2011-12 General Bulletin

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212 Clapp Hall
www.case.edu/artsci/chem
Phone: 216-368-3620; Fax: 216-368-3006
Mary D. Barkley, Department Chair

This is an archived copy of the 2011-12 Bulletin. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit http://bulletin.case.edu.

The Department of Chemistry is the largest department representing the chemical sciences at Case Western Reserve University. It consists of 21 faculty members, 11 associated faculty, 10 postdoctoral associates, about 80 graduate students, and over 100 undergraduate students majoring in chemistry. The department offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy.

The general focus of chemistry is on (1) understanding the basic properties of matter, and (2) employing this knowledge in the design, synthesis, and characterization of materials with novel and useful properties. The various degree programs strive to develop all aspects of the student’s chemical knowledge through a broad range of lecture and laboratory courses.

Chemical research is an integral part of the department’s activities; over $3 million of federal, state, and private research support flows into the department each year. State-of-the-art research facilities are available to both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates are encouraged to participate in research projects with individual faculty members in order to expand their hands-on training, problem-solving skills, and understanding of the scientific method as applied in chemical research. These research projects typically involve interchange and collaboration across all levels of experience and may also involve scientists from other departments and institutions.

Chemistry is often referred to as “the central science” because of its key role in interdisciplinary studies. Correspondingly, a degree in chemistry affords a broad range of employment opportunities. Chemists can direct their talents to specialized problems of applied research, or they can choose to delve into fundamental investigations. A degree in chemistry can cover the spectrum of chemical specialties, from biochemistry to interstellar chemistry. The degree also provides valuable preparation for other professions, such as medicine, dentistry, and law.

The American Chemical Society , with more than 160,000 members, is the major professional society in the United States for practicing chemists. Both undergraduate and graduate students may join the society. 

Facilities

The department’s facilities for experimental and theoretical research are modern and extensive. They include diverse major instruments for use by faculty and students, as well as specialized equipment serving individual research groups. Shared instrumentation includes 400- and 600-MHz NMR spectrometers, ultrafast laser systems in the Center for Chemical Dynamics, and a cyber-enabled X-ray crystallographic facility.

Other departmental instrumentation includes equipment for laser Raman spectroscopy, GC-MS and LC-MS/MS mass spectrometers, stopped-flow kinetics instrumentation, a circular dichroism spectrometer, an analytical ultracentrifuge, and equipment for electrochemical measurements. Access to very high-field NMR instrumentation is available on campus at the Cleveland Center for Membrane Structural Biology (CCMSB), which is equipped with numerous 500- to 900-MHz NMR spectrometers for solution and solid-state measurements. The chemistry department’s computers are part of the campus-wide fiber optic communications network operated by Information Technology Services, and the entire University Circle area offers wireless access. In addition to the full complement of software, Internet, and library database services offered by the university, connections to off-site databases, such as SciFinder and Ohio Supercomputer Center, are available to departmental users.

The department uses some of the foremost equipment available in high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and in tunable laser spectroscopy. Work on various aspects of chemistry as studied by these techniques is recognized throughout the world.

Department Faculty

Mary D. Barkley, PhD
(University of California, San Diego)
M. Roger Clapp University Professor of Arts and Sciences and Chair
Biophysical chemistry; fluorescence spectroscopy; tryptophan fluorescence; HIV reverse transcriptase

Alfred B. Anderson, PhD
(Johns Hopkins University)
Professor
Pure and applied theoretical chemistry: surface science, catalysis, electrocatalysis and properties of doped diamond

Clemens Burda, PhD
(University of Basel, Switzerland)
Professor
Physical chemistry of nanostructures; molecular electronics; femtosecond laser spectroscopy

James D. Burgess, PhD
(Virginia Commonwealth University)
Associate Professor
Physical chemistry of platinum-based anticancer drugs; electrode-supported bilayer membranes; electron transfer enzymes

Carlos E. Crespo-Hernández, PhD
(University of Puerto Rico)
Assistant Professor
Ultrafast spectroscopy; organic photochemistry and photophysics; environmental chemistry; computational chemistry

Robert C. Dunbar, PhD
(Stanford University)
Professor
Gas phase ions and ion-neutral interactions; ion-molecular reaction kinetics; computational chemistry

Thomas G. Gray, PhD
(Harvard University)
Associate Professor
Inorganic and organometallic chemistry; metalloclusters as nanorods; biomineralization scaffolds; luminescence imaging agents

Malcolm E. Kenney, PhD
(Cornell University)
Hurlbut Professor of Chemistry
Photodynamic therapy; porphyrin-like compounds; organosilicon compounds; flue gas desulfurization

Michael J. Kenney, PhD
(Iowa State University)
Senior Instructor and John Teagle Professorial Fellow in Chemistry
Chemical education

Irene Lee, PhD
(Pennsylvania State University)
Associate Professor
Biochemistry; enzymology

