USSO (USSO)

USSO 201. Society and Technology: How Do They Impact One Another?. 3 Units.

This course focuses on a systematic analysis of the relationships between society, and the specific institutional elements of technology and technological innovation. It describes the social aspects of computers and related technologies and explores the ways in which these technologies influence and impact organizations and individuals. The course explores the design, use and cultural significance of technologies and uses a historical focus to assess the integration of technology into all aspects of our society. The restructuring of traditional human interaction by information technology will provide a contemporary focus for the course. Offered in a seminar format, the course will provide opportunities for scholarly discussion, systematic inquiry and written communication. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 203. Law in Literature. 3 Units.

An interdisciplinary venture. This seminar will focus on law in literature by examining representations of the legal process in poems, plays, short stories, and novels. It will provide a taste of the vastness and variety of human life--and will broaden and deepen students' understanding of the role law plays in society. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 209. Face First. 3 Units.

Human beings greet the world face first. In fact, the ability to process facial features seems to be innate. A baby easily recognizes its mother's face yet the most powerful computers have difficulty using facial features to identify people. This is because all human faces are similar while fine details make each face unique. This course will begin by studying the human face as an anatomic construction of hard and soft tissue skeletal components. We will discuss how we use anatomic facial features to recognize individuals. One homework exercise will be to construct faces using an FBI identikit. Each student will create an FBI composite sketch of their own face. Seminar time will then be used to view each sketch and try to match the sketch with the seminar participant. Discussion will focus on how facial anatomy is similar or different. Following this introduction, the seminar will shift focus from anatomy to sociology. We will discuss facial attractiveness and beauty. Seminar topics will also include manipulation of facial appearance i.e., cosmetics, body piercing, veils, and plastic surgery. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 222. Science and Society Through Literature. 3 Units.

This course will examine the interaction of scientific investigation and discovery within the context of the society it occurred in. What is the effect of science on society and, as importantly, what is the effect of society on science? An introduction will consider the heliocentric controversy with focus on Galileo. Two broad areas; tuberculosis and the Frankenstein myth, will then be discussed covering the period 1800-present. With tuberculosis, fiction, art and music will be examined to understand the changing views of society towards the disease, how society's perception of tuberculosis victims changed, and how this influenced their treatments and research. With Frankenstein, the original novel in its historical context will be examined. Using fiction and viewing several films, the transformation of the original story into a myth with different connotations and implications will be discussed. Most classes will be extensive discussions coupled with student presentations of assigned materials. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 229. A Study of Power: Criteria Essential to Its Rise and Fall. 3 Units.

This SAGES seminar will coordinate examinations of major historical events and their influence on the future. Particular emphasis will focus on the development and/or demise of powerful countries and people, and political and religious infrastructures. Sample topics include: the rise and fall of the Roman empire, the Barbarian empires, the British empire, the National Socialists, the Soviet empire, etc. Development and practice of religious behavior from praying to pagan Gods and spiritual Gods may also be analyzed. The idea is to demonstrate the similarities and differences in each of these broad categories as they progressed. An examination of the impact of greater world "enlightenment" as civilization expanded over time is also discussed. The evolvement and eventual demise or change and the continuing impact on contemporary civilization shall be explored. Conclusions shall be used to suggest a model for the future. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 234. Questions of Identity. 3 Units.

Who we are informs the ways in which we act in the world. How we respond to society in the individual, local, and global community is impacted by the way we see ourselves, the way others see us, and the way we see others. Who am I? How do I look at myself in relationship to others? How does the way in which society views me affect the way I think of myself? How have writers, historians, and philosophers dealt with the challenges of self and group identity? We will explore these issues through readings from the Civil Rights Era, the Holocaust, and the period of decolonization in Africa. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 238. The First Amendment. 3 Units.

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution states that "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom of speech." In this seminar we will explore what this right has meant in America and how it has been limited throughout American history. We will discuss the importance of free speech in a democratic society and how the government balances the freedom of speech with other government interests. This course is also designed to give you a glimpse of law school and what being a lawyer is like. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 243. The Art of Fact. 3 Units.

As evidenced by the tragedy that unfolded in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, we ignore the consequences of endemic poverty at our peril. How do you evacuate a city filled with thousands of people too poor to own cars? Where do you house them after they've been rescued from their drowned neighborhoods? Although Cleveland won't likely be erased by flood, it's one of the poorest big cities in the nation making it vulnerable to disaster in times of crisis and an incubator for a host of thorny social problems. Often, it's up to journalists to bring attention to these issues, give voice to the voiceless and force policymakers to come up with solutions to seemingly intractable problems. In this seminar, we'll read and dissect the works of journalists who've written stories about complex social problems and have done so using many of the conventions employed by writers of fiction. Writer Ben Yagoda described this literary journalism as "making facts dance." We'll spend our time researching numerous social issues and learn to write about them in a clear and compelling voice. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 255. Hinduism. 3 Units.

This course will provide an introduction to Hindu thought and culture. We will read a wide range of texts and secondary sources. Two readings, the Ramayana and Samskara, will focus on issues of ethics and proper dharma. We will also be watching Deepa Mehta's Fire. There will be a visit to the Shiva-Vishnu Temple in Parma. Heavy emphasis on research and writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 260. Spin, P.R., and America Today. 3 Units.

We live today surrounded by spin--corporations don't fire, they downsize; government pronouncements are assumed to be cynically slanted and misleading; even scholarly medical articles are written by public relations (p.r.) flacks. The guiding principle isn't truth or reality but the right message and staying on it. How and why has p.r. become such a seemingly potent force in our time? What does this say about America and its values--about even the meaning of truth? In this seminar we will explore the role of public relations and image-making, in American society today. Our objectives are (1) Examine the users of p.r. today in business, politics and popular culture to shape images and define reality; (2) explore the tools used to construct and sell those messages and perceptions and (3) Analyze the values underlying these activities--to the end of deepening our understanding society today. This seminar explores these issues through reading, both academic and popular writing, discussion, and research. The writing assignments will be both academic and various forms of media and public relations formats. We will use class time to discuss and review student writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 266. Framing Our Legal System: Law in the Movies. 3 Units.

This course explores important themes in the study of law, lawyers, and legal institutions by regarding their representations in movies. We will cover such issues as race/class/gender and the law, legal ethics, legal education, the adversarial system, and the image and status of the lawyer in American culture. We will also look at the ways in which law and the legal profession affect popular culture and, conversely, the ways in which poplar views of legal problems and lawyers affect law. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 269. Create-A-College. 3 Units.

