MPHP (MPHP)

MPHP 101. Introduction to Public Health. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the science and art of public health through understanding historical and current issues through public health case histories and controversies. Students will be introduced to social, behavioral, cultural, and environmental influences on population health. Emphasis is placed on social justice as a central component of public health, with an overview of health inequity and commitment to vulnerable populations. Core public health practices relating to health promotion program design, community assessment and improvement planning, health communication, health policy and enforcement, and health behavior change will be featured. The course will promote understanding of health care and public health systems domestically and globally, including preparedness for and response to public health emergencies.

MPHP 301. Introduction to Epidemiology. 3 Units.

This course begins with the exploration of the history, philosophy and uses of epidemiology. It then moves to the basic descriptive functions of epidemiology such as condition, frequency and severity. Data is used to describe qualitatively and quantitatively diseases and injuries in a population. Applications include identifying patterns of disease and injury over time and geography The course them moves to analytical epidemiology with focus on estimation, inference, bias, confounding and adjustment in the determination of what factors are associated with, or cause disease or injury. The different kinds of study designs are introduced including ecologic, cross-sectional, case-control, retrospective and prospective cohort, and experimental designs such as clinical trials. Students are introduced to evidence-based public health with analysis of harm, benefit and cost, and intervention effectiveness. The course concludes with applications to policy, covering outbreak investigation/testing/screening, public health policy and special epidemiologic applications including molecular and genetic epidemiology, environmental health and safety, unintentional injury and violence prevention and behavioral sciences. Recommended preparation: A course in statistics taken before or concurrently with MPHP 301.

MPHP 306. History and Philosophy of Public Health. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the science and art of public health through an understanding of the history and philosophies that represent its foundation. Students will learn about the essentials of public health and applications of those precepts throughout history and in the present. The course will examine public health case histories and controversies from the past and present, in order to better understand solutions for the future. Offered as MPHP 306 and MPHP 406. Prereq: Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors only.

MPHP 313. Health Education, Communication, and Advocacy. 3 Units.

Historical, sociological, and philosophical factors that have influenced definitions and the practice of health education and health promotion are studied. Advanced concepts in health communication theory will also be explored. This course is designed to educate, motivate, and empower undergraduate and graduate students to become advocates for their own health, the health of their peers, and the health of the community. Offered as MPHP 313 and MPHP 413.

MPHP 403. Research & Evaluation Methods. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide an overview of research and evaluation methods for first-year MPH students. Through lecture, discussion and application exercises, students are introduced to the principles and processes of research and evaluation methods in public health, including formulation of research questions, aims and hypotheses and evaluation goals and objectives; literature review; development/selection of conceptual and theoretical models; quantitative, qualitative and evaluation project management; and application of ethical principles and protection of human subjects in public health research and evaluation.

MPHP 405. Statistical Methods in Public Health. 3 Units.

This one-semester survey course for public health students is intended to provide the fundamental concepts and methods of biostatistics as applied predominantly to public health problems. The emphasis is on interpretation and concepts rather than calculations. Topics include descriptive statistics; vital statistics; sampling; estimation and significance testing; sample size and power; correlation and regression; spatial and temporal trends; small area analysis; statistical issues in policy development. Examples of statistical methods will be drawn from public health practice. Use of computer statistical packages will be introduced. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students only. All others require instructor consent.

MPHP 406. History and Philosophy of Public Health. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the science and art of public health through an understanding of the history and philosophies that represent its foundation. Students will learn about the essentials of public health and applications of those precepts throughout history and in the present. The course will examine public health case histories and controversies from the past and present, in order to better understand solutions for the future. Offered as MPHP 306 and MPHP 406. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students or instructor consent.

MPHP 411. Introduction to Health Behavior. 3 Units.

Using a biopsychosocial perspective, an overview of the measurement and modeling of behavioral, social, psychological, and environmental factors related to disease prevention, disease management, and health promotion is provided. Offered as PQHS 411 and MPHP 411. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students or consent.

MPHP 413. Health Education, Communication, and Advocacy. 3 Units.

Historical, sociological, and philosophical factors that have influenced definitions and the practice of health education and health promotion are studied. Advanced concepts in health communication theory will also be explored. This course is designed to educate, motivate, and empower undergraduate and graduate students to become advocates for their own health, the health of their peers, and the health of the community. Offered as MPHP 313 and MPHP 413.

