2011-12 General Bulletin

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404 Mather House
www.case.edu/artsci/clsc
Phone: 216-368-2348; Fax: 216-368-4681
Charles Burroughs, Department Chair

This is an archived copy of the 2011-12 Bulletin. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit http://bulletin.case.edu.

The Department of Classics introduces students to the culture, life, and legacy of ancient Greece and Rome through courses in the Greek and Latin languages and literatures, in ancient history and archaeology, and in the visual and material cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world. When justified by enrollment, the department offers courses in Sanskrit and in ancient Indian religious texts. A relatively recent development is a focus on the classical tradition in Europe and beyond. The department faculty represents a range of academic disciplines and is committed, where appropriate, to an interdisciplinary approach in teaching and research.

The core purpose of the department is to offer the opportunity for study of the ancient classical languages, as a crucial point of entry into the conceptual worlds of Greece and Rome. Students are also exposed to the various facets of antiquity that made the ancient Mediterranean world the progenitor of the modern West, not least in its mingling of cultures and belief systems. The different sub-disciplines and methodologies represented in the department involve multiple ways of exploring and understanding antiquity, from philological, literary, and philosophical studies to engagement with material and visual culture and city form through archaeology, epigraphy, and art and architectural history. Further, we study major moments of the revival of antiquity, and the various lenses through which subsequent eras understood or appropriated the past. A concentration within the major focusing on the legacy of antiquity in the classical tradition is in preparation.

Knowledge of classical antiquity constitutes the backbone of a liberal education. It also provides an excellent basis for further professional training in whatever field a student may ultimately earn a livelihood; for informed engagement with the political, social, and cultural issues of our turbulent times; and for the appreciation and enjoyment of artistic and cultural achievement. A major in classics, or even a minor, may be (as it often has been) profitably combined with programs aimed toward law, medicine, management, diplomatic service, banking, journalism, library science, or politics; religious, philosophic, literary, or historical studies; careers in the fine arts (visual or performing); or museum or archival work.

Department Faculty

Charles Burroughs, PhD
(Warburg Institute, University of London)
Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts and Chair
Art and architecture in the classical tradition; Italian Renaissance; early modern urbanism; landscapes in Europe and the Americas

Ricardo A. Apostol, PhD
(University of Michigan)
Assistant Professor
Augustan poetry and culture, Hellenistic poetry, material culture

Florin Berindeanu, PhD
(University of Georgia)
Instructor; Director, World Literature Program; Secondary Appointment, Department of Cognitive Science
European literature; literary and semiotic theory; mysticism

Andrea U. De Giorgi, PhD
(Bryn Mawr College)
Assistant Professor
Roman history; archaeology; visual and material culture of the classical world

Paul A. Iversen, PhD
(Ohio State University)
Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman New Comedy; Greek and Latin epigraphy; Hellenistic culture and society

Rachel Hall Sternberg, PhD
(Bryn Mawr College)
Associate Professor
Greek language and literature; Greek social history; history of emotion; reception of the classical tradition in the age of Jefferson


Visiting Faculty

Timothy Wutrich, PhD
(Tufts University)
Visiting Assistant Professor
Greek and Roman drama; classical tradition in literature and art; philosophical approaches to literature and art; Roman civilization; Vergil


Secondary Faculty

Jenifer Neils, PhD
(Princeton University)
Ruth Coulter Heede Professor of Art History, Department of Art History and Art
Ancient art and classical archaeology

Deepak Sarma, PhD
(University of Chicago)
Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies
Hinduism; Indian philosophy; method and theory in the study of religion


Adjunct Faculty

Ramaswamy Sharma, Ph.D.
(Bharathidasan University, Trichy, India)
Adjunct Instructor
Sanskrit language and literature

Undergraduate Programs

Major

The core of the classics major is the study of the languages and literatures of ancient Greece and Rome and the societies that spoke Greek and Latin until the end of the ancient world (usually taken as the 5th century of the Common Era). The major uniquely offers exposure to a range of approaches: literary, philological, historical, archaeological, art historical, philosophical, and anthropological. Further, the scope of the department has expanded to embrace the classical tradition in and even beyond Europe, with courses on literature and art and architecture up to the 20th century.

The classics major leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree requires 36 hours of departmental offerings. The 36 hours within the Department of Classics must include: Eight courses (24 hours) in either Greek or Latin, or a combination of both provided that at least two courses are at the 300 level; three classics (CLSC) courses (9 hours), with at least two at the 300 level. In the SAGES program, the department offers a Departmental Seminar, CLSC 320, which is required of majors, though they also may take a seminar outside the department to satisfy the SAGES requirement. CLSC 320 counts as one of the classics 300-level courses.  Finally, a requirement for all majors is CLSC 381, the capstone course in SAGES.

In addition, each student completing the classics major is strongly advised to choose a related minor, selected in consultation with and approved by the departmental advisor, in such closely related fields as anthropology, art history, philosophy, comparative literature, history, theater, or English.  The association between the department and the World Literature Program is especially close.

