2016-17 General Bulletin

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SAGES Courses

For a full description of the SAGES Program, see the section on General Degree Requirements.

This list of courses includes only those courses offered directly by the SAGES Program that have been approved as permanent offerings.  Not all of the First Seminars and University Seminars listed are offered every year, but the list of offerings in any given year will include courses that received one-term approval.  All Department Seminars are offered through the academic departments and are listed among their course offerings.  Most Senior Capstone courses are offered through the academic departments, though several are offered through the SAGES Program and are included here with the course prefix UCAP.

FSAE Courses

FSAE 100. Academic English. 3 Units.

This course is designed to improve the fundamental reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills of students for whom English is not their first language. One focus of the course will be refining written academic communication: identifying and producing common types of academic writing; note-taking from reading and listening inputs; understanding and applying principles of academic text structure; summarizing and referencing information; editing and proofreading; and achieving appropriate tone and style. A second focus will be honing spoken academic communication: recognizing the purposes of and differences between spoken and written English in academic contexts; identifying and practicing interactional and linguistic aspects of participation in seminar discussions; discussing issues requiring development and application of creative and critical thinking; and preparing and delivering oral presentations. A third focus will be on enhancing reading and listening skills in academic contexts: understanding the content and structure of information delivered both orally and in print form; and reading and listening for different purposes. A final focus will be improving and extending grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation.

FSCC Courses

FSCC 100. First Seminar. 4 Units.

This four credit-hour course provides an introduction to various dimensions of academic life. It will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading from primary as well as secondary sources, and will include practice in written and oral communication in small groups. Each seminar is led both by a faculty member and a writing co-instructor. The goals are to enhance basic intellectual skills of academic inquiry, such as critical reading, thoughtful analysis, and written and oral communication; to introduce basic information literacy skills; to provide a foundation for ethical decision-making; to encourage a global and multidisciplinary perspective on the learning process; to facilitate faculty-student interactions; and, in the most general sense, to provide a supportive common intellectual experience for first-year students at Case.

FSCC 110. Foundations of College Writing. 4 Units.

Writing is both a personal and a social project. Foundations of College Writing First Seminar provides attention to the personal aspects of writing including processes, habits, and skills as well as to the social aspects of writing including types of writing, persuasion/argument, and conventions. The course structure allows us to spend more time and attention on your individual needs and goals as writers. You will learn academic writing conventions, rhetorical techniques, and various processes and methods that you might adopt and employ as you move into other writing situations. We will explore writing from multiple positions: as a writer, as a reader, and as a critic. We will explore various types of writing: alphabetic text, visuals, and multimedia. And finally we will work to achieve the course objectives through freewriting, drafting, revising, reflecting, blogging, emailing, debating, and discussing.

FSCS Courses

FSCS 150. First Seminar Continuing Semester. 3 Units.

This is a continuation of the First Seminar experience for ESL students. The seminar will continue the introduction to various dimensions of academic life. It will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading from primary as well as secondary sources, and will include practice in written and oral communication in small groups. The goals of the seminar are to continue to enhance basic intellectual skills of academic inquiry, such as critical reading, thoughtful analysis, and written and oral communication; to continue to introduce basic information literacy skills; to continue to provide a foundation for ethical decision-making; to continue to encourage a global and multidisciplinary perspective on the learning process; and to continue to facilitate faculty-student interactions. Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, or FSCS. Prereq or Coreq: FSTS 100.

FSNA Courses

FSNA 103. Energy and Society. 4 Units.

This four-credit-hour course provides an introduction to collegiate writing and to various dimensions of academic life, but will focus on the critical appreciation of the world of energy. Currently, most of the world runs on non-renewable resources; this course is designed to help students develop viewpoints about these issues, and to express themselves in a clear, coherent way. The class will involve both literacy and numeracy, and students will learn to become comfortable handling some of the quantitative measures of energy use. The class will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading, lectures and discussion, and will include practice in written and oral communication individually and in small groups.

FSNA 104. Archaeoastronomy: Monuments and Ideas. 4 Units.

The unifying theme of this course is how astronomical practice and knowledge is central to ancient civilizations and how that emphasis continues today as manifested through scientific endeavor and also as strongly through the power of unifying myth.

FSNA 109. Science and Race. 4 Units.

This four-credit seminar examines the development and impact of the concept of race. We will first focus on the causes of biological variability in species, leading to an evaluation of whether race is a useful device for understanding biological variability in humans. Second, we will examine how the understanding of race has changed over time within the biological sciences. Third, we will examine how scientific conceptualizations about race have influenced, and been influenced by, cultural beliefs. Through readings and open-ended discussion, we will critically examine the scientific process as it has been (and still is) being applied to the study of human races so that each student will ultimately be equipped to develop a scientifically sound conceptualization of race. Topics which will be covered include Social Darwinism, the eugenics movement, legislation to restrict immigration into the U.S., race-based medicine, and race and intelligence. Students are expected to enhance their skills at critical reading, thoughtful analysis, constructing logical arguments, and improving written and oral communication.

FSNA 111. Chemical Aspects of the Aging Mind. 4 Units.

This seminar will focus on three age-related neurological disorders: Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington disease. These diseases pose enormous social and economic impact, and current drug-based therapeutic approaches are limited and may not be suited to deal with the imminent problems. The seminar will examine lifestyle changes (i.e., diet, exercise, vitamins, and other habits such as reading) that are implicated in preventing or slowing down these disorders. The focus on a medical topic with important socioeconomic ramifications will provide a novel approach to enhancing critical thinking and communication skills.

FSNA 113. Facts and Values in Environmental Decisions. 4 Units.

This four-credit seminar will guide students to critically evaluate the evidence, uncertainties, and value judgments pertinent to some of the world's pressing environmental issues. We will begin by studying climate change. Students will decide the topics of exploration to follow. Through reading, field trips, discussions and writing we will investigate natural environmental processes and how they have changed with the growth in human population and technology. Students will learn about the scientific process and will consider the roll of science and technology and their limits in making decisions about shared resources.

FSNA 116. Cities (Under Construction). 4 Units.

Based on the premise that cities are never "finished," and constantly being remade, we will look at the technological and cultural history of cities from the ancient world to the present day. Students will explore the history of building materials--wood, brick, steel, concrete, and glass--used in the construction of cities. We will also trace the development of city infrastructure such as water and sewage systems; streets, bridges, and subways; electricity, telephone and the internet. Specific technological innovations, such as the elevator and the automobile, will receive special consideration. We will move both geographically and temporally to visit the world's great cities, Athens, Mexico City, Tokyo, and New York City. As we do, we will study the examples of significant building projects, such as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Chicago World's Fair, Washington, DC's Metro, and Cleveland's first skyscraper, the Rockefeller Building. The course will cover the history of the professions--engineering, architecture, and urban planning--that have contributed to the construction of cities, and will review the works of these practitioners, as well as that of artists, reformers, and utopians that have imagined new directions for the city. We will also explore first person narratives of the city, the impact of the city on personal and collective memory, and the possibilities and pitfalls of the "virtual" city. Through lecture, discussion, textual analysis, computer simulations, and writing assignments, Cities (Under Construction) will help students gain a deeper understanding of their role in remaking and sustaining the built environment.

FSNA 120. The Impact of Materials on Societal Development. 4 Units.

This four credit-hour SAGES seminar provides an introduction to various dimensions of academic life through open-ended intellectual inquiry and guided by reading from primary and secondary sources. The course will require practice in written and oral communications in small groups. A primary focus of the seminar will be to examine the impact of engineering materials on societal development through human history using a few specific materials of interest as examples: concrete, steel, and semi-conductors. At the conclusion of the course, students will be encouraged to explore the impact of other materials on the development of specific technologies as a group project.

FSNA 123. The Automobile: Its Origins, Development, and Impact on American Society. 4 Units.

The automobile is without doubt one of the defining influences on American life and society. In 1900, most people lived in rural communities, and the main forms of personal transportation were walking and the horse and buggy. Half a century later, most Americans lived in cities or suburbs, there were millions of cars in garages, and roads and highways criss-crossed the nation. The car has transformed where we live and work, how we play, and the very nature of our cities. This course will examine the American automobile from several perspectives: its origins, evolution and effect on industry; its impact on American life and leisure; and the automobile as an art form and American icon. We will also discuss how we preserve examples of our automotive heritage. These topics will be explored in the context of the usual writing and discussion components of a first SAGES course.

FSNA 124. The Challenge of Sustainability. 4 Units.

This four-credit-hour course provides an introduction to collegiate writing and to various dimensions of academic life, but will focus on the critical appreciation of the challenges we face in transitioning--or failing to transition--to a sustainable society. Climate change, along with increased development and population, are altering the natural environment we live in and rely on. This course will review some of the current and future impacts of these changes, and explore alternate paths forward and how they might be forged. The class will involve both literacy and numeracy, and students will learn to become comfortable handling some of the quantitative measures relevant to sustainability issues. The class will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading, lectures and discussion, and will include practice in written and oral communication.

FSNA 125. The Right Stuff. 4 Units.

This course will examine the Space Race. A key text for the course will be Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff. By taking a historical approach to the study of the achievements and failures of NASA scientists and astronauts, it is possible to examine: 1) how individuals dedicated to achieving a particular scientific end draw on the scientific method, 2) the consequences of scientific inquiry, and 3) how science develops in specific historic contexts.

FSNA 126. Urban Ecology. 4 Units.

This course will explore the natural world in an urban context. Urban spaces are defined by the interaction between human creation (the built environment) and the natural world. We will explore how those definitions can be complicated by human innovation meant to re-create nature, such as engineered wetlands. We'll read some classical ecology to understand how ecological issues differ in cities. Some topics we'll cover include: wildlife management; human/organism conflict and interdependence; urban heat islands; watershed, stormwater, and sewer management; and how trees grow in urban conditions. We'll also explore ethical issues such as environmental justice and sustainable development. Our field trips are meant to illuminate how urban planners, park managers, and others deal with such issues to create positive and healthy environments for their communities. Students will apply arguments and concepts learned in the course readings to the sites we visit..

FSNA 128. Naturally Spicy: Spices, History, Culture, Health and Cuisine. 4 Units.

This course will delve into the world of spices. Each commercially important spice will be discussed with the goal of understanding the influence spices and the spice trade had on the history, culture, and cuisines of different parts of the world. The chemistry of some of the natural compounds present in the spices and their effect on various diseases will be explored by reading and discussing scientific literature. Finally, the class will cook with some of these spices and sample other distinctly spiced foods to learn more about various cuisines and cultures.

FSNA 129. Engineering Design for the World's Poorest. 4 Units.

Almost half (47%) of the people in Africa have incomes less than $1.25 per day. Most of these people live as subsistence farmers in small villages with no electricity, running water or automobiles (but with cell phones). Through readings, group discussions, writing assignments, and open-ended experiential learning activities, the course will address ways that engineering solutions can improve peoples' lives within these severe economic constraints. A hands-on component of the course will involve designing and building affordable devices to meet specific needs. We have developed interactions with villages in Senegal, Malawi, and Botswana, and the engineering solutions will be explored within the context of these villages.

FSNA 133. Engineering Innovation and Design. 4 Units.

Innovation and design are cornerstones of the engineering profession and are responsible for many of the improvements in the quality of life that have taken place over the last century. Innovation is also viewed as the essential skill that will drive economies and solve many of the challenges facing societies around the globe. This seminar-based course will provide a disciplined approach to engineering innovation and design. The course requires students to engage in written and oral communications as well as working in small teams to complete open-ended design/build-related assignments. The course will culminate in the design, fabrication and validation of a prototype product to meet an identified need. The design, fabrication and validation of these products will be carried out in think[box] 1.0 (Prentke-Romich Collaboratory), and the Reinberger Design Studio.

FSNA 134. Fuel Cells. 4 Units.

Fuel Cells convert hydrogen and other fuels directly to electricity and are viewed as a key technology for non-polluting, oil-independent energy in the future. In this course, we will study and critically analyze the prospects, technical and economic barriers, and impact of broad implementation of fuel cells, focusing on the transportation sector and portable power. Major topics of the course include: (i) World and US energy outlook; (ii) Potential role and impact of fuel-cells; their advantages, principles of operation, design and materials issues, limitations and prospects for improvements; (iii) Special focus on details of a polymer type fuel cells (PEMFCs) for transportation and portable power; (iv) Modeling fuel cell performance and evaluation of controlling mechanisms that limit performance. The course is designed for students from all disciplines. Students will be expected to read assigned texts and articles and critically analyze statements and points of view presented. Quantitative analysis will be encouraged and developed. Student teams will develop a hypothesis to improve fuel cell performance by modifying the design of a component of the fuel cell. The new component design with then be fabricated and tested in an operating prototype fuel cell. Data analysis, hypothesis conclusion, and reporting of results are expected.

FSNA 135. BioDesign Basics: The Art of Finding Patient Needs. 4 Units.

BioDesign basics explores the art of finding patient needs. No prior clinical or medical education is required, as we focus on acquiring and refining the underpinning critical thinking skills needed to identify and articulate unmet clinical patient needs in contemporary healthcare settings. Many--if not a majority of--ideas leading to healthcare innovation are derived from issues that arise during the daily activities of caring for patients. Whether it is frustration with the use of a specific surgical instrument, processes that interfere with health care delivery, better waiting rooms for the family, designing more comfortable hospital gowns, or materials inadequate for intended outcomes, patient needs cover a broad range of physical and emotional states. Many students find the idea of identifying a "patient need" quite ambiguous at first, but the BioDesign process for defining patient need is a widely use national model developed at Stanford University that the student will find contains easy-to-follow steps that are simple and appealing. As an interactive and "hands-on" course, students will be engaged in discussions, events and activities to promote a first-hand understanding of "needs finding" to support individual mastery of writing and oral presentation skills. The Fourth Hour will be centered on "walking tours" of local medical institutions around University Circle as well as actual use of medical devices (wheelchairs and crutches) on campus as ways to help your efforts identify a patient need based on those observations. In short, you will create your own experiences leading to stories that make writing fun. The course requires students to engage in written and oral communications as well as working in small teams to complete open-ended assignments.

FSNA 136. Saving the World from Poverty, Disease, Injustice and Environmental Exploitation. 4 Units.

Half of the world's population lives in poverty. The causes of poverty and injustice are complex and the ramifications are numerous and serious and include grave risk to human health and to the environment. Through reading, analysis, writing, and rigorous discussion the class will investigate issues surrounding poverty and disparities in health and opportunity. We will also explore how innovation and engineering design can help address causes of poverty and disparity and meet needs of people at risk. Design teams will work throughout the semester to identify an unmet need to engineer a solution to benefit an under-served or under-resourced population. Fourth-hour activities will include interviewing knowledgeable stakeholders (locally and abroad via teleconference), learning about and volunteering with service organizations, and visiting local institutions and/or companies addressing these issues.

FSNA 137. Volts, Amps, Bits, Bytes. 4 Units.

The electrical grid, the computer, biomedical devices, electric vehicles, interactive art, and smart homes are a few examples of the pervasiveness of electronics and computer technology. This seminar will introduce the engineering design process, and present the basics of electricity, electronic circuits, measurement, sensors, and microcomputers (the Arduino), and how to use them to design and build useful devices. Students will reverse-engineer products, learn electrical and mechanical prototyping and fabrication, and apply them in a variety of hands-on labs. The course will conclude with students proposing, designing, and prototyping innovative design projects. The course will make extensive use of the Sears Design Lab and Think[box] and is writing intensive.

FSNA 138. Light. 4 Units.

This course explores Light, otherwise known as visible electromagnetic radiation. We will examine what light is in its various forms; how it is created and detected; how we perceive it; and how it has influenced our evolutionary development, our technological, artistic, and religious cultures, and our conceptions of space and time. Students will discuss topics suggested by the course readings and by exposure to the many scientific activities, historical artifacts, and artistic works on the CWRU campus and at other local institutions that involve light in a significant way.

FSNA 142. Designed by Man, Built by Nature. 4 Units.

If you look at the structure of a human tendon, and at the reinforcement system in an automobile tire, they share many design elements in common. The eye of an octopus and a high performance surveillance lens can be similar as well. The structure of sea shell and of vehicular armor - again, these share common features. In this class we will examine how nature designs things for performance, and how mankind copies these to produce useful objects. Two general introductions to technology will be supplemented with specific readings from the technical literature to provide a broad introductory background. This writing-intensive seminar is tailored for incoming CWRU students with an interest in science, engineering and technology. Among other class activities this seminar will require the student to research, design and build prototype bio-inspired systems according to assignments made in class, with a competition held during the last week of the semester.

FSNA 143. Materials and Energy. 4 Units.

Manufacturing and using the materials of modern life--metals, polymers, ceramics, paper products, and others--play major roles in the world's consumption of energy and natural resources. This course will objectively and (when applicable) quantitatively explore the technological and social forces that drive current levels of materials usage. Through readings, group discussions, writing assignments, and open-ended experiential learning activities, the course will address the following questions: What are the scale and geographical distribution of materials usage? How do the magnitude and impact of materials usage compare to those of other demands on energy and resources (such as agriculture, transportation, residential heating, and clean water)? What are the impacts--positive and negative--of materials consumption on society and the natural environment? How did the world get to its current situation, and what should, and can, be done in the future? Students successfully completing this course will be able to think critically and objectively about the role of materials in society's use of energy and natural resources, and to articulate realistic, persuasive arguments based in quantifiable facts about these topics.

FSNA 144. Is Mind What the Brain Does?. 4 Units.

Together we will explore the nature of the human mind by asking the question, "Is the mind what the brain does?" Through an exploration of neurological and psychological case studies, empirical research studies, direct experimentation, and readings and films about brain structure and function, we will form hypotheses about the relationship between the mind and the brain and gather evidence to test our hypotheses. Writing assignments will explore ideas about your own mind and brain, examples of other individuals with unusual or atypical brains and minds, and a research topic of your choice.

FSNA 145. Hostile Water. 4 Units.

Water is an essential, valuable resource that is protected by a wide variety of social, legal, and technical institutions. However, not all water is desirable. Hostile water is unwanted water from which we seek to protect ourselves. Hostile waters challenge our understanding of the natural world and the social doctrine upon which our understanding is based. This course will examine how historical "hostile water" events have altered our social perceptions and legal institutions, led to structural flood control, "damn" engineering, the National Flood Insurance Program, Landsat satellites, "Wild Rivers," FEMA, wetlands preservation, detention basins, etc., and to homeowner stormwater management options such as rain barrels and rain gardens. The course will begin with a review of the original documentation and modern interpretation of the Johnstown Flood. Students will then conduct research on historical events and prepare written briefing documents and oral presentations focusing on the physical impacts and social consequences of dramatic hostile water events. The course will end with a critical review of the Hurricane Katrina event. Class discussions will examine how hostile water events have impacted U.S. policies and institutions, and appears to be leading to stormwater management obligations for individual homeowners.

FSNA 148. Science or Pseudoscience? Exploring Extraordinary Claims. 4 Units.

In the contemporary world, extraordinary claims about ghosts, aliens, and the nature of the universe appear on popular television shows, on the Internet, and in the press. Many of these claims are framed as science. In this seminar, we critically examine the nature of these understandings of the world around us. We will ask if these claims are scientific and, if not, whether they constitute a form of pseudoscience. We will explore the role of demarcation, evidence, scientific progress, and fallacies of reasoning in pseudoscience. We will also consider the historical and sociocultural currents that give rise to these pseudoscientific claims as well as their social and political implications. Drawing on anthropological, philosophical, and historical case studies, we will consider topics such as cryptozoology, astrology, ancient aliens, parapsychology, the Nemesis theory of dinosaur extinctions, theories of intelligence, and other extraordinary claims.

FSNA 157. Plastics Recycling: Re-use of Plastic Waste. 4 Units.

About 300 million tons of plastics are produced globally each year, but only about 10 percent of these products are recycled, despite the fact that recycling uses significantly less energy and produces fewer greenhouse gas emissions than does manufacture of the virgin materials. This course will address the scientific, economic, environmental, and political issues involved in plastics recycling. Following an introduction to the chemical structures and properties of commodity plastics, we will discuss the actual recycling of plastics in municipal waste including the problems faced in collection and sorting of plastic waste and recycling economics. Then we will address the commercial applications and properties of recycled plastics and why they generally have inferior properties to virgin materials, which significantly reduces their market value. Finally we will look at biodegradable alternatives to oil-based materials as well as some options to plastics recycling, including land filling, burning for power generation, and monomer reclamation.

FSNA 158. What is Making and Manufacturing Today and Why is Innovation Part of the Story?. 4 Units.

The rise of the creative class into the world of "making" has resulted in new economic models, new definitions of manufacturing, and new ways of working. "Making" is inclusive of a wide variety of activities, from the arts and crafts, to woodworking, to high technology integrating with traditional craftsmanship, to products with embedded sensors in traditional materials, to the use of 3D printing of everything from polymers to metals to chocolate. Within all of these approaches, "innovation" is often the buzzword, the common denominator. What does innovation mean in this context? Are innovators and makers today any different from the innovators and manufacturers of the past? What role does science and math have in making and manufacturing? Through both a hands-on and historical approach, we will explore the commonalities between today's makers and yesterday's manufacturers, and arrive at an understanding of innovation and apply this understanding to a project that could continue throughout your time at CWRU.

FSSO Courses

FSSO 110. Conflict and Cooperation. 4 Units.

Why is it that when cooperation seems so likely, conflict breaks out? Or why at other times when conflict looms, cooperation wins out? This course explores the social and political complexities of this basic human condition. Through seminar discussions of classic readings, the course will introduce students to the basic social science concepts and theories used to explain conflict and cooperation. In addition to general knowledge, the course will also allow students hands on experience. Classroom time will be dedicated to simulating the decision making and negotiating dynamics which lead to cooperation or conflict. Studies will include individual, historical, and international cases. Graded projects will include small group negotiation and decision making exercises as well as individual writing tasks.

FSSO 114. Music in Our Lives. 4 Units.

This seminar will examine the role, meaning, power, and influence of music in our lives. Readings, writing assignments, and fourth-hour events will focus on the following three themes: music is important, everyone is musical, and there are many uses of music and ways to be musical. Topics include the Cleveland music scene, the use of music in political movements, music in today's media, and the use of music to heal. This course will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading from primary as well as secondary sources. It will also include practice in written and oral communication in small groups. The goals are to enhance basic intellectual skills of academic inquiry, such as critical reading, thoughtful analysis, and written and oral communication; to introduce basic information literacy skills; to provide a foundation for ethical decision-making; to encourage a global and multidisciplinary perspective on the learning process; to facilitate faculty-student interactions; and, in the most general sense, to provide a supportive common intellectual experience for first-year students at Case.

FSSO 116. Working-Class Heroes. 4 Units.

This course will focus on the representation of the American laborer in literary and other cultural texts. Beginning our study with mid-to-late nineteenth-century works, we will concentrate on how particularly American ideas about economics, race, and gender shape authors' depictions of working-class figures, reading both primary and secondary sources. We will examine and discuss historical debates concerning the "hero in struggle" while paying special attention to rhetorics of protest and reform as informed by literary modes such as Sentimentalism, Naturalism, Realism, and Modernism. Throughout the course, we will pair the literary and historical readings with pop-cultural representations of working-class figures, viewing films, listening to music, and analyzing visual arts both in class and on visits to Cleveland cultural institutions. Writing Requirements include short critical response papers, two longer papers, and a final project accompanied by class presentations.

