2011-12 General Bulletin

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Mather House
www.case.edu/artsci/arth/arth.html
Phone: 216-368-4118 or 368-2383; Fax: 216-368-4681
Catherine Scallen, Department Chair

This is an archived copy of the 2011-12 Bulletin. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit http://bulletin.case.edu.

The Department of Art History and Art offers opportunities to study art history, to participate in a broad range of studio offerings, to pursue state teacher licensure in art education, and to engage in pre-professional museum training. The Bachelor of Arts degree is granted in art history and in pre-architecture (second major only), and the Bachelor of Science degree in art education. The department offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in art history, Master of Arts in art history and museum studies, and Master of Arts in art education, and to the Doctor of Philosophy in art history and Doctor of Philosophy in art history and museum studies. All art programs are considerably enhanced by close cooperation with cultural institutions located in University Circle, in particular the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Cleveland Institute of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA).

Art History Program

Students majoring in art history have a wide variety of career opportunities. Graduates with a strong background in art history are employed as college and university professors; as museum professionals (in curatorial, educational, and administrative positions); as art librarians and archivists; as journalists: as art gallery or auction house staff members; as art conservators and restorers; as art specialists in the diplomatic service and at all levels of government; and in other careers in industry, film, and television. Some of these specialties require additional study and professional preparation beyond the bachelor’s degree. Other art history majors who have fulfilled the required prerequisites go on to attend law, medical, or business school.

The graduate programs in art history are offered as part of the joint program in art history of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art. Many classes, undergraduate and graduate level, are taught at the museum, and some courses are offered or co-taught by museum curators who hold adjunct appointments in the department. Students taking advanced-level courses use the museum’s extensive research library, and all students have an opportunity to study original works of art in the museum’s superb collections.

Art Education Program

The Art Education Program’s mission is “to prepare proactive, scholar-practitioner art educators who will develop into leaders, teachers, and talented artists in the field of art education.”

The undergraduate and graduate degree programs in art education are offered in conjunction with the Cleveland Institute of Art. Art education majors have the advantage of pursuing their academic studies in a university environment and their studio studies at a professional art school that educates artists and designers. Students participate in educational field experiences conducted in many of Greater Cleveland’s urban and suburban school systems, its museums, and its cultural institutions. Graduates of the Art Education Program have pursued careers as teachers, supervisors, and consultants in public and private schools, colleges, art schools, and museums; as administrators of galleries and art organizations; as designers of educational programs for industry; and as practicing artists. The program is especially proud of its record in recruiting and graduating students from diverse backgrounds.

The program offers pre-architecture as a second major and as a minor for students who expect to continue architectural studies at the graduate level or who simply wish to pursue an area of interest. For students seeking to develop and nurture their artistic and creative talents, the program offers a variety of introductory and intermediate art studio courses, taught by experienced artists/teachers.

Qualified undergraduates majoring in art history or art education may also participate in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program.

Art Studio Program

The Art Studio Program offers a variety of art courses that can be taken for personal enjoyment to gain experience in a variety of art media. Courses in drawing, painting, design, ceramics, enameling and jewelry, textiles, photography, digital media, and architecture are taught at various skill levels by experienced, professional artists. These courses can be taken as university electives to fulfill minors in art studio, photography, or architecture, or to complete a second major in pre-architecture. At the end of each semester there is an comprehensive exhibition of student work in the Art Gallery.

Department Faculty

Catherine B. Scallen, PhD
(Princeton University)
Associate Professor and Chair
Northern Renaissance and Baroque art and historiography

Henry Adams, PhD
(Yale University)
Professor
American art

David Carrier, PhD
(Columbia University)
Champney Family Professor of Art
Contemporary art and art criticism

Elina Gertsman, PhD
(Boston University)
Assistant Professor
Medieval art in Europe

Noelle Giuffrida, PhD
(University of Kansas)
Assistant Professor
Asian art

Anne Helmreich, PhD
(Northwestern University)
Associate Professor
18th- and 19th-century European art

Ellen G. Landau, PhD
(University of Delaware)
Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities
20th-century American and European art; critical theory and gender studies

Jenifer Neils, PhD
(Princeton University)
Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History
Ancient art and classical archaeology


Secondary Faculty

Charles Burroughs, PhD
(The Warburg Institute)
Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts, Department of Classics

Miriam R. Levin, PhD
(University of Massachussetts)
Professor, Department of History


Adjunct Faculty from the Cleveland Museum of Art

Michael Bennett, PhD
(Harvard University)
Curator, Greek and Roman Art

Susan Bergh, PhD
(Columbia University)
Curator, Art of the Ancient Americas

David Franklin, PhD
(Courtauld Institute of Art)
Museum Director
16th-century Italian art

Jane Glaubinger, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Curator of Prints

Caroline Goeser, PhD
(Rutgers University)
Interim Director of Education

Heather Lemonedes, PhD
(The Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York)
Associate Curator of Drawings

Constantine Petridis, PhD
(Ghent University)
Curator, African Art

William Robinson, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Curator, Modern European Art

Jon Seydl, PhD
(University of Pennsylvania)
The Paul J. and Edith Ingalls Vignos, Jr. Curator of European Paintings and Sculpture (1500-1800)

Marjorie Williams, MA
(University of Michigan)
Senior Director of Endowment Development
Asian art


Adjunct Art History Faculty

Gary Sampson, PhD
(University of California, Santa Barbara)
Associate Dean, Graduate Studies, Cleveland Institute of Art
History of photography

Holly Witchey, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Museum studies


Art Education

Tim Shuckerow, MA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Director, Art Education and Art Studio
Painting, ceramics

Judy Flamik, BA, NBCT
(Lake Erie College)
University Supervisor, Secondary Student Teaching

Sandra Noble, MA
(Cleveland State University)
University Supervisor, Elementary Student Teaching and Clinical/Field-Based Experience


Art Studio

Tim Shuckerow, MA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Director, Art Education and Art Studio
Painting, ceramics

Alexander Aitkin, MFA
(Ohio University)
Photography, creative photography

Jared Bendis, MA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Multimedia

Gail Berg, MA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Photography

Margaret Fischer, MA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Enameling and jewelry

JoAnn Giordano, MFA
(Cranbrook Academy of Art)
Weaving, fibers, and textiles

Sally Levine, MA
(University of Illinois)
Architecture

Martha Lois, MFA
(Kent State University)
Ceramics

Christopher Pekoc
Creative drawing

Barney Taxel, BA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Digital photography


Emeritii Faculty

D. Harvey Buchanan
Professor Emeritus of Humanities & Art History and Provost Emeritus

Walter S. Gibson
Professor Emeritus

Edward J. Olszewski
Professor Emeritus

Anita Rogoff
Professor Emerita of Art

BA Art History   |  BS Art Education   |  BA Pre-Architecture   |  Minors

Undergraduate Programs

The art history curriculum is designed to give students a broad grounding in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts, with a strong emphasis on understanding the cultural context in which they were produced. Students develop a technical and critical vocabulary as well as sound writing skills to analyze works of art. 

Integrated Graduate Studies Program. Qualified undergraduates majoring in art history or art education may also participate in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program. Interested students should note the general requirements and the admission procedures in this bulletin and may consult the department for further information.

Majors

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Bachelor of Arts in Art History

This major requires 36 hours of course work in art history, including:

ARTH 101Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas3
ARTH 102Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin3
Art History 200-level courses3-6
ARTH 396Majors Seminar3
Art History electives at the 300 level15-18
Art Studio courses3-6
Total Units30-39

Foreign language study (French, German, or Italian) is highly recommended.

Departmental Honors. Majors who wish to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in art history must make written application to the department chair no later than the fall semester of their senior year. Departmental honors are awarded upon fulfillment of the following requirements: a grade point average of at least 3.5 in the major and an A in .


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Bachelor of Science in Art Education

The Bachelor of Science in art education requires a total of 124 credits and is designed to educate professional teachers of art for the public and private schools who are also competent, creative artists. The program meets the requirements of the Ohio Board of Education to qualify its university-recommended students for Pre-K-12 Visual Art Specialist Licensure to teach art in the public schools of Ohio and more than 40 reciprocating states.

This program is conducted jointly by Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art. Admission requires application to Case Western Reserve and submission of an art portfolio to the Cleveland Institute of Art. Credentials must be acceptable to both institutions. Academic work is taken at Case Western Reserve, and the majority of art studio courses at the Cleveland Institute of Art, as follows:

Academic Courses at Case Western Reserve University
 
SAGES (First Seminar)4
Two of the following:6
USNA Thinking About Natural and Technological World
USSO Thinking about the Social World
USSY Thinking about the Symbolic World
Natural Sciences3
Quantitative Reasoning (MATH or STAT)3
Global & Cultural Diversity3
ARTH 101Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas3
ARTH 102Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin3
ARTH Electives (one must be at 300 level)6
PHED Physical Education (2 semesters)
Total Units31

 

 
Professional Education/Art Education
ARTS 295Introduction to Art Education3
ARTS 300Current Issues in Art Education3
ARTS 385Clinical/Field Based Experience I1
ARTS 386Clinical/Field Based Experience II1
ARTS 387Clinical/Field Based Experience III1
ARTS 393Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment3
ARTS 395Introduction to Multimedia Technology3
ARTS 366AStudent Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade4
ARTS 366BStudent Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade4
ARTS 465Seminar for Art Teachers4
EDUC 301Introduction to Education3
PSCL 101General Psychology I3
EDUC 304Educational Psychology3
EDUC 255Literacy Across the Content Areas3
Total Units39
 
 
Art Studio Courses at the Cleveland Institute of Art
Digital Art and Design6
Design 2D and 3D6
Drawing I, II, III9
Painting Arts 216 and CIA Color6
2D Visualization3
Studio Project3
Sculpture3
Studio Electives15
Total Units51

Retention and Advanced Standing (Undergraduate Level)

The Bachelor of Science program in art education is designed to educate professional teachers of art. There are four decision points in the program, and for each of these decision points, there are three possible outcomes: unconditional admission; conditional admission with a prescribed remedial plan which when successfully completed will result in unconditional admission; or denial of admission. Denial of admission at any decision point means the student is no longer able to pursue an art education degree at Case Western Reserve.