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors are given to students who earn the grade of “A” for their senior dissertation in CLSC 381 (capstone) and maintain a GPA in the major of 3.5.

Teacher Licensure in Latin

The Department of Classics offers a teacher licensure program for students who wish to teach Latin in secondary schools in Ohio or in any state that accepts Ohio licensure. Students earn a Bachelor of Arts degree in classics while also completing 35 hours in psychology and education course work at Case Western Reserve and at John Carroll University. For details about course requirements in education, see the program description for Teacher Licensure  section in this bulletin.

Subject area requirements:

Required Courses:18
Elementary Latin I
   and Elementary Latin II
(may be waived if appropriate)
Literature of the Republic
Survey of Latin Literature
Advanced Topics in Latin Literature
Ancient Rome: Republic and Empire
Five of the following elective LATN courses:15
Latin Prose Authors
Vergil
Livy
Horace: Odes and Epodes
Medieval Latin
Latin Didactic Literature
Drama
Directed Readings
Three CLSC elective courses, one of which must be at the 300 level9
Total Units42


Minor

A minor in classics is designed to acquaint the student with aspects of the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome by means of 15 hours of course work. These 15 hours may be any combination of Greek, Latin, and classics courses, at least 3 hours of which must be at or above the 300 level. While the study of either Greek or Latin is encouraged, neither is required for the minor.  

Graduate Study

 

Post-Baccalaureate

The department is about to launch a Classics Post-Bac program. Interested, qualified students should contact the chair. Existing courses will be offered at the 400 level.

World Literature MA: Classics Track

Qualified students may pursue graduate work in classics through the MA in the World Literature Program (WLIT). Classics courses at the 300 level may be taken for graduate credit in this way.

 

 

 

 

 

CLSC Courses

CLSC 111. Greek Civilization. 3 Units.

This course constitutes the first half of a year-long sequence on classical civilization. It examines the enduring significance of the Greeks studied through their history, literature, art, and philosophy. Lectures and discussion. (For the second course in the sequence, see CLSC 112.) Offered as CLSC 111 and HSTY 111.

CLSC 112. Roman Civilization. 3 Units.

The enduring significance of the Romans studied through their history, literature, art, and philosophy. Lectures and discussion. Offered as CLSC 112 and HSTY 110.

CLSC 201. The Ancient World. 3 Units.

Ancient Western history from the origins of civilization in Mesopotamia to the dissolution of the Roman Empire in the West. Offered as CLSC 201 and HSTY 200.

CLSC 202. Classical Mythology. 3 Units.

The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence.

CLSC 203. Gods and Heroes in Greek Literature. 3 Units.

This course examines major works of Greek literature and sets them in their historical and cultural context. Constant themes are war, wandering, tyranny, freedom, community, family, and the role of men and women within the household and the ancient city-state. Parallels with modern life and politics will be explored. Lectures and discussions. Offered as CLSC 203 and WLIT 203.

CLSC 204. Heroes and Hustlers in Latin Literature. 3 Units.

This course constitutes the second half of a sequence on Classical literature. Its main themes are heroism vs. self-promotion, love vs. lust, and the struggle between democracy and tyranny. These topics are traced in a variety of literary genres from the period of the Roman republic well into the empire. Parallels with modern life and politics will be drawn. Offered as CLSC 204 and WLIT 204.

CLSC 206. Ancient and Medieval Spain: Prehistory to 1492. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the history of the Iberian peninsula from before the Roman conquest from the Iberians, Greek, and Carthaginian settlements, through Roman, Visigothic, and Muslim rule to the conquest of Ferdinand and Isabella of the last non-Christian territory on the peninsula in 1492. The issues of conquest, frontier, cultural diversity, and change, tolerance, and intolerance will be examined. Offered as CLSC 206, HSTY 206.

CLSC 210. Byzantine World 300-1453. 3 Units.

Development of the Byzantine empire from the emperor Constantine's conversion to Christianity and founding of the eastern capital at Constantinople to the fall of Constantinople to Turkish forces in 1453. Offered as CLSC 210 and HSTY 210.

CLSC 220. Art & Literature in the Classical Tradition, Pt 1: Renaissance and Baroque (14th to 17th centuries). 3 Units.

Through lectures, varied assignments, and visits to the Cleveland Museum of Art this course will introduce students to the major issues in the study of early modern art and literatures. The emphasis will inevitably be on Italy, as the place where the physical remains of ancient Rome confronted and inspired such remarkable masters as Michelangelo (as poet and artist), Palladio, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Nicholas Poussin (Bernini and Poussin are represented in the CMAI), though some artists -- notably Leonardo -- resisted the lure of the classical past. From Italy new ideas spread to the rest of Europe and beyond. We will not have much time to study Shakespeare in the course, but we will not be able to ignore the greatest author of the Renaissance period. Like Shakespeare, we will move between the court and the city, between scenes of often-endangered order and scenes of sometimes-productive disorder, in which classical models provided a key cultural and even psychological resource in challenging times. Recommended preparation: CLSC 112. Offered as CLSC 220 and WLIT 220.