In seminar format, students will develop plans for a new institution of higher learning, shaping and communicating in several different formats its mission, goals, academic focus, and physical and financial needs. Supporting the course's research, writing, and presentation expectations will be documents from existing colleges, information on the policy and social environment for such a venture, and requirements imposed by external entities such as governmental and accrediting agencies. Course will include interactions among two sets of student teams and several intermediary presentations, culminating in a group presentation of plans for the new college to a panel of experts including current or former members of the University's Board of Trustees and the Ohio Board of Regents. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 270. The Geography of Wealth. 3 Units.

While many of us are familiar with thinking about wealth in social, political and economic terms, wealth can also be understood as a function of geography. This seminar will look at American history and culture to seek a deeper understanding of how place and wealth interact; some of the government policies that affect those interactions; and some of the grand experiments in philanthropy, law, and social policy that have tried to reverse the perceived evils of "concentrated poverty." The seminar will not require an advanced mathematical or statistical background. However, we will analyze how statistics can illuminate (and disguise) issues and problems. We will look at the business corporation as both an aggregator of wealth and as a wealth allocation system. Of necessity we will wander into matters of race, employment, power, class, culture, history, and government. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 271. Schoolhouse Rocked: Education Reform. 3 Units.

Today, the term "education reform" may bring to mind standardized tests and No Child Left Behind. Many believe that our schools must become more rigorous, with stricter rules and definable goals. "Reform," however, used to be defined differently. John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Paulo-Freire, for example, struggled to make schools freer and more humane. They hoped not to make the classroom less challenging, but more child-centered. Some disciples of such reformers, discouraged by schools' resistance to change, eventually turned to homeschooling--pulling kids out of school and educating them with real-life learning experiences. In this seminar, we will explore progressive educational theory and connect it with contemporary alternative schools and homeschooling. Visits to nearby Montessori and Waldorf schools and discussions with homeschoolers will make real-life connections to seminar reading and classwork. Challenging assumptions about how well our schools work and raising questions such as, "How do we learn?" and "What is good teaching?" will provoke thought, conversation, and interesting writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 274. Passion, Insult, and Virtue in Ancient Athens. 3 Units.

Students explore the social fabric of Athens at its height--the various social and economic institutions that shaped households and the city--state in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. Primary source material will include courtroom speeches, two comedies of Aristophanes, and Aristotle's Ethics. Topics: lust, love, marriage, prostitution, slavery, elite drinking parties, street life, hubristic violence, competition, feuding murder, the legal system, diverse concepts of virtue, and how ordinary people were expected to treat one another in good times and bad. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 275. Psychology of Creativity. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to explore how individuals become creative. What are the most important qualities, emotional and cognitive, that are related to creativity? Is there a creative personality? What is the difference between artistic and scientific creativity? How does creativity relate to mental illness? How can we foster creativity in people? The course will study creativity in children and adults and will include research studies as well as descriptions of creativity from creative individuals. We will also discuss how different cultures view and effect creativity and the ethical issues involved. This course is a seminar and will use a discussion format. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 280. Democracy?. 3 Units.

"Democracy?" poses democracy as a question, in two forms. First, what do we mean by democracy? Second, where should democracy be practiced? Although conventional understandings link democracy to political systems and issues of governance, the course will consider democracy in other institutions and locations. Course questions include: What is democracy? Why do we value democracy? Does democracy in the state require democracy in the economy? What would that look like? What are the potential conflicts between economic and political democracy with full citizen involvement? Is direct democracy democratic? Does democracy in the state require democracy in the family? In universities? In the workplace? In prisons? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 284. The Kaleidoscope of Birth. 3 Units.

The course will explore topics in science, technology and culture across time as they relate to the social construction of birth. Students and faculty will critically examine the seminar topics through an interdisciplinary approach. The learners will develop their own understanding of how science and technology related to birth have and continue to change. What happens when newer technologies supersede the old? What happens when older ideas are revived? Students will be introduced to the influence of culture and technology. Methods of oral and written communication will be enhanced via assignments. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285D. Advertising and the American Dream. 3 Units.

This SAGES seminar will explore advertising in America, its social and cultural roots, and its impact (or lack thereof) on our values, tastes, and behavior as consumers and citizens. It is hard to find a space in the contemporary world that is not plastered with ads--from the Coke cups next to the judges on "American Idol" to stencils on the sidewalks we walk on. This blizzard of advertising images may, in fact, define our age. We will examine the forces that created this giant American industry and ask: Why do we have advertising? How is it created? What social functions does it serve? How has it changed? Where is it going? Central to this seminar is discussion, research, and writing to analyze and critique this in-our-face, but little understood, social institution. Some of our discussions will flow from advertising industry news (e.g., the Super Bowl ads), a contemporary or early 20th century ad campaign, or the backstage insights of a guest from one of Cleveland's major ad agencies. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285I. Spectacle in American Culture. 3 Units.

This seminar will examine the topic of spectacle both chronologically and typologically to better u understand the power of remarkable visual experiences to awe, entertain, persuade, and create meaning from the colonial period to the present day. In the 17th century, the religious beliefs of the New England community and its need to maintain social cohesiveness gave rise to the spectacle of witch trials and public punishments. As Americans moved westward, the natural world became the focus of the spectacular. In the nineteenth century, the campaigns and debates of presidential candidates became political theater. The latter half of the century gave rise to Consumption as Spectacle as exemplified in the may expositions and World's Fairs. Today, spectacle has reached all facets of our lives. Americans are willing to expose the most intimate details of their personal relationships on television shows like Jerry Springer and The Real World. Although frequently used to maintain power, spectacle also has been employed as a tactic of resistance and as an instrument for creating alternative meaning by subcultures. More recently, spectacle has served as an instrument of terror. Through lectures, discussion, multimedia presentations, and writing assignments, we will have an opportunity to reflect on the many forms and uses of spectacle in American history. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285J. The Limits of Science. 3 Units.

Can science provide answers to the deeper puzzles of human existence, or do some questions lie beyond the scope of the scientific world view? Specifically, can science explain human consciousness, free will, and morality; and can it reveal the origins of religion? Students cannot, nor will they be expected to, provide a definitive answer to these questions. Instead, this seminar will provide students with an opportunity to engage in a conversation with each other against a backdrop of some of the most interesting and provocative research in cognitive science. In addition to learning about relevant psychological and neuroscientific research, students will engage with philosophical issues and arguments. This course aims to stretch student's beliefs about what they know now, and what they think can be known. The seminar will aim to cultivate productive and rhetorical skills, especially analytical thought, oral expressiveness, and writing skills, all of which will be useful in future pursuits. It will help students to develop a more nuanced view of human nature and the ability of science to transform our view of it. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285K. The Economics of Global Poverty. 3 Units.