Decision Point 1: Application for Admission to the Program

Official admission to the Art Education Program generally occurs at the end of the fall semester of the sophomore year after a student completes ARTS 295. Admission to the program requires:

  1. being accepted to the university
  2. being accepted as an art major through a portfolio review before matriculation
  3. successful completion of , including evaluation of an initial Teaching ePortfolio
  4. cumulative Case GPA of 2.5 or better
  5. submission of a signed Statement of Assurance of Good Moral Character
  6. a satisfactory interview with art education faculty, documented on the Teacher Licensure Admission Assessment Form
Decision Point 2: Application for Advanced Standing

The Application for Advanced Standing should be submitted by the junior year and the fall semester after Decision Point 1. The application requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current DPR form documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, an art course GPA of 2.5 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory, completed by the art education faculty
Decision Point 3: Application for Student Teaching

The Application for Student Teaching should be completed by week 8 of the semester prior to student teaching. The application requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current DPR form documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, an art course GPA of 2.5 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory, completed by the art education faculty
  4. passing a TB test
  5. presenting documentation of Hepatitis B vaccination
  6. passing official Federal and State criminal background checks
Decision Point 4: Application for Initial Licensure

Application for Initial Licensure occurs after successful completion of all degree requirements. The application requires:

  1. a successful review of the completed Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current DPR form documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, an art course GPA of 2.5 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory, completed by the art education faculty
  4. achievement of state-mandated scores on the two Praxis II national teacher exams
  5. completion of the Case Student Teaching Final Assessment by the cooperating teacher and university supervisor with a grade of B or better
  6. completion of the Case Teacher Licensure Exit Interview and Survey

After successfully completing all requirements at the four decision points, the student is recommended by the university’s director of teacher education for the Ohio Visual Art (Pre-K-12) License. Completion of the Bachelor of Science in art education does not ensure that the State of Ohio’s Visual Art Teacher License will be awarded. Teacher licensure is also obtainable through the Art Education Graduate Program of Study.

Additional information on this program is available in the office of the director of art education.


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Bachelor of Arts in Pre-Architecture

The Pre-Architecture Program introduces the student to the forms, history, and functions of architecture as well as to the studio skills relevant to its practice. The program is designed to provide a background for undergraduate students who plan to continue architectural studies at the graduate level, as well as for those interested in the study of architecture as part of a liberal or technical education.

Pre-architecture may be chosen only as a second major. The double major is required so that the perspectives provided by this interdisciplinary program may be complemented by a concentrated disciplinary experience. For a student who completes a Bachelor of Science degree (BS, BSE, or BSN), pre-architecture may serve as the sole major for a BA degree.

To declare a pre-architecture major, students should have declared a first major and have sophomore or junior standing. Up to 6 credits in general education requirements and elective courses taken by students for their first major may be applied to their pre-architecture major.

The major consists of a minimum of 30 credit hours, 15 of which are in required courses and the remainder of which are approved elective courses. Detailed information about approved electives is available in the departmental office.

The required courses are:

ARTH 101Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas3
ARTH 102Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin3
ARTS 106Creative Drawing I3
ARTS 302Architecture and City Design I3
ARTS 303Architecture and City Design II3
Art history courses6
Two of the following:6
Design and Color I
Design and Color II
Creative Drawing II
Photography Studio I
Introduction to Scenic Design
Introduction to Lighting Design
One of the following: *3
Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I
Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II
Introductory Physics I
Introductory Physics II
General Physics I - Mechanics
General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism
Total Units30

*

For students whose interests lie in aesthetics and the history of architecture, the required 3 hours may be in sociology, American studies, anthropology, history of science and technology, civil engineering, or geology.

 


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Minors

Four minors, each requiring 18 credit hours, are available: one in art history, and three through the Art Studio Program.

Art History

ARTH 101Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas3
ARTH 102Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin3
Art History electives (at least 3 hours must be taken at the 200 level)12
Total Units18

 

Art Studio

ARTS 101Design and Color I3
ARTS 106Creative Drawing I3
Four additional studio courses, two of which must be in the same area (i.e., drawing, painting, design, textiles, photography, ceramics and enameling)12
Total Units18


Photography

ARTS 220Photography Studio I3
ARTS 320Photography Studio II3
ARTS 322Digital Photography I3
ARTS 325Creative Photography3
or ARTS 365D B&W Photography Studio
ARTS 365EColor Studio3
One of the following:3
Independent Study in Art Studio
Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin
Multimedia I
Total Units18


Pre-Architecture

ARTH 101Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas3
ARTH 102Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin3
ARTS 106Creative Drawing I3
ARTS 302Architecture and City Design I3
ARTS 303Architecture and City Design II3
One approved elective (the following are recommended):3
Architecture and City Design III
Multimedia I
Total Units18

 

Graduate Programs

Master of Arts in Art History

The MA program in art history is designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge of the major art historical periods, the scholarly and bibliographical resources, and the methodologies of art history. It also offers an opportunity to investigate art historical problems in some depth. In addition to the regular graduate school application form, applicants to the graduate program in art history are required to submit GRE scores and copies of two research papers that they consider to represent their best work. The minimum GRE score for acceptance is equivalent to 500 on the former scoring system. Applicants for the MA should have a BA major or minor concentration in art history or a related humanities field and a minimum GPA of 3.5.

The master’s degree in art history is conducted exclusively under Plan B as described under the School of Graduate Studies in this bulletin. All other requirements of the MA program must be fulfilled:

  • (3)
  • Eight graduate courses on the 400 level or above, three of which must be seminars on the 500 level. These eight courses must include one course each from four of the following five areas: world art; ancient; medieval; Renaissance/Baroque; modern and American (24).
  • (3)
  • A reading knowledge of one foreign language (normally French, German, or Italian)
  • Successful performance on the MA comprehensive examination

Total: 30 hours

Master of Arts in Art History and Museum Studies

The MA program in art history and museum studies includes the same broad requirements and objectives of the MA program in art history, along with a year-long museum studies course and two supervised museum internships. In addition to the regular graduate school application form, applicants to the graduate program in art history are required to submit GRE scores and copies of two research papers that they consider to represent their best work. The minimum GRE score for acceptance is equivalent to 500 on the former scoring system. Applicants for the MA should have a BA major or minor concentration in art history or a related humanities field and a minimum GPA of 3.5.

The requirements include:

ARTH 495Methodologies of Art History3
ARTH 490AVisual Arts and Museums I3
ARTH 490BVisual Arts and Museums: II3
ARTH 491AVisual Arts and Museums: Internship1
ARTH 491BVisual Arts and Museums: Internship3
  • Six graduate courses on the 400 level or above (18), three of which must be seminars on the 500 level (9). These six courses must include one course each from four of the following five areas: world art; ancient; medieval; Renaissance/Baroque; modern and American.
  • A reading knowledge of one foreign language (normally French, German or Italian)
  • Successful performance on the MA comprehensive examination

Total: 31 hours

Master of Arts in Art Education

The Master of Arts in Art Education is offered in two plans: Plan I for those who already hold teacher licenses and who desire advanced studio- and art-related studies; Plan II for those holding the Bachelor of Fine Arts or equivalent degree who desire multi-age teacher licensure as visual art specialists. Both programs are offered jointly by Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art, and both require 36 semester hours.

The admission procedure includes an online application, three letters of recommendation, a college transcript, which are to be submitted to the Art Education office, and an interview with the program director in which students show a portfolio of artwork and discuss their program of study.  For students pursuing Plan I, The Cleveland Institute of Art admission procedure requires a portfolio. Approval by both the University and the Cleveland Institute of Art is required for admission into Plan I. Information and application forms are available online through the Office of Graduate Admission at Case Western Reserve University.

Plan I

  • 18 hours in studio to be taken at the Cleveland Institute of Art or Case Western Reserve University at the 300 level or above; and 18 hours in academic courses to be taken at Case Western Reserve University at the 400 level or above, to be selected in consultation with the director of art education; or
  • 30 semester hours of course credit: 18 hours in studio to be taken at the Cleveland Institute of Art at the 300 level or above; and 12 hours in academic courses to be taken at Case Western Reserve University at the 400 level or above, to be selected in consultation with the director of art education; AND a thesis exhibition based on individual research (not less than 6 semester hours of registration).

Plan II

EDUC 401Introduction to Education3
EDUC 404Educational Psychology3
ARTS 385Clinical/Field Based Experience I1
ARTS 386Clinical/Field Based Experience II1
ARTS 387Clinical/Field Based Experience III1
ARTS 400Current Issues in Art Education3
ARTS 493Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment3
ARTS 466AStudent Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade4
ARTS 466BStudent Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade4
ARTS 465Seminar for Art Teachers4
ARTS 602Study in Art Education3
ARTS 495Introduction to Multimedia Technology3
ARTS 497Summer Workshop in Art Education3
Total Units36

The Master’s Plan II Program in Art Education is designed to educate professional teachers of art. There are four decision points in the Art Education Program. For each of the decision points, there are three possible outcomes: unconditional admission; conditional admission with a prescribed remedial plan which when successfully completed will result in unconditional admission; or denial of admission. Denial of admission at any decision point means the student is no longer able to pursue an art education degree at Case Western Reserve University.

Decision Point 1: Application for Admission to the Program

Application for admission to the program requires:

  1. being accepted to the university
  2. being accepted as an art major through an art portfolio review
  3. submission of a signed Statement of Assurance of Good Moral Character
  4. a satisfactory interview with art education faculty, documented on the Teacher Licensure Admission Assessment Form
Decision Point 2: Application for Advanced Standing

Application for advanced standing requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current transcript documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, an art course GPA of 3.0 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory, completed by the art education faculty at the end of the first semester
Decision Point 3: Application for Student Teaching

Application for student teaching requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current transcript documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, an art course GPA of 3.0 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory, completed by the art education faculty
  4. passing a TB test
  5. presenting documentation of Hepatitis B vaccination
  6. passing official Federal and state criminal background checks
Decision Point 4: Application for Initial Licensure

Application for initial licensure occurs after successful completion of all degree requirements. The application requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current final transcript documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, an art course GPA of 3.0 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory, completed by the art education faculty
  4. achievement of state-mandated scores on the two Praxis II national teacher exams
  5. completion of the Case Student Teaching Final Assessment by the cooperating teacher and university supervisor with a grade of B or better
  6. completion of the Case Teacher Licensure Exit Interview and Survey

After successfully completing all requirements at the four decision points, the student is recommended by the university’s director of teacher education for the Ohio Provisional Art (Pre-K-12) License. Completion of the Master’s Plan II Program in Art Education degree does not ensure that the State of Ohio’s Provisional Visual Art Teacher License will be awarded.