FSSO 119. Philanthropy in America. 4 Units.

This four-credit course provides an introduction to various dimensions of philanthropy and volunteerism. Using the seminar format and an array of interactive activities, we will conduct a broad but intellectual inquiry into the systems and ethics of giving time and money to charitable causes. In four units of inquiry, we will consider the giving traditions that have influenced American culture and society since its colonial days. We will examine the role that the Third Sector (also known as the Independent or Nonprofit Sector) plays as an agent of social change in a functioning democratic republic. We will explore the nature of donors and volunteers and take a critical look at the missions and goals of a cross section of nonprofit organizations. We will wrestle with ethical issues related to philanthropy and consider the giving patterns of different social, religious, and ethnic groups. We will also turn our collective thinking to how the nonprofit sector might better serve the social needs of the nation and the world. At the end of the semester, we will reflect on how our ideas about philanthropy have changed over the course of fifteen weeks.

FSSO 120. Poverty and Social Policy. 4 Units.

This course has two major foci: poverty and social policies designed to ameliorate poverty. Sociologists in the United States and in other countries have made major contributions to studies of poverty. They have primarily focused on income-based poverty, but more recently, have also studied other forms of poverty. In this class, we will examine different conceptualizations and measures of poverty. We will then examine short-term and long-term poverty experiences and their potential consequences. We will then turn to explanations of poverty: why are some individuals more likely to experience periods of low income than others? While the United States will be the focus of the course, we will contrast the experiences of other countries. The second component will be an analysis of social policies designed to ameliorate poverty. In particular, we will examine the development and retrenchment of welfare states and other social policies, the various goals of social policy, and the different impacts social policies have had on individuals, families, other groups, and the country overall. This discussion will reflect on experiences of other countries.

FSSO 122. China in Modernization. 4 Units.

This four credit-hour course provides an introduction to various dimensions of modernization in contemporary China, especially cultural and social changes such as consumption, education, migration, and tourism as a result of economic reforms, trade expansion, foreign investments and technology transfer, especially the development of information technology. The seminar will also asses the impacts of these changes on various aspects of globalization and vice versa. It will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading relevant material, and will include practice in written and oral communication in discussion forums and small groups. The goals are to enhance basic intellectual skills of academic inquiry, such as critical reading, thoughtful analysis, and written and oral communication; to introduce basic information on literacy skills; to provide a foundation for ethical decision-making; to encourage a global and multidisciplinary perspective on the learning process; to facilitate faculty-student interactions; and, in the most general sense, to provide a supportive common intellectual experience at CWRU.

FSSO 123. Ten Developments That Are Shaking The World. 4 Units.

This seminar is an introduction to some of the most important global developments of our times. We will examine these events through political, historical, economic, cultural, sociological, scientific and ethical lenses. Readings will come from a wide-range of sources, and assignments will include exercises in written and oral communication. The professor will choose the first three global developments to be investigated as well as the relevant readings. His topics will most likely be the proliferation of nuclear weapons, the rise of China as a great power and the fiftieth anniversary of the European Union. Each of the remaining seven will be chosen by small groups of students, who will assign the readings and run the sessions for their respective topic. Possible topics include the global food crisis, genocide and the failure of the world community to stop it, global warming and the growing gap between the world's rich and poor.

FSSO 126. Religion and the Ethics of War. 4 Units.

Although war is a highly rational, organized and purposeful affair, it also is the most destructive and bloody of human activities. For this reason, war and warfare has always been subject to various religious and moral restrictions. As technology has developed, the conduct of war has changed and the definitions of just and unjust war, as well as what it means to fight justly, have undergone profound changes. This course looks at war and warfare from a variety of angles and examines how various religious and moral thinkers have tried to define just war, and create guidelines for fighting a war justly. At the end of the semester, the course looks at the moral challenges presented by new technologies and new concepts of war.

FSSO 128. Movers and Shakers: Leadership. 4 Units.

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has" (Margaret Mead, 1901-1978). This seminar is about understanding what enables people to make a generative impact on the world. Students will explore the socio-emotional and motivational characteristics of effective leaders and their ability to create positive change. Students will also be encouraged to develop their own theories of leadership and to explore their personal approaches to making a difference. The seminar will profile leaders from different occupations and walks of life. Seminar sessions will feature assigned readings on leaders and change agents, class discussion on what drives movers and shakers, and individual and group presentations on class members' emergent leadership perspectives. A key objective of the seminar is the development of critical thinking skills, writing skills, and verbal skills. Consequently, the weekly class readings, reflection papers on class readings, class discussions, class presentations (individual and group), and final project are vital features of the seminar experience. Students will be expected to leave the seminar with a grounded perspective on leaders and leadership, and the ability to articulate their own personal views on making a difference in the world.

FSSO 132. Legal Lessons in Poems and Plays. 4 Units.

This First Seminar will focus on law-related practical and philosophical lessons learned through poems and plays. At its core is the belief that by studying law in literature, students can become better thinkers and writers, readers and speakers, as well as better participants in civic affairs. This seminar will broaden and deepen students' understanding of the presence of literature and human nature in law and society.

FSSO 136. The Founding Fathers. 4 Units.

Americans often disparage politicians and U.S. political institutions, like Congress and the Presidency. Nonetheless, the same Americans often revere the men and women who founded the country and designed the political system that seems to give us so much trouble. This four credit-hour course explores American political thought from our country's founding to the present through the prism of the founding fathers. It will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry into all of the contradictions inherent in the writings and lives of the founding fathers and contemporary American politics, guided by reading from primary as well as secondary sources.

FSSO 140. Working-Class Literature. 4 Units.

In her volume, Silences (1978), writer Tillie Olson refers to the relationship between social class and literature as "the great unexamined." This statement still largely rings true, despite the continued production of novels, films, and poems depicting the working-class, and despite the unprecedented growth in recent years of America's working class. In this course, we will examine the relationship between social class and literature, reading narratives written by and about laborers in the hopes of understanding the complexities of working-class life in America, including the intricate ways in which economic status mediates one's sense of identity. Beginning our study with mid-to-late nineteenth-century works, we will consider ideas about economics, race, and gender that have shaped and that continue to influence the depiction of the working-class. Throughout the course, we will pair literary and historical readings with pop-cultural materials, viewing films, listening to music, and analyzing visual arts both in class and on visits to Cleveland cultural institutions such as the Western Reserve Historical Society and the Maltz Museum of Jewish History.

FSSO 143. Living With and Making Decisions Concerning Injustice. 4 Units.

Injustice. What do you think of when you hear that word? There are all types of injustice in this world, and chances are that during our lifetime we will either find ourselves in a position or system of power, perpetrating injustice on others; or in a position or system of supposed impotence, a subject of injustice. What are our choices? How will we respond? In this course we will examine the topic of living with and making decisions concerning injustice using, as an example, the specific injustice of slavery, examining the lives and decisions of both a famous slaveholder and two not-so-famous slaves; and learning from their lives and decisions how we might, ourselves, live with and make decisions concerning injustices we face in our lives.

FSSO 145. Berlin in History, History in Berlin. 4 Units.

From its emergence as a fishing village in the sandy marshes of the eastern frontier of Germany, to its 21st-century role as a cosmopolitan metropolis, Berlin has embodied the arc of change over time in human society. This course uses the history of the city of Berlin as the lens through which to contemplate the complexity of human social and cultural arrangements, their expression in economics and politics (including war), and the imbrication of human cultural and social constructions with the "natural" world. We will read books and articles about the history, culture, economy, and politics of Berlin, primarily from its establishment as the capital of new German Empire in 1871 to the present. We will view films that introduce us to the manic energy that Berlin represented in the transition to modernity. We will visit local museums that house examples of the material culture of Berlin, from the Cleveland Museum of Art to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. We will listen to the music of Berlin, from the baroque of the Brandenburg Concertos to the heavy metal of the Skorpions. And we will learn its history, from fishing village, to court city, to imperial metropolis and industrial engine, to divided symbol of the Cold War, to de-industrialized center of art, government, education, and incubator of high-technology. This First Seminar will prepare students to pursue their undergraduate degrees grounded in thinking about places in time, about change over time, and about human creativity, while preparing them to write and speak about their arguments with clarity and grace.

FSSO 146. The Past and Future of Art, Architecture and Museums in Cleveland. 4 Units.

During the gilded age, Cleveland became one of this country's most powerful centers of business, industry, and political power. For example, John D. Rockefeller, who started his business career in Cleveland, became the wealthiest individual in human history, and Mark Hanna, the leader of Cleveland's Republican political machine, selected and engineered the election of eight Ohio-born Presidents of the United States, setting a state record which is still unbroken. As late as the 1930s, Henry Luce located the headquarters of Time, Life and Fortune magazines in Cleveland; and the Terminal Tower, the nexus of the vast, sprawling railroad and real-estate Empire of the Van Sweringen Brothers, was the country's highest building outside of New York. This class will examine one of the by-products of this accumulation of power and money: the flowering of art and culture in Cleveland during the early 20th century, and the creation of notable cultural institutions, such as one of this country's finest symphony orchestras, one of its top ten art museums, a major university, and an array of other notable entities, many of them housed in buildings of architectural distinction. The class will also examine the economic, cultural and intellectual decline of Cleveland in the second half of the 20th century, and recent attempts to reverse this trend through intensive efforts to revitalize University Circle. In addition to classroom sessions, the course will include field trips to the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Western Reserve Historical Society, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, and an architectural tour of downtown Cleveland. The class will be centered on three interrelated questions: What makes a great city? How can the artistic and cultural life of a great city be developed and sustained? How can the social and economic collapse of a great city be reversed?

FSSO 147. Critical Attitude. 4 Units.

In his essay, "What is Enlightenment?" Immanuel Kant said enlightenment begins with the courage to use your own understanding -as opposed to following the mindset of your parents, teachers, or ministers. Two hundred years later, the great French social historian Michel Foucault called the Kantian idea of enlightenment, "critique." For Foucault, the essential is a critical attitude. In this seminar, we pursue the thread of a critical attitude focusing on three areas of your life: culture, work, and school. For reasons we will see, politics will remain in the background, as the un-broached dimension. The month on culture is called "osmosis," the month on work "treadmill" and the month on school "brainwash." In this dark(ly humorous) course, we join selected readings in the tradition of critical theory with contemporary and classic films. And we visit local cultural institutions, and events -as well as riding through the city with a critical attitude.

FSSO 149. Creativity in the Arts, Sciences, and Engineering. 4 Units.

This seminar will have a focus on creativity in the arts, sciences, and engineering. What are the similarities and differences in the creative process in these three different broad fields? How are the creative products different? What are the creative processes involved in these different domains. Are there differences in personalities between scientists and artists? How can we foster creativity in children and adults in these fields? We all read about and discuss the different dimensions of creativity; what makes something creative; what helps people become creative; the role of cognition and emotion in the creative process in the arts and sciences; and mental illness and creativity.

FSSO 151. Border Crossings: Travel, Culture, and Identity. 4 Units.

This seminar will explore the transformative nature of travel, especially in regard to individual and cultural identity. Through seminar discussions, extensive writing and revision, and formal oral presentations, our class will explore how individuals, including ourselves, define themselves in personal, local, and national contexts and how we redefine ourselves and our world as we cross geographical borders. Course texts will include works of fiction, non-fiction travel narratives, films, and scholarly essays that will compel us to question our everyday world and consider matters of cultural exchange and social belonging.

FSSO 152. Decision Making in Everyday Life. 4 Units.

Although social cognition allows us to process vast amounts of information quickly, we are not always aware of the subtle forces that guide our decision making. This course will use a seminar approach to explore rational and irrational forces that influence decision making. We will use a multi-disciplinary approach to decision making, including topics such as personality factors, incentive-based decision making, cognitive biases, automatic information processing, and theories of mind. These topics will be explored using class discussion, writings, and student presentations.

FSSO 153. Reading Social Justice: The Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards. 4 Units.

In this seminar, we will read a selection of poetry, short stories and books and use them as a framework to explore questions related to understanding tolerance, social justice and diversity. We will begin by establishing a definition of and methodology for addressing these issues in our discussion and writing, and build upon them as the semester progresses. Much of the fiction and nonfiction we will read will be by winners of the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards. In addition to our reading, we will also analyze and discuss a selection of films, art works and music related to our theme. Our Fourth Hour experiences will include attending the Awards ceremony in September, visits to cultural institutions within University Circle, lectures and guest speakers. While the primary goal of the class is to help students develop their critical thinking and writing skills, it is also intended to introduce them to a vital, Cleveland-based literary institution. By engaging the themes, texts, and authors of Anisfield-Wolf, students will have a deeper understanding not only of contemporary literature, but the importance of social justice to a liberal arts education.

FSSO 158. The Symphony Orchestra-Cultural Treasure or Outmoded Symbol?. 4 Units.

In measuring the cultural profile of a metropolitan area, the presence of a successful symphony orchestra is often used as a model to determine culture sophistication and refinement. In recent years, however, the model of the orchestra has encountered significant challenges. Using the world-renowned Cleveland Orchestra as a paradigm, this seminar will examine the role of the orchestra in ascertaining a city's cultural health. Topics of discussion, oral presentations, and writing assignments will address the historical legacy of the classical orchestra; traditional concert-going etiquette and its relevance in 21st-century culture; how orchestras have handled recent financial trials; and defining the importance of the orchestra in today's urban society. Students will have the opportunity to attend orchestral concerts during Fourth Hour, and occasional guests from the Cleveland Orchestra and other University Circle institutions will provide a direct cultural perspective.

FSSO 160. Brazil Inside and Out. 4 Units.

In this seminar we will engage in the exploration of Brazil's history, society, and culture from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. Host of the latest Soccer Cup and Summer Olympics, Brazil is one of the largest and most diverse countries in the world, as well as one the largest economies and democracies. Known by its natural beauty and resources, tropical climate, vibrant culture and friendly population, the land of soccer and Carnival is also marked by inequality, poverty, corruption, and violence. Due to this complex, challenging and fascinating profile, Brazil defies easy categorizations and provides a unique context for the development of essential academic skills. Over the course of the semester, you will have the opportunity to read, analyze and discuss relevant academic sources, news articles and audiovisual materials, like music and films; learn and experience first-hand basic aspects of Brazilian language and culture, including food and music; and interact with Brazilian students and faculty on campus.

FSSO 161. The Craft of Cloth: Textile Production Since the Industrial Revolution. 4 Units.

What counts as hand made? Since the Industrial Revolution, modes of production have been increasingly mechanized to ensure efficient production involving fewer skilled workers. Opposition to industrialization has existed since the earliest moments of the Revolution, when skilled stocking knitters destroyed stocking frames, a technology meant to replace them by putting the ability to create stockings in the hands of unskilled laborers. Today, we find ourselves in the midst of a hyper-technological age, but with an increasingly vocal artisanal subculture valorizing the artist or craftsperson who creates unique goods by hand. Our class will explore the tensions and sympathies between industry and craft, the machine and the hand, technology and the imagination. We will focus our inquiry on the production of cloth, since it was the need to produce cloth more efficiently that motivated the Industrial Revolution's earliest technological innovations. We will consider the human relationships and institutions that support the production of textiles and cloth (especially silk and cotton) and which, in turn, create global and local economies that influence social organization. This seminar will be discussion based and writing intensive, and will include field trips to a local clothing factory and to the art museum to see and analyze historic fabrics. We will also speak with local fashion and textile designers. Students will experiment with knitting, weaving, or a cloth craft of their choice in order to participate in the technical--and creative--side of cloth production.

FSSO 183. The Phoenix Effect: Fire and Revival - Holocaust and Heroism. 4 Units.

The state of Israel`s official Holocaust commemoration day is named: "Yom HaZiqaron LaShoa V'LaG'vura," Memorial Day of the Holocaust and Heroism. Why? What characterizes heroic acts? Is it physical resistance? Spiritual or religious strength? How about writing poetry, diaries, letters never to be mailed? Perhaps drawing or painting? Music and theater? Students will define heroism, and through research and analysis examine different types of heroism of the Holocaust. They will study how people living under the Nazi reign used art as a form of resistance, and how spiritual resistance manifested itself in religious practices (perpetuating religious beliefs at any cost). Music, art, clandestine writings, diaries, poetry, and literature will be explored. Students will present their research both orally and in writing.

FSSY Courses

FSSY 106. Trauma and Memory: Modes of Remembrance and Representation. 4 Units.

The twentieth century has often been referred to as a traumatic century, characterized by unprecedented and unimaginable acts of violence. Traumatic events have engrained themselves into both individual and collective memory structures. Not surprisingly, trauma studies have become a central topic of investigation across disciplinary lines. Yet much of the field is still negotiated. We will try to recreate this ongoing discussion in our classroom, when learning, talking, and writing about trauma and its remembrance. The goal of this writing-intense seminar is to give insight into the topic as well as introduce students to academic research, life, and expression. At first we will familiarize ourselves and take part in some fundamental debates: the distinction of memory and history, false memories, individual and collective memories, as well as the definitions of trauma across the disciplines. We will then have a closer look at the difficulty faced by researchers who grapple with trauma and its remembrance. In a final segment we will analyze representations of traumatic memories in public spaces, literature, and the visual arts.

FSSY 110. The Greek Hero Since Antiquity. 4 Units.

The Greek Hero and Heroic Culture since Antiquity: the Classical Tradition in Literature and the Arts is the specific topic of this seminar. The influence of ancient Greece on subsequent Western civilization has been profound. This course focuses on the impact of Greek mythology on the literature and arts of five later periods: the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque, the Revolutionary Age (1750-1848), and the Modern period. While there are many aspects of Greek mythology that we might investigate, the story of the Trojan War will serve as a central, unifying myth for exploration. The concept of the hero evolved considerably between the time of Homer and the time of Euripides; yet, the Homeric heroes continued to appear in literature and the arts from ancient times onward. How has the concept of the hero inherited from Homer changed in literature and art since antiquity? Does the word "hero" still have value? Are there relevant and meaningful applications of this very specific Greek word outside literature and art in our time? These are just some of the questions we shall consider in our study of the Greek Hero and Heroic Culture since Antiquity in literature and the arts.

FSSY 112. Shakespeare - Still a Hit. 4 Units.

What is the enduring appeal of the works of William Shakespeare? Not only are the plays themselves popular today; there are also many film versions and adaptations, some recent and some dating back to the early days of cinema. In this First Seminar, students will read approximately six Shakespeare plays, including at least one history, comedy, and tragedy. In addition, they will view at least one film version or adaptation of each play. With the help of Kelvin Smith Library, the films will be made available on streaming video with password-protected access, enabling students to view them when convenient and as often as necessary. Since this class (like all First Seminars) is writing-intensive, students will complete four formal essays as well as frequent in-class writing activities. There will also be in-class readings from the plays, discussions of the various film adaptations, and one or two short oral presentations or activities.

FSSY 113. Movies and Meaning. 4 Units.

This course explores methods for interpreting films. To interpret a film is a more aggressive and creative activity than is simply viewing one. How do critics and researchers of cinema "make meaning"? What strategies do they use? How does one mount a film interpretation that is both novel and persuasive? The course will emphasize close reading of films as, each week, we screen a film and together discuss what meanings we can infer from it. Also each week, we'll read an essay that offers an interpretation of the film. We'll analyze the reading in light of our sense of the film under consideration. Students will write short essays, approximately one every two weeks, in which they analyze the rhetorical and interpretive strategies of a given film analysis. Students will share their essays with the class, and these readings will serve as bases for class discussions. Final writing projects will consist of student interpretations of a film. At least twice during the semester, the class will, in substitution for the weekly required evening screening, attend a film off campus--either at the Cleveland Cinematheque or at the Cleveland Museum of Art. The course emphasizes writing instruction and discussion in a seminar format. There will be required evening screenings each week.

FSSY 119. Art, Music and The Museum. 4 Units.

This four credit-hour course provides an introduction to art, music, and the museum, particularly the intersections between and among these three subject areas. Formal training in these disciplines is not required. The course will be characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry and guided by readings and the experience of artworks from a wide range of styles and cultures. A strong emphasis will be placed on academic writing. The goals are to enhance basic intellectual skills including critical reading, thoughtful analysis, and written and oral communication (including PowerPoint presentation); to introduce basic information literacy skills; to encourage a global and multidisciplinary perspective on the learning process; to facilitate faculty-student interactions; and, in the most general sense, to provide a supportive intellectual experience for first-year students at Case.

FSSY 131. Death and Representation. 4 Units.

This four credit-hour course will explore the ways death has been represented in visual culture, from ancient times to the contemporary epoch. Can death, something abstract and never directly experienced, ever be represented? Throughout the ages, how have artists, patrons, and viewers influenced the imagery of death, and how, in turn, have they been influenced by it? The course includes multiple visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Natural History Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art.

FSSY 137. Cultural Representations: Ideologies, Images, and the World. 4 Units.

Narrative forms, such as myths, folktales, novels, films, and the media make significant contributions to the varied ways that people understand and imagine the spatial structures of the world. Specifically, this course will help you a) to develop an understanding of how narratives and the media have an impact on the ways we come to terms with geopolitical regions and how geopolitical regions are invented and imagined; b) to point out and address geopolitical assumptions, over-generalizations and to engage concepts such as the 'East' and 'West,' etc. critically; c) to analyze travel narratives, films, and current media representations of certain areas of the world and situate your observations into a wider set of theoretical problems; and d) to develop a set of reading skills that will help you to decipher texts(both primary and secondary) so that you can formulate productive questions and articulate your intellectual discoveries in a compelling way.

FSSY 141. "Renaissance" Men and Women: Polymaths from Late Antiquity to Leonardo Da Vinci. 4 Units.

The term "Renaissance man" is often used to refer to a polymath, someone whose expertise spans numerous and diverse subject areas. Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), perhaps the most famous polymath of all, was an artist, scientist, engineer, musician, and indeed a man who lived during the Renaissance. Yet already in late antiquity and the Middle Ages many of the great thinkers were polymaths, and they were not all men. This course examines the intellectual contributions of Leonardo da Vinci and two earlier polymaths: Saint Augustine (390-430CE), a north African bishop, philosopher, and theologian who became a Doctor of the Church; and Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179), a German nun who was a composer, philosopher, herbalist, and mystic visionary. Through discussion of writings by these three figures and of secondary literature about them, the course explores their intellectual diversity and the cultural forces that shaped them. It also examines what it meant to be a polymath at various points in history, why polymaths have become associated with the Renaissance and with men specifically, and why there are relatively few polymaths today.

FSSY 146. Doc Talk: Language & Medicine. 4 Units.

This course explores the role of language in constructing, experiencing, treating, and understanding the states we call "health" and "illness." We will ask questions such as: Why do we fight cancer but mend broken bones? When (and how) do some experiences (e.g., sadness, hunger) become symptoms of disease? Why do doctors ask where it hurts rather than when or how? Is there a difference between saying that a patient is "med compliant" and that she has "taken her prescription medicines"? To answer these questions (and to ask dozens more), we will read primary research on medical language, visit several of Cleveland's nationally renowned cultural institutions, and discuss the symbolic and social meanings of a variety of medical terms, images, objects, and patterns of communication.

FSSY 147. Art and Physics. 4 Units.