Developing countries make up at least three-fourths of the world population. This course focuses on international aspects of economics of the developing world. Questions we will ask include: why are the poorest countries failing to thrive, what can be done about it, and can the rich afford to help the poor? The term "developing country" means a country that exhibits low per capita income, high poverty level, little industrialization, or low life expectancy. However, these problems also affect developed countries. Why, then, do we study poor countries' economies separately from those of industrialized nations? The answer lies not in the types of problems but in the severity and causes of these problems. It is these issues, the causes and consequences of global poverty, and solutions to help the world's poorest, that concern us here. Raising people out of poverty requires economic growth, a more even income distribution, investment in education, health care, and infrastructure, social safety nets, honest political leaders, reliable social and financial institutions, and international aid from rich countries. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285L. Hollywood Cartoons, American Society. 3 Units.

This class provides a history of mainstream animation produced in the United States during the 20th century, emphasizing in particular the output of the Hollywood animation studios of the 1930s-1950s, the shift to television animation in the 1950s, and the rebirth of animation in the 1980s. In addition to the general history of the field and key periods of creative development in the genre, we will discuss various sub-genres or narrative fads within animation, cultural and social movements of the 20th century and how they are reflected in contemporaneous popular culture, issues of art versus commerce in the creation of popular animation, the intersection of animation and politics, and the representation of race, gender, sexuality and religion. Since this class focuses on visual media, we will also spend a great deal of time both watching films and discussing how to watch animated films with a critical eye. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285N. Globalization and American Culture. 3 Units.

This course investigates the role of the United States in globalization. The first third examines the claim that globalization entrails cultural "Americanization," the middle third covers the resistance of local cultures, and the last part explores the ways in which American invented technologies do, in fact, spread culturally specific ways of working and behavior. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285S. Correspondence. 3 Units.

Correspondence will look at the practice of writing and reading letters, and explore the use of letters as biographical, historical, and forensic evidence. Students will read love letters, "Letters to the Editor," letters from the battlefield, and correspondence between scientists and theologians. We will gain access to the experience of tourism through post cards, and the world of the modern corporation through business letters, emails and text messages. We will read examples of fiction where the letter acts as a plot device, as in the epistolary novels of the 18th century. We will think about the function of the letter as an instrument of persuasion, as an opportunity to develop ideas in a private and informal manner, and as a forum for expressing emotion. In addition, we will study the communication systems and technologies, such as the post office, the telegraph, and the internet, that have facilitated, and changed the nature of, correspondence throughout history. Students will be asked to write letters based on their personal experiences and their political opinions, and write analytical essays based on topics related to the practice and history of correspondence. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285T. Why We Believe Weird Things. 3 Units.

How, in such a skeptical age, can people maintain questionable beliefs regarding urban legends, alternative medicine, superstitions, and paranormal phenomena? How do cults manage to attract and maintain large memberships? How can so many seemingly normal people come to the conclusion that they have been abducted by aliens? We will explore the idea that these behaviors are not examples of pathological thought processes, but rather natural consequences of the biases that characterize everyday reasoning. Emphasis will be placed on critical examination of questionable phenomena with a goal of understanding why people might want to hold such beliefs. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285V. Travel Literature in the Age of Discovery. 3 Units.

The discovery of the Americas in the 15th century challenged European constructions of the known world and tested assumptions about nature, culture, and the workings of intellectual inquiry. Although before 1492 Europeans traveled, they usually read new landscapes in light of familiar religious paradigms. The discoveries forced Europeans to draw the world anew, literally and metaphorically. Students will read works of travel fiction and real-life travelers' tales, and will address the following questions: how did travel literature reflect successive discoveries? What new maps (geographical or metaphorical) did this literature help draw? How did the discoveries bear on literary genres? After a brief foray into medieval literature, students will read The Tempest, Oroonoko, excerpts from The Persian Letters, excerpts from Gulliver's Travels, Robinson Crusoe, Candide, and A Sentimental Journey. Additionally, students will read brief accounts of actual travels. Students will write three papers and prepare presentations on topics such as pilgrimage routes, map making, the search for longitude, and America in the visual arts. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285Y. Quest for Perfection: Law as a Vehicle for Social Improvement. 3 Units.

Americans often seek to use U.S. law to create "fairness" and "civility"--in a world that can sometimes be brutal and fundamentally unjust. Increasingly, we rely on courts and statutes to "fix" identified social problems and to achieve a more just society. This course will examine our reliance on law to improve human behavior and to achieve social goals. Can statutes and lawyers lead the way to a better world? What are the limits (if any) of our ability to improve society by passing new laws and mandates? Are there unforeseen, negative consequences that arise from our legal efforts to improve public and personal behavior? This course will examine those questions in the context of selected social issues. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286E. Global Tourism. 3 Units.

Tourism can be viewed as a metaphor for contemporary existence in an increasingly globalizing world where attachments and ties to a concrete place are often temporary. Besides capturing the essence of present-day mobility, tourism is a phenomenon that can be researched both politically and economically. Indeed, 10 percent of global GNP comes from tourism and many poor countries rely on the tourism industry to sustain national economic development. In this class, we will touch on the economic and political significance of tourism, but will spend most of our time thinking of what happens in the tourist encounter, what tourists expect, what drives them, and who loses as well as benefits in the encounter. Some of the specific themes include: the nature of tourist destinations, quest for authentic sites, entertainment tourism (Disneyland, Dracula-Park), tourism to Auschwitz, culinary tourism, sex tourism, and eco-tourism. By reading theoretical works, travel blogs, and literature, we will gain insight to the motivations of tourists, the inhabitants of the places being visited, and international organizations as well as governments who oversee this industry. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286F. Environment and Civic Culture in the Developing World. 3 Units.

Can the fight against environmental degradation lead to an improved civic culture and political reform in developing nations? Developing nations typically sacrifice environmental protection in favor of economic development. Only when the costs of environmental degradation become obvious do nations consider a sustainable development regime that includes environmental protection. This seminar addresses whether implementing a sustainable development model requires a new civic culture that encourages political reform. In doing so, students will examine and write about literature on economic development, environmental degradation, and several international initiatives that encourage reforms to aid sustainable development. The seminar will use the People's Republic of China as a case study, but will also draw on evidence from other developing countries. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286I. Society through Online Videos: The Broadcast of the Self. 3 Units.

In this course we will discover and explore the interrelationships of self, technology, and society in the 21st century through digital video on the internet. We will watch online videos and read about social theory as part of a rigorous examination of media and society. This course will examine the intended and unintended consequences of mass information sharing and communication via online video. Students will work with the seminar leader and build upon existing academic knowledge to extend their understanding of the structure and meanings inherent in our video-active lives. In addition to completing regular writing assignments, students will learn about digital video production and produce a short digital video essay. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286L. Exploring Non-Profit Organizations. 3 Units.