Anthony J. Pearson, PhD
(University of Aston, Birmingham, England)
Rudolph and Susan Rense Professor of Chemistry
Natural products; organometallics; organic synthesis

John D. Protasiewicz, PhD
(Cornell University)
Professor and Associate Chair
Inorganic chemistry; organometallic reaction mechanisms; catalyzed oxidations

Robert G. Salomon, PhD
(University of Wisconsin, Madison)
Charles Frederic Mabery Professor of Research in Chemistry
Chemical biology; lipid oxidation and disease; organic synthesis and reaction mechanisms

Anna C. Samia, PhD
(Georgia Institute of Technology)
Assistant Professor
Analytical chemistry; inorganic chemistry; materials and energy; bio-inorganic chemistry; functional nanomaterials; nanotheranostics

Genevieve Sauve, PhD
(California Institute of Technology)
Assistant Professor
Organic electronics; alternative energy; synthesis of polymers and inorganic complexes; transistor and solar cell devices

Daniel A. Scherson, PhD
(University of California, Davis)
Frank Hovorka Professor of Chemistry
Electrochemistry; electrode kinetics; electrocatalysis; in-situ spectroscopic methods in electrochemistry

Rekha Srinivasan, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor
Chemical education

John E. Stuehr, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor
Physical chemistry, chemical education

Gregory P. Tochtrop, PhD
(Washington University Medical School)
Assistant Professor
Chemical biology; molecular recognition; NMR; diversity-oriented synthesis

Rajesh Viswanathan, PhD
(University of Indiana)
Assistant Professor
Chemical biology; microarrays; biosynthesis and biomimetic synthesis; total synthesis of natural products

Michael G. Zagorski, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor
Organic chemistry; nuclear magnetic resonance; structure of peptides


Secondary Faculty

Paul Carey, PhD
(University of Sussex, UK)
Professor, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine
Raman spectroscopy; proteins and protein-ligand interactions

John W. Crabb, PhD
(University of Kansas Medical Center)
Professor of Molecular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University
Proteomics of the visual cycle and age-related ocular diseases

Thomas Gerken, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine
Biochemistry of glycoproteins; NMR

Thomas Kelley, PhD
(University of Notre Dame)
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine
Biochemistry; cell signaling and cholesterol processing in cystic fibrosis

John J. Mieyal, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine
Reactive oxygen species and sulfur biochemistry; enzymatic reaction mechanisms of intracellular sulfhydryl homeostasis and redox signal transduction

Stuart J. Rowan, PhD
(University of Glasgow, UK)
Professor, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case School of Engineering
Synthetic chemistry; supramolecular polymerization; reversible “dynamic” chemistry; chemical sensors; biomaterials; nanotechnology

Witold K. Surewicz, PhD
(University of Lodz, Poland)
Professor, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine
Protein aggregation and the pathogenesis of aging-related diseases; prion protein; protein folding and protein-membrane interaction

Yanming Wang, PhD
(ETH Zürich, Switzerland)
Associate Professor of Radiology; Director of Radiopharmaceutical Division, Case Center for Imaging Research, School of Medicine
Organic synthesis; molecular probes for in vivo imaging


Adjunct Faculty

M. Cather Simpson, PhD
(University of New Mexico)
Senior Lecturer in Chemistry and Physics; Associate Director, Dan Walls Centre for Pure and Applied Optics, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Biophysical chemistry; spectroscopic studies of biologically significant processes


Research Professors

Mikhail D. Linetsky, PhD
(Academy of Science of Ukraine)
Research Associater Professor
Biochemistry; chemical biology; protein chemistry; post-translational protein modification;l proteomics

BS Chemistry   |  BA Chemistry   | Teacher Licensure   |  Minor

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

The Department of Chemistry offers two curricula for undergraduate chemistry majors, leading to a Bachelor of Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree.

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Bachelor of Science Program

The BS program is designed for students who seek professional careers in the chemical sciences and is certified by the American Chemical Society. The BS curriculum provides a rigorous background in chemistry, yet offers considerable flexibility in the senior year in the choice of electives, allowing BS majors to pursue areas of chemistry of particular interest to them in greater depth. At least three credit hours of research ( / ) are required, and up to nine hours of research may be credited toward the degree.