The twentieth century's advances in physics, from relativity to quantum mechanics and string theory, have offered distinctly new ways of looking at ourselves and the world around us. It is no surprise that they have equally impacted different branches of the arts, revealing new possibilities for what to represent and how to represent it. This course intends to explore this relationship between physics and art by taking two of those signal advances -- Albert Einstein's theory of relativity and Werner Heisenberg's uncertainty principle -- and considering how they inflect artistic models of expression such as painting (Cubism), music (atonal composition), and literature (postmodern metafiction). Our goal is not to trace specific trains of influence (although they do exist) so much as to consider how parallel developments in the sciences and the arts emerge contemporaneously, and on that basis to reconstruct the conversation between them. We will try to ask what each of these discursive models has to say to the others, and how the apparently unbridgeable gap between science and art might find some points of common contact.

FSSY 154. The Imagination Project. 4 Units.

For the first years of our schooling, we are taught to play make-believe. Then, we are taught to understand facts. Whatever happened to the imagination? What is it? What are the theories that help to explain it? And what is its place at a research university? In this class, we will read, talk, think, and write about the purposes and scope of the human imagination, which is often understood as the symbolic realm of images and ideas that exists as part of our mental life. We will look at how the imagination has been understood by various thinkers and artists, and we will consider how the physical world interacts with the imagination in stories, music, film, and scientific ideas. Even though we may think that imagination means "something from nothing," it is much more complicated and collaborative than that, as we will see in our examination of larger imaginative projects such as the Sistine Chapel, Star Wars, Legos, and Disney World. We will examine the role of the imagination in as many disciplines as possible, including physics, sports, fantasy, politics, and the media. As we interrogate these sources, we will learn the basic tenets of argument and research that will help you in your upcoming SAGES courses. Are there imaginative practices that can help us succeed here at Case? How can we turn our own imaginations into reality?

FSSY 157. Pursuits of Happiness. 4 Units.

What is Happiness? And why do Americans consider its pursuit a self-evident, inalienable right? To what extent is happiness a component of the American Dream? How have writers used stories to illustrate the possibilities and limits of this ideal? This course examines the various ways that thinkers have defined happiness, using both theoretical frameworks and literary examples. Students will carefully analyze the validity and utility of these models, selecting elements to construct their own personal philosophies of happiness.

FSSY 158. Ecology in American Literature and Film. 4 Units.

How can American literature and film help us understand environmental issues? This course will explore that question by investigating several of the foundational texts of the ecology movement in the United States. Many American authors and directors are sensitive to the natural beauty of the American continent and, therefore, emotionally and spiritually affected by environmental destruction. Scientific and political questions will be important for our inquiries, but we will emphasize the cultural and spiritual aspects of environmental thinking. While science strives to understand nature and provides data documenting environmental conditions, and politics should propose pragmatic solutions, the will to act on scientific facts or political ideas requires emotional and ethical engagement, which literature and film particularly stress. The expressive content and moral messages in literary memoirs and films complement scientific work and politics by allowing us to reflect on an obligation to preserve the natural environment. Consequently, this class will consider environmental awareness and the human connection to the natural world by examining writers' experiences. Our exploration will also consider dystopian stories that imagine where environmental disasters might lead. Possible texts include Walden, Desert Solitaire, A Sand County Almanac, and movies like Jeremiah Johnson, Into the Wild, and Wall-E.

UCAP Courses

UCAP 390. Conservation of National Parks and Protected Areas: A Service Learning Capstone. 3 Units.

This capstone course explores environmental conservation with a focus on protected natural areas and community engagement. Limited to a small group that meets in weekly seminar, the course investigates the often competing interests of ecosystem protection, private development, historic preservation, and public use. A vital part of the capstone is a service learning trip during break when students travel to a National Park or other protected area to contribute to conservation efforts and to gain hands-on experience with environmental management activities. Each student chooses an issue relevant to protected areas to investigate throughout the semester and writes a significant paper about that issue, utilizing the service learning trip experience to deepen their understanding and analysis of the issue. At the end of the semester, each student makes a public presentation of his/her work. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSNA, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY or FSCS

UCAP 395. SAGES Capstone Experience. 1 - 6 Unit.

UCAP 395 affords students the opportunity to pursue a capstone experience outside the constraints of SAGES capstone courses offered by individual academic departments. Students must identify a project, a mentor and an oversight committee. If the mentor is not a Case faculty member, then the student must also identify a faculty advisor who does hold such an appointment and who will serve as the instructor of record. A capstone experience can take various forms but must include certain elements: critical thinking, regular oversight by the project advisor(s), periodic written and oral reporting of progress, a final written report which describes the project activity (which may be a performance, experiment, student teaching, live case analysis, creative writing endeavor, etc.), and a final public presentation. More details about course policies, including procedures for registering, are available via the SAGES office and web site. UCAP 395 may be taken as a one-semester or a two-semester course for 1-6 credits in any given semester and 3-6 credits total. Permit from Director of SAGES required. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

UCAP 395A. Engage Cleveland Capstone Experience. 3 Units.

This community-based capstone provides a unique opportunity for students to learn about and become involved in community issues in greater Cleveland. Limited to a small group of students, the capstone weaves together hands-on experience and academic inquiry through which students learn about urban issues, community engagement, and about themselves as leaders and advocates for social change. The capstone has two parts - a summer community-based experience (non-credit) followed by a fall semester academic capstone course (3-credit), which utilizes and builds upon the summer experience. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

USNA Courses

USNA 204. The Evolution of Scientific Ideas. 3 Units.

Scientific understanding has evolved over the years. There are very few beliefs about the natural world that have remained intact over the past few centuries, or even the past few decades. The chief goal of the course will be to give students an understanding of how scientific ideas change and how newer ideas supersede the old. Questions to be investigated include: What is Science? How do disciplinary scientific communities (physicists, chemists, biologists, etc.) form and identify themselves? How does the community of scientists within a discipline come to a consensus that it is time to adopt a new paradigm: What scientific, social, political, and cultural factors come into play during the periods of transition? The course will be in seminar format. The students will be given opportunities to explicitly develop critical thinking skills (the specific skills to be developed will be selected by the class from an explicit list) and writing and speaking skills. Class meetings will be used to share their research results and to study the assigned texts and papers. The students will be required to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 211. Einstein, Space and Time. 3 Units.

This course will explore the profound changes in our conception of space and time brought about by Einstein's theories of special and general relativity. As a University Seminar, it will also integrate writing and discussion about these topics into the class and explore the philosophical and technological context in which the ideas were developed. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 216. Fuel Cells--Reality, Prospects and Myth. 3 Units.

Fuel cells have been recently identified as a key source for non-polluting, oil-independent energy in the future. In this course, we will study and critically analyze the prospects, barriers, and impact of broad implementation of fuel cells, focusing primarily on the transportation sector. Major topics of the course include: (i) World and U.S. energy outlook; (ii) Potential role and impact of fuel-cells, their advantages, limitations and prospects for improvements; (iii) Alternative fuels--source, availability, distribution and cost; (iv) Potential political, public policy, economic, and environmental impact of large-scale implementation of fuel-cells technology. The course is designed for students from all disciplines. Students will be expected to read assigned texts and articles and critically analyze statements and points of view presented. Quantitative analysis is expected where appropriate. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 220. Suburban Landscapes: Nature, Technology, and Culture. 3 Units.

This course will examine suburban neighborhoods by focusing on the design of technology and nature in these spaces. The way that people understand and operate in the world is so entangled with values and assumptions that the physical shape of the world cannot be separated from human culture. In this sense, suburban landscapes are not simply neighborhoods but also examples of culture. The form of the land and the technologies in the suburbs are continually reshaped to correspond with the cultures of the people occupying those spaces. By studying suburban landscapes we can see how the ideas in people's heads become part of the physical world in which we live. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 223. Critical Science Fiction. 3 Units.

The emphasis of this seminar will be on developing skills of critical analysis of science fiction. A goal of the course is that the students will be able to distinguish plausible from impossible when they read their next science fiction book or watch a sci-fi movie. Upon completion of the course, the students should be well equipped to recognize scientifically unrealistic assumptions and statements in pseudoscientific books, movies, TV programs and other mass media sources. The course will be sufficiently flexible to allow coverage of topics that are proposed by, and interesting to, students, or the topics which would arise during discussions. The course will encourage open-mined approach to understanding controversial areas, as well as emphasize the great achievements that humankind made in the short historical period of our civilization. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 224. Food, Farming, and Economic Prosperity. 3 Units.

Intended to challenge conventional thinking about "progress", this course will examine the evolution of food production and consumption in the U.S. over the past 50 years. We will begin with the topic of food, itself. We will explore fundamental questions such as, What is food? Why should we care? Where does food come from? Why does it matter what we eat, and equally important, what we eat eats? Students will explore their own eating habits by keeping a journal of what, when, where, and how they eat. Discussions will focus on the social, cultural, nutritional, and technological aspects of food. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 226. Evolution of Human Behavior. 3 Units.

Human behavior is a result of the complex interplay between our genes and the environment, both of which have been shaped by evolutionary forces over millions of years. To what extent does natural selection shape our behavior today? Are humans naturally monogamous? Why do conflicts arise even in our most intimate relationships? Is human behavior ultimately in the service of reproductive success, ensuring that our genes are passed into the next generation? This course reviews the history of evolutionary theories of mind and behavior, as well as current ideas about the ecological and genetic components of behavior. We will examine key principles of neurobiology, sociobiology, and evolutionary psychology to critically evaluate evolutionary interpretations of human behaviors, including those comprising cultural traditions and social institutions. Specific topics to be addressed include human mate choice, parenting strategies, interpersonal conflict, and altruism. The course is structured as a seminar, with emphasis on discussion and formation of logical arguments. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 228. Time. 3 Units.

This seminar course will explore the nature of time from many stances, including those of Psychology, Biology, Technology and Philosophy. Yet time is central to Physics, and in Physics we will orient our explorations of time. Our understanding of time has sharpened a great deal in the last few centuries, the most obvious markers being Newton's Absolute time, which remains entrenched in modern culture, and its subsequent physical overthrow by Einstein's relativity. Given the physical primacy of Einstein's time, many questions arise: How malleable is the concept of time? Is there a fact of time? Can the present be defined? The past? The future? The successes of modern Cosmology lead us to ask: Was there a beginning of time? Will time end? The symmetry of fundamental physical laws with respect to the direction of time, counterpointed by asymmetric phenomena, lead to: Is there a master arrow of time? Is the flow of time an illusion? In this course we will investigate what "Time" is telling us about the natural world and ourselves. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 237. Landscape History and Conservation. 3 Units.

Human history is intimately intertwined with the natural landscape on which it occurred. From coastal preserves and their beach communities to Midwestern farmland and the preserved site of Thoreau's Walden Pond cabin, and at places like the Grand Canyon, the American landscape itself holds many clues to our country's natural, ecological, and cultural history. This course will investigate the lived landscape in two ways (which have a multitude of shades to them): as a place where humans shape the natural for their own memorial, productive, and aesthetic uses, or as a natural place that humans set aside or conserve. We will read landscape history and conservation theory, and we will consider global practices of conservation through UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Class work will entail a process-oriented project on the Cleveland landscape, which students are encouraged to approach through the lens of their major. We will visit the Wade Oval and the cultural gardens of Rockefeller Park as an example of current conservation practices working to protect the natural and cultural value of the local landscape. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 240. Technologies of the City. 3 Units.

Based on the premise that cities are never "finished," and constantly being remade, the University Seminar, Technologies of the City, will look at the technological and cultural history of cities from the ancient world to the present day. Students will explore the history of building materials--wood, brick, steel, concrete, and glass--used in the construction of cities. We will also trace the development of city infrastructure such as electricity, water and sewage systems, streets bridges, and subways. Technological innovations, such as the automobile, will receive special consideration. We will move moth geographically and temporally to visit the world's great cities, studying examples of significant building projects, such as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Chicago World's Fair, and Cleveland's first skyscraper, the Rockefeller Building. The course will cover the history of the professions--engineering, architecture, and urban planning--that have contributed to the construction of cities, and will review the works of these practitioners, as well as that of artists, reformers, and utopians that have imagined new directions for the city. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 245. The Impact of Technology on Society. 3 Units.

There is commonly a lack of understanding and appreciation of how the spread of advanced technologies (the artifacts of engineering) has led to economic, social, and political changes on a global scale. As a result, young people do not think that careers in science and engineering are rewarding and useful or do they think of technology as one of the most powerful forces for social change. Furthermore, in a world where advanced knowledge is widespread and low-cost labor is readily available, U.S. advantages in the marketplace and in science and engineering have begun to erode. We want to be able to compete in the world. Economic growth is driven by technological innovation. Societies that foster it lead the pack, while others lag behind. An enlightened citizenry is essential both to support and to engage in new developments in science and engineering. Insights will be given on how engineering innovations develop and have changed the world, both good and bad and, hopefully, it will be clear that engineering is essential to meet many of the major global challenges of the future. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 247. Epidemics in Human History. 3 Units.

This course will examine the role of epidemics (of all types) in human history. Disease has shaped our society in many ways and continues to do so. Despite the plethora of antibiotic and antiviral drugs since 1940, 90% of the decrease in (First World) infectious disease is due to simple public health measures and better hygiene. But overuse of antibiotics increasingly is causing the rapid evolution of "superbugs" that threaten new plagues and epidemics. Both historical and modern epidemics of plague, smallpox, Salmonella, cholera, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS will be examined. The interaction of these epidemics with societies and how the epidemics influence society, cultures, art, and literature will be major topics of discussion. The course is primarily discussion with short student presentations. In addition, 3-4 short "Front Lines" talks by and discussion with CWRU and University Hospital clinicians will explore today's realities of epidemics, infection, and antibiotic resistance in the United States, Uganda, South Africa and elsewhere. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 249. Restoring the Great Lakes: Opportunities and Challenges. 3 Units.

This seminar will focus on the issues and methods of restoring the Great Lakes, with particular emphasis on public action and decision-making processes. Students will learn about the environmental history of the lakes, as well as current challenges to improving water quality and related aspects of the ecosystem. Technical experts, field trips, and other informational resources will enable seminar participants to engage in lively debates on the best ways to address those challenges. Opportunities for observation of and/or direct collaboration with key stakeholders in the restoration process will enhance students' understanding of the processes by which key environmental decisions are made and implemented. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 252. The Future of Food. 3 Units.

Since World War II, science and technology have transformed the way Americans produce and consume food. This transformation has been supported by government policies and accomplished through the application of industrial methods in agriculture, food processing, and food delivery. Such methods have allowed a tiny fraction of the American population to produce vast quantities of food products at very low prices for American consumers. But this American diet, while inexpensive, has turned out to be high in sugar, fat, and processed grains that are contributing to chronic disease such as diabetes and obesity. In addition, environmental impacts of confined animal feeding operations, vast monoculture grain production, and global food transport are raising questions about the sustainability of American agribusiness. This seminar will explore the evolution of food production in the United States since World War II and will ask the question: is it possible to nourish the world's population using nutrition and flavor as guiding principles rather than cost? What is the true meaning of "sustainability" in agriculture? The last third of the course will be devoted to creating a plan for using part of the University Farm to grow food for the University. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 258. Designing Urban Green Space. 3 Units.

In this course, we will investigate the history, theory and practical design of green space in cities. We will focus on types of green space and their community function, relationship to commerce, aesthetics, recreation, ecology, and health in particular. Students will engage in group projects where they locate all underused space in Cleveland (vacant space, gray or brown fields) and will propose a new use for it as green space of some kind. Individual research projects will be related to that site. Lively class discussion and frequent reading responses required. Mandatory field trip to sites in downtown Cleveland. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 259. Bring Out Your Dead. 3 Units.

This course examines the interplay between history and plague outbreaks. Course readings draw largely on the writings and experiences of scientists, physicians, and public health officials. By taking a historical approach to the study of the relationship between human history and the history of disease, students will learn about the development of the scientific method (namely the slow process by which humans learned to identify, categorize, and respond to disease), how science develops in specific historic contexts, the consequence of scientific inquiry, and what humans do when they are faced with imminent death. A tentative list of plagues includes: the Athenian Plague, Black Death, Yellow Fever, TB, Malaria, Influenza in 1918, and AIDS. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 260. Life in the Past. 3 Units.

This course will focus on how we learn, discover, and make conclusions about life in the deep past. What types of life were present? And how can we understand their extinction? A principal focus will be how extinctions in North and South America have affected both the land and its animals and, consequently, the course of human development. We will look at megafauna from the local area in conjunction with the "Extreme Mammals" exhibit at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, read about the fossil boom, study the Dodo, and look at scientific ways in which animals are currently being completely re-imagined via technology (computer bone/muscle articulation, eating habits, climate models, etc.). We will also look at the cultural ways in which we view these "dinosaurs" (movies, children's books, museum exhibits) and see if it helps or hurts our scientific and historical understanding of them. At heart, our main question will be: can you really understand a time, space and creature that has been extinct for millions of years? How? Why? And why do these "monsters" hold such fascination for us? Does their disappearance bode well of the human race? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 262. How I Learned to Love The Bomb. 3 Units.

In this course, we will explore the development of the atom bomb and its historical ramifications. Our guides through this history will be the scientists themselves. Our goal will be to understand their work as well as their motivations, travails, internal conflicts, and the consequences of their achievement. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 265. Thinking National Parks. 3 Units.

This seminar provides students an opportunity to explore U.S. national parks and their history of displaying both nature and culture. This discussion-based, writing- and research-focused class requires students to examine a park system that is both extraordinarily popular and rife with controversy. We begin with several recurring questions: Where did the national parks idea come from? How has the park mission evolved and adapted? Can parks be "read" as texts, and if so, how does our point of view determine what we see? How do parks arrange displays of cultural and natural worlds, and how do they display interactions therein? How can changing park philosophies be reflected in their physical apparatus and infrastructure? Students will participate in regular class discussions, occasionally lead these same discussions, complete formal writing assignments, and develop a final research project. The course readings will alternate between historical and present-day selections, so that we explore the history of U.S. national parks while simultaneously considering challenges and controversies that matter very much today. Early readings will include John Muir and Gifford Pinchot; current trends will be explored in the writings of William Cronon, Alfred Runte, and Jennifer Price, among many others. We will view significant portions of Ken Burns' recent PBS series The National Parks: America's Best Idea. The ultimate "text" for the class, however, is an actual national park. Each student will choose a national park as the basis for their semester-long project. Students will begin with description and history of their park, and then they will explore controversies or other issues in the park, developing their own argument. Next, students will have a chance to play architect/landscaper/park-superintendent, as they propose a change to the park that would address an existing problem or enhance the visitors' experience. Finally, students will gather these pieces into a single coherent project, submitting a 10-15 page final essay as well as producing an engaging class presentation. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 266. Life After the Death of Print. 3 Units.

Around 1439, Johannes Gutenberg invented the moveable type printing press, a technological development that altered the world by ushering in an era of mass, reproducible communication. For nearly 500 years, print technologies have dominated communications. Scholars have shown that print's ability to disseminate information led to revolutions in art, science and politics. In short, print technologies have largely defined what it means to be a thinking and communicating human being. The emergence of digital technologies has altered communications in ways that are only now being understood. This course examines how developments in digital technologies impact communication practices by threatening print's historic stronghold. Consequently, the course also explores what impact new technologies have on human identity. We will consider the historical development of display technologies (printed materials and digital screens) to understand what is at stake in the move from print to digital communication. We will then investigate current phenomena associated with Web 2.0, including blogs and social networks, in order to understand how our communication choices construct and allow for our public and private identities. Additionally, the course will examine new display technologies, such as iPhones and Kindles, that allow for the possibly constant dissemination of those identities. Finally, we will hypothesize about how digital technologies force us to conceive of human identity differently from the ways that print invites. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 270. Alternative Energy Sources. 3 Units.

Alternative energy sources are needed, because of limited fossil fuel resources, increased demand, and environmental impacts. This course will deal with the issues of alternative energy sources. Various sources such as solar (thermal and photovoltaic), hydroelectric, wind, geothermal, ocean thermal, wave, tidal and geothermal energy, as well as energy from biomass will be discussed in order to determine what is practical on a large scale, as well as on the scale of the individual homeowner. We will pay attention to the efficiency of each alternative energy source as well as what limitations exist in terms of extracting useable energy. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 271. Gene, Environment and Behavior. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to encourage students to be well informed and critical consumers of the media reports about the influence of genes and environment on human behavior. This course involves the book by Matt Ridley titled, "Genome: The autobiography of a species in 23 chapters." Ridley has a Ph.D. in zoology, worked as a journalist, science editor, and national newspaper columnist. The book devotes a chapter to each pair of human chromosomes. Each chapter focuses on the role of a gene. Ridley's book was published in 1999; therefore, students will conduct their own research to update each of the chapters in Ridley's book. The first few weeks of class will be used to provide a background on genetics research through field trips and guest lectures from CWRU genetic researchers. We will have several writing workshops spread throughout the semester to offer "Just in Time" tips needed to write critical evaluations and literature reviews. Each student will present twice during the semester. The first oral presentation will revolve around a summary, critical evaluation, and an update of the human trait presented in the Ridley book on their assigned chromosome. The presentation will be about 15 minutes with 5 minutes left for questions. Students not presenting will be assigned one of the three chromosomes (chapters) covered that day and they will each write a seminar question to pose to the class. In addition, each student will also serve as a reviewer for one of the presentations to provide constructive feedback to the presenter. The second presentation will consist of new material found by each student about genes on their chromosome. They must find another trait on their chromosome and present the most current information available on that trait. In place of a final exam, each student will turn in a research paper on their assigned chromosome. We will build these papers throughout the semester with a series of graded "checkpoint" assignments. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 272. The Thames Watershed. 3 Units.

In this seminar, we will investigate the London, England-area Thames watershed and its associated concerns, like urban development, watershed management, aquatic species conservation, and habitat engineering and restoration. A critical part of this seminar will be a spring break field trip to London. On the field trip, we will focus on London's rivers and their history and ecology. We will study the Lea River Valley (where the 2012 summer Olympic Village is located), the Fleet River and various water-related constructions, such as Docklands, Regent's Canal, and the Wildfowl and Wetlands Nature Reserve, each from historical and ecological standpoints. Emphasis will be on how humans have treated the watershed historically, from using the rivers as sewers and transportation links, to restoring their ecosystems, as is the current case in the Lea River Valley. Course readings will be a mix of cultural history, London newspapers archives, and scientific studies on riparian corridor management. Students will keep field journals in London and will write an experiential learning essay about how the field trip intersected with the readings we've discussed in the seminar. They will also write a 10-12 page research paper on one of the ecological issues witnessed in London and its significance. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 274. Science and Religion. 3 Units.

Commentary on the relationship between science and religion tends to take one of the following perspectives: (1) science and religion are incompatible; (2) science and religion are compatible; (3) science and religion are not fundamentally different kinds of things. This class will critically examine each perspective by looking at the history of the relationship between science and religion and the philosophical issues that have arisen therein. We will then use what we have learned to see if we can make progress on contemporary debates surrounding science education. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 283. Cultures of Science. 3 Units.

From the laboratory to the museum, science is a dominant way in which we make sense of the world. This seminar examines the cultures of science. Drawing on the fields of anthropology, sociology, history, and science and technology studies, we explore the interplay, exchange, and fertile ground between "culture" and "science." We analyze the cultural practices of scientists, the relationship between scientific and indigenous ways of knowing, and ethics of scientific knowledge, as well as scientifically mediated understandings of personhood, nation, legality, and truth. We will consider case studies from the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia that reflect on contemporary intellectual debates and public concerns. The course considers the following questions: Is science cultural? What does objectivity mean? How are scientific facts produced? Do our understandings of citizenship and the nation have any connection to science? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 285. The Science of Madness: An Historical Investigation of Mental Illness. 3 Units.