CLSC 221. Building on Antiquity. 3 Units.

Beginning with Ancient Greece and Rome and ending in Cleveland, the course will provide orientation in the architectural orders and in most periods of European and Euro-American architectural history, as well as, to an extent, architectural criticism. The issue of how architecture has meaning will be central, not least in connection with the formalized "language" of classicism and the emergence of development of building types (temple, museum, civic hall, transportation buildings, etc.). We will also review more subtle ways in which architecture conveys meaning or mood, and the assignment of gendered associations to certain architectural elements. The course will consider more or less blatant political uses of architecture and architectural imagery, but also more elusive and/or ambiguous cases, as well as the phenomenon of the shifting meanings of architecture through changes of era, owner, audience, etc. Offered as ARTH 221 and CLSC 221.

CLSC 224. Sword and Scandal: The Classics in Film. 3 Units.

Gladiator. Alexander. The 300. Contemporary society's continuing fascination with putting the ancient world on the big screen is undeniable; and yet the causes underlying this phenomenon are not quite so readily apparent. In this course we will watch and discuss a number of movies about the ancient world, running the gamut from Hollywood classics such as Ben-Hur and Spartacus to more recent treatments (the aforementioned 300 and Gladiator, for starters), and from the mainstream and conventional (Clash of the Titans, Disney's Hercules) to the far-out and avant-garde (Fellini's Satyricon, anyone?). As we do so we'll learn quite a bit about the art and economics of film, on one hand, and the ancient world, on the other. And yet what we'll keep coming back to are the big questions: what does our fascination with the ancient Mediterranean tell us about ourselves as a society? Why do such movies get made, and what kinds of agendas do they serve? To what extent can we recapture the past accurately? And if we can't, are we doomed to just endlessly projecting our own concerns and desires onto a screen, and dressing them in togas? No knowledge of ancient languages is required for this course. Offered as CLSC 224 and WLIT 224.

CLSC 226. Introduction to Greek and Roman Art. 3 Units.

Classical art from the 8th century B.C. to the fourth century A.D.; the major developments in the architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Greece, Etruria, and Rome. Offered as ARTH 226 and CLSC 226.

CLSC 227. Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries. 3 Units.

A selection of cities and sanctuaries from the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; their political and religious institutions and the relationship to contemporary art forms. Offered as ARTH 227 and CLSC 227.

CLSC 228. Ancient Greek Athletics. 3 Units.

Exploration of the role of athletics in the ancient, primarily Greek world, and their reflection in the art of the period. Offered as ARTH 228 and CLSC 228.

CLSC 295A. Greek and Latin Elements in English: The Basic Course. 1.5 Unit.

A self-paced, computer-assisted course in the classical foundations of modern English in which the student learns the basic principles on which roots, prefixes, and suffixes combine to give precise meanings to composite words.

CLSC 295B. Greek and Latin Elements in English: Biomedical Terminology. 1.5 Unit.

(See CLSC 295A.) Advanced section that is oriented especially toward scientific and medical terminology. Prereq or Coreq: CLSC 295A.

CLSC 301. Ancient Philosophy. 3 Units.

Western philosophy from the early Greeks to the Skeptics. Emphasis on the pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle. Recommended preparation: PHIL 101 and consent of department. Offered as CLSC 301 and PHIL 301.

CLSC 302. Ancient Greece: Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic Periods. 3 Units.

The rise of Hellenic thought and institutions from the eighth to the third centuries B.C., the rise of the polis, the evolution of democracy at Athens, the crises of the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, fifth-century historiography, the growth of individualism, and the revival of monarchy in the Hellenistic period. Offered as CLSC 302 and HSTY 302.

CLSC 304. Ancient Rome: Republic and Empire. 3 Units.

Growth and development of the Roman state from the unification of Italy in the early third century B.C. to the establishment of the oriental despotism under Diocletian and Constantine. The growth of empire in the Punic Wars, the uncertain steps toward an eastern hegemony, the crisis in the Republic from the Gracchi to Caesar, the new regime of Augustus, the transformation of the leadership class in the early Empire, and the increasing dominance of the military over the civil structure. Offered as CLSC 304 and HSTY 304.

CLSC 305. Sanskrit Religious Texts. 3 Units.

Introduction to the Sanskrit language and culture through the reading of selected texts taken from the ancient religions of South Asia. Offered as CLSC 305 and RLGN 305.

CLSC 309. Advanced Sanskrit Religious Texts. 3 Units.

This class is a continuation of RLGN 305/CLSC 305, the introduction to the Sanskrit language and culture. In RLGN 309/CLSC 309 students will learn advanced Sanskrit grammar and syntax. Previous knowledge of Sanskrit is required. We will finish the lessons from Devavanipravesika that we began in the introductory course. We will then translate sections for the Bhagavad Gita. Offered as CLSC 309 and RLGN 309.

CLSC 311. Rome: City and Image. 3 Units.