Total Hours Required For Graduation:  122-123

Chemistry Courses Required (53-54 hours)

CHEM 105Principles of Chemistry I3
CHEM 106Principles of Chemistry II3
CHEM 113Principles of Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 114Chemistry Frontiers Laboratory2
CHEM 323Organic Chemistry I3
CHEM 324Organic Chemistry II3
CHEM 304Quantitative Analytical Chemistry4
CHEM 322Laboratory Methods in Organic Chemistry3
CHEM 311Inorganic Chemistry I3
One of the following courses:3
Introductory Biochemistry
Chemical Aspects of Living Systems
General Biochemistry
CHEM 331Laboratory Methods in Inorganic Chemistry3
CHEM 332Laboratory Methods in Physical Chemistry3
CHEM 335Physical Chemistry I3
CHEM 336Physical Chemistry II3
CHEM 310Instrumental Analytical Chemistry3
A minimum of 3 credit hours of the following:3
Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Research/Senior Capstone Project
Six additional hours of chemistry electives at the 300 level or above, which may include up to 6 credit hours of: 6
Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Research/Senior Capstone Project
Total Units53

Additional Required Courses (31 hours)

MATH 121Calculus for Science and Engineering I4
MATH 122Calculus for Science and Engineering II4
or MATH 124 Calculus II
MATH 223Calculus for Science and Engineering III3
or MATH 227 Calculus III
One of the following:3
Elementary Differential Equations
Differential Equations
Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science
PHYS 121General Physics I - Mechanics4
or PHYS 123 Physics and Frontiers I - Mechanics
PHYS 122General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism4
or PHYS 124 Physics and Frontiers II - Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 221Introduction to Modern Physics3
Six additional hours of approved technical electives, which may include up to 6 credit hours of6
Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Research/Senior Capstone Project
Total Units31

The chemistry electives may include any chemistry department course at the 300 level or above which is not part of the "core set," or selected courses with a strong chemistry content at the 300 level or above from other science departments. Only 3 credit hours of may be applied to a chemistry elective.

The technical electives may be chosen more widely from any of the natural sciences, math, or engineering courses. An additional 6 credits of may be taken as technical electives. Further additional credits of may be taken as Free Electives. Students may wish to group their electives into "tracks" of specialization in order to tailor their degree to a particular area of chemistry.

BS majors who plan to go on to graduate study may elect to take advanced courses in:

Inorganic Chemistry
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry
Advanced Organic Chemistry I
Advanced Organic Chemistry II
Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Chemical Kinetics
Chemical Thermodynamics
Quantum Mechanics I

Students can also elect to take other graduate offerings. Interdisciplinary strengths can be achieved by selecting technical electives in biochemistry, biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, macromolecular science, and materials science as well as in biology, geological sciences, mathematics, physics, and statistics.


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Bachelor of Arts Program

The BA program is intended for pre-professional students who plan careers in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and pharmacy or in other fields for which a baccalaureate degree in chemistry provides appropriate training. BA majors may supplement their required courses with additional chemistry courses or may utilize the curriculum’s flexibility to develop an interdisciplinary program of their choice. Many BA majors participate in undergraduate research within the Department of Chemistry (/ ) or in other science departments, including those in the medical school.

Total Hours Required For Graduation:  120

Chemistry Courses Required (31-32 hours)

CHEM 105Principles of Chemistry I3
CHEM 106Principles of Chemistry II3
CHEM 113Principles of Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 223Introductory Organic Chemistry I3
or CHEM 323 Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 224Introductory Organic Chemistry II3
or CHEM 324 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 233Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I2
CHEM 234Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II2
or CHEM 322 Laboratory Methods in Organic Chemistry
CHEM 301Introductory Physical Chemistry I3
or CHEM 335 Physical Chemistry I
CHEM 302Introductory Physical Chemistry II3
or CHEM 336 Physical Chemistry II
CHEM 304Quantitative Analytical Chemistry4
CHEM 305Introductory Physical Chemistry Laboratory3
Total Units31

Additional Required Courses (16 hours)

PHYS 115Introductory Physics I4
PHYS 116Introductory Physics II4
MATH 125Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I4
or MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering I
MATH 126Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II4
or MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engineering II
Total Units16

 


Departmental Honors

Chemistry majors who have excellent academic records may participate in the Honors in Chemistry program. To graduate with honors in chemistry, a student must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. A combined grade point average of 3.50 in chemistry, physics, and mathematics and an overall grade point average of 3.20
  2. A minimum of six credit hours of , or chemical research done under another course number with departmental approval
  3. A thesis approved by the department’s undergraduate affairs committee based on the level of research, quality of the manuscript, and chemical content

Teacher Licensure in Physical Science (Chemistry and Physics)                        

An option is available within the BA program for students to become eligible for licensure as teachers of physical science (chemistry and physics) in secondary schools (grades 9–12). Students interested in this option should contact Professor Michael Kenney. A total of 57 credit hours in the subject area are required for teacher licensure, as well as a 35-hour sequence in professional education (including student teaching) taken here and at John Carroll University. For more information, see the program description for Teacher Licensure elsewhere in this bulletin.