Since antiquity the western world's understanding of mental illness has continued to evolve. This course will examine the trajectory of that evolution, looking at the medical theories that have influenced assumptions about the causes and treatments of mental illness from the early modern era through the twenty-first century. Examples of questions we will investigate include: How we have defined the normal and the pathological in human mental behavior over time? How do we explain the centuries-old correlation that medicine has made between creativity and mental illness? Which past and present psychiatric treatments have been beneficial and which harmful? How did Darwin's theory of evolution affect theories of mental illness (and how does it continue to do so with the advent of evolutionary psychology)? How have changing philosophies of science affected the research and practice of psychology? How and why do the sciences of the mind--psychiatry, psychoanalysis, clinical psychology, psychopharmacology, the cognitive neurosciences--claim so much scientific authority and exert influence over our lives today? As a frame work for this inquiry, the class will use the concept of paradigm shifts as Thomas Kuhn defines in his classic work, the Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 286. Science and the Paranormal. 3 Units.

From paranormal television programs to the academic study of parapsychology, claims about the "science" of the paranormal abound. This seminar examines the ways in which people have attempted to scientifically explore questions of life after death, the soul, and anomalous phenomena such as ghosts, telepathy, and ESP. The seminar begins by exploring the emergence of psychical research and parapsychology in the late nineteenth century. We then critically analyze a variety of purportedly scientific approaches to the paranormal and analyze their understandings of nature and science. By exploring the claims of paranormal researchers, parapsychologists, and fringe scientists, we will analyze the constitution of science and its demarcation from pseudoscience. We consider a variety of methodological and heuristic tools to distinguish science from non-science such as falsifiability and Occam's razor and apply them to paranormal claims. We also analyze the criticisms leveled at paranormal research. We ask the following questions. What is science? What distinguishes it from "pseudoscience" or non-science? What is skepticism? Can there be a science of the paranormal? What understanding of the natural world is the paranormal grounded on? What is the relationship among science, religion, and belief? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287A. Perspectives on the Cosmos: From the Ancient Philosophers to Modern Science. 3 Units.

For all of recorded history, and presumably well before that, people have asked the Big Questions: What is the nature of the Universe? How big is it? How old? What is our place in it? For just as long, we've been making up the answers. Cosmology is the subject that seeks to answer the big questions. As such, it is the nexus where science, philosophy, and religion collide. This course will explore the subject of cosmology, from both an historical and scientific perspective. In the process, we will examine the roles of faith, philosophy, and empirical knowledge. We will survey prevailing attitudes towards the nature of the world model over time, examining the impact of belief systems on the interpretation of physical evidence. Subjects to be covered include the first vital steps of the ancient philosophers, the tension between geocentric and heliocentric world models at the time of Copernicus and Galileo, and the modern scientific world view. Students will learn to critically examine evidence and its interpretation, and to appreciate the strengths and shortcomings of various forms of human knowledge. Emphasis will be placed on the importance and limitations of empirical evidence, and the dangers inherent in the interpretation of evidence within a preconceived framework. The student will gain an appreciation for the historical development of world models, culminating with modern cosmology. In the process comes a respect for the diverse paths to knowledge followed by humanity. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287C. Animals and Humans: Making Sense of the Human-Animal Bond. 3 Units.

Humans have an incredibly complex relationship with (non-human) animals. We eat some animals and consider other animals members of our family. We worship some animals and vilify others. This class examines the complexities of our relationship with (non-human) animals. Through exploring human emotional, practical, and epistemological ties with animals, this course examines what it means to be animal as well as what it means to be human. We analyze the following questions. How do we come to know and understand animals? What are the issues surrounding the use of animals in scientific speculation, classification and experimentation, such as vivisection, cloning and the human-animal relationship in technoscience? Do some non-human animals possess material culture, social morality, and emotions such as grief and sadness? Why do animals populate our popular culture and art? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287D. Native American Environmentalism: Sustainability and Contemporary Energy. 3 Units.

This seminar course will focus on three main areas of Native American environmentalism. First, we will learn about Native Cosmologies and historical connections to the land while exposing the controversial relationship of Native Americans to land and wildlife within the myth of the "ecological Indian." Second, we will examine how Native Americans have responded to toxic pollution of indigenous lands as a result of manufacturing and uranium mining, which some refer to as "environmental racism." We will also learn about tribes who choose to host nuclear waste facilities as an exercise of their sovereignty and as an avenue of economic development. Finally, we will investigate initiatives by tribes and coalitions in land and water stewardship, investment in "new" energies and technologies, sustainability of lands (prairie and forest restoration), reclamation of waterways (dam removal), and wildlife management, to name a few. Students will inform their critical thinking about Native American environmentalism with a variety of texts and websites of scholarly and public opinion, scientific data, native knowledge, and historic fact. The seminar will include collaborative learning and presentation projects in which students will pursue research topics related to energy development, stewardship and sustainability, or wildlife management and harvesting. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287E. Evolution and the Modern World. 3 Units.

Modern evolutionary theory has influenced all aspects of biology and the clinical sciences. It has, moreover, resulted in novel ways to think about many of the social sciences. This class will focus on how the concept of evolution has dramatically altered the way we view human anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287F. Environment and the Fates of Societies: Guns, Germs, and Steel. 3 Units.

This University Seminar deals with the connections between human societies and landscape, climate, pathogens, and plant and animal species. The main method for this exploration is a close reading of Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel. Diamond explains that Western Europeans came to occupy and dominate large areas of the globe because of natural resources present in certain regions of the Old World since the end of the last Ice Age. For example, Diamond studies ancient patterns of plant diffusion or the place of mountain ranges and deserts in the development of technologies. Seminar participants will also study historical sources from specific times and places - namely North America from European contact to 1850 - and compare them to Diamond's general environmental explanations and models. Placing Diamond's broad explanations within specific historical contexts is revealing. A range of alternative methods, perspectives, primary sources from North America, and case studies (especially in environmental history) help develop a critical understanding of the complexities of the fates of societies. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287G. Genes, Genomes and Society. 3 Units.

2013 marks the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the double helix of DNA and the 10th anniversary of the sequencing of the first human genome. Advances in genetics (the study of individual genes), and genomics (the study of an entire genome) have fundamentally altered our understanding of biology. In this seminar, we will focus on topics covered by the mainstream press. We will explore the science behind the news and discuss the philosophical, ethical and societal concerns raised by these scientific advances. Topics will include: the dangers and benefits of genetically modified crops; genetics and the conservation of endangered species; learning about human biology and disease from yeast, flies, worms and fish; the use and potential misuse of genetic fingerprinting by government agencies; genetic testing; personalized medicine; and issues of genetic privacy. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287H. Plants in Medicine. 3 Units.

Plants have always been the basis of medicinal treatments, and as they continue to be essential to modern forms of medicine, alternative and traditional alike. In this course, we will consider the history of how humans have used particular plants for medicinal purposes, such as the cinchona tree (Cinchona officinalis) for quinine, willow bark (Salix) for aspirin, and the yew tree (Taxus baccata) for the cancer medication paclitaxel. By investigating how a plant is used medicinally through time, we will also come to understand the culture that used it and how they conceived of health in relationship to nature. We will read texts that show how a plant's medicinal uses can be tied to colonialism and global exploration. For example, the first botanical gardens were collections of medicinal plants cultivated for use and experimentation, often containing non-native plant-based cures discovered through colonial contact. While this is not a course in botany per se, we will be discussing basic plant biology, cultivation practices, and the contemporary science of using plants as the basis for pharmaceutical cures. Students should be active course participants in class discussion and on field trips. Writing instruction will focus on research-based argument, and students will complete a researched essay focusing on a medicinal plant of their choice. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287J. Transportation in American Life. 3 Units.

We will explore the critical role of transportation in the development of our cities, regions, states, and nation. The course will consider the historic role of transportation, its current role, and what role it might play in the future. Transportation will be viewed in the context of national policies, overall political will, and our culture at large. Since colonial times, transportation, in its many forms, has been the subject of intense debate, governmental policies, as well as the subject of public and private investment. We will see how certain individuals and groups used ego, power, and wealth to use transportation for shaping the nation's commerce, travel patterns, and physical appearance. We'll also see the evolution of government and business in transportation decisions and funding. Finally, because of transportation's daily impact, we will look at current issues as part of every class. We will especially focus on the transportation issues of northeast Ohio, a microcosm of national transportation issues. Some of these issues include funding, decision-making, land use, "suburban sprawl," and economic development. We'll also look at transportation issues specific to the University Circle area such as the Health Line and the proposed "Opportunity Corridor." Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287K. Human Research Ethics: Scientific Truth vs. Cultural Belief. 3 Units.

Scientific breakthroughs in genetics, neuroscience, and behavioral psychology have allowed us to learn more about ourselves than ever before. But how much do we really want to know - and who gets to decide? Is DNA our destiny? Should the quest for scientific knowledge trump cultural belief? How does society balance risk to a few in the face of the needs of the many? Using a blend of historical documents and literary examples, we will examine the evolution of the ethical standards that govern how doctors experiment on their patients. We will also debate the hard choices that medical researchers make when the quest for scientific truth intersects with cultural belief. Finally, we will apply what we have learned to find solutions to real-world ethical problems in medical research. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287P. Women and Science: Changing Paradigms. 3 Units.

Is science objectively neutral in that true scientific knowledge would be independent of the discoverer? In this view, the scientific discoverer is more like a midwife that brings forth pre-existing knowledge to the world. Or - is scientific knowledge guided and shaped by the people who practice science, in which case it is influenced by the social context in which it occurs, making the scientist more like a sculptor who creates something new using the tools that are currently available. In this course we will examine this second question by looking specifically at the relationship of gender to science through several lenses. One approach we will use is make case studies of the lives of major women scientists and the way that their gender impacted their work, from the type of scientific research they pursued, the kind of support and encouragement that they obtained as they proceeded in their careers, to the rewards and recognition (or the lack of them) that their work received from their peers. Using a more conjectural line of inquiry, we will also consider the role that gender might have played in developing scientific theories and whether there can be such categories as "masculinist" and "feminist" science. We will conclude this part of our inquiry with an analysis of the current state of science and how well these approaches reflect the way science is pursued today. A third issue involves looking at the relationship of gender and science but from the opposite direction. In other words, we will consider how science has influenced our understanding of gender, rather than how gender has influenced science. Over time, scientific ideas about the physiological and intellectual differences between males and females have changed dramatically several times with major political and sociological ramifications. Consequently, we will examine the science of gender in its cultural and political context from antiquity through the twentieth century. In order to explore these interweaving threads, we will be taking an interdisciplinary approach that will draw on the history and philosophy of science (particularly Thomas Kuhn's The Revolution of Scientific Ideas), as well as on anthropology and cultural theory. By the conclusion of the course we will have examined the scientific evidence that has supported assumptions about gender in various philosophical paradigms, including humanism, rationalism (i.e., Enlightenment philosophy), nineteenth century moralism, modernism, and postmodernism. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287Q. Gothic Science: Discovery and Dread in the 18th Century. 3 Units.

Discovery has always enticed us. From the ocean voyage to the space mission, from the discovery of electricity to gene-splicing, men and women have sought to explore the boundaries of knowledge. However, such explorations often come at a cost. New scientific discovery in the 18th century--from neurology to reproduction to electricity--caused as much fear as excitement. The Enlightenment focus on clarity and rationality harbors a dark double self that appears as monstrosity in early Gothic fiction. This course will explore the ways cultural anxieties are re-interpreted through fictional narratives and reflect on what this says about our own scientific explorations today. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287T. Conflicts and Controversies in American Science and Technology. 3 Units.

How do changes in science and technology affect American life? How do cultural ideas shape scientific practice? Is technological progress inevitable, or do we get to decide what changes we want and which ones we don't? How do we make ethical choices about science and technology in a world with inherent power imbalances? This course provides an introduction to thinking through these questions by presenting works by historians, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, journalists, and others to explore a range of social issues in modern science and technology. After two weeks of introduction, the course is divided into four sections: (a) Biology, Biotech, and Biomedicine; (b) Science Policy and the Politics of Science; (c) Problems in Social Science; and (d) Computers and Other Thinking Machines. While the course's content is arranged around these topics, its main purposes are to develop critical thinking skills around ubiquitous and contentious subjects of science, technology, power, culture, and values as well as to hone skills in reading, speaking, research, and essay writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 287U. Energy - The Great Challenge Ahead. 3 Units.

Among the greatest challenges we face today is to find means of meeting our energy requirements without jeopardizing the environment or fostering geopolitical conflicts. This course investigates what we can do both individually and collectively to tackle this energy challenge. The questions we will consider include: To what extent is the world aware of the energy challenge and its environmental implications? What is already being done to meet this challenge? What role can technology play in addressing it? What research can we be doing now to help predict the future of our energy needs and potential environmental impacts? By investigating these questions, students will develop a fuller and more precise understanding of the energy challenge, as well as generate possible solutions. Students may not receive credit for both USNA 287U and USNA 288L. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 288B. The Green Energy Transformation in Germany. 3 Units.

This seminar introduces students to the development and successes of green technologies in Germany. We will examine the proactive development of renewable energy and energy conservation technologies, commonly referred to as Energiewende, that was started by the German Green movement and promoted by Germany's innovative renewable energy policies. We will consider such questions as: What are the implications of this German success story, both for the US and the rest of the world? What lessons can be applied to other situations? What factors might limit the utility of those lessons? In the process of our investigation, we will examine such important issues as globalization, resource finiteness, and sustainability challenges, including economic crises, climate change, energy insecurity, and global competition. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USNA 288L. Future Energy: @home&abroad. 3 Units.

Among the greatest societal challenges we face today is to find means of meeting our energy requirements without jeopardizing the environment or fostering geopolitical conflicts. This course investigates what we can do both individually and collectively to tackle this challenge. The questions we will consider include: To what extent is the world aware of the energy challenge and its environmental implications? What is already being done to meet this challenge? What role can technology play in addressing it? What research can we be doing now to help predict the future of our energy needs and potential environmental impacts? By investigating these questions, students will develop a fuller and more precise understanding of the energy challenge, as well as generate possible solutions. As an important and indeed unique aspect of this course that will greatly enhance their learning experience, students will compare strategies implemented in the State of Ohio and an international location to meet the energy and the environment challenge. To this end the course will require enrolled students to join the instructor in an international location for five or more days over a University break to visit energy conversion and storage installations involving solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind farms, geothermal and hydroelectric and acquire profound knowledge of technological and economic factors involved in their operation and maintenance. Students may not receive credit for both USNA 287U and USNA 288L. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSNA/USNA; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO Courses

USSO 201. Society and Technology: How Do They Impact One Another?. 3 Units.

This course focuses on a systematic analysis of the relationships between society, and the specific institutional elements of technology and technological innovation. It describes the social aspects of computers and related technologies and explores the ways in which these technologies influence and impact organizations and individuals. The course explores the design, use and cultural significance of technologies and uses a historical focus to assess the integration of technology into all aspects of our society. The restructuring of traditional human interaction by information technology will provide a contemporary focus for the course. Offered in a seminar format, the course will provide opportunities for scholarly discussion, systematic inquiry and written communication. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 203. Law in Literature. 3 Units.

An interdisciplinary venture. This seminar will focus on law in literature by examining representations of the legal process in poems, plays, short stories, and novels. It will provide a taste of the vastness and variety of human life--and will broaden and deepen students' understanding of the role law plays in society. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 205. The Human Struggle Through the Lens of Sport. 3 Units.

This seminar explores, through the medium of sport literature, the interaction of sport, society, and self. Students will examine the social and psychological effects on participants, consumer, and society of sport through the study of fiction, research studies, essays, and poetry having a sport motif. Topics include racism and sexism (valuing diversity), love (cooperating), death (losing), transformation (aging), and achievement (winning). This class is limited to students participating in SAGES. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 209. Face First. 3 Units.

Human beings greet the world face first. In fact, the ability to process facial features seems to be innate. A baby easily recognizes its mother's face yet the most powerful computers have difficulty using facial features to identify people. This is because all human faces are similar while fine details make each face unique. This course will begin by studying the human face as an anatomic construction of hard and soft tissue skeletal components. We will discuss how we use anatomic facial features to recognize individuals. One homework exercise will be to construct faces using an FBI identikit. Each student will create an FBI composite sketch of their own face. Seminar time will then be used to view each sketch and try to match the sketch with the seminar participant. Discussion will focus on how facial anatomy is similar or different. Following this introduction, the seminar will shift focus from anatomy to sociology. We will discuss facial attractiveness and beauty. Seminar topics will also include manipulation of facial appearance i.e., cosmetics, body piercing, veils, and plastic surgery. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 222. Science and Society Through Literature. 3 Units.

This course will examine the interaction of scientific investigation and discovery within the context of the society it occurred in. What is the effect of science on society and, as importantly, what is the effect of society on science? An introduction will consider the heliocentric controversy with focus on Galileo. Two broad areas; tuberculosis and the Frankenstein myth, will then be discussed covering the period 1800-present. With tuberculosis, fiction, art and music will be examined to understand the changing views of society towards the disease, how society's perception of tuberculosis victims changed, and how this influenced their treatments and research. With Frankenstein, the original novel in its historical context will be examined. Using fiction and viewing several films, the transformation of the original story into a myth with different connotations and implications will be discussed. Most classes will be extensive discussions coupled with student presentations of assigned materials. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 229. A Study of Power: Criteria Essential to Its Rise and Fall. 3 Units.

This SAGES seminar will coordinate examinations of major historical events and their influence on the future. Particular emphasis will focus on the development and/or demise of powerful countries and people, and political and religious infrastructures. Sample topics include: the rise and fall of the Roman empire, the Barbarian empires, the British empire, the National Socialists, the Soviet empire, etc. Development and practice of religious behavior from praying to pagan Gods and spiritual Gods may also be analyzed. The idea is to demonstrate the similarities and differences in each of these broad categories as they progressed. An examination of the impact of greater world "enlightenment" as civilization expanded over time is also discussed. The evolvement and eventual demise or change and the continuing impact on contemporary civilization shall be explored. Conclusions shall be used to suggest a model for the future. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 231. Evolution as Metaphor and Model: Why Don't We Live Forever?. 3 Units.

Evolution will be used to examine biological, historical, and social issues associated with health, illness and aging. In this overview course, evolution is a paradigm that is used to understand how systems change over time. The readings and discussions will identify universal processes and patterns in order to understand the effect of disease on history and explain how and why humans remain vulnerable to aging. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 234. Questions of Identity. 3 Units.

Who we are informs the ways in which we act in the world. How we respond to society in the individual, local, and global community is impacted by the way we see ourselves, the way others see us, and the way we see others. Who am I? How do I look at myself in relationship to others? How does the way in which society views me affect the way I think of myself? How have writers, historians, and philosophers dealt with the challenges of self and group identity? We will explore these issues through readings from the Civil Rights Era, the Holocaust, and the period of decolonization in Africa. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 238. The First Amendment. 3 Units.

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution states that "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom of speech." In this seminar we will explore what this right has meant in America and how it has been limited throughout American history. We will discuss the importance of free speech in a democratic society and how the government balances the freedom of speech with other government interests. This course is also designed to give you a glimpse of law school and what being a lawyer is like. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 243. The Art of Fact. 3 Units.

As evidenced by the tragedy that unfolded in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, we ignore the consequences of endemic poverty at our peril. How do you evacuate a city filled with thousands of people too poor to own cars? Where do you house them after they've been rescued from their drowned neighborhoods? Although Cleveland won't likely be erased by flood, it's one of the poorest big cities in the nation making it vulnerable to disaster in times of crisis and an incubator for a host of thorny social problems. Often, it's up to journalists to bring attention to these issues, give voice to the voiceless and force policymakers to come up with solutions to seemingly intractable problems. In this seminar, we'll read and dissect the works of journalists who've written stories about complex social problems and have done so using many of the conventions employed by writers of fiction. Writer Ben Yagoda described this literary journalism as "making facts dance." We'll spend our time researching numerous social issues and learn to write about them in a clear and compelling voice. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 255. Hinduism. 3 Units.

This course will provide an introduction to Hindu thought and culture. We will read a wide range of texts and secondary sources. Two readings, the Ramayana and Samskara, will focus on issues of ethics and proper dharma. We will also be watching Deepa Mehta's Fire. There will be a visit to the Shiva-Vishnu Temple in Parma. Heavy emphasis on research and writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 260. Spin, P.R., and America Today. 3 Units.

We live today surrounded by spin--corporations don't fire, they downsize; government pronouncements are assumed to be cynically slanted and misleading; even scholarly medical articles are written by public relations (p.r.) flacks. The guiding principle isn't truth or reality but the right message and staying on it. How and why has p.r. become such a seemingly potent force in our time? What does this say about America and its values--about even the meaning of truth? In this seminar we will explore the role of public relations and image-making, in American society today. Our objectives are (1) Examine the users of p.r. today in business, politics and popular culture to shape images and define reality; (2) explore the tools used to construct and sell those messages and perceptions and (3) Analyze the values underlying these activities--to the end of deepening our understanding society today. This seminar explores these issues through reading, both academic and popular writing, discussion, and research. The writing assignments will be both academic and various forms of media and public relations formats. We will use class time to discuss and review student writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 266. Framing Our Legal System: Law in the Movies. 3 Units.

This course explores important themes in the study of law, lawyers, and legal institutions by regarding their representations in movies. We will cover such issues as race/class/gender and the law, legal ethics, legal education, the adversarial system, and the image and status of the lawyer in American culture. We will also look at the ways in which law and the legal profession affect popular culture and, conversely, the ways in which poplar views of legal problems and lawyers affect law. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 269. Create-A-College. 3 Units.

In seminar format, students will develop plans for a new institution of higher learning, shaping and communicating in several different formats its mission, goals, academic focus, and physical and financial needs. Supporting the course's research, writing, and presentation expectations will be documents from existing colleges, information on the policy and social environment for such a venture, and requirements imposed by external entities such as governmental and accrediting agencies. Course will include interactions among two sets of student teams and several intermediary presentations, culminating in a group presentation of plans for the new college to a panel of experts including current or former members of the University's Board of Trustees and the Ohio Board of Regents. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 270. The Geography of Wealth. 3 Units.

While many of us are familiar with thinking about wealth in social, political and economic terms, wealth can also be understood as a function of geography. This seminar will look at American history and culture to seek a deeper understanding of how place and wealth interact; some of the government policies that affect those interactions; and some of the grand experiments in philanthropy, law, and social policy that have tried to reverse the perceived evils of "concentrated poverty." The seminar will not require an advanced mathematical or statistical background. However, we will analyze how statistics can illuminate (and disguise) issues and problems. We will look at the business corporation as both an aggregator of wealth and as a wealth allocation system. Of necessity we will wander into matters of race, employment, power, class, culture, history, and government. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 271. Schoolhouse Rocked: Education Reform. 3 Units.

