel perspectives derived from the intersection of anthropology and ecology are discussed. The primary perspective focused upon is the understanding that human culture and the natural world in which it is embedded are essentially communicative, or semiotic processes, which thrive upon diverse interaction and feedback. Preserving and restoring the Natural World thus shifts from protecting individual species and particular cultural practices to enhancing the communicative matrix of life and multiple cultural views of the environment. Through this understanding, students will learn to apply a more elegant, effective, and aesthetically pleasing perspective to the challenging environmental issues facing our contemporary world. An in-depth examination of the North American Prairie, along with a comparison of influences on the landscape by indigenous and modern Western Culture will serve as the particular region of focus. Offered as ANTH 382 and ANTH 482. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

ANTH 488. Globalization, Development and Underdevelopment: Anthropological Perspective. 3 Units.

This course examines both theoretical and practical perspectives on globalization and economic development in the "Third World." From "Dependency," "Modernization," and "World System" theory to post-structuralist critiques of development discourse, the class seeks to provide a framework for understanding current debates on development and globalization. The "neoliberal monologue" that dominates the contemporary development enterprise is critically examined in the context of growing global inequality. Special consideration is given to the roles of international agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the "development industry." The course also focuses on the contribution of anthropologists to development theory and practice with emphasis on the impact of development on the health of the poor and survival of indigenous cultures. Opportunities for professional anthropologists in the development field are reviewed. Offered as ANTH 388 and ANTH 488.

ANTH 495. Research Practicum in Medical Anthropology and Global Health. 3 Units.

This course prepares selected Anthropology graduate students for research in medical anthropology and global health in both local and global settings, with the goal of enhancing the research skills of students early in their graduate careers. Prereq: Graduate standing in Anthropology.

ANTH 503. Seminar in Social Cultural Anthropology. 3 Units.


ANTH 504. Anthropological Research Design. 3 Units.

Practical and theoretical issues in the selection of questions for health and aging research in societal settings. Illustration of frameworks and designs for research. Discussion of the problems of collection, analysis, and interpretation of data along with the nonscientific influences on the research process and the use of results. Prereq: Graduate standing in anthropology.

ANTH 511. Seminar in Anthropology and Global Health: Topics. 3 Units.

This course examines the current issues in global health and the emerging anthropological paradigm directed at global health issues. The objective of the course is to provide graduate students in medical anthropology an in-depth examination of global health from several perspectives. The course will feature perspectives from anthropologists as well as others working in the fields of global health. Prereq: Graduate standing in Anthropology.

ANTH 513. Seminar in Ethnopsychiatry. 3 Units.

Theory and practice of psychotherapeutic forms. Diagnostic and therapeutic forms from Europe, the United States, Japan, India, and other major cultural traditions and those of local areas such as West Africa, Native America, and Latin America. The cultural theories of mental disorders, related conceptions of self and person, and the relationships of local psychological theory to clinical praxis and outcome.

ANTH 519. Seminar in Human Ecology and Adaptability. 3 Units.


ANTH 530. Seminar in Medical Anthropology: Topics. 3 Units.

Various topics will be offered for graduate students in medical anthropology, such as "Anthropological Perspectives on Women's Health and Reproduction" and "Biocultural Anthropology." Prereq: ANTH 480.

ANTH 591. Seminar in Physical Anthropology. 3 Units.


ANTH 599. Tutorial: Advanced Studies in Anthropology. 1 - 18 Units.

(Credit as arranged.) Advanced studies in anthropology.

ANTH 601. Independent Research. 1 - 18 Units.

(Credit as arranged.)

ANTH 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Units.

(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.