MPHP 421. Health Economics and Strategy. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to develop the analytical skills necessary for understanding how the U.S. health care sector operates, how it has evolved, the forces at work behind perceived deficiencies (in quality and cost control), and the impact of alternative policy proposals. Special attention is giving to recent developments in the healthcare marketplace, and the strategic considerations they create for providers and insurers. These issues are addressed through the lens of microeconomic theory. Under this framework, outcomes result from the interaction of decisions made by participants in the healthcare economy (e.g. patients, providers, insurers, government), with those decisions governed by the preferences, incentives and resource constraints facing each decision-maker. Principles of microeconomics will be reviewed as necessary to ensure consistent understanding of basic concepts. The course is designed to appeal to a broad audience, particularly students interested in healthcare management, public health, medical innovation, health law, and public policymaking. Offered as HSMC 421 and MPHP 421.

MPHP 429. Introduction to Environmental Health. 3 Units.

This survey course will introduce students to environmental and occupational health topics including individual, community, population, and global issues. Students will develop an understanding of the human health impacts of physical, biological, and chemical agents in the environment and workplace including basic principles of toxicology. Presentation of concepts including risk assessment, communication and management as well as discussion of environmental and occupational practices, policies and regulations that promote public and population health is included.

MPHP 431. Statistical Methods I. 3 Units.

Application of statistical techniques with particular emphasis on problems in the biomedical sciences. Basic probability theory, random variables, and distribution functions. Point and interval estimation, regression, and correlation. Problems whose solution involves using packaged statistical programs. First part of year-long sequence. Offered as ANAT 431, BIOL 431, CRSP 431, PQHS 431 and MPHP 431.

MPHP 432. Statistical Methods II. 3 Units.

Methods of analysis of variance, regression and analysis of quantitative data. Emphasis on computer solution of problems drawn from the biomedical sciences. Design of experiments, power of tests, and adequacy of models. Offered as BIOL 432, PQHS 432, CRSP 432 and MPHP 432. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 431 or equivalent.

MPHP 433. Community Interventions and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to design, conduct, and assess community-based health interventions and program evaluation. Topics include assessment of need, evaluator/stakeholder relationship, process vs. outcome-based objectives, data collection, assessment of program objective achievement based on process and impact, cost-benefit analyses, and preparing the evaluation report to stakeholders. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 490, PQHS/EPBI 431, or MPHP 405. Offered as PQHS 433 and MPHP 433. Prereq: MPHP 411

MPHP 439. Public Health Management and Policy. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of health policy-making and includes a background on the basic structure and components of the US Health Care System (such as organization, delivery and financing). It will also cover introductory concepts in public health management, including the role of the manager, organizational design and control, and accountability. We will address relevant legal, political and ethical issues using case examples. At the end of the course, students will understand how health policy is developed and implemented in various contexts, and the challenges facing system-wide efforts at reform. This is a required course for the MPH degree. Grades will be based on a series of assignments. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI Students or instructor consent.

MPHP 447. Global Health: Outbreak Investigation in Real-Time. 3 Units.

This course provides a trans-cultural, trans-disciplinary, multimedia learning experience by analyzing historical and real-time data from the annual dengue endemics and sporadic epidemics in Puerto Rico and Brazil. A rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases using real-time and historical surveillance data of endemic and epidemic Dengue in Bahia, Brazil. This is an advanced epidemiology course in which core material will be primarily taught through reading assignments, class discussion, group projects, and class presentations. The course will utilize the online web-based communication and learning technology to create a single classroom between the CWRU and international partners with unique and complementary skills. In addition to joint classroom lectures across sites, student groups will also perform smaller-scale videoconference meetings for assigned group projects, thus creating strong international connections for the students, faculty, and our institutions. Note: Due to the complexities of time zones for this international course, the course will begin at 8:00a.m. until the U.S.A. adjusts clocks for Daylight Savings Time (unlike Brazil). Therefore, classes after the second week of March will begin at 9:00a.m. Offered as PQHS 447, INTH 447 and MPHP 447.

MPHP 450. Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies. 3 Units.

Issues in the design, organization, and operation of randomized, controlled clinical trials and intervention studies. Emphasis on long-term multicenter trials. Topics include legal and ethical issues in the design; application of concepts of controls, masking, and randomization; steps required for quality data collection; monitoring for evidence of adverse or beneficial treatment effects; elements of organizational structure; sample size calculations and data analysis procedures; and common mistakes. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 431 or consent of instructor. Offered as PQHS 450 and MPHP 450.

MPHP 451. A Data-Driven Introduction to Genomics and Human Health. 3 Units.