Today, the term "education reform" may bring to mind standardized tests and No Child Left Behind. Many believe that our schools must become more rigorous, with stricter rules and definable goals. "Reform," however, used to be defined differently. John Dewey, Maria Montessori, and Paulo-Freire, for example, struggled to make schools freer and more humane. They hoped not to make the classroom less challenging, but more child-centered. Some disciples of such reformers, discouraged by schools' resistance to change, eventually turned to homeschooling--pulling kids out of school and educating them with real-life learning experiences. In this seminar, we will explore progressive educational theory and connect it with contemporary alternative schools and homeschooling. Visits to nearby Montessori and Waldorf schools and discussions with homeschoolers will make real-life connections to seminar reading and classwork. Challenging assumptions about how well our schools work and raising questions such as, "How do we learn?" and "What is good teaching?" will provoke thought, conversation, and interesting writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 274. Passion, Insult, and Virtue in Ancient Athens. 3 Units.

Students explore the social fabric of Athens at its height--the various social and economic institutions that shaped households and the city--state in the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. Primary source material will include courtroom speeches, two comedies of Aristophanes, and Aristotle's Ethics. Topics: lust, love, marriage, prostitution, slavery, elite drinking parties, street life, hubristic violence, competition, feuding murder, the legal system, diverse concepts of virtue, and how ordinary people were expected to treat one another in good times and bad. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 275. Psychology of Creativity. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to explore how individuals become creative. What are the most important qualities, emotional and cognitive, that are related to creativity? Is there a creative personality? What is the difference between artistic and scientific creativity? How does creativity relate to mental illness? How can we foster creativity in people? The course will study creativity in children and adults and will include research studies as well as descriptions of creativity from creative individuals. We will also discuss how different cultures view and effect creativity and the ethical issues involved. This course is a seminar and will use a discussion format. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 280. Democracy?. 3 Units.

"Democracy?" poses democracy as a question, in two forms. First, what do we mean by democracy? Second, where should democracy be practiced? Although conventional understandings link democracy to political systems and issues of governance, the course will consider democracy in other institutions and locations. Course questions include: What is democracy? Why do we value democracy? Does democracy in the state require democracy in the economy? What would that look like? What are the potential conflicts between economic and political democracy with full citizen involvement? Is direct democracy democratic? Does democracy in the state require democracy in the family? In universities? In the workplace? In prisons? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 284. The Kaleidoscope of Birth. 3 Units.

The course will explore topics in science, technology and culture across time as they relate to the social construction of birth. Students and faculty will critically examine the seminar topics through an interdisciplinary approach. The learners will develop their own understanding of how science and technology related to birth have and continue to change. What happens when newer technologies supersede the old? What happens when older ideas are revived? Students will be introduced to the influence of culture and technology. Methods of oral and written communication will be enhanced via assignments. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285A. Ethnicity and Local History. 3 Units.

This course will explore the many different kinds of ethnic communities to which we belong. Why have local ethnic groups formed arts and cultural organizations, sports clubs, charities, and other groups which highlight their difference? How have these local groups operated within larger, national ethnic groups and how have they helped us negotiate our identities as citizens, members of religious communities, and/or members of other nations? To what extent have these groups been successful in encouraging future generations to identify with the ethnic group? Our starting point and focus will be an examination of theories of civil society, ethnic identity formation, and nationalism. We will then turn to an examination of the ethnic communities in the Greater Cleveland area. This study of our own local context will then be followed by a consideration of ethnic organizations in other parts of the world. As we consider how ethnic communities have developed and changed throughout history, we will also examine our connections to these communities and, it is hoped, gain a better appreciation for the diversity which surrounds us. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285D. Advertising and the American Dream. 3 Units.

This SAGES seminar will explore advertising in America, its social and cultural roots, and its impact (or lack thereof) on our values, tastes, and behavior as consumers and citizens. It is hard to find a space in the contemporary world that is not plastered with ads--from the Coke cups next to the judges on "American Idol" to stencils on the sidewalks we walk on. This blizzard of advertising images may, in fact, define our age. We will examine the forces that created this giant American industry and ask: Why do we have advertising? How is it created? What social functions does it serve? How has it changed? Where is it going? Central to this seminar is discussion, research, and writing to analyze and critique this in-our-face, but little understood, social institution. Some of our discussions will flow from advertising industry news (e.g., the Super Bowl ads), a contemporary or early 20th century ad campaign, or the backstage insights of a guest from one of Cleveland's major ad agencies. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285I. Spectacle in American Culture. 3 Units.

This seminar will examine the topic of spectacle both chronologically and typologically to better u understand the power of remarkable visual experiences to awe, entertain, persuade, and create meaning from the colonial period to the present day. In the 17th century, the religious beliefs of the New England community and its need to maintain social cohesiveness gave rise to the spectacle of witch trials and public punishments. As Americans moved westward, the natural world became the focus of the spectacular. In the nineteenth century, the campaigns and debates of presidential candidates became political theater. The latter half of the century gave rise to Consumption as Spectacle as exemplified in the may expositions and World's Fairs. Today, spectacle has reached all facets of our lives. Americans are willing to expose the most intimate details of their personal relationships on television shows like Jerry Springer and The Real World. Although frequently used to maintain power, spectacle also has been employed as a tactic of resistance and as an instrument for creating alternative meaning by subcultures. More recently, spectacle has served as an instrument of terror. Through lectures, discussion, multimedia presentations, and writing assignments, we will have an opportunity to reflect on the many forms and uses of spectacle in American history. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285J. The Limits of Science. 3 Units.

Can science provide answers to the deeper puzzles of human existence, or do some questions lie beyond the scope of the scientific world view? Specifically, can science explain human consciousness, free will, and morality; and can it reveal the origins of religion? Students cannot, nor will they be expected to, provide a definitive answer to these questions. Instead, this seminar will provide students with an opportunity to engage in a conversation with each other against a backdrop of some of the most interesting and provocative research in cognitive science. In addition to learning about relevant psychological and neuroscientific research, students will engage with philosophical issues and arguments. This course aims to stretch student's beliefs about what they know now, and what they think can be known. The seminar will aim to cultivate productive and rhetorical skills, especially analytical thought, oral expressiveness, and writing skills, all of which will be useful in future pursuits. It will help students to develop a more nuanced view of human nature and the ability of science to transform our view of it. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285K. The Economics of Global Poverty. 3 Units.

Developing countries make up at least three-fourths of the world population. This course focuses on international aspects of economics of the developing world. Questions we will ask include: why are the poorest countries failing to thrive, what can be done about it, and can the rich afford to help the poor? The term "developing country" means a country that exhibits low per capita income, high poverty level, little industrialization, or low life expectancy. However, these problems also affect developed countries. Why, then, do we study poor countries' economies separately from those of industrialized nations? The answer lies not in the types of problems but in the severity and causes of these problems. It is these issues, the causes and consequences of global poverty, and solutions to help the world's poorest, that concern us here. Raising people out of poverty requires economic growth, a more even income distribution, investment in education, health care, and infrastructure, social safety nets, honest political leaders, reliable social and financial institutions, and international aid from rich countries. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285N. Globalization and American Culture. 3 Units.

This course investigates the role of the United States in globalization. The first third examines the claim that globalization entrails cultural "Americanization," the middle third covers the resistance of local cultures, and the last part explores the ways in which American invented technologies do, in fact, spread culturally specific ways of working and behavior. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285S. Correspondence. 3 Units.

Correspondence will look at the practice of writing and reading letters, and explore the use of letters as biographical, historical, and forensic evidence. Students will read love letters, "Letters to the Editor," letters from the battlefield, and correspondence between scientists and theologians. We will gain access to the experience of tourism through post cards, and the world of the modern corporation through business letters, emails and text messages. We will read examples of fiction where the letter acts as a plot device, as in the epistolary novels of the 18th century. We will think about the function of the letter as an instrument of persuasion, as an opportunity to develop ideas in a private and informal manner, and as a forum for expressing emotion. In addition, we will study the communication systems and technologies, such as the post office, the telegraph, and the internet, that have facilitated, and changed the nature of, correspondence throughout history. Students will be asked to write letters based on their personal experiences and their political opinions, and write analytical essays based on topics related to the practice and history of correspondence. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285T. Why We Believe Weird Things. 3 Units.

How, in such a skeptical age, can people maintain questionable beliefs regarding urban legends, alternative medicine, superstitions, and paranormal phenomena? How do cults manage to attract and maintain large memberships? How can so many seemingly normal people come to the conclusion that they have been abducted by aliens? We will explore the idea that these behaviors are not examples of pathological thought processes, but rather natural consequences of the biases that characterize everyday reasoning. Emphasis will be placed on critical examination of questionable phenomena with a goal of understanding why people might want to hold such beliefs. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285V. Travel Literature in the Age of Discovery. 3 Units.

The discovery of the Americas in the 15th century challenged European constructions of the known world and tested assumptions about nature, culture, and the workings of intellectual inquiry. Although before 1492 Europeans traveled, they usually read new landscapes in light of familiar religious paradigms. The discoveries forced Europeans to draw the world anew, literally and metaphorically. Students will read works of travel fiction and real-life travelers' tales, and will address the following questions: how did travel literature reflect successive discoveries? What new maps (geographical or metaphorical) did this literature help draw? How did the discoveries bear on literary genres? After a brief foray into medieval literature, students will read The Tempest, Oroonoko, excerpts from The Persian Letters, excerpts from Gulliver's Travels, Robinson Crusoe, Candide, and A Sentimental Journey. Additionally, students will read brief accounts of actual travels. Students will write three papers and prepare presentations on topics such as pilgrimage routes, map making, the search for longitude, and America in the visual arts. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 285Y. Quest for Perfection: Law as a Vehicle for Social Improvement. 3 Units.

Americans often seek to use U.S. law to create "fairness" and "civility"--in a world that can sometimes be brutal and fundamentally unjust. Increasingly, we rely on courts and statutes to "fix" identified social problems and to achieve a more just society. This course will examine our reliance on law to improve human behavior and to achieve social goals. Can statutes and lawyers lead the way to a better world? What are the limits (if any) of our ability to improve society by passing new laws and mandates? Are there unforeseen, negative consequences that arise from our legal efforts to improve public and personal behavior? This course will examine those questions in the context of selected social issues. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286E. Global Tourism. 3 Units.

Tourism can be viewed as a metaphor for contemporary existence in an increasingly globalizing world where attachments and ties to a concrete place are often temporary. Besides capturing the essence of present-day mobility, tourism is a phenomenon that can be researched both politically and economically. Indeed, 10 percent of global GNP comes from tourism and many poor countries rely on the tourism industry to sustain national economic development. In this class, we will touch on the economic and political significance of tourism, but will spend most of our time thinking of what happens in the tourist encounter, what tourists expect, what drives them, and who loses as well as benefits in the encounter. Some of the specific themes include: the nature of tourist destinations, quest for authentic sites, entertainment tourism (Disneyland, Dracula-Park), tourism to Auschwitz, culinary tourism, sex tourism, and eco-tourism. By reading theoretical works, travel blogs, and literature, we will gain insight to the motivations of tourists, the inhabitants of the places being visited, and international organizations as well as governments who oversee this industry. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286F. Environment and Civic Culture in the Developing World. 3 Units.

Can the fight against environmental degradation lead to an improved civic culture and political reform in developing nations? Developing nations typically sacrifice environmental protection in favor of economic development. Only when the costs of environmental degradation become obvious do nations consider a sustainable development regime that includes environmental protection. This seminar addresses whether implementing a sustainable development model requires a new civic culture that encourages political reform. In doing so, students will examine and write about literature on economic development, environmental degradation, and several international initiatives that encourage reforms to aid sustainable development. The seminar will use the People's Republic of China as a case study, but will also draw on evidence from other developing countries. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286I. Society through Online Videos: The Broadcast of the Self. 3 Units.

In this course we will discover and explore the interrelationships of self, technology, and society in the 21st century through digital video on the internet. We will watch online videos and read about social theory as part of a rigorous examination of media and society. This course will examine the intended and unintended consequences of mass information sharing and communication via online video. Students will work with the seminar leader and build upon existing academic knowledge to extend their understanding of the structure and meanings inherent in our video-active lives. In addition to completing regular writing assignments, students will learn about digital video production and produce a short digital video essay. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286J. Women's Education at CWRU: The Flora Stone Mather Oral History Project. 3 Units.

This seminar will offer a discussion-based exploration of the history of women's education in America. Much of the discussion will focus on the emergence of coordinate colleges, including the College for Women (later renamed Flora Stone Mather College) at Western Reserve University. The seminar will also give students an opportunity to contribute to the historical literature by conducting interviews with Flora Stone Mather alumnae. Students will be instructed in the basic principles and techniques of oral history and engage in the creation of primary source materials--tapes and transcriptions--essential for historical documentation. They will then reflect on the relationship between the stories they have collected and the present-day educational experiences of women at Case Western Reserve University. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286L. Exploring Non-Profit Organizations. 3 Units.

This seminar is structured to expose students to the opportunities and challenges of working in and running non-profit organizations. Students will explore the importance and significant roles non-profit organizations play in our society. The class will learn how non-profits are organized and regulated and the importance of the organization's mission is to determining the impact of the non-profit organization in the community. Additionally, the students will learn how non-profits are funded and how these organizations maintain their financial stability and sustainability in the community. These goals will be accomplished through group analysis of non-profit organizational principles, and investigation of existing non-profit organizations. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286M. Hip-Hop Narrative in Film. 3 Units.

This seminar explores films of the Hip-Hop Generation and, by presenting certain films in chronological order, draws out the common threads. Hip-Hop culture is a conversation, an argument between the have-nots and the rest of us. The goals and objectives of that conversation have evolved and changed in timbre and urgency. Tracking that dialog through the late 60s, the post-civil rights era, the emergence of the b-boy, Reaganomics, and the rise of the new Black middle class helps us to get a better look at where it is and where it's going. By isolating the stories told by filmmakers within a certain period and then analyzing their place in the larger Hip-Hop narrative, the instructor and the students can infer truths about the politics and zeitgeist of the times in which the film works were conceived. This course will consist of lots of film, yes, but also lots of reading and writing. Upon successful completion, the student should be able to recognize and define the Hip-Hop narrative in popular cinema, focus critical thinking skills, pull the narrative from certain films and discuss it, note and discuss the visual aesthetic and how it impacts the story, and discuss the marketing, packaging, and cultural impact of the Hip-Hop narrative. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286P. Immigrant Entrepreneurs--Can They Drive Cleveland's Economy Once Again?. 3 Units.

This seminar will focus on the impact of immigrant entrepreneurs in Cleveland--past, present and future. The class will take a look back at the historic contributions immigrant entrepreneurs played in creating economic prosperity in Cleveland during the 20th century. While immigrant entrepreneurs once played a central role in driving Cleveland's economic success, in recent years the city has attracted much less foreign talent than other faster growing U.S. metropolitan areas. Cleveland's population is at its lowest level since 1903 and continues to shrink. Chicago, Philadelphia and Louisville, among other cities, have embarked on efforts to attract foreign talent to not only address the "brain drain" of young people leaving their cities but also to spur economic development. In a March 29, 2009 editorial, The Plain Dealer argued for a more proactive approach in Cleveland to attract foreign talent: "If Cleveland is to regain (its) lofty status--especially in a global economy that rewards intelligence, creativity and innovation--it needs to re-establish itself as a magnet for new Americans. We need their fresh ideas, entrepreneurial zeal and optimism. We need them to help reverse decades of migration away from the region's urban core." The culmination of the seminar will examine the question of whether Cleveland should proactively recruit foreign talent and look closely at the public policy, regulatory and political challenges that must be overcome in order to effectively do so. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286Q. History of Late 20th Century Popular Culture. 3 Units.

This course focuses on American popular culture of the late twentieth century (c. 1970 to 2001). Students will analyze this period using a variety of historical texts and primary sources (everything from more "traditional" sources such as printed materials to films, television episodes and clips, music and sound lyrics, fanzines ["zines"], graphic novels, and music videos). Secondary sources include history essays and monographs, as well as articles by scholars employing critical theory. Students will explore whether "products" of popular culture perpetuate power structures and help to shape the discourse of late twentieth century American culture. Moreover, they will examine how individuals contribute to and challenge the discourses as consumers and creators of pop culture. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286U. Ideal Communities, Utopian Visions, and Totalitarian Nightmares. 3 Units.

This course will study communal attempts to form ideal societies and will offer a transcultural, transhistorical view of how various authors and filmmakers have imagined the best and worst possibilities of human society. Its central questions are: How can society be improved? What role does education play in improving society? How do you define freedom? How can we combine freedom with social order? How can social problems be critiqued through representations of ideal or dysfunctional societies? The course will be interdisciplinary by combining historical study with analysis of literature, film, art, and music. In studying and discussing utopian communities, students will examine the problems that each community attempted to solve, their philosophical approach to solving these problems, the success or failure of their solutions, and the similarities and differences among these communities. In studying utopian and dystopian literature and film, we will analyze the problems and solutions that each text or film examines and proposes, and will look at each text or film in its social and historical context. We will also explore how authors and filmmakers have used their utopian and dystopian visions to respond to the positive or negative trends in their own societies. In addition, we will discuss how each text or film coincides with or challenges our perceptions of the strengths and problems in our society and how we might solve those problems. This course will encourage students to think about the kind of world they would like to help bring about, as well as the various social problems that may darken the future of the human race. Students will write in class regularly about these issues as well as the assigned readings that raise these issues, and will write essays about ideal communities, utopian texts, and dystopian texts. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286V. Management of Chronic Illness in a Cultural Context. 3 Units.

This course will explore the cross cultural, self-care approaches to health problems. It covers substance-based (e.g., herbs, acupuncture), mind-body (e.g., yoga, qigong), spiritual (e.g., prayer) and social (e.g., communal, family) approaches that have been used to manage chronic diseases and promote wellness in various cultural settings. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286X. The Future of News. 3 Units.

The saying goes, "Strong Press, Strong Democracy." But what of strong democracy in the Internet Age when the traditional press seems weak? That's this seminar's big question. Can the "old" media, struggling to avoid financial collapse, still deliver the news necessary to be democracy's watchdog, as in the past? Can the new internet media--blogs, YouTube, viral videos, "hyperlocalism" experiments, pro publica investigations, crowd sourcing, instant news, Facebook, Gawker, True/Slant, Drudge and the proliferation of the other news and entertainment sources--take its place or complement traditional journalism? How do these new entrants change the nature of news and the role of the media in our society? These are uncharted developments, but they go to the heart of the continued success of America's democratic experiment. Our goal is to grasp more clearly the connections between media, news, citizenship and democracy in this new age. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 286Y. The Holocaust and Local History. 3 Units.

The Holocaust and Local History will focus on how the events that make up the Holocaust affected communities in both Eastern Europe, where the most horrific crimes of the Holocaust occurred, and in the United States, where the Jewish community responded to the events with both astonishment and action. A focus on local histories will illustrate the legacy of the Holocaust and help students understand how history directly affects their own lives and the lives of those around them. The goal is to uncover the role that this complex history continues to play in our daily lives, whether in the small towns of Eastern Europe or the suburbs of greater Cleveland. Topics will include the course of the Holocaust in towns in Eastern Europe, the effects of the Holocaust in American communities like Cleveland, and the commemoration of the Holocaust and memory of local Jewish communities in Eastern Europe. Students will examine these topics with the help of primary and secondary sources, hear from local survivors of the Holocaust, and learn more about how the Holocaust is represented in local museums. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287B. Migration in Human History. 3 Units.

The movements of individuals and groups, along with the ideas, technologies, and diseases that accompanied them, have played an integral role in shaping human history. Migration has continually created, challenged and shaped societies from the most ancient periods through to the present. It has a transformative effect on communities at the points of origin, along migration routes, and at temporary and final destinations. This seminar will introduce students to several different ways of thinking about migration throughout history, from the contacts between nomadic and settled societies, to colonial settlement and diasporas and migration from rural towns and villages to industrial cities, as well as the ongoing mobility at the highest and lowest levels of modern society. Indeed, many contemporary conflicts of class and culture can be traced back to migration, in the interactions between those seen as migrants and those who consider themselves natives. This seminar will also encourage students to consider the importance of different forms of migration in their own lives, in the histories of their families, and in the city around them. Cleveland is a city founded by migrants from Connecticut (hence the 'Western Reserve' in the name of the university), populated by both transatlantic and internal American migration, and shaped by the local migrations that affected ethnic neighborhoods, suburbs, and smaller towns throughout the region. Compared to historical migrations of thousands and millions of people, such movements may seem minor, but they can be studied and understood in similar terms. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287C. Murder in the Jazz Age. 3 Units.

Having lived through the devastation and consequences of World War I, you might think that Americans would have been appalled by the violent murders that marred the 1920s. To be sure, they were. Americans were also drawn to the infamous murders as though understanding these crimes would enable them to explain the changes in society, such as changes to gender rules and urbanization, brought about and accelerated by the war. In this class, we will examine the major crimes of the decade in the hopes of gaining the insight that the people at the time sought. The course readings include secondary sources that provide an analysis of the decade and primary sources from the murder cases themselves. In addition, students will become familiar with the historical context and scientific advancements that gave birth to modern forensics. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287E. Clash of the Titans: Economic, Industrial and Social Trends for the 21st Century. 3 Units.

Since the beginning of recorded human civilization, locally dominant societies have risen, prospered, decayed and finally ended, with new ones taking their place. Starting in the 15th century, however, Europe established global dominance and maintained it for four centuries, from the age of New World exploration through the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century. Then came the rise of the United States, which in the late 20th century became the world's only superpower, economically, industrially, militarily and, increasingly, culturally. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, we are witnessing the "flattening" of the world due to the technological revolution, a phenomenon brought about by the instant and worldwide generation of and access to information. Two major consequences of this evolution are: a) Individuals are more empowered than at any time in history and the traditional societal structure is under constant challenge; b) Companies have changed their business structures and practices and have begun to operate on a truly global scale. The main goal of the course is to help students learn the lessons of history and use them to develop an educated argument as to whether the US will continue in its prominent leadership role, or whether one or both of the emerging Asian economic powerhouses, China and India, will supplant it and become dominant. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287J. Education in sub-Saharan Africa. 3 Units.

The level of education in sub-Saharan Africa is much lower than in the United States. In some sub-Saharan countries, less than 20% of the adults are literate, less than 10% have a secondary school education, and less than 1% have a college education. The low level of education keeps the region in poverty--most households in sub-Saharan Africa have no electricity or running water. This seminar will address the barriers that hinder education in sub-Saharan Africa, and explore ways to overcome these barriers. The barriers have a broad range of origins, including economic (not enough money for teacher salaries, books, and school maintenance), societal (education not seen as important, especially for girls), technological (lack of electricity and transportation), institutional (widespread corruption in government), and medical (AIDS, malaria and diseases from unclean water cause student absences and orphan students). Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287O. Utopia and Social Change in American Fiction. 3 Units.

In this course we will read American Utopian fiction alongside selections from other academic disciplines in order to consider the issues, problems, and conflicts for creating meaningful social change. We will consider questions such as: What has it meant/does it mean to imagine a perfect American society? Who is excluded from these visions and on what grounds? How has the radically different social order represented in utopian fiction been used to critique American society's injustices? In our readings we will think through the ways in which historical perceptions of equality, hope, and political action have been portrayed in imagining ideal communities. We will also examine how academic theories have influenced and reacted to American utopian literature. Our coursework may include essay responses, service learning, and primary research (interviews and surveys), and will culminate in a project in which you will present your vision of a utopian future in a creative form and interpret and explain this "future" through a research paper analyzing the decisions that went into its creation. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287P. Technology and Social Change. 3 Units.