This seminar is structured to expose students to the opportunities and challenges of working in and running non-profit organizations. Students will explore the importance and significant roles non-profit organizations play in our society. The class will learn how non-profits are organized and regulated and the importance of the organization's mission is to determining the impact of the non-profit organization in the community. Additionally, the students will learn how non-profits are funded and how these organizations maintain their financial stability and sustainability in the community. These goals will be accomplished through group analysis of non-profit organizational principles, and investigation of existing non-profit organizations. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286M. Hip-Hop Narrative in Film. 3 Units.

This seminar explores films of the Hip-Hop Generation and, by presenting certain films in chronological order, draws out the common threads. Hip-Hop culture is a conversation, an argument between the have-nots and the rest of us. The goals and objectives of that conversation have evolved and changed in timbre and urgency. Tracking that dialog through the late 60s, the post-civil rights era, the emergence of the b-boy, Reaganomics, and the rise of the new Black middle class helps us to get a better look at where it is and where it's going. By isolating the stories told by filmmakers within a certain period and then analyzing their place in the larger Hip-Hop narrative, the instructor and the students can infer truths about the politics and zeitgeist of the times in which the film works were conceived. This course will consist of lots of film, yes, but also lots of reading and writing. Upon successful completion, the student should be able to recognize and define the Hip-Hop narrative in popular cinema, focus critical thinking skills, pull the narrative from certain films and discuss it, note and discuss the visual aesthetic and how it impacts the story, and discuss the marketing, packaging, and cultural impact of the Hip-Hop narrative. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286Q. History of Late 20th Century Popular Culture. 3 Units.

This course focuses on American popular culture of the late twentieth century (c. 1970 to 2001). Students will analyze this period using a variety of historical texts and primary sources (everything from more "traditional" sources such as printed materials to films, television episodes and clips, music and sound lyrics, fanzines ["zines"], graphic novels, and music videos). Secondary sources include history essays and monographs, as well as articles by scholars employing critical theory. Students will explore whether "products" of popular culture perpetuate power structures and help to shape the discourse of late twentieth century American culture. Moreover, they will examine how individuals contribute to and challenge the discourses as consumers and creators of pop culture. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286V. Management of Chronic Illness in a Cultural Context. 3 Units.

This course will explore the cross cultural, self-care approaches to health problems. It covers substance-based (e.g., herbs, acupuncture), mind-body (e.g., yoga, qigong), spiritual (e.g., prayer) and social (e.g., communal, family) approaches that have been used to manage chronic diseases and promote wellness in various cultural settings. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286X. The Future of News. 3 Units.

The saying goes, "Strong Press, Strong Democracy." But what of strong democracy in the Internet Age when the traditional press seems weak? That's this seminar's big question. Can the "old" media, struggling to avoid financial collapse, still deliver the news necessary to be democracy's watchdog, as in the past? Can the new internet media--blogs, YouTube, viral videos, "hyperlocalism" experiments, pro publica investigations, crowd sourcing, instant news, Facebook, Gawker, True/Slant, Drudge and the proliferation of the other news and entertainment sources--take its place or complement traditional journalism? How do these new entrants change the nature of news and the role of the media in our society? These are uncharted developments, but they go to the heart of the continued success of America's democratic experiment. Our goal is to grasp more clearly the connections between media, news, citizenship and democracy in this new age. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286Y. The Holocaust and Local History. 3 Units.

The Holocaust and Local History will focus on how the events that make up the Holocaust affected communities in both Eastern Europe, where the most horrific crimes of the Holocaust occurred, and in the United States, where the Jewish community responded to the events with both astonishment and action. A focus on local histories will illustrate the legacy of the Holocaust and help students understand how history directly affects their own lives and the lives of those around them. The goal is to uncover the role that this complex history continues to play in our daily lives, whether in the small towns of Eastern Europe or the suburbs of greater Cleveland. Topics will include the course of the Holocaust in towns in Eastern Europe, the effects of the Holocaust in American communities like Cleveland, and the commemoration of the Holocaust and memory of local Jewish communities in Eastern Europe. Students will examine these topics with the help of primary and secondary sources, hear from local survivors of the Holocaust, and learn more about how the Holocaust is represented in local museums. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287C. Murder in the Jazz Age. 3 Units.

Having lived through the devastation and consequences of World War I, you might think that Americans would have been appalled by the violent murders that marred the 1920s. To be sure, they were. Americans were also drawn to the infamous murders as though understanding these crimes would enable them to explain the changes in society, such as changes to gender rules and urbanization, brought about and accelerated by the war. In this class, we will examine the major crimes of the decade in the hopes of gaining the insight that the people at the time sought. The course readings include secondary sources that provide an analysis of the decade and primary sources from the murder cases themselves. In addition, students will become familiar with the historical context and scientific advancements that gave birth to modern forensics. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287E. Clash of the Titans: Economic, Industrial and Social Trends for the 21st Century. 3 Units.

Since the beginning of recorded human civilization, locally dominant societies have risen, prospered, decayed and finally ended, with new ones taking their place. Starting in the 15th century, however, Europe established global dominance and maintained it for four centuries, from the age of New World exploration through the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century. Then came the rise of the United States, which in the late 20th century became the world's only superpower, economically, industrially, militarily and, increasingly, culturally. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, we are witnessing the "flattening" of the world due to the technological revolution, a phenomenon brought about by the instant and worldwide generation of and access to information. Two major consequences of this evolution are: a) Individuals are more empowered than at any time in history and the traditional societal structure is under constant challenge; b) Companies have changed their business structures and practices and have begun to operate on a truly global scale. The main goal of the course is to help students learn the lessons of history and use them to develop an educated argument as to whether the US will continue in its prominent leadership role, or whether one or both of the emerging Asian economic powerhouses, China and India, will supplant it and become dominant. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287H. Vocation and Life. 3 Units.

What is your life for? Should it be for anything? The idea of a vocation originally meant a calling to a higher purpose, however that may be conceived. Over time, the idea of a vocation flattened out and became another word for a job. Yet living for a job hardly seems like living. One advantage of the older meaning of the word was to highlight this fact: the question of life is how to live life. In this course, we explore the concept of a vocation--both as a calling and as a job--and we use the seminar format and its exercises to provide ourselves with the opportunity to focus our lives on what we are living for, or, at the least, why we do not think we need to do anything beyond just living well. But what is it to live well? What is the point of all our work? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287J. Education in sub-Saharan Africa. 3 Units.

The level of education in sub-Saharan Africa is much lower than in the United States. In some sub-Saharan countries, less than 20% of the adults are literate, less than 10% have a secondary school education, and less than 1% have a college education. The low level of education keeps the region in poverty--most households in sub-Saharan Africa have no electricity or running water. This seminar will address the barriers that hinder education in sub-Saharan Africa, and explore ways to overcome these barriers. The barriers have a broad range of origins, including economic (not enough money for teacher salaries, books, and school maintenance), societal (education not seen as important, especially for girls), technological (lack of electricity and transportation), institutional (widespread corruption in government), and medical (AIDS, malaria and diseases from unclean water cause student absences and orphan students). Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287P. Technology and Social Change. 3 Units.

