2011-12 General Bulletin

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106B Guilford House
www.case.edu/artsci/engl
Phone: 216-368-2340; Fax: 216-368-4367
Mary Grimm, Department Chair

This is an archived copy of the 2011-12 Bulletin. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit http://bulletin.case.edu.

The Department of English offers courses of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Included among the department’s offerings are literary and cultural studies, linguistics, film, journalism and new media, creative writing, visual rhetoric, rhetoric, and professional writing.

Combining the intellectual resources of a major research university with a scale and set of values more typical of a liberal arts college, the department puts great stress on class discussion, individual conferences or tutorials, and other opportunities for students and faculty to work closely together. Likewise, the curriculum is deliberately flexible to respond to student needs and interests and to encourage close cooperation with the faculty in planning a course of study.

A major in English prepares one for various sorts of careers. Three paths are common:

  • English leads readily to careers that put a premium on writing skills and on the ability to analyze complex human situations. In addition to the fields that have often been of first interest to English majors (writing and publishing, journalism, advertising, the film industry, public relations, and teaching), significant opportunities exist in the corporate world, in government, and in nonprofit organizations such as those devoted to social service, the environment, or the arts.
  • The BA in English is usually essential to anyone expecting to do graduate work in English or to pursue a career as a teacher or a scholar in the field.
  • The BA in English traditionally has been an important steppingstone to success in professional school, and many of our English majors choose this path. A significant number go on to law school, many to medical or business school, and some to nursing, journalism, social work, or library school, as well as directly into the business world.

Facilities

In addition to manuscript and rare-book holdings in the Special Collections Division, Kelvin Smith Library has strengths in Renaissance literature, 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century English literature; and American literature. The library also houses an outstanding collection of several thousand films and other audiovisual materials, supported in part by English department endowment funds. In Strosacker Auditorium, the Film Society maintains facilities capable of projecting 35 mm and 16 mm films. In the library’s Freedman Center, students have access to video cameras, state-of-the-art digital editing software, and stations where they can view audiovisual materials from the library collection.

Department Faculty

Michael Clune, PhD
(Johns Hopkins University)
Assistant Professor
American literature; literature and science; poetry

Kimberly Emmons, PhD
(University of Washington)
Associate Professor; Director of Composition
Rhetoric; composition; gender and language; medical humanities

Christopher Flint, PhD
(University of Pennsylvania)
Associate Professor
18th-century English literature; print culture

T. Kenneth Fountain, PhD
(University of Minnesota)
Assistant Professor
Scientific and technical communication; visual culture; rhetorical theory

Jessica Gerard, PhD
(University of Arizona)
Instructor; Director, SAGES ESL Program
Applied educational linguistics; ESL writing pedagogy

Sarah Gridley, MFA
(University of Montana)
Assistant Professor
Creative writing (poetry); feminist and eco-poetics

Mary Grimm, MA
(Cleveland State University)
Associate Professor and Chair
Creative writing (fiction); contemporary literature; graphic novels

Megan Swihart Jewell, PhD
(Duquesne University)
Instructor; Director, Writing Resource Center
American literature; writing studies; poetics

Kurt Koenigsberger, PhD
(Vanderbilt University)
Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies
19th- and 20th-century British literature; postcolonial literature

James Kuzner, PhD
(Johns Hopkins University)
Assistant Professor
Renaissance literature; Shakespeare

William H. Marling, PhD
(University of California, Santa Barbara)
Professor
American and world literature; modernism; popular culture

Marilyn Sanders Mobley, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor
Toni Morrison; Black women writers; African American literature; cultural studies

Erika Mae Olbricht, PhD
(University of New Hampshire)
Instructor; SAGES Instructional Coordinator
16th- and 17th- century British literature and theatre; landscape studies

John M. Orlock, MFA
(Pennsylvania State University)
Samuel B. and Virginia C. Knight Professor of Humanities
Playwriting; screenwriting

Judith Oster, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor
American literature; poetry; cross-cultural literature; the teaching of English