Doctor of Philosophy in Art History

The doctoral program in art history is designed to allow advanced graduate students the opportunity to specialize in designated areas. Admission to the program requires an MA in art history or its equivalent, including a reading knowledge of one approved foreign language (normally French, German, or Italian). Admission to the program is made on the basis of academic record, experience, recommendations, and personal interviews. Applicants are required to submit GRE scores and two research papers written during their matriculation for a master’s degree, or a thesis if completed by the time of application.

University requirements for the doctoral degree include a minimum of 36 hours of course credits, but the department may require additional course work as preparation for the general examination or for the dissertation. The minimum credits are to be distributed as follows:

ARTH 495Methodologies of Art History3
Three courses 400 level or above9
Two graduate seminars at the 500 level6
ARTH 701Dissertation Ph.D.18
Total Units36

Doctoral students must demonstrate an ability to read two approved languages (other than English) useful in art historical research. German is normally required as one of the two languages for students concentrating in Western art. Both languages must be approved by the department at the time of admission or during the first semester of doctoral study. The general examination cannot be taken until the language requirement is fulfilled.

Doctoral students are required to pass a written and oral general examination before being advanced to candidacy. Within two weeks after the written examination, the faculty examining committee will administer the oral examination. A final evaluation will be based on the student’s performance in both the written and oral sections of the general examination.

Doctor of Philosophy in Art History and Museum Studies

The doctoral program in art history and museum studies is offered to a limited number of candidates. The program combines the academic requirements of the art history doctoral program with museum training, and is designed to provide experience in issues of museological practice and history, connoisseurship, conservation, and interpretation, as well as a planned program of academic course work and independent research. Coursework includes a year-long museum studies course and supervised internships. Admission to the program is made on the basis of academic record, experience, recommendations, and personal interviews. A master’s degree in art history or its equivalent is required for admission. Applicants are required to submit GRE scores and two research papers written during their matriculation for a master’s degree, or a thesis if completed by the time of application. Reading knowledge of one approved foreign language (normally French, German, or Italian) is also required for admission.

Students in the museum studies program are required to take a minimum of 48 hours of graduate study as follows:

ARTH 490AVisual Arts and Museums I3
ARTH 490BVisual Arts and Museums: II3
Three elective courses at the 400 level or above9
Three graduate seminars at the 500 level9
ARTH 610AAdvanced Visual Arts and Museums: Internship I3
ARTH 610BAdvanced Visual Arts and Museums Internship II3
ARTH 701Dissertation Ph.D.18
Total Units48

The requirement to take ARTH 490A and B will be waived for students who received the Master of Arts in art history and museum studies from Case Western Reserve University from 2011 onward. Students who have not taken ARTH 495 Methodologies of Art History or its equivalent should take this course as part of their preparation. During the two-semester internship, the student will be assigned to one or more departments in the Cleveland Museum of Art for supervised study and practice that will be evaluated by a member of the faculty in art history. The dissertation subject should be related to some aspect of art museum research; it may take the form of a special collection or exhibition catalogue, but it must satisfy the scholarly standards of the department and the university.

Doctoral students must demonstrate an ability to read two approved languages (other than English) useful in art historical research. German is normally required as one of the two languages for students concentrating in Western art. Both languages must be approved by the department at the time of admission or during the first semester of doctoral study. The general examination cannot be taken until the language requirement is fulfilled.

Doctoral students are required to pass a written and oral general examination before being advanced to candidacy. Within two weeks after the written examination, the faculty examining committee will administer the oral examination. A final evaluation will be based on the student’s performance in both the written and oral sections of the general examination.

 

ARTH Courses

ARTH 101. Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas. 3 Units.

The first half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of the ancient Mediterranean, medieval Europe, MesoAmerica, Africa, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis, and socio-cultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

ARTH 102. Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin. 3 Units.

The second half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of Renaissance and Baroque Europe, America, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis historical and sociocultural contexts and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art. (ARTH 101 and 102 may be combined, or either can be taken in conjunction with any other 100 or 200 level Art History class to complete a sequence in the Arts portion of the Humanities section of the General Education Requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences or can be used as part of a three course Humanities sequence in the Engineering Core curriculum.)

ARTH 104. Introduction of Asian Art. 3 Units.

This course surveys the vast cultural landscapes of Asia, from India to Central Asia, and Southeast Asia, on to China, Korea and then Japan.

ARTH 203. The Arts of Asia. 3 Units.

A survey of Japanese and Chinese art from the Bronze Age to the 18th century, with particular emphasis on objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art. The relationship of art works to Buddhism and Hinduism is explored along with cultural rituals, ceremonies, and traditions.

ARTH 204. Arts of East Asia. 3 Units.

A survey of the major developments in the arts of East Asia from the bronze age to the present in a wide range of media, including sculpture, painting, ceramics, architecture, calligraphy, prints, and installations. The course explores factors behind the making of works of art, including social, political and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for the arts of China, Japan, and Korea. Attention will be paid to the relationship between art and the ideas and practices of Buddhism, Shinto, Daoism, and Confucianism. Our topics include: secular and sacred narrative scroll painting, ceramics and tea culture, landscape painting, Buddhist cave temples, ancient bronzes, mortuary art, expressions of resistance and reclusion in visual arts, cross-cultural exchanges within the region and with the West, and the role of East Asian artists in the contemporary international art market.

ARTH 220. Jewish Traditional Art and Architecture. 3 Units.

Tradition and transformation in Jewish artistic expression over time and across space. Course will begin with the biblical period and continue down to the present day in Israel and America. Examination of how concepts such as "Jewish" and "art" undergo change within the Jewish community over this period. Offered as ARTH 220 and JDST 220.

ARTH 221. Building on Antiquity. 3 Units.

Beginning with Ancient Greece and Rome and ending in Cleveland, the course will provide orientation in the architectural orders and in most periods of European and Euro-American architectural history, as well as, to an extent, architectural criticism. The issue of how architecture has meaning will be central, not least in connection with the formalized "language" of classicism and the emergence of development of building types (temple, museum, civic hall, transportation buildings, etc.). We will also review more subtle ways in which architecture conveys meaning or mood, and the assignment of gendered associations to certain architectural elements. The course will consider more or less blatant political uses of architecture and architectural imagery, but also more elusive and/or ambiguous cases, as well as the phenomenon of the shifting meanings of architecture through changes of era, owner, audience, etc. Offered as ARTH 221 and CLSC 221.

ARTH 226. Introduction to Greek and Roman Art. 3 Units.

Classical art from the 8th century B.C. to the fourth century A.D.; the major developments in the architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Greece, Etruria, and Rome. Offered as ARTH 226 and CLSC 226.

ARTH 227. Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries. 3 Units.

A selection of cities and sanctuaries from the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; their political and religious institutions and the relationship to contemporary art forms. Offered as ARTH 227 and CLSC 227.

ARTH 228. Ancient Greek Athletics. 3 Units.

Exploration of the role of athletics in the ancient, primarily Greek world, and their reflection in the art of the period. Offered as ARTH 228 and CLSC 228.

ARTH 240. Architecture: Ancient to 1850. 3 Units.

Western traditions of architecture and urban design from antiquity to the early nineteenth century, with emphasis on pre-industrial cities and landscapes. Interactions between western theory and practice and certain non-western cultures, especially the Arab/Turkish world and China.

ARTH 241. Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Manuscript Illumination and Graphic Arts between 250 and 1500. 3 Units.

This course will introduce students to the pivotal works of art created between approximately 250 and 1500. We will discuss painting, sculpture, architecture, manuscript illumination, and graphic arts. Medieval visual and material culture will be considered within the framework of socio-political developments, rapid urban growth, the flowering of monastic culture, the rise of universities, and changes in devotional practices. While the course will primarily focus on western part of the medieval Christendom, we will also discuss Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course.

ARTH 250. Art in the Age of Discovery. 3 Units.

A survey of developments in Renaissance art and architecture in northern Europe and Italy during a new age of science, discovery and exploration, 1400-1600.

ARTH 260. Art in the Age of Grandeur. 3 Units.

A survey of European art in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an era of rising nationalism, political aggrandizement, religious expansion and extravagant art patronage.

ARTH 270. American Art and Culture Before 1900. 3 Units.

Survey of the development of American art from colonial times to the present which explores how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting is emphasized, but the course also considers architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature, and music. Offered as AMST 270 and ARTH 270.

ARTH 271. American Art and Culture: The Twentieth Century. 3 Units.

Survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized, but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature, and music. Offered as AMST 271 and ARTH 271.

ARTH 280. Modern Art and Modern Science. 3 Units.

An examination of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 19th to the mid 20th century. Special attention is given to the emergence of "modernism" and the influence of science on such movements as Impressionism and Cubism.

ARTH 284. History of Photography. 3 Units.

A survey of the history of photography from its inception in 1839 to the present. Emphasis is on the complex relationship between technological innovations and picture-making; the artistic, documentary, and personal uses of photography; and the relationship of photography to other art forms.

ARTH 290. Introduction to the Art of Sub-Saharan Africa. 3 Units.

Exploration of the diverse forms and multiple contexts of the visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa. Attention focused on the sculpture of different peoples of West and Central Africa. Ancient arts in terracotta and bronze of Nigeria, Mali, and Chad and rock art of Saharan, Southern, and Eastern Africa will also be explored. Topics such as the styles, aesthetics, meanings, and functions of African art and the training, techniques, and status of the African artist will be discussed.

ARTH 293. A World Art History. 3 Units.

Traditionally European (and American) art historians focused on the art tradition of their own culture. But recently there has been interest in a world art history. Specialists look at the history of other visual cultures. And so then the great intellectual challenge is to write a narrative including art from everywhere. This project is very important politically. Our world has so many dangerous conflicts, and so sympathetic study of art from other cultures is an important way to promote international understanding. In the first part of the class we look at the history of European art history. We discuss Vasari's great pioneering history, and the development of his concerns by Hegel; and, in the mid-twentieth century by Ernst Gombrich and Clement Greenberg. This monocultural tradition focuses on the history of European art. In the second part we consider the art of three great cultures outside Europe, China, India, and Islam. We read a little about their art history, focusing on the ways in which it is very different from the history of European art. The aim is not to do a systematic analysis, which would be a very large task, but to introduce some suggestive themes. We will discuss the role of the medium in Chinese scroll painting and Islamic concepts of decoration. We will look at the representations of carpets within European paintings. They are an important example of what happens when diverse cultures connect.