This class examines the reciprocal relationship between material culture (technology) and non-material culture (society and social structure) as they produce social change. The class is organized by major areas in the development of technology as well as chronologically in terms of major epochs of technological and societal development. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287Q. Social Constructs Associated with Marginalization: Making a Difference. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' awareness of selected social constructs within the global society (i.e., vulnerability) that have the potential to generate circumstances that place some individuals or groups at risk for marginalization and diminished well-being. The course will be conducted within a seminar format and will provide opportunities for scholarly inquiry and debate regarding the nature of the constructs posited. Students will critique each other's social constructs with intent to generate innovative strategies to reduce individual and global marginalization. Each student will prepare a formal written report of their findings related to their construct of interest. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287R. The Business of Sports-Content, Television, Social Media, Consumer Products, Advertising & Marketing. 3 Units.

The sports industry is experiencing rapid growth and is expected to become one of the nation's top 25 industries by 2030. This seminar will explore five elements of the business model that is driving this growth: content, television, social media, advertising, and consumer products. In addition, it will examine the marketing of these five elements. Students will be graded on class participation, essays, and a final paper. They will be asked to read weekly articles on each aspect of the sports industry and to participate in social media sites in order to understand how powerful this platform is to the sports business. In addition, they will work together in groups to create their own sports marketing websites and present these sites for evaluation by the entire class. The results of the evaluation will contribute to their grade for this part of the course. Guest lecturers for the seminar will include nationally recognized experts and representatives of the sports industry, many of whom visit northeast Ohio for sporting events. Students in the course will acquire a unique perspective on a business that is projected to become one of the world's leading growth industries in the 21st century. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287T. Gender, Visibility and Performance: The Courtesan. 3 Units.

Throughout history, the figure of the courtesan has embodied seduction, performance, and mystery; occupying the private spaces of the real and the imaginary across cultures. The impact of the courtesan on society can be seen in travelogues, poetry, and historical treatises, as well as in texts written specifically about courtesans themselves. Those cultures which had a courtesan class frequently experienced varying degrees of social discomfort. Within the culture, there was tension between those who patronized courtesans and those who considered them a social menace. From without, cultures which had courtesans were believed to be either excessively decadent or highly civilized, depending on the cultural standpoint of the observer. In this seminar, we will study real courtesans as well as examine the figure of the courtesan within the context of literature, religion, music history, and gender theory. The seminar will begin with an overview of the origins of the courtesan, focused on the roles of women and slave musicians in the court and temple in Egypt, India, Greece, and Mesopotamia starting in 3,000 BCE. Then, we will explore factors leading to the development of a courtesan class and compare the roles of courtesans and their place in their culture in Europe, India, Asia, and the Middle East. Readings and class discussion will encompass issues relating to the impact of gender on performance, literary genres, education, and social and legal status, as well as continuing questions related to translation of primary sources, colonialism, and religious movements. In addition to the readings, we will also study images of the courtesan from antiquity to the present, listen to music by and about courtesans, sample some of their writing, and watch films about "real" courtesans. The primary goal is not only to look at the impact of courtesans in history, but also to engage issues related to gender and performance from a variety of different disciplinary and cultural points of view. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287V. The Public and the Past: History in the Marketplace. 3 Units.

How does one or should one "sell" the past? Our primary encounters with the past are not in the university classroom, but via popular media, museums, theme parks, and historic sites; entities whose survival is increasingly dependent upon market economics. This dependency often demands attention to audience size and the need to avoid controversies that could alienate private and public funders. Complicating this is the issue of heritage--the somewhat mythic pasts which individuals, groups, and nations claim as their right, even when research challenges the underlying myths. What then are the consequences, in terms of ethics and accuracy, or in terms of civic value, when one turns history into a heritage-based commodity? More specifically, how does this affect professional historians? Can they work in history outside of academe without sacrificing integrity and standards? The seminar will debate these critical questions and also take an in-depth look at the growing field (positions, products and potential) of public/applied history. Readings, documentaries, interviews, and on-site visits to public history institutions will provide the basis for our discussions and the written assignments in this seminar as well as serve as an introductory "course" for students interested in a career in public or applied history. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287X. The War.... 3 Units.

Why do people go to war? Why are they willing to give up everything and send their children off to fight? What makes people cheer when war is declared? This class will address these questions by focusing on 1914 and the start of the First World War. It will be a course focused on understanding the politics, motivations, and imaginings surrounding the origins of World War I. The course readings include secondary sources that provide an analysis of 1914 and primary sources that provide the various perspectives of those living through the events. In addition to furthering their writing skills, students will become familiar with library research methods. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287Z. Concubines, Soldiers and Field Hands: World Slavery from Antiquity to the Present. 3 Units.

For many Americans, the most familiar type of slavery is plantation slavery of the Americas and the horrific consequences to the indigenous peoples and transplanted peoples from Africa. The longevity of the institution of slavery, and acceptance of the practice by many different cultures and belief systems, however, reaches from antiquity to the present day. In addition to providing physical labor and domestic services, slaves have been used as entertainers, civil servants, led armies and served in temples. Slavery is a complex legal, religious, moral and social institution, and the relationship between slave, state and owner/slaver is equally complicated; so much so that understanding the bond between them, and what the actual boundary was between "free" and "un-free", is still difficult to determine in some cultures. In this seminar, we will use a chronological framework to examine the institution of slavery, uses for slaves, methodologies and sources for studying slavery and the slave trade in world history. Beginning with slavery in the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome, the class will include slavery and the feudal system in medieval Europe, indentured servitude and concubinage, slaves in the early Islamic courts, the Ottoman slave trade, the African slave trade and slavery in the Americas, and the current problem of human trafficking. Within each section, students will read primary texts and recent scholarship examining the social, economic and religious rationales behind slavery. We will also study different methodologies and the impact of gender, race and social class on the study of world slavery. As many slaver cultures had different definitions for what it meant to be a slave, we will address questions related to translation, interpretation and perception when dealing with primary sources. The primary goal of the course is to provide a broader context for the institution of slavery in world history as a means not only to understand the impact of slavery has had on American culture, but on other cultures as well. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288B. Doing Good: How Nonprofits Change Lives. 3 Units.