Subject area requirements for students majoring in chemistry:

One of the following:3
ASTR 201The Sun and its Planets3
or GEOL 110 Physical Geology
PHYS 121General Physics I - Mechanics4
PHYS 122General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism4
PHYS 221Introduction to Modern Physics3
CHEM 105Principles of Chemistry I3
CHEM 106Principles of Chemistry II3
CHEM 113Principles of Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 223Introductory Organic Chemistry I3
or CHEM 323 Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 224Introductory Organic Chemistry II3
or CHEM 324 Organic Chemistry II
PHYS 331Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I3
ENGR 131Elementary Computer Programming3
MATH 125Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I4
MATH 126Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II4
CHEM 301Introductory Physical Chemistry I3
CHEM 302Introductory Physical Chemistry II3
CHEM 304Quantitative Analytical Chemistry4
CHEM 305Introductory Physical Chemistry Laboratory3
PHYS 310Classical Mechanics3
PHYS 324Electricity and Magnetism I3
PHYS 315Introduction to Solid State Physics3
or PHYS 316 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics

Course requirements for students majoring in physics and seeking physical science teacher licensure are listed under the Department of Physics.


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Minor

Students may complete a minor in chemistry, defined as one year of freshman chemistry (including laboratory); two additional three-hour lecture courses; and two additional laboratory or approved courses. A recommended sequence would include:

CHEM 105Principles of Chemistry I3
CHEM 106Principles of Chemistry II3
CHEM 113Principles of Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 223Introductory Organic Chemistry I3
or CHEM 323 Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 224Introductory Organic Chemistry II3
or CHEM 324 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 233Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I2
CHEM 234Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II2
Total Units18

Other sequences may be followed after consultation with the Department of Chemistry.

BS Chemistry   |  BA Chemistry   | Teacher Licensure   |  Minor

Graduate Programs

Master of Science Programs

The MS degree in chemistry may be obtained by completing (1) a program that includes the preparation of a master’s thesis, or (2) a program involving only course work. Both programs require a minimum of 27 credit hours, of which up to six credit hours may be for the master’s thesis. Course work for the master’s degree may be taken on a part-time basis, but thesis research can be undertaken only by full-time graduate students. Thus, only the master’s degree without thesis can be earned entirely on a part-time basis.

The Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Program (STEP) is a three- or four-semester professional MS degree offered in chemistry as well as in biotechnology, mathematics, statistics, and physics. Students enter the Chemistry Entrepreneurship program with a bachelor’s, master’s, or PhD degree in a chemistry-related field. The program consists of advanced courses in chemistry, business, and technology innovation and an entrepreneurial project with technical content in an existing company or new venture.

Doctor of Philosophy Program

The PhD degree in chemistry is granted to those students who have shown an extensive knowledge of advanced chemistry and the ability to do original research. The program usually requires four years of full-time study after the bachelor’s degree. Besides advanced courses, the program consists of cumulative and oral examinations, seminars and colloquia, and an original research project. At least twelve months must be spent in residence on campus while fulfilling the PhD thesis research requirement.

Full-time graduate students who maintain satisfactory academic performance while pursuing the PhD degree in chemistry normally receive a stipend for teaching and/or research, which includes full tuition and a monthly amount sufficient to cover living expenses.

Research

The Department of Chemistry is noted for research programs in (1) chemical biology and (2) energy and materials. Projects range from synthetic studies of important bioactive substances, including antibiotics and DNA-binding substances, to detailed examination of the surface properties of materials used in batteries and electrolytic cells. Studies are being performed with molecules as simple as oxygen and as complicated as those which describe the active centers of enzymes or the protein core of insoluble aggregates that deposit in neurodegenerative disease. Efforts are being made to understand the basic chemical properties leading to reactive mediators generated from physiological lipids.

Other research is aimed at developing new drugs for photodynamic therapy and at understanding the mechanism of action of drugs for antiretroviral therapy. The influence of metal ions in modifying reactivity is a common interest of several members of the faculty, as is the development of organometallic compounds for materials and catalysis. Chemical surfaces are being studied, as are various applications of nanoparticles, from cells to the environment. Studies designed to characterize electrode-electrolyte interfaces, the electrochemical properties of new semiconductors, and single-cell microelectrodes are also ongoing. These efforts are complemented by theoretical studies on the interfacial structure and bonding of composite materials.

Case Western Reserve University ranks among the leading universities internationally in its strengths in electrochemistry and has brought these strengths together in the Yeager Center for Electrochemical Studies (YCES) . The interdisciplinary nature of electrochemistry involves the interaction of electrochemists in the chemistry and chemical engineering departments with metallurgists, surface physicists, inorganic and organic chemists, polymer membrane chemists, and electrical engineers. Such interactions, lacking on most campuses, are promoted at Case Western Reserve University through YCES. Graduate students in the chemistry department have the opportunity to specialize in electrochemistry in one of the most extensive course and research programs in the United States.