ARTH 302. Buddhist Art in Asia. 3 Units.

This course explores the visual culture of Buddhism in Asia from its origins in India to its transmission and transformation in China, Korea, Japan, Tibet, Nepal, and Southeast Asia. Our historically and culturally structured examination will trace major developments in Buddhist art and their relationship with belief, practice, and ritual. We will consider the ways that artistic traditions have adapted and evolved both within individual cultures and cross-culturally. The study of sculpture, architecture, and painting in their religious contexts will be our primary focus, but we will also consider the movement of Buddhist art from temples to sites of secular display in museums around the world and the religious and cultural issues that arise from these moves. Topics include: representations of the life of the historical Buddha; visual programs of temples; artistic representations of paradises and hells; sacred sites and architecture; Imperial patronage of Buddhist art; the role of art in pilgrimage and ritual; and visual imagery associated with schools of Buddhism such as Pure Land, Chan, and Zen. Offered as ARTH 302 and ARTH 402.

ARTH 303. History of Far Eastern Art. 3 Units.

A survey of traditional arts of Asia east of the Indus river, designed to emphasize the creative contributions of the artist with particular attention to the international relations of: the Bronze Age, Buddhist art, Hindu art and the later arts of China, Korea, and Japan. National and regional contributions to the developed styles of South Asia and the Far East will be stressed. Offered as ARTH 303 and ARTH 403.

ARTH 304. Art of West Africa. 3 Units.

This course will survey artistic traditions of the past and traditions that continue to flourish to this day in culture regions in West Africa called the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast. An area of immense geographical and human diversity, the Western Sudan is the homeland of some of Africa's most renowned medieval empires. An ancient culture known as Jenne (8th - 17th century) has produced a wide variety of refined ceramic artifacts. The Guinea Coast is densely populated by hundreds of different ethnic groups and harbors a diversity of artistic traditions. An active trade with Europeans was established in the region as early as in the 15th century. Gender-restricted and ritually powerful organizations still serve as the major patrons of the arts in the region. Contrary to the elongated so-called "pole style" typical of the Western Sudan, the arts of the Guinea Coast are characterized by organic and elegant forms and smooth surfaces in a variety of media. Offered as ARTH 304 and ARTH 404.

ARTH 307. Arts of China. 3 Units.

A survey of the major developments in Chinese art from the Neolithic period to the present, including archaeological discoveries, bronzes, calligraphy, painting, sculpture, ceramics, architecture, performance art, and installations. Among topics covered are: ancient funerary art and tombs; painting and sculpture of early Buddhist grottoes; landscape painting; art commissioned and collected by the imperial court; literati painting and calligraphy; public and private art associated with Daoist; Buddhist, and Confucian religious practices and sites; art produced during periods of non-Chinese rule under the Tanguts, Mongols, and Manchus; foreign influences on Chinese artists; and the role of Chinese artists in the contemporary international art market. The course explores factors behind the creation and reception of works of art, including social, political and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for and artistic traditions of the visual culture of China. Recommended preparation: Students with some Asian studies, Chinese language, Chinese history, or other appropriate background. Offered as ARTH 307 and ARTH 407. Prereq: One 100- or 200-level ARTH course or requisites not met permission from instructor.

ARTH 308. Arts of Japan. 3 Units.

A survey of the major developments in Japanese art from prehistoric times to the present in a wide range of media, including sculpture, ceramics, architecture, calligraphy, painting, garden design, woodblock prints, film, and installations. Among topics covered are: Buddhist art, narrative handscrolls, ink painting and portraiture associated with Zen, ceramics for tea ceremony, Edo and Meiji period woodblock prints, and Western and Chinese influences on Japanese artists. Modern and contemporary artists and filmmakers such as Isamu Noguchi, Akira Kurosawa, Yayoi Kusama, Yasumasa Morimura, and Takashi Murakami are also investigated. The course explores factors behind the making of works of art, including social and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for and aesthetic principles of the arts of Japan. Prerequisites include one previous art history course at the 100- or 200-level or permission of instructor. Students with some Asian studies, Japanese language, Japanese history, or other appropriate background by be permitted to enroll at the discretion of the instructor. Offered as: ARTH 308 and ARTH 408. Prereq: One 100- or 200-level ARTH course or by permission of instructor.

ARTH 311. Rome: City and Image. 3 Units.

This course studies the architectural and urban history of Rome from the republican era of the ancient city up to the eighteenth century using the city itself as the major "text." The emphasis will be placed on the extraordinary transformations wrought in the city, or at least in key districts, by powerful rulers and/or elites, especially in the ancient empire and in the Renaissance and baroque eras. In a larger perspective, the great construction projects exerted a far-reaching effect within and beyond Europe, but we will study them in relation to their topographical situation, their functions, and their place in a long history of variations on prestigious themes since many of the artworks and the urban settings featured in the course carry the mark of the Long history of the city itself. Recommended preparation: At least one 200-level course in ANTH, ARTH, CLSC, ENGL, HSTY, or RLGN. Offered as ARTH311/411 and CLSC 311.

ARTH 328. Greek Sculpture. 3 Units.

Greek sculpture from the Archaic period through the Hellenistic; style, the development of specific types, and the uses of architectural sculpture. Offered as ARTH 328, CLSC 328, and ARTH 428.

ARTH 332. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy. 3 Units.

The arts of the Italian peninsula from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 332, CLSC 332, and ARTH 432.

ARTH 333. Greek and Roman Painting. 3 Units.

Greek vase painting, Etruscan tomb painting and Roman wall painting. The development of monumental painting in antiquity. Offered as ARTH 333, CLSC 333, and ARTH 433.

ARTH 334. Art and Archaeology of Greece. 3 Units.

A survey of the art and architecture of Greece from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (100 B.C.) with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 334, CLSC 334, and ARTH 434.

ARTH 335. Issues in Ancient Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in Ancient art. Lectures, discussions and reports. Offered as ARTH 335 and ARTH 435.

ARTH 340. Issues in the Art of China. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Chinese art. Sample topics may include: Women painters in Beijing, Modern Artists in China-1980-Present, Shang Dynasty Tombs, Yuan Dynasty Buddhist Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 340 and ARTH 440.

ARTH 341. Issues in the Art of Japan. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Japanese art. Sample topics may include: Muromachi Hanging Scrolls, Ryoan-ji Temple Garden Architecture, Rimpa School Panel Screens, Buddhist Panting in the Edo Period. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 341 and ARTH 441.

ARTH 342. Issues in the Art of India. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Indian art. Sample topics may include: Northern Temple Architecture, Mughal Painting, Gupta Period Sculpture, Great Stupa sculptural Articulation. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 342 and ARTH 442.

ARTH 343. Issues in the Art of Southeast Asia. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Southeast Asian art. Sample topics may include: Buddhist Art, Introduction to Southeast Asian Art, Temple Architecture in Thailand, Cambodian Stone Carvings. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 343 and ARTH 443.

ARTH 344. Issues in the Art of Africa. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of African art. Sample topics may include: Ritual Masks, Sub-Saharan Religious Architecture, Carvings of Twins in Fertility Rites, Benin Bronze Warrior Reliefs. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 344 and ARTH 444.

ARTH 345. Issues in Pre-Columbian Art. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Pre-Columbian art. Sample topics may include: Ancient Meso-America, Mayan Temple/Palace Complexes, Royal Peruvian Settlements, Inca Decorative Arts. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 345 and ARTH 445.

ARTH 346. Issues in the Art of Native Peoples. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of art of native peoples. Sample topics may include: North American Indian Art, Mound Building Cultures in the Central United States, Introduction to Maiori Polychrome Painting, Decorative American Indian Bead Work. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 346 and ARTH 446.

ARTH 347. Issues in Islamic Art. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Islamic art. Sample topics may include: Mosque Architecture in Spain, Islamic Decorative Arts, Mughal Figurative Art, Introduction to the Art of Islam. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 347 and ARTH 447.

ARTH 349. Gothic Art in Western Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages. 3 Units.

This course will examine the development and dissemination of Gothic art in Western Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages. We will consider a variety of media, including architecture, metalwork, sculpture, manuscript illumination, panel paintings, fresco cycles, and small devotional objects. As we study medieval art in its socio-historical contexts--private and public, monastic and political, liturgical and lay--we will pay special attention to issues of patronage, relationships between texts and images, the introduction of visionary and mystical devotion, attitudes towards education and authority, differences between male and female piety, modes of medieval viewing, and reception and manipulation of art by medieval audiences. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course. Offered as ARTH 349 and ARTH 449.

ARTH 350. Issues in Medieval Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in Medieval Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 350 and ARTH 450.

ARTH 351. Late Gothic Art in Italy. 3 Units.

Sculpture of the Pisani; early trends in Pisa, Siena, and Florence; Cimabue and Giotto; Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death. Offered as ARTH 351 and ARTH 451.

ARTH 352. Italian Art of the 15th Century. 3 Units.

The early 15th century in Florence, civic humanism, the sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello, the painting of Masaccio; the International Style in painting, the art of Uccello, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Botticelli; Carpaccio and the Bellini in Venice. Offered as ARTH 352 and ARTH 452.

ARTH 353. Sixteenth Century Italian Art. 3 Units.

The development of the High Renaissance and Mannerist styles in Italy and late 16th century trends: painting and sculpture. Offered as ARTH 353 and ARTH 453.

ARTH 356. Italian Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture. 3 Units.

Italian sculpture from the early 12th century to the later 18th century. The Pisani, Ghiberti, Donatello, Michelangelo, the Mannerists and Bernini. Offered as ARTH 356 and ARTH 456.

ARTH 358. Medieval Body. 3 Units.

This course will explore the meanings and representations of the body in western medieval culture. Topics will include bleeding bodies, fragmented bodies, lactating bodies, labile bodies, cosmic bodies, physiological bodies, mystical bodies, suffering bodies, edible bodies, enclosed bodies, gendered bodies, Christ's bodies, Mary's bodies, decomposing bodies, macabre bodies, resurrected bodies, dead bodies, intercessory bodies, unhinging bodies, translucent bodies, martyred bodies, desirable bodies, desirous bodies, abhorrent bodies, mimetic bodies, nude bodies, marginalized bodies, defleshed bodies, social bodies, political bodies, monstrous bodies, mnemonic bodies, and deformed bodies. We will explore the complex rhetoric of embodiment as it manifests itself in the ambiguous discourse--both medieval and contemporary--on the relationships between the material and intangible, spiritual and physical, somatic and mental, corporeal and ethereal. Offered as ARTH 358 and ARTH 458.