This course studies the architectural and urban history of Rome from the republican era of the ancient city up to the eighteenth century using the city itself as the major "text." The emphasis will be placed on the extraordinary transformations wrought in the city, or at least in key districts, by powerful rulers and/or elites, especially in the ancient empire and in the Renaissance and baroque eras. In a larger perspective, the great construction projects exerted a far-reaching effect within and beyond Europe, but we will study them in relation to their topographical situation, their functions, and their place in a long history of variations on prestigious themes since many of the artworks and the urban settings featured in the course carry the mark of the Long history of the city itself. Recommended preparation: At least one 200-level course in ANTH, ARTH, CLSC, ENGL, HSTY, or RLGN. Offered as ARTH311/411 and CLSC 311.

CLSC 312. Women in the Ancient World. 3 Units.

The course offers a chronological survey of women's lives in Greece, Hellenistic Egypt, and Rome. It focuses on primary sources as well as scholarly interpretations of the ancient record with a view to defining the construction of gender and sexuality according to the Greco-Roman model. Additionally, the course aims to demonstrate how various methodological approaches have yielded significant insights into our own perception of sex and gender. Specific topics include matriarchy and patriarchy; the antagonism between male and female in myth; the legal, social, economic, and political status of women; the ancient family; women's role in religion and cult; ancient theories of medicine regarding women; paderasty and homosexuality. Offered as CLSC 312 and WGST 312.

CLSC 313. Thinking Communication in Ancient and Medieval Literature. 3 Units.

The ancients were much concerned with the nature and validity of signs: Important decisions depended on the flight of birds or the coloration of the liver of a sacrificial victim. The relationship of language to truth, i.e., a reality beyond the contingent, was a crucial issue, not least because of the rise of sophistic rhetoric: for an orator, language was a tool in a contest rather than a means to true understanding. The discipline of medicine, developed by such important figures as Galen and Hippocrates, depended on the interpretation of physical signs to diagnose and treat ailments of mind and body. The term for the theory of signs - semiotics - is derived from the Greek term "semeiotike", and for many Greek philosophers and their Roman and medieval successors the sign was a key issue. For Christians especially, new forms of vision and discerning truth presented particular problems: after all, the Christian God revealed his intentions through "portents" that had to be read and interpreted. And even if sacred scripture was in some way understood as encapsulating the whole word, there were countless passages requiring clarification or adaptation to contemporary situations. In other words, the concern was with the relationship between a universe of structured signs (the subject of semiotics) and structures of interpersonal communication (pragmatics). Offered as CLSC 313 and COGS 318. Prereq: WLIT 211 or WLIT 212.

CLSC 314. Love Poetry from Sappho to Shakespeare. 3 Units.

Introduction to the love poetry of ancient Greece and Rome and its impact on the later European tradition in such poets as Petrarch, Chaucer, and Shakespeare. Readings will focus especially on questions of generic convention, audience expectation, and the social setting of love poetry in the different ages under consideration. No knowledge of the original languages required. Offered as CLSC 314 and WLIT 314.

CLSC 315. Erotic Literature Ancient to Modern. 3 Units.

The erotic drive is a fundamental impulse in human beings, indeed in the animal world in general. Primordially, the erotic find expression in sexual desire and in associated behaviors, which in antiquity -- as in other myth-oriented cultures -- amounts to a production of poetry to aid in seduction, to praise an object of desire, or simply reflect the nature of love and/or sexual desire in general. Highly sexualized language appears in both ancient and modern texts that take into account a variety of foundational texts in Western culture. From Plato, who wrote a whole dialogue (Symposium) describing different kinds of love, to Christian interpreters of sacred texts, eroticism was a term that defined both pagan and religious experiences. This course will explore fictional as well as theoretical inquiries into the nature and purpose of erotic desire and its evaluation as aesthetic phenomenon. It will focus on texts such as Longus's Daphnis and Chloe, Abelard's Letters, Aucassin and Nicolette, mystical voices, Freudian theory and modern contribution such as Roland Barthes and Georges Bataille. Modern theoreticians as those mentioned here illustrate how the libidinal (whether understood as subjective drive or in Freudian terms) is inseparable from the aesthetic. Offered as: CLSC 315 and WLIT 317. Prereq: WLIT 211 and WLIT 212.

CLSC 316. Greek Tragedy. 3 Units.

This course provides students the opportunity to read a significant number of ancient Greek tragedies in modern English translations. We shall read, study, and discuss selected works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and attempt to understand the plays as literature composed for performance. We shall study literary elements within the plays and theatrical possibilities inherent in the texts. As we read the plays, we shall pay close attention to the historical context and look for what each play can tell us about myth, religion, and society in ancient Athens. Finally, we shall give occasional attention to the way these tragic dramas and the theater in which they were performed have continued to inspire literature and theater for thousands of years. Lectures will provide historical background on the playwrights, the plays, the mythic and historical background, and possible interpretation of the texts as literature and as performance pieces. Students will discuss in class the plays that they read. The course has three examinations and a final project that includes a short essay and a group presentation. Offered as CLSC 316, WLIT 316, WLIT 416.