Colloquia and Seminars

The department sponsors a rich program of colloquia and seminars on recent advances in chemical research. Most notable among these is the Frontiers in Chemistry Lecture Series, in which scientists of international distinction lecture on major discoveries and developments in chemistry. In addition, a weekly colloquium series provides lectures by invited speakers in a variety of fields of chemical investigation. Both of these programs are addressed to an audience of faculty, graduate students, and other chemical scientists in the university and the Cleveland area, and are a vital means to broaden current knowledge. Numerous other seminars and meetings are held on a more specialized and informal level. Most individual research groups conduct weekly discussions to evaluate their progress.

Courses

CHEM 102. The Molecules of Medicine. 1 Unit.

The central tenet of CHEM 102 is the identification and presentation of concrete examples to illustrate how basic scientific principles impact medicine in a substantive way. Several topics will be addressed that include medical diagnostics, medical instrument design, and drug development. An emphasis of this class will be to convey how topics being presented in other classes in the pre-medical curriculum have a direct and substantive impact on the practice of medicine.

CHEM 105. Principles of Chemistry I. 3 Units.

Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

CHEM 106. Principles of Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, inorganic, and polymer chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 105 or equivalent.

CHEM 111. Principles of Chemistry for Engineers. 4 Units.

A first course in university chemistry emphasizing chemistry of materials for engineering students. Atomic theory and quantitative relationships; gas laws and kinetic theory; solutions, acid-base properties and pH; thermodynamics and equilibrium; kinetics, catalysis, and mechanisms; molecular structure and bonding. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry or permission of department.

CHEM 113. Principles of Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Units.

A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or ENGR 145.

CHEM 114. Chemistry Frontiers Laboratory. 2 Units.

An introduction to laboratory techniques and computer-based methods for chemical research for the chemistry major. Scientific information databases, structural chemistry, experimental design and data handling, chemical synthesis and characterization. Prereq: CHEM 105 or CHEM 111, and CHEM 113. Coreq: CHEM 106.

CHEM 223. Introductory Organic Chemistry I. 3 Units.

Introductory course for science majors and engineering students. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers as well as an introduction to spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

CHEM 224. Introductory Organic Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and continues spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines, and selected special topics. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

CHEM 233. Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. 2 Units.

An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent. Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

CHEM 234. Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory II. 2 Units.

A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 233. Coreq: CHEM 224

CHEM 290. Chemical Laboratory Methods for Engineers. 3 Units.

Techniques of chemical synthesis, analysis, and characterization. Uses students' backgrounds in general and organic chemistry, but requires no background in chemical laboratory operations. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

CHEM 301. Introductory Physical Chemistry I. 3 Units.

First of a two-semester sequence covering principles and applications of physical chemistry, intended for chemistry and engineering majors and other students having primary interests in biochemical, biological or life-science areas. States and properties of matter. Thermodynamics and its application to chemical and biochemical systems. Chemical equilibrium. Electrochemistry. Recommended preparation: One year each of undergraduate physics and calculus, preferably including partial derivatives. Prereq: CHEM 106 or equivalent.

CHEM 302. Introductory Physical Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Continuation of CHEM 301. Chemical kinetics and catalysis. Introductory quantum chemistry. Spectroscopy. Statistical thermodynamics. Prereq CHEM 301 or CHEM 335.

CHEM 304. Quantitative Analytical Chemistry. 4 Units.

A one-semester laboratory and lecture course involving quantitative chemical measurements, error analysis and advanced concepts in chemical equilibrium. Automatic ittration, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and iodine methods. Basic analytical instrumentation. Prereq: CHEM 106 and CHEM 113.

CHEM 305. Introductory Physical Chemistry Laboratory. 3 Units.

A one-semester laboratory course focusing on the principles and quantitative characterization of chemical and biochemical systems. Experiments include chemical equilibrium kinetics, electrochemistry, spectroscopy and the use of computers for the statistical analysis of experimental data. Seminar discussions and disciplinary writing of results. Prereq: CHEM 301 and CHEM 304 or CHEM 335. Or Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 302 or CHEM 336.

CHEM 310. Instrumental Analytical Chemistry. 3 Units.

Principles and applications of analytical instrumentation including optical spectroscopies (AAS, UV-Vis, IR, Raman), magnetic resonance spectroscopies (NMR, EPR), microscopy and imaging, and separation techniques. Recommended preparation for CHEM 410: Two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry. Offered as CHEM 310 and CHEM 410. Prereq: CHEM 301 and CHEM 302 or CHEM 335 and CHEM 336.

CHEM 311. Inorganic Chemistry I. 3 Units.

Fundamentals of inorganic chemistry. Topics include molecular structure, molecular shape and symmetry, structure of solids, d-metal complexes, oxidation and reduction, and acids and bases. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 301 or CHEM 335.

CHEM 312. Inorganic Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Continuation of CHEM 311. Fundamentals of inorganic chemistry. Topics include electronic spectra of complexes, structures and properties of solids, organometallic compounds, and descriptive chemistry of representative elements. Prereq: CHEM 311.