The American economy is made up of three sectors: government, business, and nonprofit. It's pretty obvious what government and business do, but the activity of nonprofits, while it is everywhere, is much more subtle. A nonprofit is most likely where you were born, went to school, attend church, or adopted your family dog. If you became an Eagle Scout, watched "Sesame Street," attended a benefit concert, or participated in a walk for a cause, you were engaged with a nonprofit. Perhaps you haven't given much thought to the way the organization was structured, where it gets its money, or what kind of an impact it's really having. In this seminar, students will learn what nonprofits are, how they operate, how they influence everyday lives, and their role in advancing social change and a civil society. We will consider the economic impact of nonprofits as well as their role in protecting culture, environment, values, and heritage. We will also look at the key challenges facing nonprofits today and how they are addressing them. Writing assignments will include a grant proposal for a new or existing nonprofit. The seminar will feature guest speakers and class visits to nonprofits in the Cleveland area. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288C. Green Transformation and Globalization. 3 Units.

This seminar introduces students to the recent major green transformation in China and elsewhere in the world, focusing on the way the green changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. The seminar will also assess the impacts of various aspects of green transformation and globalization on today's and future world and vice versa. This seminar promotes broad knowledge of-and increased appreciation of the importance of diversity in China's cultural past, social frameworks, economic conditions, and natural environment. In a close connection to the primary readings, which include several recent relevant works, the students will be exposed to a variety of related primary and secondary materials (such as texts, photos, film clips, music, songs, and websites). In addition to receiving informative yet concise instruction, the student will also be involved in practice in critical reading and thinking, in writing and orally presenting research papers. In these activities, the students will be introduced to basic methods and concepts critical to the understanding of important economic, social, and cultural developments and changes as products of movements rather than isolated incidents. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288D. Why we ride: Motorcycles in America. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to explore motorcycle culture as an outcome, microcosm, and sometimes foil for broader American culture from the end of World War II to the present. We will examine historical accounts and current media to understand the variety of perspectives on this elastic and evolving subculture. Many within the motorcycle press and industry believe that motorcycling is in the midst of a major cultural shift, which may reflect changes in generational values as well as economic realities, and which makes this a uniquely fascinating time to study this significant American subculture. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288E. Music in Early Childhood. 3 Units.

This course develops critical thinking, writing, and discussion skills through guided inquiry on the subject of music in early childhood. Researchers in the areas of child development, linguistics, sociology, psychology, and music education have documented children's musical development and noted the interplay of musical development with many other spheres of child development and interaction. What is the role of music in a child's holistic development? Could enriching musical experiences provide needed interventions to children considered "at-risk?" What is the "First 2000 Days" movement and how does music enter the equation? What types of music therapy are available for young children in medical, educational, and social settings, and what impact have we seen in these areas? In this course, students will explore these questions through reading, research, guest lectures, and observations of young children. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288J. Museums and Community. 3 Units.

This course will use Cleveland-area museums as a laboratory to think critically about the role of museums within society. It will combine literature review, museum visits, and discussions led by museum professional. The goal is that students consider what role, if any, they believe museums should play in society in general, and in their local community in particular. Since experiential learning is key to understanding museums, museum visits will be foundational elements of the course. Students will first explore a local museum with the instructor and collaborate on a case study. They will then work individually on case studies of two local institutions that they have not previously visited. Finally, drawing on the readings and class discussions, each student will expand one of the case studies into a plan to make that institution fall more in line with their personal vision of museums in society. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288T. Coffee and Civilization. 3 Units.

Whether you enjoy an occasional cup or sip throughout the day from a bottomless mug, did you know that since its introduction in the Western world coffee has been intimately tied to sociability and intellectual life? In this seminar, we will explore coffee's civilizing history, from eighteenth-century coffee houses buzzing with political dissent, to 1920s establishments crowded with avant-garde artists and our modern bookstore cafés. We will also explore the human and ecological costs of our taste for coffee by investigating the enduring connections between coffee, slavery, North-South geo-political relations, and notions of fair trade. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288Y. The Secret History of Corporate America. 3 Units.

The corporation is the most powerful economic institution of our time. How did it come to reign, and how does its power affect us economically, politically, and socially? This course will chart the history and impact of corporate capitalism. Topics will include the corporation's impact on democracy, consumer culture, the environment, and even the university itself. If you have ever wondered why products are purposely designed to wear out (planned obsolescence), why unions are so powerless in America, why the military is as powerful as it is, why it takes special technology from the Diebold corporation to run a simple election, why broadcasting companies are allowed to profit by using the public airwaves for free, why it looks like there are a million publishers of books when in truth giant companies dominate 80 percent of the book market, why the perfect lawn is a marketing ploy to get consumers to buy a lot of chemical inputs, why universities, which are supposed to be bastions of independent thought, are now dominated by an army of administrators who run around talking about return on investment instead of figuring out how to create a culture where students can learn, then this is the course for you. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289C. Ethics For The Real World: Developing a Code of Ethics to Guide Decisions in Work and Life. 3 Units.

This seminar addresses two major questions: How do the contexts in which we live or work affect ethical behavior? And how can we manage to struggle through personal and organizational challenges if we find they present us with something ethically compromising? In this course, we look to religion, spiritual teaching and cultural upbringing to understand sources of personal values and standards of behavior that might help structure one's life in the midst of difficult contexts. One way we consider this is through practical exercises including development of your own personal code of ethics, an iterative process designed to help you articulate the principles of your own moral construction. These can serve as a foundation for leadership integrity and moral courage for ethical decisions throughout life and work. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289H. The Meaning of Difference: Constructions of Diversity in American Culture. 3 Units.

Diversity means different things to different people in the United States and around the world. In the United States, in particular, the meaning of difference is connected to categories of identity, meaning and ideas. In this course, we will focus on discovering and understanding various categories of difference, the ways they are constructed, and by whom. We will look at how language and power operate in culture and how the interactions of language and power affect all of us. We will explore constructions of difference in American culture according to race, ethnicity, sex and gender, social class, sexual orientation/expression, disability, and religion. When we read American culture as a text, what do we see and hear about diversity? How do we make meaning of what we see and hear about diversity? What have scholars/thought leaders/writers written about the topic? How have these definitions of diversity affected your own life? How does diversity shape the stories we tell about ourselves, others, American culture and the culture of other nations? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289J. Treasure or Trash: Examining Theatrical Credibility. 3 Units.

This seminar is a fundamental study of theatre from the standpoint of developing the critical acumen of a potential audience. It covers each ingredient of the theatrical experience-audience, playwriting, acting, directing, theatre architecture, design and technology-and attempts to help students define a reasonable set of standards to judge that part of the experience as an audience member and to clearly communicate their feelings and thoughts regarding that experience. In addition to class discussions, lectures, and readings, students are also required to attend four live performances-two theater productions offered by Case Western Reserve University's Department of Theater and two productions at the Cleveland Play House. The students will write critical essays about their experience as an audience member in relation to a particular aspect of the performance. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289K. Riots and Rituals: Struggles for Justice in a Globalizing World. 3 Units.