CLSC 317. Inspiration: The Topic of Creativity in Art and Literature--Ancient to Medieval. 3 Units.

Inspiration is an inextricably essential part of the aesthetic genesis, and it has instantly become one of the most frequented themes of artistic creation. Where does inspiration come from? Are artists "chosen ones" that implicitly stand out from the "non-inspired" rest? Trying to answer these questions and others related to the phenomenon of creativity, one direction that this course should take and focus on is the theme of "divine" or "transcendent" as a source of inspiration in art and literature. The course will start with the mystical teaching and theories of Pythagoras that influenced Plato and the Neo-Platoists that will be carried on further in the general tradition of Christian literature. In this respect, the course will examine creativity in readings that include both Ancient and Medieval writers whose writings place the subject of inspiration at the center of their own aesthetic invention. Among the authors included in the course will be Pseudo-Dyonisius, Gregory Palamas, Jacopone da Todi, Caterina da Siena, Dante, Petrarch, and Meister Eckhart. Offered as: CLSC 317 and WLIT 319.

CLSC 318. Landscape Archaeology and Epigraphy. 3 Units.

Landscape archaeology addresses the complex ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them. As by-products of the interaction between people and place, landscapes designate spaces occupied by specific social groups whose members draw from their environs a shared identity and who situate their actions within specific normative frameworks. The landscapes of the Greek and Roman East are no exception to this. As "cultural landscapes," they were the scene of thousands of years of actions, including the organizing of space or the altering of the land for diverse purposes such as subsistence, or for economic, social, political, religious and military concerns. As such they offer us the possibility to investigate the agencies, actions, and negotiations between particular communities and the various greater powers that exercised control over them. This course will, therefore, introduce students to the study of Landscape Archaeology/Intensive Surveying through five weeks of hands-on fieldwork in the region of Isparta, Turkey, the locus of an ancient landscape called Northwestern Pisidia about which little is known. This landscape has a long storied past, lying as it did along a fault line between earthshaking empires, including the Hittites, Lydians and Persians to North and to the East, and the Greeks, Macedonians and Romans to the West. As such it was a contested space, not only in terms of the physical control of the land, but also the culture. This course will investigate this cultural landscape through the analysis of the archaeological material found. There will also be an opportunity to work with the archaeological material in the Isparta Museum, especially the epigraphical material there. We will also take field trips to important ancient sites and museums in the area to better grasp the region's ancient cultural profile and context. In addition, we will discuss archaeological ethics, issues of cultural patrimony, the importance of teamwork, and the need to work side by side with the local community. Offered as CLSC 318 and CLSC 418.

CLSC 319. Epic: The Sublime and Terrible in Literature. 3 Units.

The course focuses on the epic genre that dominates the dawn of Western literature as well as the literary traditions of much of the rest of the world. From the Homeric epic to the Middle Ages and deep into the Renaissance, there was a collective urge to record both in verse and in prose extraordinary adventures with exceptional heroes as central figures. Thus, the epic genre typically encouraged variations in the aesthetic treatment of the hero that eventually came to define distinct categories within the genre. "Sublime" and "terrible" are common notions in the aesthetics of classicism, from antiquity to the early modern period. Authors studied in the course include such key figures in the creation and development of epic as Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Gotffried von Strassburg, Dante, and Cervantes. The works of these authors exemplify, on the one hand, the aesthetic directions mentioned above and, on the other hand, provide opportunities for using the close engagement with particular texts to illuminate wider cultural fields, in which various aesthetic perceptions of social, political, and religious reality coexist and therefore stimulate remarkable innovations in the standard epic narrative. Offered as CLSC 319, CLSC 419, WLIT 320 and WLIT 420.

CLSC 320. Departmental Seminar: Alexander the Great. 3 Units.

This course is the Classics Departmental Seminar in the Sages sequence, though it can also be taken for regular credit in Classics or History. The seminar on Alexander the Great is normally taken in the Spring semester of junior year, and offers students a firm grounding in the diverse materials, methods, and approaches that can be brought to bear on the study of Greco-Roman antiquity of its legacy up to today.. Alexander's career is urgently relevant today for two primary reasons: the establishment of new forms of interaction between European/"western" and Asian/"eastern" civilizations; and the idea of global domination, wedding Greek and Asian as well as African (Egyptian) conceptions of rule and governance. Beyond the exploration of the ancient world of, or shaped by, Alexander, we will focus also on the reception of the historical figure, i.e., on the sometimes fantastic image of Alexander diffused in later epics (Islamic, medieval) as well as on the more critical but often ideologically slanted early modern approach. Because of the expansion of the scope of the seminar (as Alexander himself) beyond Europe and the critical examination of the traditional separation of East and West - or the three continents (Europe, Africa, and Asia) distinguished in antiquity - this course qualifies as a Global and Cultural Diversity course.

CLSC 328. Greek Sculpture. 3 Units.