CHEM 322. Laboratory Methods in Organic Chemistry. 3 Units.

Experimental approach to the synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies; chromatographic techniques. Prereq: CHEM 304 and CHEM 223 or CHEM 323. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

CHEM 323. Organic Chemistry I. 3 Units.

Relationships between molecular structure and chemical reactivity and development of sophisticated problem-solving skills in the context of organic reaction mechanisms and multi-step synthesis. Homolytic and heterolytic substitution, elimination, oxidation and reduction reactions; topics in stereochemistry and spectroscopy. Recommended for chemistry, biochemistry, and related majors. Prereq: CHEM 106 or equivalent.

CHEM 324. Organic Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Continuation of CHEM 323. Introduces the chemistry of carbonyl, aromatic and amino functional groups, and develops the concepts of conjugation and resonance, molecular orbital theory and pericyclic reactions. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

CHEM 325. Physical Methods for Determining Organic Structure. 3 Units.

Structure determination of organic compounds using mass spectrometry and modern instrumental techniques such as infrared, ultraviolet, visible, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry. Offered as CHEM 325 and CHEM 425.

CHEM 328. Introductory Biochemistry. 3 Units.

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the "dark reactions" of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

CHEM 329. Chemical Aspects of Living Systems. 3 Units.

A survey of biochemical systems exploring their molecular circuitry and architecture. Protein structure and function. Lipids, cell membranes, channels and pumps. Redox processes and electron transport. Lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, its control, reciprocal regulation, and global integration. Nucleotide biosynthesis, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. RNA synthesis, splicing, and translation: protein synthesis and the control of gene expression. Sensory and immune systems. Molecular motors. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry and one semester of undergraduate physical chemistry. Offered as CHEM 329 and CHEM 429.

CHEM 331. Laboratory Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Units.

Synthesis, separation techniques, physical properties, and analysis. Advanced techniques of chemical synthesis, leading the student to the preparation of interesting inorganic and organometallic compounds. Prereq: CHEM 322.

CHEM 332. Laboratory Methods in Physical Chemistry. 3 Units.

Modern techniques of physicochemical measurement, including, kinetics, spectroscopy, and electrochemistry and the use of statistical methods for the analysis of experimental data. Seminar discussions and disciplinary writing of results. Prereq: CHEM 304. Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 336.

CHEM 333. Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Development. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview on how principles in chemistry and biology are integrated to facilitate drug development. Primary emphasis will be placed on the development of organic molecules as drugs and metabolic enzymes as drug targets. Subjects pertinent to the introduction of medicinal chemistry, evaluation of drug efficacies in vitro and in vivo, and drug metabolism will be covered. Offered as CHEM 333 and CHEM 433. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323 and BIOL 215. Coreq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324.

CHEM 335. Physical Chemistry I. 3 Units.

First of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for chemistry majors and others with career goals in the physical sciences or engineering. States of matter. Kinetic theory of gases. Transport phenomena. Chemical thermodynamics and its application to chemical systems. Equilibrium. Ionic solutions and electrochemistry. Introduction to chemical kinetics. Recommended preparation: One year each of undergraduate physics and calculus, including partial derivatives. Prereq: CHEM 106 or equivalent.

CHEM 336. Physical Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Continuation of CHEM 335. Reaction kinetics and catalysis. Reaction dynamics. Chemical quantum mechanics. Statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Spectroscopy. Prereq: CHEM 335 or Chemical Engineering Major with at least Junior standing.

CHEM 337. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Units.

Introduction to quantization, measurement and the Schrodinger equation; angular momentum and states of molecules. Perturbation theory, spectroscopy and chemical bonding. Variational theory and calculations of molecular properties. Offered as CHEM 335 and CHEM 446. Prereq: CHEM 336.

CHEM 339. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 3 Units.

An introduction to metal ions in biology and medicine. Topics of emphasis include metalloenzymes, inorganic elements in pharmaceuticals, and physical methods of characterization in biology. Course material will be presented through a seminar format, and will involve extensive class participation, student presentations, and literature research reports. Offered as CHEM 339 and CHEM 439. Prereq: CHEM 224 or CHEM 324

CHEM 395. Chemistry Colloquium Series. 1 Unit.

Course content provided by Thursday chemistry department colloquia (or Frontiers in Chemistry lectures). Discussion sessions review previous lectures and lay foundation for forthcoming lectures.

CHEM 397. Undergraduate Research. 1 - 6 Unit.

Independent research project within a research group in the chemistry department or, by petition, within a research group in another Case department. Arrangements should be made with the faculty member selected. Open to all chemistry majors and other qualified students; required for Honors in Chemistry. A written report is required each semester.

CHEM 398. Undergraduate Research/Senior Capstone Project. 3 - 6 Units.