This course asks students to explore two broad questions: How might we understand contemporary globalization? And, how do those people marginalized by globalization seek justice? Globalization and social justice have now become household terms. However, today, perhaps more than ever, we must ask precisely what type of globalization we are experiencing and what type of globalization we want for our future. If we are seeking the best possible global future for everyone, then it is crucial that we understand how those left behind by globalization struggle to get their interests heard. This course takes a unique approach to these problems by working with two extended case studies. We start with Cleveland, Ohio in the 1960s, and the beginnings of economic globalization in the United States. Cleveland's Hough riots of 1966 were one of the most violent political events in the city's history. We then move to contemporary Madagascar, where global rainforest conservation programs pose a real threat to the cultures of indigenous groups and their rights to land. Here, ritual has become a powerful means by which Malagasy groups assert their interests. With both case studies, important questions arise for classroom consideration: What is the exact nature of the globalization processes at work in both places? What can we learn about the development of globalization between the 1960s and now? Who are the groups most harmed by these processes? And, what can riots and rituals teach us about how groups marginalized by globalization struggle to have their claims for justice heard? The instructor has carried-out long term research in both Cleveland and Madagascar, and will take an interdisciplinary approach to theories of globalization and justice throughout the course. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289L. The Roots of the Arab-Israeli Conflict. 3 Units.

This reading- and discussion-based seminar delves into one of the most complicated issues in our world. To begin to understand it takes careful reading and reflection, skills on which this course focuses. It also takes untangling the underlying issues from the trauma, dogma, and violence surrounding them. Seminar participants will learn how the roots of the conflict lie in the Ottoman and British Empires. Course materials include histories of Zionism, pre-Zionist Palestine, the British Mandate years, the British Empire in other Arab lands, and the 1948 war and aftermath. Primary sources from the perspective British officials on the ground in Palestine receive much attention. The histories of engineering and agriculture are highlighted alongside traditional social and political perspectives. Students may not get credit for this course if they have taken HSTY 339. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289M. The Detective Novel. 3 Units.

Who dunnit? Why do we keep asking this question? You dunnit. Readers have an investment in finding answers to puzzles and to threatening narrative situations. In this course on one of the world's most popular literary genres, you will not only learn of its origins, but about theories of why you keep reading these stories. The texts begin with the Memoirs of Eugene-Francois Vidocq and stories of Edgar Allan Poe, and run though contemporary novelists such as Sara Paretsky and Natsuo Kirino. Why is this genre appeal so popular in so many cultures? There will be a strong comparativist slant to the course; students will be encouraged to explore the cultural context of Natsuo Kirino's and Stieg Larsson's novels which, like many of the classics, provide fertile ground for comparison to film adaptations. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289Q. The Nazis Next Door: Everyday Germans and National Socialism 1919-1990. 3 Units.

From the beginning of the National Socialist Party in 1919 until German Unification in 1990, everyday Germans had to deal with the reality that, regardless of their own political beliefs, many neighbors and even relatives embraced the doctrines of National Socialism. This seminar explores this complex reality from the rise of National Socialism, through the crimes of the Third Reich, and the stumbling and mixed efforts of the postwar Germanies to cope with the presence of Nazis in German society. Ranging from the defeated and divided society of the Weimar Republic, through the Nazi triumph, crimes, and defeat, to the recivilization of Germans after the war, we will examine how Germans dealt with the fact that to some degree, there were always Nazis next door. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289V. To Everest and Back: The Politics and Culture of Mountaineering. 3 Units.

In April 2014, at the start of the climbing season, 16 Sherpas working for commercial operators died in an avalanche on Mount Everest. This event precipitated an unprecedented crisis: after tense negotiations with their Western employers and clients, the Sherpas brought the spring climbing season to an abrupt close. Although this action seemed sudden, it had been a long time coming. Conditions on the mountain had by all accounts been deteriorating for decades: ugly trash heaps, tensions caused by economic disparities between Western guides and their indigenous counterparts, and ever more demanding--yet often under-prepared--Western clients indicated that what had once been the site of adventure and achievement had devolved into crass commercialism and exploitation. What is Everest for anyway? To whom does it belong? This course will chart the history of the "conquest" of Everest. We will ask the following questions: What prompted Westerners to venture into landscapes that their ancestors had previously shunned? When and how did the West's aesthetic appreciation of high mountains begin? When did this appreciation morph into a competitive drive to scale ever higher peaks in far-away lands? How does this history overlap with that of colonialism? Is mountaineering an ethical endeavor? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289Z. China and the World: 19th and 20th Century Encounters. 3 Units.

Although frequently characterized as a country with a past that was marked by insularity and disdain for all things foreign, until the West "opened [it] up," China's engagement with the world has been long and deep. China--Chinese emperors, Chinese governments, and Chinese people across the social spectrum--have energetically engaged with the broader world, permitting, encouraging, and seeking the circulation of foreign ideas and goods. This course is about how China has taken measure of the world and the goods and ideas that have flowed into and out of China during the past several centuries, from roughly the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Students will examine one topic in depth as an historical case study during the semester-long course. Possible topics from which the case study will be drawn include the Opium Wars, meanings of revolution, gender and sexuality, religion and political ideology, the environment, nationalism, history of science and technology, etc. Focus on a single thematic topic serves as a microcosm of social, political, and economic exchanges that highlight the complex ways in which understandings of China and the world have shifted over time. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290C. Marginalization & Health. 3 Units.

Even in a free and democratic society such as the US, individuals and even entire groups can be systematically marginalized: they are blocked from various rights, opportunities, and resources that are normally available to others. One especially important consequence of marginalization is diminished health and well-being. This seminar examines the social factors associated with marginalization and health in American society. Why are some individuals and groups at risk for marginalization? How does marginalization produce health inequalities? What can be done about them? Using quantitative and qualitative research methods and careful analysis of current scholarly literature, students will critically examine the current evidence related to these inequalities and generate their own social justice strategies to address them and their causes. In addition, students will have the opportunity to hear from guest experts in the field and participate in off-campus learning activities. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290D. Help Yourself: Self-Help and the Science of Human Behavior. 3 Units.

Each year, people seeking to improve their lives spend millions of dollars on self-help books, classes, and programs.Why? How are they useful? And if they work so well, why do people continue to need them? This course uses some basic theories and research of human personality and behavior to investigate whether and how self-help works. In addition to using this information to investigate the claims made by self-help gurus, students will provide students with strategies they can apply to their own lives, including how to change unwanted behaviors, how to cope with stress, and how to promote overall health and wellness. The course will be conducted in a seminar-format to allow for scholarly discussion and facilitate critical thinking. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the course material through the writing of a paper reporting results of a self-experiment and an oral presentation discussing the merits of a self-help program. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290G. A History of Workers in the US. 3 Units.