Greek sculpture from the Archaic period through the Hellenistic; style, the development of specific types, and the uses of architectural sculpture. Offered as ARTH 328, CLSC 328, and ARTH 428.

CLSC 330. Topics in Classical Tradition. 3 Units.

This course will examine facets and tendencies of cultural development in modern Europe and beyond which involve the engagement of historians, philosophers, literary authors and critics, artists, architects, and/or society in general with the classical world and its legacy. In some cases courses will be programmatically associated with special events, e.g., exhibitions in The Cleveland Museum of Art. No prerequisites have been included, but students taking this course should have completed intermediate humanities courses, preferably in CLSC/LATN/GREK as well as WLIT. Offered as CLSC 330 and CLSC 430.

CLSC 332. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy. 3 Units.

The arts of the Italian peninsula from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 332, CLSC 332, and ARTH 432.

CLSC 333. Greek and Roman Painting. 3 Units.

Greek vase painting, Etruscan tomb painting and Roman wall painting. The development of monumental painting in antiquity. Offered as ARTH 333, CLSC 333, and ARTH 433.

CLSC 334. Art and Archaeology of Greece. 3 Units.

A survey of the art and architecture of Greece from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (100 B.C.) with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Offered as ARTH 334, CLSC 334, and ARTH 434.

CLSC 340. Seminar in Enlightenment Art and Literature: Piranesi and Vico. 3 Units.

This course explores aspects of the European eighteenth century as a transformative epoch in the history of western culture. Though the Enlightenment is usually associated especially with France, in this course we will focus on Italy, as the irresistible goal of travelers taking part in the "Grand Tour," and as a landscape of powerful ancient and modern architecture and artworks universally recognized as exemplary. In particular we will study one of the strangest and most fascinating visual artists of the period, the self-proclaimed architect Giovani Battista Piranesi (1720-1778) famous no less now than in his own time for his fantastic prison engravings as well as his views of Rome, involving a radical rethinking of the city as a particular kind of inhabited as well as imagined space. Piranesi's polemical response to the advocates of the Greek revival, then coming into fashion, will lead into discussion of the key philosophical debates and aesthetic shifts of the time, notably the emergence of the notion of the sublime as a category eventually subversive of western ideals of rationality and still present -- and potent -- in our own culture. Finally we will place Piranesi within a current of discussion of the origins and nature of language and of human society in general, not least as manifested in architecture and other symbolic practices. The leading figure here is the Neapolitan G.B. Vico, whose New Science of 1725 remains one of the most stimulating texts in the western intellectual tradition. Offered as CLSC 340, COGS 340, WLIT 340, CLSC 440, and WLIT 440.

CLSC 381. Classics Senior Seminar. 3 Units.

The capstone is the final requirement of the SAGES program and is normally taken in the fall semester of senior year. It involves an independent study paper resulting from exploration of a topic chosen in consultation with the student's capstone advisor, who will regularly review progress on the project. In the capstone students employ, integrate, and demonstrate analytical, rhetorical, and practical skills developed and honed through the SAGES curriculum as well as their major or minor studies. The capstone project has both a written and an oral component oral presentation and argumentation will be stressed. The product of the capstone may take different forms: there will always be a written component, but other forms of expression are also encouraged, such as a webpage or poster for a poster session. As for the kind of project that might be done: students interested in literature might work on an annotated translation of a classical text; archaeology students might produce a virtual exhibit centered on a specific site or problem. Prereq: CLSC 111 and CLSC 112, plus courses prescribed for each track of the major.

CLSC 395. Directed Readings. 1 - 3 Unit.

Readings in English on a topic of interest to the student and acceptable to the instructor. Designed and completed under the supervision of the instructor with whom the student wishes to work.

CLSC 416. Greek Tragedy. 3 Units.

This course provides students the opportunity to read a significant number of ancient Greek tragedies in modern English translations. We shall read, study, and discuss selected works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and attempt to understand the plays as literature composed for performance. We shall study literary elements within the plays and theatrical possibilities inherent in the texts. As we read the plays, we shall pay close attention to the historical context and look for what each play can tell us about myth, religion, and society in ancient Athens. Finally, we shall give occasional attention to the way these tragic dramas and the theater in which they were performed have continued to inspire literature and theater for thousands of years. Lectures will provide historical background on the playwrights, the plays, the mythic and historical background, and possible interpretation of the texts as literature and as performance pieces. Students will discuss in class the plays that they read. The course has three examinations and a final project that includes a short essay and a group presentation. Offered as CLSC 316, WLIT 316, WLIT 416.

CLSC 418. Landscape Archaeology and Epigraphy. 3 Units.