Independent research project within a research group in the chemistry department or, by petition, within a research group in another Case department. Arrangements should be made by consultation with the faculty member selected and the Senior Capstone Committee of the chemistry department. Open to all chemistry majors and other qualified students. Satisfies the research requirement for Honors in Chemistry. A written report and public oral presentations are required.

CHEM 406. Chemical Kinetics. 3 Units.

Theory and characterization of chemical rate processes. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry.

CHEM 407. Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 Units.

Thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics and their application to chemical problems. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry.

CHEM 408. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 Units.

Topics in physical chemistry, intended for entering graduate students, giving background tools appropriate for graduate research in areas of chemistry other than physical chemistry. Illustrations from the contemporary chemical research literature will be emphasized. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, quantum chemistry and computation, spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics and dynamics. Recommended preparation: One year of undergraduate physical chemistry.

CHEM 410. Instrumental Analytical Chemistry. 3 Units.

Principles and applications of analytical instrumentation including optical spectroscopies (AAS, UV-Vis, IR, Raman), magnetic resonance spectroscopies (NMR, EPR), microscopy and imaging, and separation techniques. Recommended preparation for CHEM 410: Two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry. Offered as CHEM 310 and CHEM 410.

CHEM 412. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. 3 Units.

Chemistry of inorganic systems. Spectroscopy, magnetism, and stereochemistry of transition metal compounds. Recommended preparation: One semester of undergraduate inorganic chemistry and two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry.

CHEM 413. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Topics in mechanisms of inorganic reactions including ligand substitution, electron transfer, stereochemical interconversions, and catalytic pathways; supramolecular inorganic complexes and molecular devices. Prereq: CHEM 412 or equivalent.

CHEM 414. Organometallic Reactions and Structures. 3 Units.

Bonding, structure, and mechanistic aspects of organometallic chemistry and the relevance of organometallic species to chemical catalysis. Recommended preparation: One semester of undergraduate inorganic chemistry.

CHEM 421. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. 3 Units.

Structure, bonding, and molecular orbital theory. Stereochemistry and conformational analysis. Reaction mechanisms. Aromaticity and aromatic substitution. Pericyclic reactions, orbital symmetry conservation, and free radical chemistry. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry.

CHEM 422. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. 3 Units.

Carbocations and carbanions. Nucleophilic and electrophilic aliphatic substitutions. Heterolytic addition and elimination reactions. Carbonyl reactions. Acyl transfer chemistry. Oxidations, reductions, and rearrangements. Prereq: CHEM 421 or consent of instructor.

CHEM 425. Physical Methods for Determining Organic Structure. 3 Units.

Structure determination of organic compounds using mass spectrometry and modern instrumental techniques such as infrared, ultraviolet, visible, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry. Offered as CHEM 325 and CHEM 425.

CHEM 428. Introductory Biochemistry. 3 Units.

A survey of biochemistry with a strong emphasis on the chemical logic underlying metabolic pathways and the evolution of biomolecules. Cellular architecture. Amino acids and protein structure, purification, analysis, and synthesis. DNA, RNA, the flow of genetic information, and molecular biological technology. Enzyme kinetics, catalytic, and regulatory strategies. Sugars, complex carbohydrates, and glycoproteins. Lipids and cell membranes. Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, carbon fixation through the "dark reactions" of photosynthesis, aerobic catabolism through the citric acid cycle, and glycogen metabolism. Biosynthesis and degradation of fatty acids, amino acids, and proteins. Offered as CHEM 328 and CHEM 428.

CHEM 429. Chemical Aspects of Living Systems. 3 Units.

A survey of biochemical systems exploring their molecular circuitry and architecture. Protein structure and function. Lipids, cell membranes, channels and pumps. Redox processes and electron transport. Lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, its control, reciprocal regulation, and global integration. Nucleotide biosynthesis, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. RNA synthesis, splicing, and translation: protein synthesis and the control of gene expression. Sensory and immune systems. Molecular motors. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry and one semester of undergraduate physical chemistry. Offered as CHEM 329 and CHEM 429.

CHEM 430. Advanced Methods in Structural Biology. 1 - 6 Unit.

The course is designed for graduate students who will be focusing on one or more methods of structural biology in their thesis project. This course is divided into 3-6 sections (depending on demand). The topics offered will include X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, cryo-electron microscopy, and computational and design methods. Students can select one or more modules. Modules will be scheduled so that students can take all the offered modules in one semester. Each section is given in 5 weeks and is worth 1 credit. Each section covers one area of structural biology at an advanced level such that the student is prepared for graduate level research in that topic. Offered as BIOC 430, CHEM 430, PHOL 430, and PHRM 430.

CHEM 433. Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Development. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview on how principles in chemistry and biology are integrated to facilitate drug development. Primary emphasis will be placed on the development of organic molecules as drugs and metabolic enzymes as drug targets. Subjects pertinent to the introduction of medicinal chemistry, evaluation of drug efficacies in vitro and in vivo, and drug metabolism will be covered. Offered as CHEM 333 and CHEM 433.