ARTH 359. Women and Medieval Visual Culture. 3 Units.

This course will explore works made by and for women--as well as images of women--in the Romanesque and Gothic periods. We will discuss female monastics who commissioned and produced art, and consider the roles of women as patrons and consumers. The course will explore different ways of seeing, reading, figuring, and interacting with images of the female body, frequently seen as a fraught site of desire and repulsion, fear and fascination. Primary sources will include works of Hildegard of Bingen, Christine of Pizan, and the Roman de la Rose among others. Students will be asked to read critical material that addresses different constructions of gender and sex in medieval images and secular as well as religious texts. The course, therefore, will not simply focus on artistic production, but will include readings and discussions of social and political history, theology, and literature of the Middle Ages. Offered as ARTH 359 and ARTH 459.

ARTH 360. Renaissance Art in Northern Europe. 3 Units.

Painting, sculpture and the graphic arts in the Netherlands, Germany, and France, 1400-1580, highlighting artists such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Pieter Bruegel. The rise of secular subjects and bourgeois patronage is explored. Offered as ARTH 360 and ARTH 460.

ARTH 361. Dutch and Flemish 17th Century Painting. 3 Units.

The golden age of Dutch and Flemish art with study of major masters (Rubens, Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer) and developments in subject matter: landscape, still-life, and genre themes. Offered as ARTH 361 and ARTH 461.

ARTH 362. Issues in Renaissance Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in Renaissance art. Lectures, discussions and reports. Offered as ARTH 362 and ARTH 462.

ARTH 365. Issues in Baroque Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in baroque art. Lectures, discussions and reports. Offered as ARTH 365 and ARTH 465.

ARTH 367. 17th and 18th Century French Art. 3 Units.

A Survey of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture in France from 1600-1780. Attention will be given to stylistic developments and to social and political contexts, patronage and art theory. Offered as ARTH 367 and ARTH 467.

ARTH 374. Impressionism to Symbolism. 3 Units.

Major developments in European painting and sculpture during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Post-impressionism synthetism, symbolism, and the arts and crafts movement considered in their socio-cultural contexts. Works of Degas, Manet, Monet, Klimt, Bocklin, Gauguin, etc. Offered as ARTH 374 and ARTH 474.

ARTH 379. Issues in 19th Century Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in 19th century art, with class lectures, discussions and reports. Consult department for current topic. Offered as ARTH 379 and ARTH 479.

ARTH 380. Abstract Expressionism and Its Aftermath. 3 Units.

An examination of the development and influences of Abstract Expressionism, including the impact on the Beat Generation and Pop Art. Offered as ARTH 380 and ARTH 480.

ARTH 381. Neoclassicism to Realism. 3 Units.

The main developments of European art chiefly painting and sculpture from post-impressionism to the present; the nature of abstract art and the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and science. Offered as ARTH 381 and ARTH 481.

ARTH 382. Visions of Utopia: 20th Century European Art. 3 Units.

Major movements in early 20th century European painting and sculpture with utopian goals. Focus on the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and sciences. Offered as ARTH 382 and ARTH 482.

ARTH 383. Gender Issues in Feminist Art: The 20th/21st Century. 3 Units.

An in-depth thematic approach to issues affecting works of art by and about women. Focus on the late 20th century. Emphasis on a specifically modern use of feminine myths, subjects and modes of production, and feminist criticism. Offered as ARTH 383, WGST 383 and ARTH 483.

ARTH 384. American Art and Architecture in the Age of Washington and Jefferson. 3 Units.

In the 18th century, Americans created not only a political revolution but an artistic and creative one as well. In the 17th century, most Americans were subsistence farmers and most of their products, manufactures, and buildings were relatively crude. In the 18th century, Americans not only established a new and lasting form of government, but for the first time produced paintings, buildings, furniture and silver that rivaled the finest productions of Europe. Notably, many of the leaders of the American Revolution, such as Paul Revere, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, also made significant contributions to the arts. Offered as ARTH 384 and ARTH 484.

ARTH 385. American Avant-Garde: 1900 - 1925. 3 Units.

An examination of the development of avant-garde styles in New York during the early twentieth century. In-depth discussion of the Photo-secession, Stieglitz's "291" gallery, the Armory Show, Marcel Duchamp's move to America, and the formation and demise of the New York Dada movement. Offered as ARTH 385 and ARTH 485.

ARTH 390. Introduction to the Art Object and its Explication. 3 Units.

A basic introduction to the museum and gallery worlds as institutions with a focus on the work of art, and on the institution's responsibility to the art object. Skills are to be developed in stylistic and conceptual analyses, problem solving, and critical thought. Emphasis will be placed on written and verbal expression to be developed to articulate visual works of art. The institutional function of the museum or gallery is studied as driven by the acquisition, care, and explication of the object as an entity, or in connection with others of like kind. That there is a building, a director, a Board of Trustees, curators, conservators, a Registrar, security officers, a maintenance crew, is all in response to the art object as one in a gathering of such, or collection. The course is intended as a pre-professional, experiential introduction to the functioning of the art museum with site visits and presentations by museum professionals.

ARTH 392. Issues in 20th/21st Century Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in 20th/21st century art, with class lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 392 and ARTH 492.

ARTH 393. Contemporary Art: Critical Directions. 3 Units.

An examination of the directions taken by avant-garde American art and criticism in the aftermath of Abstract Expressionism. Includes the rise and fall of modernism in the 1960s and '70s, as well as an investigation of Post-modern trends and theories. Offered as ARTH 393 and ARTH 493.

ARTH 394. Departmental Seminar. 3 Units.

The Department of History of Art and Art departmental seminar. A topical course, emphasizing disciplinary writing and modes of investigation and analysis. It is recommended for Art History majors before the majors seminar/capstone course, typically taken in the junior or senior years. The course advances the goals of SAGES within the disciplinary context of art history by focusing on close readings of art history texts (with an emphasis upon methodological approaches), examination of original works of art when possible, analytical writing, and intensive seminar-style discussion. Prereq: ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 and at least one 200-level ARTH course.

ARTH 395. Internship. 3 Units.

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a campus internship supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship. Recommended preparation: ARTH 101, ARTH 102, or ARTH 104, and consent.

ARTH 396. Majors Seminar. 3 Units.

Capstone course required of all undergraduate Art History majors, typically taken in senior year. Requires professional-level research with peer and faculty oversight culminating in formal written and oral presentations. Limited to Art History majors.

ARTH 397. History of Prints and Printmaking. 3 Units.

Development of techniques and style and the social function of prints. The great masters: Durer, Rembrandt, Goya, and others. Based on the extensive collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 397 and ARTH 497.

ARTH 398. Independent Study in Art History. 1 - 3 Unit.

Individual research and reports on special topics.

ARTH 399. Honors Thesis. 3 Units.

Intensive study of a topic or problem leading to the preparation of an honors thesis.

ARTH 402. Buddhist Art in Asia. 3 Units.

This course explores the visual culture of Buddhism in Asia from its origins in India to its transmission and transformation in China, Korea, Japan, Tibet, Nepal, and Southeast Asia. Our historically and culturally structured examination will trace major developments in Buddhist art and their relationship with belief, practice, and ritual. We will consider the ways that artistic traditions have adapted and evolved both within individual cultures and cross-culturally. The study of sculpture, architecture, and painting in their religious contexts will be our primary focus, but we will also consider the movement of Buddhist art from temples to sites of secular display in museums around the world and the religious and cultural issues that arise from these moves. Topics include: representations of the life of the historical Buddha; visual programs of temples; artistic representations of paradises and hells; sacred sites and architecture; Imperial patronage of Buddhist art; the role of art in pilgrimage and ritual; and visual imagery associated with schools of Buddhism such as Pure Land, Chan, and Zen. Offered as ARTH 302 and ARTH 402.

ARTH 403. History of Far Eastern Art. 3 Units.

A survey of traditional arts of Asia east of the Indus river, designed to emphasize the creative contributions of the artist with particular attention to the international relations of: the Bronze Age, Buddhist art, Hindu art and the later arts of China, Korea, and Japan. National and regional contributions to the developed styles of South Asia and the Far East will be stressed. Offered as ARTH 303 and ARTH 403.

ARTH 404. Art of West Africa. 3 Units.

This course will survey artistic traditions of the past and traditions that continue to flourish to this day in culture regions in West Africa called the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast. An area of immense geographical and human diversity, the Western Sudan is the homeland of some of Africa's most renowned medieval empires. An ancient culture known as Jenne (8th - 17th century) has produced a wide variety of refined ceramic artifacts. The Guinea Coast is densely populated by hundreds of different ethnic groups and harbors a diversity of artistic traditions. An active trade with Europeans was established in the region as early as in the 15th century. Gender-restricted and ritually powerful organizations still serve as the major patrons of the arts in the region. Contrary to the elongated so-called "pole style" typical of the Western Sudan, the arts of the Guinea Coast are characterized by organic and elegant forms and smooth surfaces in a variety of media. Offered as ARTH 304 and ARTH 404.

ARTH 407. Arts of China. 3 Units.

A survey of the major developments in Chinese art from the Neolithic period to the present, including archaeological discoveries, bronzes, calligraphy, painting, sculpture, ceramics, architecture, performance art, and installations. Among topics covered are: ancient funerary art and tombs; painting and sculpture of early Buddhist grottoes; landscape painting; art commissioned and collected by the imperial court; literati painting and calligraphy; public and private art associated with Daoist; Buddhist, and Confucian religious practices and sites; art produced during periods of non-Chinese rule under the Tanguts, Mongols, and Manchus; foreign influences on Chinese artists; and the role of Chinese artists in the contemporary international art market. The course explores factors behind the creation and reception of works of art, including social, political and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for and artistic traditions of the visual culture of China. Recommended preparation: Students with some Asian studies, Chinese language, Chinese history, or other appropriate background. Offered as ARTH 307 and ARTH 407.

ARTH 408. Arts of Japan. 3 Units.