Landscape archaeology addresses the complex ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them. As by-products of the interaction between people and place, landscapes designate spaces occupied by specific social groups whose members draw from their environs a shared identity and who situate their actions within specific normative frameworks. The landscapes of the Greek and Roman East are no exception to this. As "cultural landscapes," they were the scene of thousands of years of actions, including the organizing of space or the altering of the land for diverse purposes such as subsistence, or for economic, social, political, religious and military concerns. As such they offer us the possibility to investigate the agencies, actions, and negotiations between particular communities and the various greater powers that exercised control over them. This course will, therefore, introduce students to the study of Landscape Archaeology/Intensive Surveying through five weeks of hands-on fieldwork in the region of Isparta, Turkey, the locus of an ancient landscape called Northwestern Pisidia about which little is known. This landscape has a long storied past, lying as it did along a fault line between earthshaking empires, including the Hittites, Lydians and Persians to North and to the East, and the Greeks, Macedonians and Romans to the West. As such it was a contested space, not only in terms of the physical control of the land, but also the culture. This course will investigate this cultural landscape through the analysis of the archaeological material found. There will also be an opportunity to work with the archaeological material in the Isparta Museum, especially the epigraphical material there. We will also take field trips to important ancient sites and museums in the area to better grasp the region's ancient cultural profile and context. In addition, we will discuss archaeological ethics, issues of cultural patrimony, the importance of teamwork, and the need to work side by side with the local community. Offered as CLSC 318 and CLSC 418.

CLSC 419. Epic: The Sublime and Terrible in Literature. 3 Units.

The course focuses on the epic genre that dominates the dawn of Western literature as well as the literary traditions of much of the rest of the world. From the Homeric epic to the Middle Ages and deep into the Renaissance, there was a collective urge to record both in verse and in prose extraordinary adventures with exceptional heroes as central figures. Thus, the epic genre typically encouraged variations in the aesthetic treatment of the hero that eventually came to define distinct categories within the genre. "Sublime" and "terrible" are common notions in the aesthetics of classicism, from antiquity to the early modern period. Authors studied in the course include such key figures in the creation and development of epic as Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Gotffried von Strassburg, Dante, and Cervantes. The works of these authors exemplify, on the one hand, the aesthetic directions mentioned above and, on the other hand, provide opportunities for using the close engagement with particular texts to illuminate wider cultural fields, in which various aesthetic perceptions of social, political, and religious reality coexist and therefore stimulate remarkable innovations in the standard epic narrative. Offered as CLSC 319, CLSC 419, WLIT 320 and WLIT 420.

CLSC 430. Topics in Classical Tradition. 3 Units.

This course will examine facets and tendencies of cultural development in modern Europe and beyond which involve the engagement of historians, philosophers, literary authors and critics, artists, architects, and/or society in general with the classical world and its legacy. In some cases courses will be programmatically associated with special events, e.g., exhibitions in The Cleveland Museum of Art. No prerequisites have been included, but students taking this course should have completed intermediate humanities courses, preferably in CLSC/LATN/GREK as well as WLIT. Offered as CLSC 330 and CLSC 430.

CLSC 440. Seminar in Enlightenment Art and Literature: Piranesi and Vico. 3 Units.

This course explores aspects of the European eighteenth century as a transformative epoch in the history of western culture. Though the Enlightenment is usually associated especially with France, in this course we will focus on Italy, as the irresistible goal of travelers taking part in the "Grand Tour," and as a landscape of powerful ancient and modern architecture and artworks universally recognized as exemplary. In particular we will study one of the strangest and most fascinating visual artists of the period, the self-proclaimed architect Giovani Battista Piranesi (1720-1778) famous no less now than in his own time for his fantastic prison engravings as well as his views of Rome, involving a radical rethinking of the city as a particular kind of inhabited as well as imagined space. Piranesi's polemical response to the advocates of the Greek revival, then coming into fashion, will lead into discussion of the key philosophical debates and aesthetic shifts of the time, notably the emergence of the notion of the sublime as a category eventually subversive of western ideals of rationality and still present -- and potent -- in our own culture. Finally we will place Piranesi within a current of discussion of the origins and nature of language and of human society in general, not least as manifested in architecture and other symbolic practices. The leading figure here is the Neapolitan G.B. Vico, whose New Science of 1725 remains one of the most stimulating texts in the western intellectual tradition. Offered as CLSC 340, COGS 340, WLIT 340, CLSC 440, and WLIT 440.

CLSC 481. Special Studies. 1 - 6 Unit.

Subject matter varies according to need.

GREK Courses

GREK 101. Elementary Greek I. 3 Units.

Beginning course in Greek language, covering grammar (forms and syntax) and the reading of elementary selections from ancient sources. Makes a start toward reading Greek authors.

GREK 102. Elementary Greek II. 3 Units.

Beginning course in Greek language, covering grammar (forms and syntax) and the reading of elementary selections from ancient sources. Makes a start toward reading Greek authors. Prereq: GREK 101 or equivalent.

GREK 201. Greek Prose Authors. 3 Units.

Readings from authors such as Plato, Lysias, Xenophon, and Herodotus. Prereq: GREK 102 or equivalent.

GREK 202. Introduction to Greek Poetry. 3 Units.

Primarily readings from Homer, Hesiod, and Theocritus. Selections from Greek lyric may be introduced at the instructor's discretion. Prereq: GREK 201 or equivalent.