CHEM 435. Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry. 3 Units.

Systematic consideration of reactions involving functional group transformations and carbon-carbon bond formations used in modern organic synthesis. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry.

CHEM 436. Complex Molecular Synthesis. 3 Units.

An advanced organic chemistry course providing students with an in-depth examination of the art of total synthesis drawing from both classical and recent examples. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry.

CHEM 439. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 3 Units.

An introduction to metal ions in biology and medicine. Topics of emphasis include metalloenzymes, inorganic elements in pharmaceuticals, and physical methods of characterization in biology. Course material will be presented through a seminar format, and will involve extensive class participation, student presentations, and literature research reports. Offered as CHEM 339 and CHEM 439. Prereq: Graduate standing.

CHEM 445. Electrochemistry I. 3 Units.

Electrochemical properties and processes of electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Fundamental background for work in corrosion, electrodeposition, industrial electrolysis, electro-organic synthesis, batteries, fuel cells, and photoelectrochemical energy conversion. Recommended preparation: One semester of undergraduate physical chemistry.

CHEM 446. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Units.

Introduction of quantization, measurement and the Schrodinger equation; angular momentum and states of molecules. Perturbation theory, spectroscopy and chemical bonding. Variational theory and calculations of molecular properties. Recommended preparation: Two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry. Offered as CHEM 335 and CHEM 446.

CHEM 447. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Units.

Continuation of CHEM 446. Ab initio and semi-empirical methods, configuration interactions, time dependent phenomena, and introduction to band theory of solids. Prereq: CHEM 446.

CHEM 450. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 Units.

Translation, rotation, vibration, and electronic transitions of molecules. Prereq: CHEM 446.

CHEM 475. Protein Biophysics. 3 Units.

This course focuses on in-depth understanding of the molecular biophysics of proteins. Structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein function and structure-function relationships will be considered at the advanced conceptual level. The application of these theoretical frameworks will be illustrated with examples from the literature and integration of biophysical knowledge with description at the cellular and systems level. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, and student presentations. A special emphasis will be placed on discussion of original publications. Offered as BIOC 475, CHEM 475, PHOL 475, PHRM 475, and NEUR 475.

CHEM 491. Modern Chemistry for Innovation I. 3 Units.

The first half of a two-semester sequence providing an understanding of chemistry as a basis for successfully launching new high-tech ventures. The course will examine physical limitations to present technologies and the use of chemistry to identify potential opportunities for new venture creation. The course will provide experience in using chemistry for both identification of incremental improvements and as the basis for alternative technologies. Case studies will be used to illustrate recent commercially successful (and unsuccessful) venture creation and will illustrate characteristics for success. Admission to this course requires consent of the department.

CHEM 492. Modern Chemistry for Innovation II. 3 Units.

Continuation of CHEM 491, with an emphasis on current and prospective opportunities for Chemistry Entrepreneurship. Longer term opportunities for Chemistry Entrepreneurship in emerging areas, including (but not be limited to) biomaterials, pharmacogenomics, biocatalysis, and drug discovery. Prereq: CHEM 491.

CHEM 493. Feasibility and Technology Analysis. 3 Units.

This course provides the tools scientists need to determine whether a technology is ready for commercialization. These tools include (but are not limited to): financial analysis, market analysis, industry analysis, technology analysis, intellectual property protection, the entrepreneurial process and culture, an introduction to entrepreneurial strategy and new venture financing. Deliverables will include a technology feasibility analysis on a possible application in the student's scientific area. Offered as BIOL 493, CHEM 493, and PHYS 493.

CHEM 501. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Lectures on advanced topics in inorganic chemistry presented by staff or visiting lecturers. Course title, content, and credit change from year to year.

CHEM 502. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Lectures on advanced topics in inorganic chemistry presented by staff or visiting lecturers. Course title, content, and credit change from year to year.

CHEM 504. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Lectures on advanced topics in organic chemistry presented by staff or visiting lecturers. Course title, content, and credit change from year to year.

CHEM 506. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Lectures on advanced topics in physical chemistry presented by staff or visiting lecturers. Course title, content, and credit change from year to year.

CHEM 507. Special Readings in Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.

Detailed study of a special topic in chemistry under the guidance of a faculty member.

CHEM 508. Special Readings in Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.

Detailed study of a special topic in chemistry under the guidance of a faculty member.

CHEM 509. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry. 1 - 6 Unit.


CHEM 601. Research. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Special research in an area of chemistry under the guidance of a faculty member.

CHEM 605. Chemistry Colloquium Series. 1 Unit.

Course content provided by Thursday chemistry department colloquia (or Frontiers in Chemistry lectures). Discussion sessions review previous lectures and lay foundation for forthcoming lectures.

CHEM 651. Thesis M.S.. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.)

CHEM 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.