This course introduces the foundational concepts of genomics and genetic epidemiology through four key principles: 1) Teaching students how to query relational databases using Structure Query Language (SQL); 2) Exposing students to the most current data used in genomics and bioinformatics research, providing a quantitative understanding of biological concepts; 3) Integrating newly learned concepts with prior ones to discover new relationships among biological concepts; and 4) providing historical context to how and why data were generated and stored in the way they were, and how this gave rise to modern concepts in genomics. Offered as PQHS 451, GENE 451, and MPHP 451.

MPHP 456. Health Policy and Management Decisions. 3 Units.

This seminar course combines broad health care policy issue analysis with study of the implications for specific management decisions in organizations. This course is intended as an applied, practical course where the policy context is made relevant to the individual manager. Offered as HSMC 456 and MPHP 456.

MPHP 460. Introduction to Health Services Research. 3 Units.

This survey course provides an introduction to the field of Health Services Research and an overview of key health services research concepts and methods, including conceptual frameworks and models; outcomes research; risk adjustment; disparities in health care; policy/health care systems; cost and cost-effectiveness; quality of life, process improvement; patient satisfaction; patient safety; health economics; statistical modeling techniques; and qualitative research methods. Offered as PQHS 460 and MPHP 460.

MPHP 464. Obesity and Cancer: Views from Molecules to Health Policy. 3 Units.

This course will provide an overview of the components of energy balance (diet, physical activity, resting metabolic rate, dietary induced thermogenesis) and obesity, a consequence of long term positive energy balance, and various types of cancer. Following an overview of energy balance and epidemiological evidence for the obesity epidemic, the course will proceed with an introduction to the cellular and molecular biology of energy metabolism. Then, emerging research on biologically plausible connections and epidemiological associations between obesity and various types of cancer (e.g., colon, breast) will be presented. Finally, interventions targeted at decreasing obesity and improving quality of life in cancer patients will be discussed. The course will be cooperatively-taught by a transdisciplinary team of scientists engaged in research in energy balance and/or cancer. Didactic lectures will be combined with classroom discussion of readings. The paper assignment will involve application of course principles, lectures and readings. Offered as PQHS 464 and MPHP 464.

MPHP 466. Promoting Health Across Boundaries. 3 Units.

This course examines the concepts of health and boundary spanning and how the synergy of the two can produce new, effective approaches to promoting health. Students will explore and analyze examples of individuals and organizations boundary spanning for health to identify practice features affecting health, compare and contrast practices and approaches, and evaluate features and context that promote or inhibit boundary spanning and promoting health. Offered as MPHP 466, PQHS 466, SOCI 466, NURS 466 and BETH 466. Prereq: Graduate student status or instructor consent.

MPHP 467. Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research. 1 Unit.

Comparative effectiveness research is a cornerstone of healthcare reform. It holds the promise of improved health outcomes and cost containment. This course is presented in a convenient 5-day intensive format in June. There are reading assignments due prior to the 1st session. Module A, Days 1-2: Overview of comparative effectiveness research (CER) from a wide array of perspectives: individual provider, institution, insurer, patient, government, and society. Legal, ethical and social issues, as well as implications for population and public health, including health disparities will also be a component. Module B, Day 3: Introduction to the various methods, and their strengths, weaknesses and limitations. How to read and understand CER papers. Module C, Days 4-5: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. This will cover costing, cost analysis, clinical decision analysis, quality of life and cost-effectiveness analysis for comparing alternative health care strategies. Trial version of TreeAge software will be used to create and analyze a simple cost-effectiveness model. The full 3-credit course is for taking all 3 modules. Modules A or C can be taken alone for 1 credit. Modules A and B or Modules B and C can be taken together for a total of 2 credits. Module B cannot be taken alone. If taking for 2 or 3 credits, some combination of term paper, project and/or exam will be due 30 days later. Offered as PQHS 467 and MPHP 467.

MPHP 468. The Continual Improvement of Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary Course. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to be members of interprofessional teams to engage in the continual improvement in health care. The focus is on working together for the benefit of patients and communities to enhance quality and safety. Offered as PQHS 468, MPHP 468, and NURS 468.

MPHP 475. Management of Disasters Due to Nature, War, or Terror. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to make participants aware of the special needs of children and families in disaster situations and understand public health approaches to address these needs. The learning objectives for this course are: 1) Identify the most important problems and priorities for children in disaster situations, 2) Identify the organizations most frequently involved in providing assistance in disaster situations and define their roles and strengths, 3) Describe the reasons why children are among the most vulnerable in disaster events, 4) Conduct emergency nutritional assessments for children, 5) Develop health profiles on displaced children and plan interventions based on results, 6) Define common psychosocial issues of children and the means to address them, 7) List basic points of international law including the Geneva Convention that relate to all persons involved in disaster situations, 8) List important security issues, 9) Appreciate ethical issues involved in disaster situations and employ skills of cross cultural communication, 10) Recognize and respond to special issues for children involved in biological and chemical terrorist attacks.