GREK 306. Tragedy. 3 Units.

Reading and interpretation of selected plays of Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. Prereq: GREK 202 or equivalent.

GREK 307. History. 3 Units.

Extensive reading in Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War, especially Books VI and VII, the expedition against Syracuse. Prereq: GREK 202 or equivalent.

GREK 308. Comedy. 3 Units.

Origin, ambiance, and development of Greek Old Comedy and persisting characteristics of the genre. Translation of selected plays from Greek into English. Prereq: GREK 202 or equivalent.

GREK 311. Homer. 3 Units.

Reading and translation of extensive selections from the Odyssey. Introduction to epic meter, to Homeric Greek, and to the poet's style. Consideration of evidences of oral composition and discussion of the heroic tradition. Prereq: GREK 202 or equivalent.

GREK 370. Greek Prose Composition. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the principles and practice of composing continuous passages of Greek prose. It is designed to review and to strengthen students' command of Attic forms while becoming more aware of the ways Greek syntax was employed to express thought. Via practice at writing Greek prose, the ultimate goal is for the students to become more proficient and sensitive readers of ancient Greek. Prereq: GREK 202.

GREK 380. Advanced Topics in Greek Literature. 3 Units.

Study and discussion of important authors, works, and topics not covered regularly. Content will reflect particular interests of students and faculty and timeliness of the topics. Prereq: GREK 202 or equivalent.

GREK 382. Senior Dissertation. 3 Units.

A course of independent study and research culminating in the preparation of a thesis on a topic approved by the supervising faculty member. Enrollment in this course must be approved by the Chair of the Department. Offered as GREK 382 and LATN 382. Prereq: GREK 381 or LATN 381.

GREK 395. Directed Readings. 1 - 3 Unit.

Readings in Greek of authors selected to serve the individual interests and needs of undergraduate students. Each program planned and completed under the supervision of the instructor with whom the student wishes to work.

LATN Courses

LATN 101. Elementary Latin I. 3 Units.

An introduction to the elements of Latin: pronunciation, forms, syntax, vocabulary, and reading.

LATN 102. Elementary Latin II. 3 Units.

An introduction to the elements of Latin: pronunciation, forms, syntax, vocabulary, and reading. Prereq: LATN 101 or equivalent.

LATN 201. Latin Prose Authors. 3 Units.

Reading and discussion of such prose authors as Cicero, Caesar, Livy or Pliny. Prereq: LATN 102 or equivalent.

LATN 202. Vergil. 3 Units.

Primarily readings from The Aeneid; selections from Vergil's other work may be introduced at instructor's discretion. Recommended preparation: LATN 201 or equivalent.

LATN 305. Literature of the Republic. 3 Units.

A reading course in prose and poetry of the Roman Republic. Extensive selections from Cicero and Catullus, and one comedy of Terence. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 306. Survey of Latin Literature. 3 Units.

Reading and discussion of selections from the various genres of Latin literature of the Roman Republic and Empire such as historical narrative, lyric and elegiac poetry, comic drama, forensic rhetoric, philosophical dialogue, didactic literature, letters, and epigrams. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 307. Livy. 3 Units.

Readings in Books I and XXI, with other selections from this major Augustan historian. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 308. Horace: Odes and Epodes. 3 Units.

Readings and discussion of extensive selections from the poetry of Horace; consideration of Horace as exemplifying the spirit of the Augustan Age. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 309. Medieval Latin. 3 Units.

Reading and interpretation of Latin texts from the Middle Ages. Material selected according to the needs and interests of students. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 351. Latin Didactic Literature. 3 Units.

Readings from didactic poetry such as Lucretius and Vergil's Georgics. Parodies like Ovid's Ars Amatoria or prose treatises may also be introduced. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 354. Drama. 3 Units.

Reading of at least one play each by Plautus and Terence. Attention to the history of Latin and Greek New Comedy, and the contrasting styles of the two authors. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 370. Latin Prose Composition. 3 Units.

This course is designed to strengthen students' active command of Latin grammar and idiomatic prose style. At a basic level, students are trained to pay attention to details and thus write grammatically correct. Going beyond this, the course teaches Latin Idioms. Finally, it aims to develop students' intuitive feeling for the Latin language. The ultimate goal is to write in a Ciceronian prose style. Prereq: LATN 202.

LATN 380. Advanced Topics in Latin Literature. 3 Units.

Study and discussion of important authors, works, and topics not covered regularly. Content will reflect particular interests of students and faculty and timeliness of topics. Prereq: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 382. Senior Dissertation. 3 Units.

A course of independent study and research culminating in the preparation of a thesis on a topic approved by the supervising faculty member. Enrollment in this course must be approved by the Chair of the Department. Offered as GREK 382 and LATN 382.

LATN 395. Directed Readings. 1 - 3 Unit.

Directed readings in Latin of authors selected to serve the individual interests and needs of undergraduate students. Each program planned and completed under the supervision of the instructor with whom the student wishes to work.