This course examines the lives of the ethnically and racially diverse women and men, skilled and unskilled, and rural and urban laborers that produce the goods and provide the services that society consumes. At crucial moments, working people have joined social movements in an effort to improve some aspect of their lives. We therefore will assess workers in relation to several known and less known American social movements, such as the eight-hour day movement during the late nineteenth century, the peace movement during WWI, and the Civil Rights movement in the wake of WWII. As we study these social movements through the lens of labor history, we will focus on making sense of periods of conflict and cooperation between European American, African American, and Mexican American workers. Throughout the course we will also discuss the politics of time-managed work, the role of unions within a competitive market economy, the influence of public policy and government institutions, and the relationship between industrial economies and blue-collar communities. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290M. The Effects of Race, Class and Education: A Dialogue on Current Issues. 3 Units.

Recent decades have seen a growing income and opportunity disparity in America. In our seminar, we will examine a variety of overlapping issues related to this crisis, with special attention to the impact of race, class and educational levels in determining how people fare in society. The larger set of issues includes poverty, income inequality, job loss and its effect on the industrial city, the concept of a "living wage," affordable housing, education, and sentencing and incarceration. Readings, class discussions, and student papers will all explore these topics. In urban communities such as Cleveland and Northeast Ohio, the income and opportunity divide is especially visible and persistent. Recognizing this, we have incorporated a novel approach to experiential learning in our seminar. Case Western Reserve students will interact with a similarly sized group of students incarcerated at Lorain Correctional Institution, a state prison located in nearby Grafton, Ohio. The two groups will conduct workshops together and will hold joint discussions via teleconference throughout the semester. The incarcerated students will be studying the same material on the same schedule and will be sharing their views with students in the seminar. We believe there are several benefits to this dialogue. We have two Northeast Ohio institutions - our university and the prison - which are neighbors but whose residents are largely from opposite sides of the divide. It will be useful to consider the income and opportunity divide from both perspectives and to share ideas and experiences related to the overall problem of inequality. A bilateral discussion and interaction will not only enhance the students' educational experience, but also, we hope, will foster greater understanding. Procedures will be in pace to ensure strict confidentiality and anonymity in any and all exchanges of views between CWRU students and students at the prison. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290S. Cultural Ecology and Sustainability: An Anthropological Approach. 3 Units.

In the modern period, we have witnessed spectacular scientific and technological achievements. We have also experienced devastating climate change and massive biodiversity loss that threaten life on Earth as we know it. Is it possible that the solutions to these problems are not scientific or technological, but rather cultural? How have other cultures, whether from the present or the past, dealt with sustainability challenges? How might an examination of indigenous or traditional cultures, some of which have existed sustainably for thousands of years and even enhanced the biodiversity of their environments, lead to a clearer understanding of the deleterious attitudes and actions of our own modern culture? How can we integrate the wisdom of these cultures to ensure the survival of our own? In this seminar, we will use these questions to enhance our understanding of the relationship between human culture and the natural world, as well as the ways in which a deeper understanding of cultural ecology can promote sustainability. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290T. Making: Innovation, Work, and Competition. 3 Units.

Manufacturing has been an important source of economic growth and innovation. In many countries, it has helped create a middle class by providing both well-paying jobs and cheap goods. In recent decades, however, manufacturing has declined in the US. Should we be concerned about this trend? Does off-shoring of production to places like China threaten or enhance the US standard of living or technological strength? Do efforts to protect manufacturing in the US hurt people in developing countries? How will the development of "maker spaces" (such as CWRU's ThinkBox) affect the way goods are produced? How does high-wage Germany run a trade surplus in manufacturing? Does environmental regulation help or hurt manufacturing? In this seminar, we will address these questions both practically and theoretically. In addition to reading engineering, historical and literary depictions of manufacturing, we will visit factories and speak with leaders from industry, labor, and government. We will also consider broader economic policy questions by reading the works of prominent economists and political scientists. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290U. Power and Fashion: Dress and Politics in American History. 3 Units.

As clothing is one of the most accessible means through which we express our identities, political and social tensions are often embedded and embodied in dress. As an expressive medium, clothing and appearance became crucial in the construction of political identities and in serving as a means of control, oppression, as well as protest and resistance. This seminar will examine the links between clothing, sartorial practices and political significance. Readings will address the question of sartorial politics from a historical perspective. Special attention will be given to the role of clothes in negotiating and constructing gender, race, class, sexual, and national identities from the 18th century to the present. Students may not earn credit for both this course and HSTY 126. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290V. Education and Inequality in America. 3 Units.

Guided by the aspiration to provide equal opportunity to all and initiatives like No Child Left Behind, the US educational system has defined itself as a free and open system that rewards accomplishment and nourishes every student¹s potential. It is based on a philosophy that stands in stark contrast to the foreclosed and explicitly stratified educational systems of many European countries. Why then is it the case that, compared to other advanced postindustrial societies, the US has extraordinary levels of inequality? This course will examine in detail the processes that regulate social inequality and the educational system. We will analyze how differences between students¹ social, cultural, and economic capital create a stratified educational experience that shapes not only how students are educated, but also the value of that education in the labor market. We will also trace how the inequalities that exist in the US education system from primary school through college play an important role in the reproduction of class inequality, challenging the myth that education is a vehicle for socioeconomic mobility. This course also explores how these inequalities in education run along the axes of race, class, and gender. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290W. Understanding Body Image through Self-Perception. 3 Units.

This course examines the historical, psychological, and cultural approaches to the self-perception of one's own body. We will explore how body standards have changed throughout history and across cultures, and how this is reflected in portraiture. Additionally, we will investigate psychological studies on body image, acknowledging the challenges in an evidence-based approach and considering medical diagnoses when distortion in self-perception occurs. Finally, we will analyze current body standards perpetuated by the media in regards to body size, shape, and gender. Through reading and discussion, students will gain a deeper understanding of healthy body image and strategies for applying it to their own lives. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290Y. Shrinking the World: Ham Radio and Distance Communication. 3 Units.

Radio operators can talk to each other across the world, launch and use space satellite stations, and bounce their voices off the moon. And yet the Federal Communications Commission still regulates what they may say on the air. Why is that? And why does amateur radio require a license? In this course, we'll discuss the history of long-distance communication methods stretching from the British Penny Post into the modern digital age, viewed particularly through the lens of the Amateur Radio Service. We will also explore the ways that advances in communication technology have changed politics, entertainment and personal interactions. Who makes the rules for a new system of communication? What causes changes in those rules? Was Orson Welles morally, ethically, or legally responsible for causing a mass panic with his reading of "War of the Worlds?" What might the future hold for communications? Students will earn amateur radio licenses, make contacts with other radio amateurs around the world and with each other, and possibly bounce signals off the moon and listen for their return. We will also look at the ham radio culture, from QSL cards to public service and contesting. Students will learn some basic hands-on electronics, but no previous technical background is required. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.