MPHP 477. Internship at Health-Related Government Agencies. 3 Units.

This independent study course will incorporate a one-semester-long internship at health-related government agencies (Ohio Department of Health, Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, or Cleveland City Health Department). The choice of the agency will depend on the student's academic interests and research goals. The objective is to develop a level of familiarity with the organizational and operational aspects of such agencies, and to gain an understanding of agencies' and bureaus' interactions with the legislative body, as well as the processes of developing, implementing, managing, and monitoring health initiative. The instructor and the liaison persons at the agencies will be responsible for planning structured encounters of interns with key administrators and policy makers, and to select a research project, based on the intern's research interests and the agencies' research priorities. Interns will be required to submit a draft of the report to the instructor at the end of the semester. The approved, final report will be submitted to the agency. The project will be evaluated for its methodological soundness and rigor. Students will be required to be at the agency one day a week. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 515.

MPHP 482. Qualitative and Mixed Methods in Public Health. 3 Units.

Understanding complex public health issues requires both qualitative and quantitative inquiry. The exploration of the perceptions and experiences of people is as essential as analyzing the relationships among variables. Often, the integration of the two methods is required in order to effectively address the significant health issues faced by today's society. It is the purpose of this course to facilitate a meaningful and substantive learning process around engaging in, and critically analyzing, qualitative and mixed methods research in public health. This includes gaining first-hand experience in research design and collecting, managing, analyzing, and interpreting data for the purposes of making data-driven program and policy recommendations. In addition, students will have the opportunity to engage with local professionals engaged in qualitative and mixed methods research.

MPHP 483. Introduction to Epidemiology for Public Health Practice. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce the basic principles and methods of epidemiology. Epidemiology has been referred to as the basic science for public health. Application of epidemiologic principles is critical to disease prevention, as well as in the development and evaluation of public policy. The course will emphasize basic methods (study design, measures of disease occurrence, measures of association, and causality) necessary for epidemiologic research. It is intended for students who have a basic understanding of the principals of human disease as well as statistics. Prereq: Must be an MPHP Plan A or MPHP Plan B, or EPBI student in order to enroll in the course.

MPHP 484. Global Health Epidemiology. 1 - 3 Units.

This course provides a rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases and, more generally, global health. This is an advanced epidemiology that embraces an active learning environment. Students are expected to invest time out of the classroom reading and working with classmates. Classes will be conducted with discussions, debates, group projects, and group presentations. By taking this course, students will develop a framework for interpreting, assessing, and performing epidemiologic research on issues of global importance. The course will be divided into three modules:1) Global Health Epidemiology 2) Helminth Epidemiology, and 3) Epidemiology of Disease Elimination. Each module is worth 1 credit hour and may be taken separately. Each module will have a separate project and/or exam. The final exam time will be used for group presentations and panel discussion. Active class participation is required through discussions, case studies, and group projects. Offered as PQHS 484, INTH 484, and MPHP 484.

MPHP 485. Adolescent Development. 3 Units.

Adolescent Development can be viewed as the overriding framework for approaching disease prevention and health promotion for this age group. This course will review the developmental tasks of adolescence and identify the impact of adolescent development on youth risk behaviors. It will build a conceptual and theoretical framework through which to address and change adolescent behavior to promote health.

MPHP 490. Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the principles of epidemiology covering the basic methods necessary for population and clinic-based research. Students will be introduced to epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of risk estimation, and casual inference (bias, confounding, and interaction) with application of these principles to specific fields of epidemiology. Classes will be a combination of lectures, discussion, and in-class exercises. It is intended for students who have a basic understanding of the principals of human disease and statistics. Offered as PQHS 490 and MPHP 490. Prereq or Coreq: PQHS/EPBI 431 or Requisites Not Met permission.

MPHP 494. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. 3 Units.

This course focuses on tuberculosis (TB) and HIV epidemiology, including perspectives on these diseases in the US and globally. It is a follow-up to PQHS/MPHP 484: Global Health Epidemiology, but these courses do not necessarily need to be taken in sequence. This is an advanced course, focusing on methods and approaches in epidemiology and public health. Offered as PQHS 494, INTH 494 and MPHP 494. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 490.

MPHP 499. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Units.


MPHP 510. Health Disparities. 3 Units.