A survey of the major developments in Japanese art from prehistoric times to the present in a wide range of media, including sculpture, ceramics, architecture, calligraphy, painting, garden design, woodblock prints, film, and installations. Among topics covered are: Buddhist art, narrative handscrolls, ink painting and portraiture associated with Zen, ceramics for tea ceremony, Edo and Meiji period woodblock prints, and Western and Chinese influences on Japanese artists. Modern and contemporary artists and filmmakers such as Isamu Noguchi, Akira Kurosawa, Yayoi Kusama, Yasumasa Morimura, and Takashi Murakami are also investigated. The course explores factors behind the making of works of art, including social and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for and aesthetic principles of the arts of Japan. Prerequisites include one previous art history course at the 100- or 200-level or permission of instructor. Students with some Asian studies, Japanese language, Japanese history, or other appropriate background by be permitted to enroll at the discretion of the instructor. Offered as: ARTH 308 and ARTH 408. Prereq: One 100- or 200-level ARTH course or by permission of instructor.

ARTH 411. Rome: City and Image. 3 Units.

This course studies the architectural and urban history of Rome from the republican era of the ancient city up to the eighteenth century using the city itself as the major "text." The emphasis will be placed on the extraordinary transformations wrought in the city, or at least in key districts, by powerful rulers and/or elites, especially in the ancient empire and in the Renaissance and baroque eras. In a larger perspective, the great construction projects exerted a far-reaching effect within and beyond Europe, but we will study them in relation to their topographical situation, their functions, and their place in a long history of variations on prestigious themes since many of the artworks and the urban settings featured in the course carry the mark of the Long history of the city itself. Recommended preparation: At least one 200-level course in ANTH, ARTH, CLSC, ENGL, HSTY, or RLGN. Offered as ARTH311/411 and CLSC 311.

ARTH 428. Greek Sculpture. 3 Units.

Greek sculpture from the Archaic period through the Hellenistic; style, the development of specific types, and the uses of architectural sculpture. Offered as ARTH 328, CLSC 328, and ARTH 428.

ARTH 432. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy. 3 Units.

The arts of the Italian peninsula from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 332, CLSC 332, and ARTH 432.

ARTH 433. Greek and Roman Painting. 3 Units.

Greek vase painting, Etruscan tomb painting and Roman wall painting. The development of monumental painting in antiquity. Offered as ARTH 333, CLSC 333, and ARTH 433.

ARTH 434. Art and Archaeology of Greece. 3 Units.

A survey of the art and architecture of Greece from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (100 B.C.) with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 334, CLSC 334, and ARTH 434.

ARTH 435. Issues in Ancient Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in Ancient art. Lectures, discussions and reports. Offered as ARTH 335 and ARTH 435.

ARTH 440. Issues in the Art of China. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Chinese art. Sample topics may include: Women painters in Beijing, Modern Artists in China-1980-Present, Shang Dynasty Tombs, Yuan Dynasty Buddhist Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 340 and ARTH 440.

ARTH 441. Issues in the Art of Japan. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Japanese art. Sample topics may include: Muromachi Hanging Scrolls, Ryoan-ji Temple Garden Architecture, Rimpa School Panel Screens, Buddhist Panting in the Edo Period. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 341 and ARTH 441.

ARTH 442. Issues in the Art of India. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Indian art. Sample topics may include: Northern Temple Architecture, Mughal Painting, Gupta Period Sculpture, Great Stupa sculptural Articulation. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 342 and ARTH 442.

ARTH 443. Issues in the Art of Southeast Asia. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Southeast Asian art. Sample topics may include: Buddhist Art, Introduction to Southeast Asian Art, Temple Architecture in Thailand, Cambodian Stone Carvings. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 343 and ARTH 443.

ARTH 444. Issues in the Art of Africa. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of African art. Sample topics may include: Ritual Masks, Sub-Saharan Religious Architecture, Carvings of Twins in Fertility Rites, Benin Bronze Warrior Reliefs. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 344 and ARTH 444.

ARTH 445. Issues in Pre-Columbian Art. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Pre-Columbian art. Sample topics may include: Ancient Meso-America, Mayan Temple/Palace Complexes, Royal Peruvian Settlements, Inca Decorative Arts. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 345 and ARTH 445.

ARTH 446. Issues in the Art of Native Peoples. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of art of native peoples. Sample topics may include: North American Indian Art, Mound Building Cultures in the Central United States, Introduction to Maiori Polychrome Painting, Decorative American Indian Bead Work. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 346 and ARTH 446.

ARTH 447. Issues in Islamic Art. 3 Units.

This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Islamic art. Sample topics may include: Mosque Architecture in Spain, Islamic Decorative Arts, Mughal Figurative Art, Introduction to the Art of Islam. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 347 and ARTH 447.

ARTH 449. Gothic Art in Western Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages. 3 Units.

This course will examine the development and dissemination of Gothic art in Western Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages. We will consider a variety of media, including architecture, metalwork, sculpture, manuscript illumination, panel paintings, fresco cycles, and small devotional objects. As we study medieval art in its socio-historical contexts--private and public, monastic and political, liturgical and lay--we will pay special attention to issues of patronage, relationships between texts and images, the introduction of visionary and mystical devotion, attitudes towards education and authority, differences between male and female piety, modes of medieval viewing, and reception and manipulation of art by medieval audiences. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course. Offered as ARTH 349 and ARTH 449.

ARTH 450. Issues in Medieval Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in Medieval Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 350 and ARTH 450.

ARTH 451. Late Gothic Art in Italy. 3 Units.

Sculpture of the Pisani; early trends in Pisa, Siena, and Florence; Cimabue and Giotto; Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death. Offered as ARTH 351 and ARTH 451.

ARTH 452. Italian Art of the 15th Century. 3 Units.

The early 15th century in Florence, civic humanism, the sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello, the painting of Masaccio; the International Style in painting, the art of Uccello, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Botticelli; Carpaccio and the Bellini in Venice. Offered as ARTH 352 and ARTH 452.

ARTH 453. Sixteenth Century Italian Art. 3 Units.

The development of the High Renaissance and Mannerist styles in Italy and late 16th century trends: painting and sculpture. Offered as ARTH 353 and ARTH 453.

ARTH 456. Italian Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture. 3 Units.

Italian sculpture from the early 12th century to the later 18th century. The Pisani, Ghiberti, Donatello, Michelangelo, the Mannerists and Bernini. Offered as ARTH 356 and ARTH 456.

ARTH 458. Medieval Body. 3 Units.

This course will explore the meanings and representations of the body in western medieval culture. Topics will include bleeding bodies, fragmented bodies, lactating bodies, labile bodies, cosmic bodies, physiological bodies, mystical bodies, suffering bodies, edible bodies, enclosed bodies, gendered bodies, Christ's bodies, Mary's bodies, decomposing bodies, macabre bodies, resurrected bodies, dead bodies, intercessory bodies, unhinging bodies, translucent bodies, martyred bodies, desirable bodies, desirous bodies, abhorrent bodies, mimetic bodies, nude bodies, marginalized bodies, defleshed bodies, social bodies, political bodies, monstrous bodies, mnemonic bodies, and deformed bodies. We will explore the complex rhetoric of embodiment as it manifests itself in the ambiguous discourse--both medieval and contemporary--on the relationships between the material and intangible, spiritual and physical, somatic and mental, corporeal and ethereal. Offered as ARTH 358 and ARTH 458.

ARTH 459. Women and Medieval Visual Culture. 3 Units.

This course will explore works made by and for women--as well as images of women--in the Romanesque and Gothic periods. We will discuss female monastics who commissioned and produced art, and consider the roles of women as patrons and consumers. The course will explore different ways of seeing, reading, figuring, and interacting with images of the female body, frequently seen as a fraught site of desire and repulsion, fear and fascination. Primary sources will include works of Hildegard of Bingen, Christine of Pizan, and the Roman de la Rose among others. Students will be asked to read critical material that addresses different constructions of gender and sex in medieval images and secular as well as religious texts. The course, therefore, will not simply focus on artistic production, but will include readings and discussions of social and political history, theology, and literature of the Middle Ages. Offered as ARTH 359 and ARTH 459.

ARTH 460. Renaissance Art in Northern Europe. 3 Units.

Painting, sculpture and the graphic arts in the Netherlands, Germany, and France, 1400-1580, highlighting artists such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Pieter Bruegel. The rise of secular subjects and bourgeois patronage is explored. Offered as ARTH 360 and ARTH 460.

ARTH 461. Dutch and Flemish 17th Century Painting. 3 Units.

The golden age of Dutch and Flemish art with study of major masters (Rubens, Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer) and developments in subject matter: landscape, still-life, and genre themes. Offered as ARTH 361 and ARTH 461.

ARTH 462. Issues in Renaissance Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in Renaissance art. Lectures, discussions and reports. Offered as ARTH 362 and ARTH 462.

ARTH 465. Issues in Baroque Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in baroque art. Lectures, discussions and reports. Offered as ARTH 365 and ARTH 465.

ARTH 467. 17th and 18th Century French Art. 3 Units.

A Survey of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture in France from 1600-1780. Attention will be given to stylistic developments and to social and political contexts, patronage and art theory. Offered as ARTH 367 and ARTH 467.

ARTH 474. Impressionism to Symbolism. 3 Units.

Major developments in European painting and sculpture during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Post-impressionism synthetism, symbolism, and the arts and crafts movement considered in their socio-cultural contexts. Works of Degas, Manet, Monet, Klimt, Bocklin, Gauguin, etc. Offered as ARTH 374 and ARTH 474.

ARTH 479. Issues in 19th Century Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in 19th century art, with class lectures, discussions and reports. Consult department for current topic. Offered as ARTH 379 and ARTH 479.

ARTH 480. Abstract Expressionism and Its Aftermath. 3 Units.

An examination of the development and influences of Abstract Expressionism, including the impact on the Beat Generation and Pop Art. Offered as ARTH 380 and ARTH 480.

ARTH 481. Neoclassicism to Realism. 3 Units.

The main developments of European art chiefly painting and sculpture from post-impressionism to the present; the nature of abstract art and the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and science. Offered as ARTH 381 and ARTH 481.

ARTH 482. Visions of Utopia: 20th Century European Art. 3 Units.

Major movements in early 20th century European painting and sculpture with utopian goals. Focus on the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and sciences. Offered as ARTH 382 and ARTH 482.

ARTH 483. Gender Issues in Feminist Art: The 20th/21st Century. 3 Units.

An in-depth thematic approach to issues affecting works of art by and about women. Focus on the late 20th century. Emphasis on a specifically modern use of feminine myths, subjects and modes of production, and feminist criticism. Offered as ARTH 383, WGST 383 and ARTH 483.