This class examines the reciprocal relationship between material culture (technology) and non-material culture (society and social structure) as they produce social change. The class is organized by major areas in the development of technology as well as chronologically in terms of major epochs of technological and societal development. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287Q. Social Constructs Associated with Marginalization: Making a Difference. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' awareness of selected social constructs within the global society (i.e., vulnerability) that have the potential to generate circumstances that place some individuals or groups at risk for marginalization and diminished well-being. The course will be conducted within a seminar format and will provide opportunities for scholarly inquiry and debate regarding the nature of the constructs posited. Students will critique each other's social constructs with intent to generate innovative strategies to reduce individual and global marginalization. Each student will prepare a formal written report of their findings related to their construct of interest. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287R. The Business of Sports-Content, Television, Social Media, Consumer Products, Advertising & Marketing. 3 Units.

The sports industry is experiencing rapid growth and is expected to become one of the nation's top 25 industries by 2030. This seminar will explore five elements of the business model that is driving this growth: content, television, social media, advertising, and consumer products. In addition, it will examine the marketing of these five elements. Students will be graded on class participation, essays, and a final paper. They will be asked to read weekly articles on each aspect of the sports industry and to participate in social media sites in order to understand how powerful this platform is to the sports business. In addition, they will work together in groups to create their own sports marketing websites and present these sites for evaluation by the entire class. The results of the evaluation will contribute to their grade for this part of the course. Guest lecturers for the seminar will include nationally recognized experts and representatives of the sports industry, many of whom visit northeast Ohio for sporting events. Students in the course will acquire a unique perspective on a business that is projected to become one of the world's leading growth industries in the 21st century. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287T. Gender, Visibility and Performance: The Courtesan. 3 Units.

Throughout history, the figure of the courtesan has embodied seduction, performance, and mystery; occupying the private spaces of the real and the imaginary across cultures. The impact of the courtesan on society can be seen in travelogues, poetry, and historical treatises, as well as in texts written specifically about courtesans themselves. Those cultures which had a courtesan class frequently experienced varying degrees of social discomfort. Within the culture, there was tension between those who patronized courtesans and those who considered them a social menace. From without, cultures which had courtesans were believed to be either excessively decadent or highly civilized, depending on the cultural standpoint of the observer. In this seminar, we will study real courtesans as well as examine the figure of the courtesan within the context of literature, religion, music history, and gender theory. The seminar will begin with an overview of the origins of the courtesan, focused on the roles of women and slave musicians in the court and temple in Egypt, India, Greece, and Mesopotamia starting in 3,000 BCE. Then, we will explore factors leading to the development of a courtesan class and compare the roles of courtesans and their place in their culture in Europe, India, Asia, and the Middle East. Readings and class discussion will encompass issues relating to the impact of gender on performance, literary genres, education, and social and legal status, as well as continuing questions related to translation of primary sources, colonialism, and religious movements. In addition to the readings, we will also study images of the courtesan from antiquity to the present, listen to music by and about courtesans, sample some of their writing, and watch films about "real" courtesans. The primary goal is not only to look at the impact of courtesans in history, but also to engage issues related to gender and performance from a variety of different disciplinary and cultural points of view. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287V. The Public and the Past: History in the Marketplace. 3 Units.

How does one or should one "sell" the past? Our primary encounters with the past are not in the university classroom, but via popular media, museums, theme parks, and historic sites; entities whose survival is increasingly dependent upon market economics. This dependency often demands attention to audience size and the need to avoid controversies that could alienate private and public funders. Complicating this is the issue of heritage--the somewhat mythic pasts which individuals, groups, and nations claim as their right, even when research challenges the underlying myths. What then are the consequences, in terms of ethics and accuracy, or in terms of civic value, when one turns history into a heritage-based commodity? More specifically, how does this affect professional historians? Can they work in history outside of academe without sacrificing integrity and standards? The seminar will debate these critical questions and also take an in-depth look at the growing field (positions, products and potential) of public/applied history. Readings, documentaries, interviews, and on-site visits to public history institutions will provide the basis for our discussions and the written assignments in this seminar as well as serve as an introductory "course" for students interested in a career in public or applied history. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287X. The War.... 3 Units.

Why do people go to war? Why are they willing to give up everything and send their children off to fight? What makes people cheer when war is declared? This class will address these questions by focusing on 1914 and the start of the First World War. It will be a course focused on understanding the politics, motivations, and imaginings surrounding the origins of World War I. The course readings include secondary sources that provide an analysis of 1914 and primary sources that provide the various perspectives of those living through the events. In addition to furthering their writing skills, students will become familiar with library research methods. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 287Z. Concubines, Soldiers and Field Hands: World Slavery from Antiquity to the Present. 3 Units.

For many Americans, the most familiar type of slavery is plantation slavery of the Americas and the horrific consequences to the indigenous peoples and transplanted peoples from Africa. The longevity of the institution of slavery, and acceptance of the practice by many different cultures and belief systems, however, reaches from antiquity to the present day. In addition to providing physical labor and domestic services, slaves have been used as entertainers, civil servants, led armies and served in temples. Slavery is a complex legal, religious, moral and social institution, and the relationship between slave, state and owner/slaver is equally complicated; so much so that understanding the bond between them, and what the actual boundary was between "free" and "un-free", is still difficult to determine in some cultures. In this seminar, we will use a chronological framework to examine the institution of slavery, uses for slaves, methodologies and sources for studying slavery and the slave trade in world history. Beginning with slavery in the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome, the class will include slavery and the feudal system in medieval Europe, indentured servitude and concubinage, slaves in the early Islamic courts, the Ottoman slave trade, the African slave trade and slavery in the Americas, and the current problem of human trafficking. Within each section, students will read primary texts and recent scholarship examining the social, economic and religious rationales behind slavery. We will also study different methodologies and the impact of gender, race and social class on the study of world slavery. As many slaver cultures had different definitions for what it meant to be a slave, we will address questions related to translation, interpretation and perception when dealing with primary sources. The primary goal of the course is to provide a broader context for the institution of slavery in world history as a means not only to understand the impact of slavery has had on American culture, but on other cultures as well. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288B. Doing Good: How Nonprofits Change Lives. 3 Units.

The American economy is made up of three sectors: government, business, and nonprofit. It's pretty obvious what government and business do, but the activity of nonprofits, while it is everywhere, is much more subtle. A nonprofit is most likely where you were born, went to school, attend church, or adopted your family dog. If you became an Eagle Scout, watched "Sesame Street," attended a benefit concert, or participated in a walk for a cause, you were engaged with a nonprofit. Perhaps you haven't given much thought to the way the organization was structured, where it gets its money, or what kind of an impact it's really having. In this seminar, students will learn what nonprofits are, how they operate, how they influence everyday lives, and their role in advancing social change and a civil society. We will consider the economic impact of nonprofits as well as their role in protecting culture, environment, values, and heritage. We will also look at the key challenges facing nonprofits today and how they are addressing them. Writing assignments will include a grant proposal for a new or existing nonprofit. The seminar will feature guest speakers and class visits to nonprofits in the Cleveland area. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288C. Green Transformation and Globalization. 3 Units.

This seminar introduces students to the recent major green transformation in China and elsewhere in the world, focusing on the way the green changes took place in relation to globalization, environment and climate protection, technology innovation, income redistribution, domestic consumption, and education, to meet the challenges of financial crisis, climate change, energy insecurity, and international competition. The seminar will also assess the impacts of various aspects of green transformation and globalization on today's and future world and vice versa. This seminar promotes broad knowledge of-and increased appreciation of the importance of diversity in China's cultural past, social frameworks, economic conditions, and natural environment. In a close connection to the primary readings, which include several recent relevant works, the students will be exposed to a variety of related primary and secondary materials (such as texts, photos, film clips, music, songs, and websites). In addition to receiving informative yet concise instruction, the student will also be involved in practice in critical reading and thinking, in writing and orally presenting research papers. In these activities, the students will be introduced to basic methods and concepts critical to the understanding of important economic, social, and cultural developments and changes as products of movements rather than isolated incidents. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288D. Why we ride: Motorcycles in America. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to explore motorcycle culture as an outcome, microcosm, and sometimes foil for broader American culture from the end of World War II to the present. We will examine historical accounts and current media to understand the variety of perspectives on this elastic and evolving subculture. Many within the motorcycle press and industry believe that motorcycling is in the midst of a major cultural shift, which may reflect changes in generational values as well as economic realities, and which makes this a uniquely fascinating time to study this significant American subculture. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288J. Museums and Community. 3 Units.

This course will use Cleveland-area museums as a laboratory to think critically about the role of museums within society. It will combine literature review, museum visits, and discussions led by museum professional. The goal is that students consider what role, if any, they believe museums should play in society in general, and in their local community in particular. Since experiential learning is key to understanding museums, museum visits will be foundational elements of the course. Students will first explore a local museum with the instructor and collaborate on a case study. They will then work individually on case studies of two local institutions that they have not previously visited. Finally, drawing on the readings and class discussions, each student will expand one of the case studies into a plan to make that institution fall more in line with their personal vision of museums in society. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288T. Coffee and Civilization. 3 Units.

Whether you enjoy an occasional cup or sip throughout the day from a bottomless mug, did you know that since its introduction in the Western world coffee has been intimately tied to sociability and intellectual life? In this seminar, we will explore coffee's civilizing history, from eighteenth-century coffee houses buzzing with political dissent, to 1920s establishments crowded with avant-garde artists and our modern bookstore cafés. We will also explore the human and ecological costs of our taste for coffee by investigating the enduring connections between coffee, slavery, North-South geo-political relations, and notions of fair trade. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 288Y. The Secret History of Corporate America. 3 Units.

The corporation is the most powerful economic institution of our time. How did it come to reign, and how does its power affect us economically, politically, and socially? This course will chart the history and impact of corporate capitalism. Topics will include the corporation's impact on democracy, consumer culture, the environment, and even the university itself. If you have ever wondered why products are purposely designed to wear out (planned obsolescence), why unions are so powerless in America, why the military is as powerful as it is, why it takes special technology from the Diebold corporation to run a simple election, why broadcasting companies are allowed to profit by using the public airwaves for free, why it looks like there are a million publishers of books when in truth giant companies dominate 80 percent of the book market, why the perfect lawn is a marketing ploy to get consumers to buy a lot of chemical inputs, why universities, which are supposed to be bastions of independent thought, are now dominated by an army of administrators who run around talking about return on investment instead of figuring out how to create a culture where students can learn, then this is the course for you. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289C. Ethics For The Real World: Developing a Code of Ethics to Guide Decisions in Work and Life. 3 Units.

This seminar addresses two major questions: How do the contexts in which we live or work affect ethical behavior? And how can we manage to struggle through personal and organizational challenges if we find they present us with something ethically compromising? In this course, we look to religion, spiritual teaching and cultural upbringing to understand sources of personal values and standards of behavior that might help structure one's life in the midst of difficult contexts. One way we consider this is through practical exercises including development of your own personal code of ethics, an iterative process designed to help you articulate the principles of your own moral construction. These can serve as a foundation for leadership integrity and moral courage for ethical decisions throughout life and work. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289J. Treasure or Trash: Examining Theatrical Credibility. 3 Units.

This seminar is a fundamental study of theatre from the standpoint of developing the critical acumen of a potential audience. It covers each ingredient of the theatrical experience-audience, playwriting, acting, directing, theatre architecture, design and technology-and attempts to help students define a reasonable set of standards to judge that part of the experience as an audience member and to clearly communicate their feelings and thoughts regarding that experience. In addition to class discussions, lectures, and readings, students are also required to attend four live performances-two theater productions offered by Case Western Reserve University's Department of Theater and two productions at the Cleveland Play House. The students will write critical essays about their experience as an audience member in relation to a particular aspect of the performance. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289K. Struggles for Justice in Complex Globalizing Environments: Cleveland and Madagascar. 3 Units.

Increasing complexity is a hallmark of contemporary human life. In environments across the globe, elaborate and varied material conditions are linked to fast-paced, globalizing changes in economic, social and cultural arrangements. This course is concerned with struggles for justice in such spaces and places of globalization. How are people now formulating their interests, having them heard and getting them satisfied? What are the shapes assumed by contemporary struggles for justice? We will approach such questions of "the social" by first considering theories and models of complexity and globalization. Students will consider how material, economic and socio-cultural forms are integrated, how these arrangements are tied to global processes, how they change, and how political processes fit in. These theoretical concerns will then be fleshed out through extended case studies of social life in the rainforests of southeastern Madagascar and the urban neighborhoods of Cleveland, Ohio. In Madagascar, we will look at the attempts by indigenous Tanala (People of the Forest) to keep their land and hold on to their way of life in the face of international conservation groups managing a national park. In Cleveland, the focus will be on poor African-American communities living on the city's east side who try to gain a voice in city planning issues. The instructor has carried-out long term field and historical research in both locations, and insights and examples culled from his work will be employed throughout the term. The course will also take an interdisciplinary approach, employing theories and methods from the fields of anthropology, sociology, geography, ecology, and urban studies. Readings, extended class discussion, focused writing projects and research presentations will help prepare students for a required research paper on a specific society living with issues of complexity. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289M. The Detective Novel. 3 Units.

Who dunnit? Why do we keep asking this question? You dunnit. Readers have an investment in finding answers to puzzles and to threatening narrative situations. In this course on one of the world's most popular literary genres, you will not only learn of its origins, but about theories of why you keep reading these stories. The texts begin with the Memoirs of Eugene-Francois Vidocq and stories of Edgar Allan Poe, and run though contemporary novelists such as Sara Paretsky and Natsuo Kirino. Why is this genre appeal so popular in so many cultures? There will be a strong comparativist slant to the course; students will be encouraged to explore the cultural context of Natsuo Kirino's and Stieg Larsson's novels which, like many of the classics, provide fertile ground for comparison to film adaptations. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289Q. The Nazis Next Door: Everyday Germans and National Socialism 1919-1990. 3 Units.

From the beginning of the National Socialist Party in 1919 until German Unification in 1990, everyday Germans had to deal with the reality that, regardless of their own political beliefs, many neighbors and even relatives embraced the doctrines of National Socialism. This seminar explores this complex reality from the rise of National Socialism, through the crimes of the Third Reich, and the stumbling and mixed efforts of the postwar Germanies to cope with the presence of Nazis in German society. Ranging from the defeated and divided society of the Weimar Republic, through the Nazi triumph, crimes, and defeat, to the recivilization of Germans after the war, we will examine how Germans dealt with the fact that to some degree, there were always Nazis next door. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 289Z. China and the World: 19th and 20th Century Encounters. 3 Units.

Although frequently characterized as a country with a past that was marked by insularity and disdain for all things foreign, until the West "opened [it] up," China's engagement with the world has been long and deep. China--Chinese emperors, Chinese governments, and Chinese people across the social spectrum--have energetically engaged with the broader world, permitting, encouraging, and seeking the circulation of foreign ideas and goods. This course is about how China has taken measure of the world and the goods and ideas that have flowed into and out of China during the past several centuries, from roughly the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Students will examine one topic in depth as an historical case study during the semester-long course. Possible topics from which the case study will be drawn include the Opium Wars, meanings of revolution, gender and sexuality, religion and political ideology, the environment, nationalism, history of science and technology, etc. Focus on a single thematic topic serves as a microcosm of social, political, and economic exchanges that highlight the complex ways in which understandings of China and the world have shifted over time. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290G. A History of Workers in the US. 3 Units.

This course examines the lives of the ethnically and racially diverse women and men, skilled and unskilled, and rural and urban laborers that produce the goods and provide the services that society consumes. At crucial moments, working people have joined social movements in an effort to improve some aspect of their lives. We therefore will assess workers in relation to several known and less known American social movements, such as the eight-hour day movement during the late nineteenth century, the peace movement during WWI, and the Civil Rights movement in the wake of WWII. As we study these social movements through the lens of labor history, we will focus on making sense of periods of conflict and cooperation between European American, African American, and Mexican American workers. Throughout the course we will also discuss the politics of time-managed work, the role of unions within a competitive market economy, the influence of public policy and government institutions, and the relationship between industrial economies and blue-collar communities. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSO 290M. The Effects of Race, Class and Education: A Dialogue on Current Issues. 3 Units.

Recent decades have seen a growing income and opportunity disparity in America. In our seminar, we will examine a variety of overlapping issues related to this crisis, with special attention to the impact of race, class and educational levels in determining how people fare in society. The larger set of issues includes poverty, income inequality, job loss and its effect on the industrial city, the concept of a "living wage," affordable housing, education, and sentencing and incarceration. Readings, class discussions, and student papers will all explore these topics. In urban communities such as Cleveland and Northeast Ohio, the income and opportunity divide is especially visible and persistent. Recognizing this, we have incorporated a novel approach to experiential learning in our seminar. Case Western Reserve students will interact with a similarly sized group of students incarcerated at Lorain Correctional Institution, a state prison located in nearby Grafton, Ohio. The two groups will conduct workshops together and will hold joint discussions via teleconference throughout the semester. The incarcerated students will be studying the same material on the same schedule and will be sharing their views with students in the seminar. We believe there are several benefits to this dialogue. We have two Northeast Ohio institutions - our university and the prison - which are neighbors but whose residents are largely from opposite sides of the divide. It will be useful to consider the income and opportunity divide from both perspectives and to share ideas and experiences related to the overall problem of inequality. A bilateral discussion and interaction will not only enhance the students' educational experience, but also, we hope, will foster greater understanding. Procedures will be in pace to ensure strict confidentiality and anonymity in any and all exchanges of views between CWRU students and students at the prison. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSO/USSO; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY Courses

USSY 201. Mathematical Life and Death in the Ancient Greek World. 3 Units.

A seminar on the earliest mathematical proofs. The Greek Thales studied with Egyptian priests and gave the first geometric proof. Pythagoras went to Egypt, on Thales's advice, then founded a mathematical religious colony in Italy. Plato took much philosophy and mathematics from the Pythagoreans. Aristotle took only mathematics. Their arguments over mathematical science echoed in the world-city of Alexandria, where even slaves were encouraged to be scholars. There Euclid wrote the standard mathematics text for the next 2,000 years. The great Archimedes synthesized Platonic and Aristotelian conceptions. His mathematics inspired Galileo's and Newton's physics. His war machines inspired a Roman soldier to kill him on sight. A woman, Hypatia, later became the leading mathematician and Platonist philosopher of Alexandria and was torn to pieces by a mob for her pagan ideas. What did mathematics mean to these people? What can we learn about religious freedom, or about the science of war? Why do we all accept mathematics form 200 BC whole only specialist scholars remember the physics, biology, or religion of ancient Greece? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 209. Art and Math. 3 Units.

Students in this University Seminar will explore relationships between art and mathematics. Topics include: pattern, symmetry and beauty in natural forms; symmetry and proportion in art, architecture, ornament and design; perspective and optics; number, iteration, and infinity; mathematical and computer techniques and themes in art, architecture and design. Note: This class is limited to students participating in SAGES. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 211. Beethoven and the Age of Revolution. 3 Units.

Beethoven's music is symbolic of the age and spirit of change which reached its zenith with the French Revolution. Fueled by political, social, and emotional reactions, his oeuvre was remarkable in every way. From the early works, imitative of Haydn and Mozart, through his truly unique later compositions, Beethoven was revolutionary in his person and in his music. The course will center around specific Beethoven masterworks which are being presented by University Circle Institutions, and student attendance at these concerts will be required. Class sessions will involve discussions concerning the historical and cultural setting, influences, and analytic investigation into these masterworks. Readings will be taken from Joseph Kaman and Alan Tyson (The New Grove Beethoven), Frida Knight (Beethoven and the Age of Revolution), and George Marek (Beethoven: Biography of a Genius). This course is directed towards the general university student, and no specialized knowledge of music is necessary, although certain rudimentary aspects of musical discourse will be covered. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 227. Travel Writing on Screen. 3 Units.

Through the image of the traveler in a wide range of films, we will examine such issues as border crossing, culture shock, and the nature of memory. Topics include: The Grand Tour, pilgrimage, exile, and imaginary journeys. A group presentation, 5 short-reaction papers, and a take-home final essay are required. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 229. Art Mirrors Art. 3 Units.

At the beginning of the Renaissance, about the year 1400, an important new theme arose in painting, sculpture and printmaking--the theme of art about art. At a time when the status of artists in society was rising, new subjects began to appear in western European art that depicted both the artist and the process of making art. Self portraits of artists, depictions of Saint Luke painting the Virgin Mary, images of women as artists and muses, classical and mythological stories of art making (Pygmalion and Galatea, Apelles painting the mistress of Alexander the Great), depictions of painting and sculpture studios and of art academies and instruction, scenes of art galleries and collections, still lifes about art, all reflected this new cultural interest in art as a topic in itself. This seminar will look at individual works of art and subject types to understand what they tell us about the role of the arts and the changing status of the artist in the Renaissance and early modern period, up to the eve of the French Revolution, about 1789. The works we study will thus be understood as symbolic indicators of social status and ideas about what art meant to European society. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 233. Constructing the Self. 3 Units.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore how individuals construct and present the self. The class will explore what we know of the self from historical, sociological, psychological, and philosophical perspectives. We will examine how the meaning of the self has changed over time. We will also explore where the self comes from, and the role of parents, peers and society in making a person who they are. Finally, we will explore how the self is defined for others, whether through an online presence, fashion choices, or the names that people prefer for themselves. Specific topics will include Freud's view of the self as unavailable to consciousness, the importance and fallacy of high self-esteem, individualist and collective societies, and the ethics of self-presentation. Students should expect to develop their critical thinking as well as writing and oral presentation skills through this class. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 241. The Birth of the Modern: 1905-1925. 3 Units.

"The Birth of the Modern: 1905-1925" will attempt to answer the question "What is the modern?" by exploring some of the breakthrough works of literature, music, art, and scientific theory in the first decades of the twentieth century. We will study what characterizes the new modes of thinking or "language" of modernity, developed in experimental work across the arts, the sciences, and the social sciences. We will be examining some of the major manifestos of and statements about the nature of Modernism in order to see how they illuminate, for example, a novel by James Joyce or a painting by Picasso, a composition by Stravinsky, a scientific theory of Einstein's, or a psychological theory of Freud's. At the conclusion of the seminar, students will present their findings and write a research paper about "the modern" as it relates to a field of particular interest to them. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 246. How to Make a Leader. 3 Units.

Leaders are both born and made. Some seem to naturally know what to do and some need to study and practice to gain the necessary skills. Both groups can be successful and it usually requires a combination of natural ability and effort to become the very best. Leaders often point to role models as being important to the development of "natural" or acquired ability. This course is appropriate for both those who are intellectually curious about leadership. The course will be divided into three sections. The first part will involve reading and discussions to explore and identify what leaders are like and what they do. During the second part you will observe leaders in action and talk to them about what they think makes them successful. Some examples of what you may observe will include a surgeon in the operating room (theater), a coach with his/her players, an executive in the board room, a concertmaster with his/her musicians and a judge in a courtroom. The third part of the course will involve readings and discussions during which you will develop a personal approach to the level of leadership to which you aspire. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 249. Paris: From Revolution to Globalization. 3 Units.

This course explores the history of Paris as it became the center of French national life, international culture and politics in the 19th century and a global city in the late 20th. The course acquaints students with the history of Paris as a dynamic environment deeply influenced by industrializing forces during this period. We will study contemporary writings, art and popular culture economic developments, political and military events, and architectural and engineering projects that have profoundly shaped the city and popular responses to it. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 250. Medical Narratives. 3 Units.