This course aims to provide theoretical and application tools for students from many disciplinary backgrounds to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The course will be situated contextually within the historical record of the United States, reviewing social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to disparities in general, with a central focus on health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities among other subgroups (e.g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed. Students will be expected to develop a research proposal (observational, clinical, and/or intervention) rooted in their disciplinary background that will incorporate materials from the various perspectives presented throughout the course, with the objective of developing and reinforcing a more comprehensive approach to current practices within their fields. Offered as CRSP 510, PQHS 510, MPHP 510, NURS 510, and SASS 510.

MPHP 532. Health Care Information Systems. 3 Units.

This course covers concepts, techniques and technologies for providing information systems to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of health care organizations. Offered as HSMC 432 and MPHP 532.

MPHP 540. Operational Aspects of Global Health and Emergency Response. 3 Units.

Among professional in the medical field and the field of public health, there is a gap in knowledge, structure and research in best practices surrounding emergency response. This gap results from the limited number of training programs in the United States that focus on this very specialized field and the limited number of academic partnerships with international non-governmental organizations (NGOs). This course helps remedy this gap by introducing public health students and international emergency medicine fellows to the overall structure and operations of international humanitarian coordination systems, types of emergency response, morbidity and mortality associated with various emergencies, and the actors and institutions involved. The course highlights, through reading, workshops, and examples, the real world issues that must be faced and overcome in the field during emergency response operations.

MPHP 650. Public Health Practicum. 1 - 3 Units.

The Public Health Practicum is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, supervised, and evaluated community-based experience. The Practicum is designed to move students beyond the walls of academia, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health activities are conducted. To complete the Practicum, students must complete three credits of MPHP 650, dedicating at least 120 hours to a substantial public health experience, and attend Community Health Research and Practice (CHRP) group meetings. Prereq: Complete at least 9 credit hours in the MPH program and be in good academic standing.

MPHP 652. Public Health Capstone Experience. 1 - 9 Units.

Public health field practicum, involving a placement at a community-based field site, and a Master's essay. The field placement will provide students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired through their Master of Public Health academic program to a problem involving the health of the community. Students will learn to communicate with target groups in an effective manner; to identify ethical, social, and cultural issues relating to public health policies, research, and interventions; to identify the process by which decisions are made within the agency or organization; and to identify and coordinate use of resources at the placement site. The Master's essay represents the culminating experience required for the degree program and may take the form of a research thesis, an evaluation study, or an intervention study. Each student is required to formally present the experience and research findings. In any semester in which a student is registered for MPHP 652 credit, it is required that the student attend the Community Health Research and Practice (CHRP) group at a minimum of two sessions per 3 credits. CHRP is held once a week for approximately an hour and a half for the duration of fall, spring, and summer semesters. MPHP 652 credit is available only to Master of Public Health students.

MPHP 655. Dual Degree Field Practicum II. 3 Units.

This course is designed to be taken by MSSA/MPH joint degree students as the second field period of their master's program. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The Field Practicum is an integral component of the MSASS and MPH curriculums, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, supervised, and evaluated community-based experience. The Practicum is designed to move students beyond the walls of academia, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which social work and public health activities are conducted. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. (EPAAS Program Objective M6 and EPAAS Content Area 4.7) The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level MSSA/MPH joint degree students with field related opportunities to continue to develop foundation level competencies in the eight MSSAS abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work and public health theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. Offered as MPHP 655 and SASS 655.

MPHP 656. Dual Degree Field Capstone III. 3 Units.

The Public Health Capstone Project is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, mentored, and evaluated public health scholarly project. This course is designed to be taken by advanced level students. It consists of a 288 hour field based Capstone experience and participation in 12 hours of professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is designed to move students beyond the walls and constraints of the classroom, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health and social work activities are conducted. It is also designed to provide graduate level dual degree students with field related opportunities to begin to develop advanced level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to continue to develop and hone social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. (EPAS Program Objective M6 and EPAS Content Area 4.7) Offered as SASS 656 and MPHP 656. Prereq: MPHP 655.

MPHP 657. Dual Degree Field Capstone IV. 3 Units.

The Public Health Capstone Project is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, mentored, and evaluated public health scholarly project. This course is designed to be taken by advanced level students. It consists of a 288 hour field based Capstone experience and participation in 12 hours of professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is designed to move students beyond the walls and constraints of the classroom, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health and social work activities are conducted. It is also designed to provide graduate level dual degree students with field related opportunities to begin to develop advanced level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. Offered as MPHP 657 and SASS 657.