ARTH 484. American Art and Architecture in the Age of Washington and Jefferson. 3 Units.

In the 18th century, Americans created not only a political revolution but an artistic and creative one as well. In the 17th century, most Americans were subsistence farmers and most of their products, manufactures, and buildings were relatively crude. In the 18th century, Americans not only established a new and lasting form of government, but for the first time produced paintings, buildings, furniture and silver that rivaled the finest productions of Europe. Notably, many of the leaders of the American Revolution, such as Paul Revere, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, also made significant contributions to the arts. Offered as ARTH 384 and ARTH 484.

ARTH 485. American Avant-Garde: 1900 - 1925. 3 Units.

An examination of the development of avant-garde styles in New York during the early twentieth century. In-depth discussion of the Photo-secession, Stieglitz's "291" gallery, the Armory Show, Marcel Duchamp's move to America, and the formation and demise of the New York Dada movement. Offered as ARTH 385 and ARTH 485.

ARTH 489. M.A. Qualifying Paper. 3 Units.

Individual research and intensive study of a specific topic in art history which culminates in a written M.A. Qualifying Paper. Recommended preparation: 27 credit hours of Art History.

ARTH 490A. Visual Arts and Museums I. 3 Units.

This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations, focusing on the context of Western Europe and the United States. As a result of this course, students should be familiar with the following topics: the historic development of the museum, from its origins in collecting practices to its modern incarnation as an institution; the development and care of a collection, including acquisition, cataloguing, and conservation; the display and housing of a collection, including internal and external museum architecture; the study and interpretation of the collection/exhibition, considering diverse publics; the governance of the institution, including project management, finance, and administration. Through the study of these topics, the student should be familiar with the following concepts: the museum as a place for learning, research and scholarship and the museum as steward of cultural property and the attendant issues of ethics and the law. ARTH 490A concentrates on museum collections and related aspects of care, research, interpretation and scholarship. Students who successfully complete ARTH 490A and ARTH 490B may be considered for admission into ARTH 491A, a supervised internship in an art museum or gallery situation.

ARTH 490B. Visual Arts and Museums: II. 3 Units.

This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations, focusing on the context of Western Europe and the United States. As a result of this course, students should be familiar with the following topics: the historic development of the museum, from its origins in collecting practices to its modern incarnation as an institution; the development and care of a collection, including acquisition, cataloguing, and conservation; the display and housing of a collection, including internal and external museum architecture; the study and interpretation of the collection/exhibition, considering diverse publics; the governance of the institution, including project management, finance, and administration. Through the study of these topics, the student should be familiar with the following concepts: the museum as a place for learning, research and scholarship and the museum as steward of cultural property and the attendant issues of ethics and the law. ARTH 490B concentrates on the museum as an institution, including physical aspects, management and governance, and as a site of learning. The inter-connections between these broad fields and individual departments will be demonstrated and reinforced throughout the semester. Students who successfully complete ARTH 490A and ARTH 490B may be considered for admission into ARTH 491A, a supervised internship in an art museum or gallery situation.

ARTH 491A. Visual Arts and Museums: Internship. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: ARTH 490.

ARTH 491B. Visual Arts and Museums: Internship. 3 Units.

Second semester of Internship sequence. This internship focuses on the implementation of a comprehensive project that would serve a function similar to the requirement of a qualifying paper for the completion of a master's degree in art history. It is recommended that students undertake this internship in the same division in which their first internship was situated although students may find opportunities to parlay the skills acquired in the first internship to successful advanced work in another division. The key distinction here is that the work in ARTH 491B should build upon the expertise developed in ARTH 491 and represent a significant advance in responsibilities and skills. By week 10 of ARTH 491, students should begin to identify a potential project for ARTH 491B. By the first week of the semester in which ARTH 491B is to be completed, the student must file an internship agreement form with the department that includes a brief description of the project to be completed, including a summary of the project and major milestones/time line. In addition to working under the direct supervision of a museum mentor, the student must obtain a faculty mentor for the project and this information should be included in the internship agreement form. Students must file a mid-term and final report describing their duties and responsibilities and a self-assessment of their performance and a final portfolio with a final version of their project as well as examples of drafts and feedback received in the course of completing the project. Students must also keep a journal that tracks their milestones in completing their projects. The faculty supervisor will solicit a letter of assessment from the internship supervisor immediately upon the close of the internship and in sufficient time for final grades. Recommended preparation: ARTH 490, ARTH 491A.

ARTH 492. Issues in 20th/21st Century Art. 3 Units.

Various topics in 20th/21st century art, with class lectures, discussions, and reports. Offered as ARTH 392 and ARTH 492.

ARTH 493. Contemporary Art: Critical Directions. 3 Units.

An examination of the directions taken by avant-garde American art and criticism in the aftermath of Abstract Expressionism. Includes the rise and fall of modernism in the 1960s and '70s, as well as an investigation of Post-modern trends and theories. Offered as ARTH 393 and ARTH 493.

ARTH 494A. Directed Readings in Non-Western Art. 1 - 3 Unit.

Directed reading.

ARTH 494B. Ancient Art. 1 - 3 Unit.


ARTH 494C. Medieval Art. 1 - 3 Unit.


ARTH 494D. Renaissance and Baroque Art. 1 - 3 Unit.


ARTH 494E. American Art. 1 - 3 Unit.


ARTH 494F. Modern Art. 1 - 3 Unit.


ARTH 495. Methodologies of Art History. 3 Units.

The study of art history as a discipline in its practical and theoretical aspects. Consideration given to research methods, style and historical context, and a critical examination of selected major art historical texts with a view to understanding traditional as well as recent approaches. Special attention is given to art historical writing, employing selected original works in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Required of first-year graduate students in the Ph.D. and Master's programs.

ARTH 497. History of Prints and Printmaking. 3 Units.

Development of techniques and style and the social function of prints. The great masters: Durer, Rembrandt, Goya, and others. Based on the extensive collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 397 and ARTH 497.

ARTH 512. Seminar in Ancient Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 518B. Seminar in Asian Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 540. Seminar in Non-Western Art. 3 Units.

Topics may include: African Art and The West, Africa: Symbolism and Ritual, The Classic Period in Mesoamerica, Andean Textiles.

ARTH 545B. Seminar in Medieval Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 551. Seminar in Renaissance Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 552. Seminar in Baroque Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 565. Seminar in American Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 570. Seminar: 19th Century Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 575. Critical Theory Seminar. 3 Units.

In-depth study of controversial revisionist writings which demonstrate the strong impact of structuralist, poststructuralist, semiotic, Marxist, psychoanalytic, film, and gender theories on recent art historical discourse. Discussion of a wide range of current theoretical positions applied to visual and critical analysis of 19th and 20th century art works. Recommended preparation: ARTH 495.

ARTH 576. Seminar in Modern Art. 3 Units.


ARTH 584. Seminar: History of Photography. 3 Units.

This seminar style course will investigate various topics in the history of photography, making use of objects in area collections whenever possible. In addition to original works of art, the course will stress recent directions in the secondary literature. Students will gain skills in examination of objects, research, critical analysis, and written and verbal communication.

ARTH 601. Research in Art History. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.)

ARTH 610A. Advanced Visual Arts and Museums: Internship I. 3 Units.

First semester of the internship sequence. The intern will work under the supervision of a museum professional to plan and execute a specific project. The student must also obtain a faculty mentor for the project. An internship agreement form must be filed with the department by the end of the first week of classes that includes a brief description of the project. If it is a project to be completed in one semester, a time line should be included as well. The intern must file a mid-term and final report describing their duties and responsibilities and a self-assessment of their performance. A portfolio kept in the department will include the final version of their project as it stands at the end of the semester, as well as examples of drafts and any evaluation received in the course of completing the project. The intern must also keep a journal that tracks their milestones in the execution of their project. The faculty supervisor will solicit a letter of assessment from the museum supervisor immediately upon the close of the internship and in sufficient time to assign a final grade. Prereq: ARTH 490A and ARTH 490B.

ARTH 610B. Advanced Visual Arts and Museums Internship II. 3 Units.

Second semester of the internship sequence. The intern will either continue with the execution of the project begun in the first semester (ARTH 610A) or, when appropriate, undertake a new project. The intern will work under the supervision of a museum professional, and must obtain a faculty mentor for the project. An internship agreement form must be filed with the department by the end of the first week of classes that includes a brief description of the project. A time line should be included as well. The intern must file a mid-term and final report describing their duties and responsibilities and a self-assessment of their performance. A portfolio kept in the department will include the final version of their project as it stands at the end of the semester, as well as examples of drafts and any evaluation received in the course of completing the project. The intern must also keep a journal that tracks their milestones in the execution of their project. The faculty supervisor will solicit a letter of assessment from the museum supervisor immediately upon the close of the internship and in sufficient time to assign a final grade. Prereq: ARTH 490A and 490B and ARTH 610A.

ARTH 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

ARTS Courses

ARTS 101. Design and Color I. 3 Units.

Organizational and structural projects as a basis for the development of style. Studies in line, texture, shape, space, value, color, and two dimensional composition through studio problems, art studio media and techniques.

ARTS 106. Creative Drawing I. 3 Units.

Development of graphic fluency in black and white through direct observation of nature and the model. Drawing as a means of enlarging visual sensitivity using a wide range of media and subject matter. Work from nude model.

ARTS 201. Design and Color II. 3 Units.

Continuation of ARTS 101. Composition: three-dimensional projects. Advanced work in the properties and uses of color and materials. Prereq: ARTS 101.

ARTS 204. Printmaking. 3 Units.

Printmaking is an introductory studio class of basic fine art printmaking processes. Students will learn how to make original printed images from a wide variety of matrix printing surfaces, including linoleum, copper metal plate, plastic and cardboard. Intaglio and relief processes will be learned. Prereq: ARTS 101 or ARTS 106.

ARTS 206. Creative Drawing II. 3 Units.

Continuation of ARTS 106. Advanced work in graphic representation. Development of visual acuity and a personal drawing style while working in color. Work from nude model. Prereq: ARTS 106.

ARTS 210. Enameling and Jewelry I. 3 Units.

Techniques in the application of vitreous enamel on copper and of constructed metal jewelry. Technical skill and suitability of design as applied to the medium.

ARTS 212. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles I. 3 Units.

Learn basic concepts and methods for designing textile surfaces: fabric painting and dyeing. Construct textiles using off-loom weaving and interlacing techniques. Emphasis on development of technical skills, application of design concepts and personal expression.