This course examines the relationship between medicine and narrative by exploring the representational structures and narrative conventions that have been used to understand and communicate the experience of illness, to tell stories about the human body, and to diagnose and treat disease. The course focuses on literary texts (including novels, plays, short stories and memoirs) written by doctors, patients, nurses and creative writers, as well as on medical case histories from different cultures and historical periods. It examines such topics as the uses of narrative in medical practice; the uses of metaphor in conceptualizing and representing disease; the ethical dilemmas posed by medical research and practice; the therapeutic value of narrative; the structural similarities (and historical links) between detective fiction and medical case histories; the imaginative function of illness in literature; the cultural myths and iconography of disease in different historical periods; the representation of physical and mental illness and the human body in language and art, and cultural responses to major health crises such as bubonic plague, syphilis, and AIDS. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 267. Medieval Love Songs: Poetry, Music, Spirituality. 3 Units.

In the high and late Middle Ages (c1100-c1450), love songs accounted for much of the poetry and music composed at the secular courts and urban centers of Europe. At the same time, spiritual love songs were an important element of medieval Christian theology and worship. What may surprise a modern audience is that the worldly love songs were often intensely spiritual, while the religious ones were often highly sensual and erotic. This seminar investigates the convergence of worldly and spiritual elements in the poetry and music of medieval love songs. Students will learn basic tools for analyzing medieval poetry and music, and through such analysis, coupled with discussion of readings from the scholarly literature, they will explore the provocative interactions between literal and allegorical, sacred and profane, and ascetic and erotic elements in medieval culture. Primary texts will be drawn from Bernard of Clairvaux's commentaries on the Song of Songs, the courtly lyrics and melodies of the troubadours and trouveres, and the lyric poetry of Dante, Pertrach, and Boccaccio. No prior musical training required. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 275. Colors, Capes, and Characters: American Comics Symbolism. 3 Units.

The history of the comic book is a vital site for critical questions about intersections of art and popular culture in America. In this course we will not simply read "funny books," but will examine a genre that is as unique as its many colorful protagonists: from Popeye to Superman, Wonder Woman to the X-men, comics have given us larger-than-life characters who are often caricatures of dominant (and sometimes subversive) American ideologies. We will learn not only the history of this unique genre, but will interrogate what it means to truly read comics artistically, politically, culturally, and symbolically. At heart, reading comics in an exercise in interpretation: given visual symbols, what meanings can we take from them? What can comics tell us? And how can we write about them in intelligent, critical ways? In this course we will learn to approach comics through critical thinking strategies; that is, questioning what they are, what they say, and where they come from. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 279. Navigating Contemporary Art. 3 Units.

Art has always had a shifting, complicated relationship to the general public. In today's world, contemporary art is sometimes regarded as a detached, self-reflexive, and elite mystery reserved for in-the-know connoisseurs and aspiring scene-makers. Yet there are many points of entry for meaningful dialogue about the art, the artists, and the audience that comprise the world of contemporary art. This seminar will explore the critical and cultural contexts that can help foster this conversation. It will include visits to local museums, galleries, and artists' studios, and culminate in a tour of the Progressive Art Collection. The goal of the seminar is to inspire a genuine interest in contemporary art and provide students with the tools required to think, speak, and write more clearly about it. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 280. Passport to Eastern Europe. 3 Units.

Images and texts shape rather than merely reflect the world and its geopolitical structures. Novels, films, and myths make significant contributions to the varied ways that people make sense of continents, nations, and other (often too conveniently used) geopolitical categories such and the East and West. After considering the ways in which the European continent has been imagined over the centuries, we will explore texts and films that have contributed to the invention of East Central Europe and the Balkans and continue to shape our understanding of the eastern parts of Europe. The class will include analyses of current news coverage of this area to unpack representations disseminated by the media and to reflect on the forces that aim to shape our understanding of geopolitical entities. Ultimately, the course hopes to address geopolitical assumptions, evaluate cultural contexts, and help you think critically about the constructed nature of geopolitical categories. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 284. The Art of Madness. 3 Units.

Taking a historical approach, this course will examine the relationship between the evolution of social and medical attitudes toward mental illness and fictional representations of madness in literature. Beginning with the early modern period, students will compare period sociological and medical narratives on mental illness to fiction works with representations of madness. In so doing, students will consider how the interactive dynamics of art and science contribute to cultural and social thought. Specific areas of inquiry will include: the development of psychology and its effect on societal perceptions of mental illness; cultural developments that occurred in response to changing perceptions of mental illness over the centuries; and the use of representational structures and narrative conventions in understanding and communicating the experience of mental illness. Other interrogations will include the imaginative function of mental illness in literature (e.g., melancholy's role in creativity); the cultural myths in iconography of mental illness in different historical periods; and ethical dilemmas regarding mental illness as reflected in both medical and literary narratives. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285D. The World of African Literature. 3 Units.

In this seminar, we will look at how a diverse number of African writers have responded, in both form and content, to three periods in Africa's literary history: the 1960s, or the decolonization period, which produced nationalist literature; the 1970s and 1980s, or the neocolonial period, which produced revolutionary novels; and the 1990s through the present, a period producing literature that contends with globalization. In an attempt to answer the riddle of what makes an African novel African, we shall grapple with fundamental questions concerning the origin of the novel; how it came to Africa; African literary traditions; and the language of the African novel. We will also use African literature to explore universal questions about politics and literature: What is a protest novel? What is the role of the writer and of art in society? The goal of the seminar is to increase your appreciation of African literature and literature in general, and at the same time sharpen your analytical, critical, oral and written skills. You will be expected to lead discussions, engage in peer critiques and, through scholarly essays, engage African literature. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285I. Representing the Immigrant. 3 Units.

For many the world over AMERICA is a dream, a powerful myth, whether imagined through TV and movies, metaphors such as The Gold Mountain, or as symbolized by the Statue of Liberty. Following those visions may lead to success or disenchantment or both. Through fiction, memoir, films, and photographs we will explore the experience of immigrants: the tensions, generational conflicts, and difficulties with communication and culture their families undergo. We will examine expressions of those varied and complex experiences, especially how language represents them. We will also look at the significance of language itself--think about what and how words mean, and the difficulties of linguistic and cultural translation. Students will share their reactions to what we read and see in class discussion and also in writing informally, even (if they wish) personally. Formal requirements: two shorter analytical papers and a longer paper using sources and possibly interviews, also to be presented in oral reports. There will be conferences on papers and revision. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285N. The American Dream: Real and Imagined. 3 Units.

What is meant when we or our leaders talk about "the American dream"? Is it a political cliché, a myth, or something fundamental to our national ethos? In this seminar students will explore what is meant by "the American dream." We will pose the questions: how it has been defined by artists, writers, political leaders, immigrants and the native-born; how it has changed over time; and to what extent the dream is real and/or imagined? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285T. Art, Music and Culture. 3 Units.

This course uses the intersections of art and music as a way to understand how the arts reflect, interact with, and influence the cultures in which they develop. After an introduction to research and writing in the arts (week 1), the course continues with a survey of certain historical periods and masterpieces of European and American art and music from 1700 to the present (weeks 2-6). It then takes up a few important themes in the interaction of music and the visual: 1) the concert hall as the intersection of architecture and acoustics (week 7); 2) the art museum and its music (week 8); 3) music and film (week 9); 4) the Broadway musical (week 10), and 5) rock music and its artifacts (week 11). A full week (12) of instruction on writing and oral presentation then prepares students for a seminar paper and seminar report, the creation and refining of which constitutes the final phase (weeks 12-15) of the course. Requirements and activities include, in addition to the seminar paper and report, a series of activities including three optional and three required events centered on the Cleveland Museum of Art and its concerts, the Cleveland Orchestra at Severance Hall, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285U. Popular Music and Film. 3 Units.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying music in American film. Students will learn to analyze film and music with greater sophistication, to contextualize them in time and place, and to interpret their meanings. The films predominantly feature jazz and popular music. We will discuss several aspects of a film: filmmaking techniques, visual composition, the film's available interpretations, audience reception, and so on. We will also discuss musical composition and performance, artists' self-representation, the link between music and commerce, and so on. Course sources include films and critical literature. The primary focus of the class will be on the ways music and film intersect as entertainment and art. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285V. Castaways and Cannibals: Stories of Empire. 3 Units.

Through a study of texts that exploit "new world" images like the castaway, the cannibal, the wild man, and the exotic woman, this course explores the ideologies that propelled nineteenth-century imperialism, particularly regarding the British in Australia and South Africa. The class will consider how British settlers made "homes" in hostile and unfamiliar climates, how they addressed the problem of unfriendly and unequal contact with indigenous peoples, and how contemporary novelists reevaluate the historical past. The course will work under the premise that contemporary geopolitical realities have been shaped by the imaginative work of British colonialists who, under the principle of terra nullius or "no man's land," claimed the land and the resources of these southern territories and dismissed the very existence of the indigenous peoples that populated them. The scope of the course will be broadly historical, exploring works that participated in British imperialism, as well as those that take a modern perspective. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, film, ethnography, natural history, history, and criticism. Ultimately, students will consider how narratives participate in the shaping of reality and of real-world relations of power. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285X. Living in the Digital Age. 3 Units.

Digital technologies have changed the world we live in. This brave new world is populated by new-media, video, games, and social networks. To survive this world we need a vocabulary of criticism and authorship, a "New Media Literacy" that we can use to effectively and efficiently embrace our roles as both artist and critic. This course explores a wide variety of New Media themes in both contemporary and historical contexts. Students in the course will analyze their ever-evolving relationship to New Media as both viewers and creators. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285Y. Musical Acts: The Performer in Western Culture. 3 Units.

Much of music history emphasizes the text/composition and its author/composer. Yet music is unique among the arts in that a musician must bring the work to life; arguably, a piece of music can only be said to exist in real time, in performance. This course will examine musical performance as it has evolved over the centuries and consider how thinking about performance and performers continues to change. Although an understanding of the rudiments of music will be helpful, students will not need advanced training in music for this course to be of interest. Readings will include historical accounts and reviews as well as articles about performance and musical aesthetics. Further sources will be recorded audio, video and live performances, as well as interactions with performers (and teachers of performers) from the Cleveland Institute of Music and the university's departments of music, theater and dance. The interests and needs of the students will help set the tempo and line of our class discussions. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 285Z. The Ubiquitous Frankenstein. 3 Units.

This seminar will explore the birth, evolution, devolution, and undead nature of the Frankenstein myth in popular culture. Using Mary Shelley's novel, her source texts, 19th- and 20th-century critical accounts, and 19th- and 20th-century popular cultural manifestations, the seminar participants will discover how "Frankenstein" found its way into the Western mind and continues to provoke responses both in those familiar and in those completely unfamiliar with the novel. The course will touch on issues of literary influence, science/technology, religion, ethics, education, literary merit, popular culture relevance, and adaptation as art form. Central questions for the seminar include: (1) Does the Frankenstein myth as we perceive it today have anything to do with Mary Shelley's original novel? (2) What were the moral and ethical implications of Shelley's novel for her time and for the generations afterward? (3) Is an "accurate" film adaptation of a literary work possible or needed? (4) Is being ubiquitous a blessing or a blight for a literary work? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 286C. How Photos Shape What We See. 3 Units.

Because of both its special ability to convince and its ubiquity, photography has had a major impact on the way we view the world, and particularly in our view of "the other." Just like other major forms of discourse, photography should be approached with a thoughtful and critical attitude. Some of the techniques of critical looking are different from the techniques of critical reading, but the fundamental tasks are very similar. The aim of this seminar is to help students develop an awareness of why and how photographs are such effective media of communication, and to help them develop an ability to read photographs critically. This is, of course, set within a general context of developing critical reading and writing skills. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 286J. Creativity and Constraint. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to explore creative problem-solving as it relates to different disciplines and types of problems and to encourage a passion for finding best solutions, not merely obvious ones. We will use and evaluate case studies of real-world projects and complex decisions, readings about creativity, firsthand accounts from creative professionals, and in-class exercises to hone strategic thinking skills. The seminar is specifically concerned with how constraints--ranging from budgets and schedules to the laws of physics--can encourage, rather than inhibit, creative solutions. But we will also consider general questions about the process and psychology of problem-solving. Areas of investigation will include steps in establishing problem scope and defining and recognizing successful solutions; the dynamics of group versus individual problem-solving; and strategies for communicating complex ideas to teammates and leading the creative process. Students will be expected to participate actively in shaping class discussions and activities. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 286S. Shakesploitation of an Icon: Four Hundred Years of Shakespeare Marketing. 3 Units.

Following the interregnum in England, William Shakespeare began a long, sustained trajectory as a cultural icon, first in England, but eventually among all English-speaking cultures. In the process, Shakespeare's works have been reinterpreted, adapted, re-contexted, commoditized, and re-purposed for the sake of art, educational relevance, and entertainment. In the process, Shakespeare has often become the tool of unabashed commercialism, a practice which has come to be known as "Shakesploitation." But why is Shakespeare's work so frequently purloined? Why are out of context references to him so ubiquitous? Why do people tend to equate the name of Shakespeare with qualities of genius? Why have his works been continually adapted (often shamelessly) not only for the stage, but into other genres, including operas, paintings, novels and films? How do we account for the proliferation of Shakespeare-based self-help books such as Shakespeare on Leadership? Why is the infant stimulation video Baby Shakespeare a best-seller? This course will explore these questions not only by reading a selection of Shakespeare's most enduring works, but also by examining criticism, adaptations, and marketing strategies that have been applied to Shakespeare's image and works over the last four centuries. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 286U. Puzzled. 3 Units.

"Puzzled" will look at the practice of puzzle making and puzzle-solving and explore the meaning of puzzles for different cultures throughout history. We will read works from the disciplines of math, history, anthropology, philosophy, and literature. We will explore why certain types of puzzles became popular and how puzzles have transferred from one culture to another. We will examine the role of code writing and code-breaking in the military and in the world of business. We will read examples of fiction and watch films that adopt the form of the puzzle as a narrative device. We will think about the function of puzzles as instruments to exercise the faculties of reason and logic and as a means of leisure or pleasant distraction. Students will be asked to both solve and create puzzles over the course of the semester. They will write analytical essays on topics related to the practice and history of puzzle making and puzzle solving, and they will pursue a research topic that revolves around an issue or problem that has "puzzled" them. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 286V. Food Craze: (No) Reservations. 3 Units.

The great number of food-related TV-shows indicate an unprecedented interest in questions about and fascination with food; in fact, these TV shows allure viewers with the appeal of a myth: eating involves discovery (Anthony Bourdain's No Reservations, On the Road Again with Mario Batali, Planet Food), thrill (Bizarre Foods), or "supernatural" competition (Man vs. Food, Top Chef). These television shows and food-related writings that accompany them in earnest "worship" food and often promote ideas of multiculturalism by which exciting and novel locales, foods, and meal preparatory techniques are discovered. The objective of this course is to "indulge" in these shows and food writings and scrutinize them: What explains such fascination with the viewing of and reading about food? In what ways can food-exploration trips expand on ideas and critiques of multiculturalism and globalization? What explains the centrality and "mythical" nature of food in the twenty-first century? To begin these conversations, we will touch on a plethora of food writing works including works motivated by environmental and health concerns such as Michael Pollan's essays. Then we look at the world of cookbooks (including the cookbooks of Julia Child and Rachel Ray), food blogs and TV-shows, and essays by Bill Buford and Calvin Trillin among many others. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287F. Telling True Stories: Literary Journalism in America. 3 Units.

Literary journalism is a genre of nonfiction writing that employs all of the reportorial and truth-telling covenants of traditional journalism, while employing rhetorical and storytelling techniques more commonly associated with fiction. In short, it is journalism as literature. This course will introduce you to major themes in American literary journalism, the genre's representative writers, and the enduring questions of the field. For example, we will ask how these stories work as narratives, as scientific explanations, as political tools, and as entertainment. How do these categories overlap? How do they motivate us to act? Where are these stories published and who is the readership? How do historical and cultural contexts influence and appear in the works? What is the relationship between (literary) journalism and democracy? What is the relationship between form and content? Is there a difference between physical truth and emotional truth? In the process of answering these questions, this course will emphasize close reading, interdisciplinary thinking, and the writing process. Through reading assignments, class discussions and presentations, and paper writing we will have the opportunity to examine, analyze, and develop our own interpretations about these multifaceted writings and the diverse cultural experiences and meanings they chronicle. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287G. Shadowplay/East and West. 3 Units.

Shadows flicker across the screen, drawing us back to the precursors of the cinema and forward to digital effects. To borrow Gorki's phrase, the cinema is truly a "train of shadows." This course focuses on interactions between shadow theatre, dance, visual arts, the cinema, and traditional forms of play. While the main focus is on traditional artistic forms, we also explore modern variants, including the use of shadows in contemporary photography. We will look at shadows in different (yet overlapping) contexts, and compare the effects of still and moving shadows. All of these contexts involve moments of narrative and silence. Through a series of short papers which will be integrated into a longer paper, each student will explore his/her approach to a central question: What does it mean to play with shadows? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287H. Cityscapes in 20th-Century and Contemporary Visual Culture. 3 Units.

This seminar will explore the dynamic meanings of modern and contemporary urban environments through visual representation. What does a city look like? As great complex entities of constant change, we will see that cities have been portrayed in a myriad of ways. What social ideals have engaged the vision of architects, urban planners, and landscape designers in the making of the metropolis since the late 19th century? How have artists interpreted major cities as sites of modernity, technological advancement, civilization and cultural vanguard; or, in contrast as sites of failed experiment? How can forms of representation help us envision the entirety of urban spaces of diverse geographies, including typically un-aesthetic forms of fringe areas, the abandoned zones of prior use, and infrastructures? What recent developments in convergent media might be employed as catalyst for achieving an enhanced understanding of the interrelationship of urban structures, spaces, and human need? Our chief objective is to begin to comprehend the enormity of these questions. Thus, we will view and discuss selected examples of architecture, design, art, photography, film and video, in essence sampling the roles they have played in the process of conceiving and imagining the design and significance of cities. Our examination of visual material will be organized over the course of the semester according to three major overlapping themes: the utopian and visionary city, the visual culture of cities, and the emerging city. The methods by which we will seek to interpret the visual component of our studies in the three categories will be adapted from the perspectives of visual culture, urban studies, urban design and landscape urbanism, and architectural history. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287M. Literature of 9/11. 3 Units.

Nearly 10 years after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, politicians, economists, artists, and educators continue to use the umbrella term "post-9/11" to describe our general cultural sensibility. Yet, what does it mean, specifically, to live in a "post-9/11" America? How have the cataclysmic events of that day altered our political and intellectual points of view? In this course, we will explore these questions by considering how novelists, poets, and other writers have and continue to represent September 11th. We will analyze techniques used to narrate the story of 9/11, investigating how American cultural values--or critiques of such values--influence the aesthetic choices that writers make. Our course will begin chronologically at "Ground Zero," as we examine representations of the immediate urban trauma while exploring the tensions between memorial and commemoration, spectacle and commercial pursuits. We will then focus on works by both American and international authors addressing the days and months following the attacks. We will examine how America is depicted with respect to its foreign policy and domestic politics, paying particular attention to the space of the "home." In addition to novels, short fiction, and poetry, we will read cultural criticism and some philosophy. Students will be given additional opportunities to explore film and other visual or new media representations of 9/11. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287N. Fantasy and Philosophy. 3 Units.

Fantasy novels and films can be philosophical catalysts. One can read philosophical arguments and debate ethical and epistemological issues. Or, one can become immersed in a work of art and imagination that presents a fiction expressing the same profound human issues. Such a work dramatizes philosophical debates and conflicts, and hurls readers and viewers into poignant, gripping, suspenseful, horrific, or beautiful stories that convey those very same struggles with truth and morality. Indeed, while many philosophical works are inaccessible to everyone but those with a specialized vocabulary (or prescient ability to discern tortured language), literary and cinematic works actually stimulate a different part of the brain. The ideas are conveyed and processed differently, and this is why works of fiction can have such poignant and lasting effects on the emotions, provoke us to meditate on the grave and constant in human sufferings, and revisit those works as we relive our own struggles with truth, morality, love, identity, conflict, violence, and death. In this course students will read short works of fiction and philosophy, and watch films that delve into philosophical issues. These include selections from The Seventh Seal, Dr. Strangelove, Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Star Trek, Futurama, House, M.D., True Blood, Dexter, Woman in the Dunes, The Denial of Death, The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons, Death's Dream Kingdom, Thus Spake Zarathustra, Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature, Serial Killers and Philosophy, and The Bhagavad Gita. Students who have taken USSO 286W for credit may not take this course. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287O. What is Art for?. 3 Units.

Together we will study a crucial and distinctive aspect of the human mind: the uniquely human ability to engage in the production and reception of art. This course will explore human responses to artistic works in a wide range of media: literature, music, painting, and performance. Some of the larger questions we will be addressing in this course are the following: What is art for? Is art simply a kind of cognitive play that refines behavioural options over time? How is art related to (or dependent on) simulation, empathy and aspects of social cognition? What precisely can science contribute to explaining the aesthetic response and the artistic impulse? What, given the inherent constraints on human creativity imposed by human cognitive abilities, are the unique artistic conventions that contribute to experiencing a work of art as a work of art? What are the conceptual, intentional, emotional dimensions of art, manifested as they are in artistic creativity, talent and appreciation? Like most big questions, these are addressed in different ways by the disciplines of psychology, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, philosophy, and aesthetics. By exploring some collisions among these multiple perspectives we will learn more than through any single perspective. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287T. King Arthur's Days and Knights. 3 Units.

Few legends have remained popular and vital as long as the story of King Arthur has. Beginning with brief references in sixth-century histories, Arthur has risen again and again in medieval adventure stories, Victorian lyrics, and contemporary cinema. Over thirty-five films, in fact, have depicted the adventures of the Round Table. How can we explain this phenomenon? To investigate this question, this seminar will trace the development of the legend from its oldest remaining written manifestations to the present day. A chronological approach will allow us to see how Arthur's story accumulated new elements over time, including the famous love affair between Lancelot and Guinevere and the equally famous quest for the Holy Grail--neither of which appeared in the earliest versions of the story. We will discuss topics such as what Arthur has represented at different periods in time and how his story changes when it is retold in different genres and media. We will also consider how writers have adapted Round Table stories to suit political and social agendas. Finally, to broaden our perspective we will spend a unit exploring legends from a variety of cultures and comparing their presentation of heroism. Texts will include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, pieces of Sir Thomas Malory's The Death of Arthur, the indispensable Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and portions of its new incarnation, Spamalot. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 287X. Paris in the Arts. 3 Units.

Since the late eighteenth century, Paris has been a favorite subject for visual artists and writers alike, as well as the birthplace of several seminal artistic movements, such as Impressionism, Cubism, and the New Wave. This course will use representations of Paris in the arts as lenses through which the identity and recent history of this major city will come into focus. Further, stories, photographs, and films that stage the city of Paris and its people will also allow us to explore the broader relationship between art, the city, and the plight of modern man. The course will include a wide range of artworks, from mid-nineteenth century photographs documenting the destruction of Medieval Paris and the advent of a rational capital, to stories chronicling the fate of hopeful newcomers, and films where the city is treated either as intimate landscape or impersonal grid. The course will be both discussion based and writing intensive: students will be encouraged to envision class participation and writing assignments as means to analyze collaboratively, as well as individually, the material at hand. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288E. Fantastic Voyages: The Journey in the Ancient and Medieval World. 3 Units.