ARTS 214. Ceramics I. 3 Units.

The techniques of hand building in pinch, coil and slab methods. Development of sensitivity to design and form. Basic work in stoneware, earthenware, and glazing.

ARTS 216. Painting I. 3 Units.

The creative, conceptual, visual, and technical aspects of painting. Style ranging from naturalism to abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media.

ARTS 220. Photography Studio I. 3 Units.

Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

ARTS 295. Introduction to Art Education. 3 Units.

General history and theories of art education. Development of personal philosophy as basis for teaching art. Topics in professional standards, creativity, aesthetic theory, and art criticism. (Clinical/field experience required.)

ARTS 300. Current Issues in Art Education. 3 Units.

Contemporary issues in Art Education; understanding art goals and standards of National Art Education Association and the Ohio State Department of Education for teachers, students and administrators. Special topics: art and technology, multiculturalism, special populations and classroom management. Offered as ARTS 300 and ARTS 400. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 302. Architecture and City Design I. 3 Units.

The social spatial, and aesthetic elements in architecture; the components of the building: the window, door, roof, enclosing walls, and character of interior and exterior space. Projects related to small, intimate scale and residential structures. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment. Offered as ARTS 302 or ARTS 402.

ARTS 303. Architecture and City Design II. 3 Units.

The social, spatial, and aesthetic elements of the urban setting of architecture, the organizational components of the city, the path, the node, the edge, and the grid. Projects related to large-scale and public buildings and their relationship to the encompassing visual world. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment. Offered as ARTS 303 or ARTS 403.

ARTS 304. Architecture and City Design III. 3 Units.

A study of historic precedents and the social implications of modern and contemporary architecture including analysis and form interpretation as it relates to building and materials technologies. Practical application and synthesis of architectural knowledge through site visits and research of local and regional architecture. Discussions of historic and contemporary architects, engineers and significant architecture and engineering firms. Prereq: ARTS 302 and ARTS 303.

ARTS 310. Enameling and Jewelry II. 3 Units.

Continuation of ARTS 210. Advanced enameling and jewelry techniques applied to copper or silver, cloisonne, champleve, basse taille, plique-jour. Creative use of design principles and jewelry techniques. Prereq: ARTS 210.

ARTS 312. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles II. 3 Units.

Continuation of ARTS 212. Exploration of a selected area of textiles in surface design or constructed textiles. Development of a personal aesthetic through design and execution of a series of projects. Prereq: ARTS 212.

ARTS 314. Ceramics II. 3 Units.

Continuation of ARTS 214. Problematic approach to technical aspects of ceramics; experience in wheel throwing and option of hand-building. Experimentation with glaze and clay body formulation available. Prereq: ARTS 214.

ARTS 316. Painting II. 3 Units.

The creative, conceptual, visual and technical aspects of painting. Styles ranging from expressionism, cubism, surrealism and abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media leading to the development of personal painting style. Prereq: ARTS 216.

ARTS 320. Photography Studio II. 3 Units.

Continuation of ARTS 220. Advanced theory and black and white techniques. Development of personal aesthetic encouraged. Field work. 35mm camera required. Prereq: ARTS 220.

ARTS 322. Digital Photography I. 3 Units.

Introduction of color and digital photography. A systematic approach to the digital photography workflow and its application to creative photography. History of the medium. Field and computer lab work. Advanced amateur digital camera required. Prereq: ARTS 220.

ARTS 325. Creative Photography. 3 Units.

Creative photography through photographing and responding to photographs. The question of self-expression and photographic medium explored in the pursuit of understanding images. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320 or ARTS 322.

ARTS 350. Multimedia I. 3 Units.

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology to design, create, express, and present. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging, animation, video, multimedia, production and presentation. Offered as ARTS 350 and ARTS 450. Prereq: One from ARTS 101, ARTS 106, ARTS 216, or ARTS 220 or permission of the Director of Art Education.

ARTS 365A. Painting. 3 Units.

Advanced painting projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 216 and ARTS 316.

ARTS 365B. Design and Color. 3 Units.

Advanced design projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 101 and ARTS 201.

ARTS 365C. Enameling and Jewelry. 3 Units.

Advanced enameling and jewelry projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 210 and ARTS 310.

ARTS 365D. B&W Photography Studio. 3 Units.

Advanced black and white projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320.

ARTS 365E. Color Studio. 3 Units.

Advanced digital color studio projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 322.

ARTS 365G. Ceramics. 3 Units.

Advanced ceramics projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 214 and ARTS 314.

ARTS 365H. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles. 3 Units.

Advance textile projects determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 212 and ARTS 312.

ARTS 366A. Student Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade. 4 Units.

Teaching art for early childhood, elementary, and middle school students in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Professional standards and practices. Offered as ARTS 366A and ARTS 466A. Prereq: ARTS 295, ARTS 300, ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, and ARTS 393. Coreq: ARTS 366B and ARTS 465.

ARTS 366B. Student Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade. 4 Units.

Teaching adolescents and young adults art in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, assessment and classroom management. Professional standards and practices. Offered as ARTS 366B and ARTS 466B. Prereq: ARTS 295, ARTS 300, ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387 and ARTS 393. Coreq: ARTS 366A and ARTS 465.

ARTS 385. Clinical/Field Based Experience I. 1 Unit.

Art education students observe and assist art teachers in classes in a variety of public and private educational environments such as local schools, Cleveland Museum of Art. Students study, identify, and analyze differences in art curriculum taught at the various art programs that they observe. Written reports using departmental observation guidelines are required. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 386. Clinical/Field Based Experience II. 1 Unit.

Art education students become sensitized to serving needs of "special" populations. Observation of educational strategies for teaching learning disabled and/or physically disabled students. Written reports using departmental observation guidelines required. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 387. Clinical/Field Based Experience III. 1 Unit.

Art education students observe and assist in art programs for artistically gifted students working in specialized art areas (drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history). Written reports using departmental observation guidelines are required. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 393. Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment. 3 Units.

Growth and development of image making from Pre-K through young adult. Principles and practices of art instruction in grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Issues in art education. Curriculum construction, implementation and assessment of art lessons that address content areas of art production, art history, art appreciation, and art criticism. Clinical field experiences required. Offered as ARTS 393 and ARTS 493. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 395. Introduction to Multimedia Technology. 3 Units.

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in art, electronic portfolio development, and teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging and video, multimedia production and presentation, the Internet, information processing, computer systems and management as they relate to art education. Offered as ARTS 395 and ARTS 495. Prereq: ARTS 101 and ARTS 201 or ARTS 220 and ARTS 320.

ARTS 399. Independent Study in Art Studio. 1 - 3 Unit.

Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit of Director only.

ARTS 400. Current Issues in Art Education. 3 Units.

Contemporary issues in Art Education; understanding art goals and standards of National Art Education Association and the Ohio State Department of Education for teachers, students and administrators. Special topics: art and technology, multiculturalism, special populations and classroom management. Offered as ARTS 300 and ARTS 400.

ARTS 402. Architecture and City Design I. 3 Units.

The social spatial, and aesthetic elements in architecture; the components of the building: the window, door, roof, enclosing walls, and character of interior and exterior space. Projects related to small, intimate scale and residential structures. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment. Offered as ARTS 302 or ARTS 402.

ARTS 403. Architecture and City Design II. 3 Units.

The social, spatial, and aesthetic elements of the urban setting of architecture, the organizational components of the city, the path, the node, the edge, and the grid. Projects related to large-scale and public buildings and their relationship to the encompassing visual world. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment. Offered as ARTS 303 or ARTS 403.

ARTS 450. Multimedia I. 3 Units.

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology to design, create, express, and present. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging, animation, video, multimedia, production and presentation. Offered as ARTS 350 and ARTS 450.

ARTS 465. Seminar for Art Teachers. 4 Units.

For art education majors and teacher licensure candidates. Principles and practice in school art instruction grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Organization and management of the art program that incorporates writing sequential art curriculum that integrates art production, art history, appreciation, and criticism. Planning, development, and evaluation of teaching materials, lessons, and units. The seminar includes discussion of professional issues, ethics, art advocacy, and classroom management. Prereq: ARTS 295 or ARTS 602, and ARTS 393 or ARTS 493. Coreq: ARTS 366A and ARTS 366B or ARTS 466A and ARTS 466B.

ARTS 466A. Student Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade. 4 Units.

Teaching art for early childhood, elementary, and middle school students in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Professional standards and practices. Offered as ARTS 366A and ARTS 466A. Prereq: ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, ARTS 400, ARTS 493, and ARTS 602. Coreq: ARTS 465 and ARTS 466B.

ARTS 466B. Student Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade. 4 Units.

Teaching adolescents and young adults art in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, assessment and classroom management. Professional standards and practices. Offered as ARTS 366B and ARTS 466B. Prereq: ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, ARTS 400, ARTS 493, and ARTS 602. Coreq: ARTS 465 and ARTS 466A.

ARTS 493. Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment. 3 Units.

Growth and development of image making from Pre-K through young adult. Principles and practices of art instruction in grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Issues in art education. Curriculum construction, implementation and assessment of art lessons that address content areas of art production, art history, art appreciation, and art criticism. Clinical field experiences required. Offered as ARTS 393 and ARTS 493. Prereq: ARTS 602.

ARTS 494. Teaching Art. 3 Units.

Research contrasting theories of art education in relationship to a variety of educational settings in elementary and secondary schools. Developing innovative, interdisciplinary, comprehensive curriculum models for a specific organization. For licensed art teachers only or consent of instructor.

ARTS 495. Introduction to Multimedia Technology. 3 Units.

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in art, electronic portfolio development, and teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging and video, multimedia production and presentation, the Internet, information processing, computer systems and management as they relate to art education. Offered as ARTS 395 and ARTS 495.

ARTS 497. Summer Workshop in Art Education. 3 Units.

A current art education issue is covered in depth.

ARTS 602. Study in Art Education. 3 Units.

General history and theories of art education. Development of personal philosophy as basis for teaching art. Topics in professional standards, creativity, aesthetic theory, and art criticism. Students produce an art education research paper. Clinical/Field experiences are required.

ARTS 605. Final Creative Thesis. 1 - 3 Unit.

Students receive individual guidance for an approved self-designed creative project from program faculty members. A public exhibition or presentation is required. By permit only.