When we make a record of a journey to an unfamiliar place (regardless of whether or not we really went there), we are framing difference. On the one hand, we create a record of what we see and experience, while on the other, we reveal our own cultural standpoint based on how we represent that experience. In this seminar, students will read a selection of narratives from antiquity to the late medieval era that purport to depict a "real" journey into the unknown, with the intent of examining how the representation of different cultures by the traveler, whether real or imaginary, shapes and defines cultural boundaries. Our focus will be on journeys within the cultures of the Mediterranean and Europe (including Britain), and will include texts from Greek, Roman, Middle Eastern, and Western travelers. Students will consider the texts in relation to their context and audience, evaluate the authority of the author's account using primary source material, and draw on subsequent scholarship. By undertaking a symbolic journey through the eyes of different travelers, students will learn not only to examine texts from several perspectives, but also to recognize the ways in which cultural differences and "otherness" are constructed. We will begin with the concept of the journey in the ancient world, particularly how different cultures traveled and how their mode of transport (horse, boat, foot) and mode of living (nomadic, sedentary) influenced their perception of the people they encountered. As we move from antiquity into the medieval era, we will trace how religious, political, and economic changes influenced representations of other cultures. In addition to written texts, we will study visual references, including illustrations based on the seminar's required texts as well as early maps. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288I. Diversions: Experimental Stories and New Media. 3 Units.

In this course, students will study works in which the authors and artists have experimented with traditional linear forms and created stories that are, for instance, labyrinthine, framed, collaged, geometrical, digressive, and even networked. While both print-based and digital texts offer spaces for diverse and deeply engaging written or visual performances, they also require further critical inquiry into the ways in which they create, reflect, or resist social and cultural values. Our focus in this course will be exploring how stories (and other texts) - in print, on screen, on canvas, in digital formats - that don't follow or that play with conventional rules of order encourage us to participate in making sense of our contemporary world. The goals of the course include: exploring the relationship between form and content in written and visual productions, developing a critical perspective from which to enjoy, assess, and respond creatively to traditional print and multimedia presentations, and making excellent use of research resources at CWRU and cultural resources at University Circle. In addition, students will work to develop their writing and presentation skills and to innovate novel models of research writing. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288J. Cultural Representations of Violence. 3 Units.

The twentieth century was arguably the most violent in human history. That legacy has carried into our own time: from 9/11 to school shootings to the recent conflict in Libya, violence surrounds us. But what exactly is violence? How is it that we all recognize it when we see it? How do we represent it to ourselves? Most importantly, how do we make sense of it? Can we make sense of it? This class will explore these questions by studying the uneasy role violence plays in literature, film, performance art, and other cultural productions. As we do so, we will consider two central and potentially conflicting ideas. On the one hand, violence tends to resist our abilities to represent it; any depiction seems somehow inadequate to the real thing. At the same time, representations of violence surround us constantly, and for any number of political, cultural, and social reasons. Thus, violence in modern and contemporary culture is paradoxical, both permeating and resisting our imaginations. Through class discussions, written responses, presentations, and independent research projects, we will explore these and other ideas, considering how art attempts to comprehend violence and how artistic representations of violence relate to (implicate?) their audience. Although our focus will be largely on art, and primarily literature, our approach will be necessarily interdisciplinary. Be prepared to weigh in on topics as diverse as politics, aesthetics, philosophy, gender and sexuality, war, trauma, and colonialism. Undoubtedly, violence can be a painful subject, but the goal of our seminar is to pursue a rigorous intellectual and imaginative inquiry into one of the most pressing topics of our time. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288K. Hiroshima: History, Memory, Representation. 3 Units.

On August 6, 1945, when the U.S. first used nuclear weapons against Japan, the name "Hiroshima" ceased to designate merely a place, and came to signify an event, an anxiety, and a prognosis for the future. This course seeks to interrogate the various and overlapping discourses which constitute the symbolic nexus around Hiroshima--and, to a lesser extent, Nagasaki. We will be asking how the event of the bombing has been understood according to different disciplinary perspectives (history, psychology, literature, and film) and how it is represented from both American and Japanese perspectives. Accordingly, our investigation will be an intensely comparative attempt to answer the question: if there is something like what Robert Lifton calls "the atomic bomb experience," then how is that experience captured in different forms of cultural expression? Or, perhaps more importantly, how do these cultural objects speak to an ongoing negotiation with historical trauma in the present? What differences and similarities do we find among different, cross-cultural encounters with the atomic bomb? Our investigation into the politics of representation around this event will lead us ultimately to ask whether it is even possible to capture the novelty and horror of an event that in many ways exceeds language altogether. After orienting ourselves to the history of the bombings and the psychological and philosophical issues at stake in them, we will turn to some of its canonical representations in John Hersey's Hiroshima and Masuji Ibuse's Black Rain. From there, we will look at Yoshihiro Tatsumi's graphic novel Goodbye. And we will conclude with the cinematic representations of Alain Resnais's Hiroshima mon amour and Ishiro Honda's Godzilla. As a University Seminar, the course will also include substantial instruction in research and writing, leading to students' production of a medium-length research paper which they will work on throughout the semester. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288R. Cultural and Ethical Issues in American-Chinese Business Relations. 3 Units.

The American and Chinese economies are the two biggest economies in the world. The Chinese economy is the fastest growing large economy in the world. The dynamic American economy is unique in its combination of large multinational enterprises and small entrepreneurial firms. The American economy is characterized by a vast private sector, the rule of law, and the largest private capital markets in the world. The Chinese economy is 30 years into a period of reform from communist industrial organization to "socialism with Chinese characteristics", which includes a significant role for the private sector. The Chinese economy is still an experiment. The established American business system exists within a democratic political system, where corporate lobbying has a significant influence on the creation of laws and government policy. The Chinese economy is still under the tight control of the Chinese Communist Party, a one-party dictatorship. When Americans go to China to do business, they find the cultural, social, political, and moral systems vastly different than what they are familiar with. Transparency International Ranks China 27 out of 28 of the most corrupt large economies in the world. In China, bribery of government officials and kickbacks to sales and purchasing managers is common. Key questions we will investigate are: 1. In what ways are the two business systems similar and different? 2.What is the nature of Chinese social relations? How do they differ from American social relations? What effect do they have on business? 3. What is the nature of the Chinese political system? What impact does it have on business in China? 4. How do American business people negotiate the Chinese business system? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288V. Seclusion, Gender and the Exotic: Imagining the Harem. 3 Units.

When the term "harem" is invoked, the first image that comes to mind is of scantily clad women living in sequestered opulence in some exotic, yet vaguely "Eastern" place. This image has been reproduced and perpetuated through art, literature and music to the degree that even today, familiar themes of seduction, passivity and mystery related to the harem can be found throughout popular culture. Historically, gender segregation reaches into antiquity and existed in a variety of forms, cross-culturally. The term "harem" was not used regularly until the 13th century, and then only referred to the specific form of gender segregation used by the Ottoman court. Application of the word "harem" to all women's quarters in other cultures was the result of European contact with the Ottoman Empire, despite the fact that other cultures often had their own, distinct, terminology for women's spaces. In this seminar, we will explore the history and practice of gender segregation as a means to examine how the idea of the harem was constructed in the Eastern and Western imagination. Under what circumstances did women live separately? How were gendered spaces created, justified and maintained? Where did our image of the harem come from? Using primary and secondary sources, we will examine a selection of histories and representations of the harem in literature, slave and travel narratives, and religion. As the Western idea of the harem is part of what Edward Said theorized as "Orientalism", we will explore Said's theory as well as subsequent theories related to gender and the exotic. In addition, we will look at images of women's quarters from antiquity to the present and listen to representations of the exotic in music. Our goal is not only to study the historical fact of the harem, but also to engage issues related to gender, the exotic and representation from different disciplinary and cultural points of view. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288W. A History of Noise: Music and Politics from Beethoven to Jimi Hendrix. 3 Units.

This writing-intensive course examines the roles that noise has played in political discourses throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Its charged bookends--Beethoven and Jimi Hendrix-- invite students to challenge supposed differences between "Art" and popular music and examine relationships between music and society. "Who does 'Art' serve?," "Is it possible to distinguish between 'Art' and noise?," and "Is sound capable of influence at all?" are among the chief questions this course explores. The curriculum's historical breadth allows students to consider these larger questions through a variety of case studies, including (among others) the bombast and nationalism of Beethoven's ninth symphony; the Marxist-inspired "emancipation" of sound, as presented by Arnold Schoenberg; the gender-bending metal of Eddie Van Halen; and the protest-by-distortion of Hendrix's national anthem at Woodstock. By the end of this course, students will gain more awareness of the ways in which the music surrounding them seeks to shape society. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288X. 1939. 3 Units.

This course will examine the year 1939. At the time, people in the United States and Great Britain were invested in creating an active and lush fantasy world. There were debutant balls, the World's Fair, college sports, "The Big Sleep," "Gone With the Wind," and "The Wizard of Oz." Meanwhile Hitler was also conceiving of his dream world. The history of 1939 is the history of these competing fantasies and their collision. In addition to bettering their writing and research skills, students in this class will learn to understand the language and imagery of films, speeches, propaganda, social mores, diplomacy, and other various modes of communication that were used to construct and reinforce the sundry of imagined realities of 1939. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 288Y. Shots in the Dark: Investigating Crime Films. 3 Units.

Crime movies and their subgenres (Gangster, film noir, detective, police) are the most enduringly popular of all Hollywood genres. They've been around since the silent era and attest to America's fascination with crime. But another reason we are so attracted to crime films stems from a pair of contradictory narrative projects that underline the genre. On the one hand, these films valorize the distinctions between the genre's stock characters--criminal, victim and avenger--in order to affirm the social, moral or institutional order. On the other hand, crime movies explore the relations between the three roles in order to mount a critique that challenges that order. In addition to emphasizing film studies, we will study the films for what they say about crime, criminals and criminal law. As most crime films contain an investigation, so too will the organization of the course. There are methods for analyzing film just as there are methods for investigating a crime scene. Investigation requires identifying, collecting, analyzing and interpreting evidence. We'll start by investigating what makes the genre so enduring--its mise-en-scene, intent or characters? You will be reporting your findings in three scholarly papers: a formal analysis on a specific film, a sociological analysis of a specific film and a research paper with documentation. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 289A. Do We Have Free Will?. 3 Units.

Concepts such as freedom, choice, moral responsibility, and autonomy are commonly invoked to describe our sense, as human beings, that our actions and thoughts are really our own. This seems like experiential commonsense-when I choose to read a novel instead of a philosophy text it feels like the decision to do so was made by me, that there was no coercion, or other seen or unseen force, that intervened to make me choose as I did. We extend this logic to the judgment of moral and legal responsibility. If you engage in good behavior, you get the praise; if you do bad things, you are blameworthy. Despite our self-perception that we freely make decisions and choose our actions, we sometimes invoke the notion that certain events are the result of some prior cause or circumstance that determines what occurs in the present. In this instance, we do not appear to be fully free in our choices because we cannot undo the causes that dictate what is taking place here and now. To the extent that we experience current actions as having a cause in the past, we are flirting with the idea that our behavior is not wholly free, but determined or conditioned by what has come before. Determinism, necessity, fate, destiny, predestination: these are terms typically used to describe the sense that our actions and thoughts are the result of unknown forces or circumstances beyond our control. This course uses classic and contemporary texts, taken from multiple cultural traditions, to explore the problem of free will and related issues of body/mind dualism and personal identity. Although the term "free will" does not appear in all cultural contexts, found everywhere are questions of whether we are free to act and think as we wish or whether our thoughts and actions are in some way determined. We also read science fiction short stories as thought experiments in order to help us understand the ramifications of various positions on free will and related problems. This course is discussion-based and writing-intensive. Classes focus on analysis and interpretation of texts and ideas. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 289E. Poets of Ohio. 3 Units.

More often than not, contemporary society views poetry as a strange and dated art form. When the genre actually does receive recognition, it is usually under the guise of Hip-Hop or Slam Poetry. While both of those offshoots contain their own poetic and artistic merit, this course intends to familiarize you with contemporary, literary poetry and highlight the dynamic poetry community of Ohio. Luckily for us, many of the poets we will read during the course agreed to visit our class this semester to talk about their work and read their poems. In addition to demonstrating that poetry is alive, well, and thriving all around us, we will also attempt to think critically about this genre. Why do poetic texts, both of the present and the past, seem so difficult to read and understand? What writing techniques, strategies, and styles do poets use that make comprehending their work such a challenge? More importantly, why would anyone choose to write in this manner? Through close readings of the primary texts, researching the historical and literary contexts surrounding contemporary poetry, and discussing the art form with each other (as well as with the poets themselves), we will come to a better understanding of how these texts function. To this extent, our course will engage the symbolic world as we explore the local and national poetry communities, noting how writers found relationships upon geography, aesthetics, and demographics (just to name a few), using written texts to express some emotion, thought, or identity. In order to accomplish these goals, we will read, participate in class discussions, and write extensively about poetry composed by contemporary Ohio poets. Therefore, you will be expected to engage our course texts critically, thinking through the manner in which language operates as a tool for generating and sustaining, as well as undermining, community formation. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 289F. Reading and Writing The City. 3 Units.

This seminar will follow Joyce Carol Oates by asking, "If the City is a text, how shall we read it?" To explore this question, we will study a wide range of writings and other cultural productions. The first part of the course will examine classic and contemporary texts about city life from urban studies, history, philosophy, and geography, among other fields. These texts will provide useful frameworks and insights for the second part of the course, where we will analyze contemporary cultural productions that offer their own intriguing urban visions, including fiction, poetry, film, and music. We will analyze how these texts suggest ways of both reading/interpreting and writing/rewriting the city. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 289G. The American West on Film. 3 Units.

Few geographical areas in the United States contain as many tall tales and mythological figures as the American frontier. From an extreme point of view, the West is the only American myth because no other nation can claim the cowboy, the Native American, or the immigrant worker on the transcontinental railroad. And yet, each of these figures remains spectacularly diverse. We celebrate their variety and lionize their individuality in film, popular novels, and cultural criticism. From the visions of the New World to the conquest of the frontier, the color of the American West proliferates and transforms, defining our culture. In this course, we will investigate how critics have understood our fascination with the Western frontier. The class will broadly explore version of the frontier in novels, films, and historical accounts. Reading about the history of the actual west, the course will then examine how the films of the twentieth century alter history in order to express the fantasies and anxieties of their own time. By studying both history and film, we will be able to interrogate manifest destiny and the myth of American exceptionalism. What makes the West such an integral part of our understanding of America? How has its actual history become myth? What does the American fascination with the cowboy, the Native American, or the outlaw imply about our nation? Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 289J. Beauty Myths Today. 3 Units.

Published just over 20 years ago, Naomi Wolf's influential study "The Beauty Myth" significantly influenced popular thinking about body image. Analyzing both cultural trends and empirical data, Wolf argued that as women made unprecedented advances in public life in the latter half of the 20th century, they were at the same time held to increasingly unrealistic standards of physical beauty. Wolf's study not only contributed to extant analyses of sexism in the media, but also introduced to mainstream readers the politics of the representation of women's bodies in popular culture. This course will examine to what extent Wolf's original claim hold true today. In other words, what physical standards must one meet in order to be considered professionally and personally successful? In exploring this question, we will look at the origins and current workings of the American beauty industry, considering the changing representation of the ideal body throughout the 20th century. We'll read texts by historians, philosophers, novelists, poets, cultural critics, and journalists who examine the politics of beauty. To both (re-)define and trace the continuing effects of beauty myths in the 21st century, we'll consider the rhetoric of ideal womanhood as it shows up in popular texts such as websites promoting anorexia, TV shows about plastic surgery, diet books, magazines, and guides for mothers. Students will have opportunities to define the beauty myth more broadly, exploring its effects on men and its mediating presence in other cultural sites. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 289Y. Reading and Writing Biography. 3 Units.

The study and practice of biography, that is, writing about someone's life, is an important tool for understanding how meaning is constructed. In this class, we will learn some of the history of biography and what it hopes to accomplish in its various sub-genres. Why are biographies so popular? Why are we so interested in them? What do they do? Is it possible to perfectly represent an objective truth of someone or does the discussion of someone else's life require a more symbolic interpretation of things? We will engage in reading and discussing some important and contemporary biographies in a variety of styles and genres from autobiography to works of near-fiction. We will learn how researchers use facts to construct more symbolic narratives around an argument that tells a story about someone's life in a way that engages with important issues of self, audience, and the location of truth. As our final research project, we will undertake our own biographical projects where we will do primary research in order to construct focused narratives of people of our own choosing. To work up to this point, we will work on our own autobiographies, look at the lives of things, and look at some films which foreground the narrative of life. This course will be of great use to writers and researchers who must be able to communicate by any kind of true account in a way that is both engaging and comprehensive. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 290C. Out of Proportion. 3 Units.

In this seminar, we will explore the meaning of things great and small, from the largest buildings and greatest distances, to nanotechnology and the smallest viruses. The seminar's goal will be to inspire critical thinking by confronting our fascination with things expanding and contracting, growing and shrinking, things speeded up and things slowed down. We will approach the subject from a variety of disciplines - cultural history, psychology, mathematics, philosophy, literature, economics, and the sciences - with the intention of unpacking both the topic itself and the tools that we use to explain our world. We will ask questions about why we find gigantism and dwarfism unsettling; how we define ugliness and beauty; how we understand the odds and statistics of horrific or wonderful things happening to us; and how this determines our behavior. After examining theory and examples of things "out of proportion", students will produce a research project that combines primary and secondary sources and will make an argument in behalf of an example that they find compelling. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 290N. Django Chained. 3 Units.

To gain a better understanding of the experience and history of slavery from the perspective of the enslaved, we will read the works of Octavia Butler. She knew that the problem with the historical narrative was that slaves did not write it. As a science fiction and fantasy author, Butler spent her career giving voice to the enslaved by recovering their experience and exposing it to the reader through the lens of imagined and symbolic worlds. By reading her work, we will come to understand a different way of viewing history. We will join the historical narrative with the science fiction narrative to arrive at a deeper understanding of the human experience with subjugation and oppression. The class readings will have time travel, vampires, and aliens. However, the most frightening monsters of all will be human. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 290Q. Great Nineteenth-Century Novels: A Close Look at Some Masterpieces of Continental Fiction. 3 Units.

The form and nature of the novel has changed a lot since the nineteenth-century. There's been the modern novel, the post-modern novel, the experimental novel, the graphic novel, and who knows what's coming next? This course is about what the continental novel was like in the nineteenth-century, the Golden Age of the genre. Its major premise is that you don't have to be a literature major to read, enjoy, and profit from the old-style classic novels. We will read novels by Balzac, Flaubert, Turgenev, and Tolstoy in modern translations, and we will take our time with them, looking closely at the component parts: narrator, plot, setting, character, dialogue, where the meaning comes from. The course offers, in part, obviously, a chance to read some of the great European novels of the nineteenth-century. It also provides a chance to go at a slow enough pace to allow time to study and discuss in detail the techniques these masters of the novel used so brilliantly. Students who complete the course, therefore, will become both familiar with classic texts and more knowledgeable and skillful readers of any and all narrative fiction. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 290U. Poetry for People Who Hate Poetry. 3 Units.

You don't hate it. In fact, you probably already love poetry, even if you don't know it. You might copy moody indie rock lyrics into your journal or quote the rhymes in a rap verse to your friends. You might hum advertising jingles to yourself; you speak in slang and think in metaphor. Why do we tend to treat only some of these instances of figurative language as poems? Is there a difference between poems and poetry? What can our individual attitudes about poetry reveal about what and whom we value on a cultural scale? In this course we will ask these and other questions about our collective love/hate relationship with poetry. All of this attention to how poems and poetry work will help us understand how our own writing should work. This course also focuses on the development of independent research skills and the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments. We will write in a variety of lengths and genres; our reading and research will culminate in a project challenging students to compile an anthology of essential "poetry" with a critical introduction. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 291F. Literary Arcadias: Idealized Landscapes and the Intrusion of Reality. 3 Units.

The literary genre of pastoral has long depicted the simplicity of life in a natural environment--a place situated at a time before environmental exploitation, colonization, and urbanization. These pastoral retreats are often given the generic name "Arcadia." As many critics and authors have noted, however, literary depictions of Arcadia often expose the delicate balance of conflicting realities: peace and war, rich and poor, rural and urban. In this seminar, we will investigate what happens when external reality disrupts Arcadia's Edenic space. Is the creation of these idyllic settings a way of masking the disturbing realities of class inequality, political power, and environmental degradation? Or are authors attempting to articulate an alternative to them? As part of our investigation, we will consider how the pastoral genre has evolved over time, noting especially how depictions of Arcadia have responded to various cultural, commercial, and political changes. We will also examine how the idea of Arcadia shapes contemporary culture and our own understanding of the relationship between nature and society in the modern world. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 291Q. P.R., Spin, and Inventing Reality. 3 Units.

Is it reality or is it spin? We all know the terms--"it's spin," "it's P.R.," "he's a flack"--and none of them are said kindly. Yet, over the past century public relations has become an often invisible multi-billion dollar manipulation of our collective perception of reality. Sometimes this manipulation is benign. But just as often it can weaken our democracy through weapons of words, images, and argument. This seminar will explore the origins and consequences of this silent, symbolic revolution. We will look at the uses of P.R. today in business, politics, and popular culture; examine the tools used to construct and sell those perceptions; and look into the values underlying these activities. We will do so through both academic and media materials, as well as through writing, research, and discussion. All of these are intended to deepen your critical thinking and writing skills, and build your research, discussion, and oral presentation strengths. Students who have received credit for USSO 260 may not receive credit for this course. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.

USSY 291T. Demystifying the Guerilla Fighter: Imperialism, Race, and Revolution in Latin America. 3 Units.

The image of Ernesto "Che" Guevara is embossed in many a t-shirt, poster, and bumper sticker across college campuses. Guevara's writings and, more specifically, select catchy quotes, also have circulated in websites and popular films for the last couple of decades. In this course we will examine the myths surrounding men like Guevara by tracing the history of conquistadores, nuns, mystics, insurgents, and revolutionaries in Latin America from the colonial to the modern period. Toward this goal we will look at an array of personal letters, diary entries, government documents, religious texts, essays, prose, and works of literature written by women and men who viewed themselves, and were viewed by others, as speaking to, or ushering in, transformative change. As a class we will also examine the connections between imperial projects and calls for action in colonial and early modern Latin America and the Caribbean, explore the relationships between slavery, gender norms, and capitalism, and assess the changing nature of what freedom, reform, and revolution meant to various actors from the late eighteenth century to the late twentieth century. Indeed, our end goal as a class is to map out what some of our assumptions have been regarding what it means to be a guerilla fighter, connect it to how calls for change have manifested themselves across time, unearth the ironies and allure of radical frameworks, and investigate what this understanding can do for us as we tackle questions of change and possibility. Requirements to enroll: 1) Passing letter grade in a First Seminar OR concurrent enrollment in FSTS 100 (if transfer student); AND 2) No previous/concurrent enrollment in FSSY/USSY; OR Requisites not met permission.