James Sheeler, MA
(University of Colorado)
Shirley Wormser Professor of Journalism and Media Writing; Director of Undergraduate Studies
Journalism

William R. Siebenschuh, PhD
(University of California, Berkeley)
Professor
18th- and 19th-century British literature; biography and autobiography

Robert Spadoni, PhD
(University of Chicago)
Associate Professor
Film studies

Gary Lee Stonum, PhD
(Johns Hopkins University)
Oviatt Professor of English
American literature; literary theory

Thrity Umrigar, PhD
(Kent State University)
Professor
Creative writing (fiction and memoir); journalism; African-American literature

Athena Vrettos, PhD
(University of Pennsylvania)
Associate Professor
19th-century British literature; literature and medicine; literature and psychology; women’s and gender studies

Martha Woodmansee, PhD
(Stanford University)
Professor; Professor of Law
Literary theory; 18th- and 19th-century comparative literature; copyright

Teacher Licensure in Integrated Language Arts    |  Integrated Graduate Studies    |    Minors  

Undergraduate Programs

Major

The major in English includes two tracks. The primary track consists of at least 30 semester hours in English above the 100 level (including 15 hours at the 300 level or above). The required courses are:

ENGL 300English Literature to 18003
ENGL 302English Literature since 18003
or ENGL 308 American Literature
ENGL 380Departmental Seminar3
ENGL 395Capstone Seminar3
One of the following:3
History of the English Language
Chaucer
Renaissance Literature
Milton
Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies
Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances
Eighteenth-Century Literature
Studies in the Eighteenth Century
English Literature, 1780-1837
Fifteen additional hours of English courses, at least 3 of which must be at the 300 level15
Total Units30

 

Because of the flexibility of departmental requirements and the variety of career paths to which the major may lead, all students should confer frequently and closely with advisors. No courses outside the department are required for the major, but the department recommends courses in comparative literature, history, philosophy, history and criticism of the fine arts, theater, and literature in other languages. Students planning to go to graduate school are reminded of the importance of foreign language study.

Completion of the University composition requirement ( or SAGES First Seminar) is a prerequisite for most English courses at the 200 level and above.

Departmental Honors

To qualify for honors, English majors follow a track consisting of at least 36 hours above the 100 level, including the general requirements for the major (see above); , or approved substitute; at least 18 hours of approved electives in literary and cultural studies; and one of the following language courses, or an equivalent in a language for which 300-level literature courses are available:

FRCH 202Intermediate French II4
GREK 202Introduction to Greek Poetry3
GRMN 202Intermediate German II4
JAPN 202Intermediate Japanese II4
LATN 202Vergil3
SPAN 202Intermediate Spanish II4

The award of honors requires a minimum GPA of 3.5 in courses taken for the honors program.

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Teacher Licensure in Integrated Language Arts

A special program is available that leads to the BA and candidacy for licensure by the State of Ohio to teach Integrated Language Arts in grades 7-12 (Adolescents to Young Adults). The teaching credential is valid in Ohio and honored in many other states. The program consists of a more prescriptive form of the normal English major and a series of education courses that includes student teaching in a local school. (See the program description for Teacher Licensure elsewhere in this bulletin.) Because of the student teaching and because some of the education courses must be taken at John Carroll University, early and careful planning is vital. Consult Judith Oster, the advisor for teacher licensure in language arts, for details about this program.

The subject area requirements for teacher licensure (42 credit hours) are as follows:

ENGL 150Expository Writing3
ENGL 200Literature in English3
ENGL 202Advanced Expository Writing3
ENGL 204Introduction to Journalism3
ENGL 256Major American Writers3
ENGL 380Departmental Seminar3
ENGL 255Major British Writers3
ENGL 324Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies3
or ENGL 325 Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances
Take one of the following
ENGL 301Linguistic Analysis3
or ENGL 379 Topics in Language Studies
or COSI 313 Language Development
Two of the following:6
Poetry
Introduction to Gender Studies
African-American Literature
The Immigrant Experience
Topics in African-American Literature
Post-Colonial Literature
Minority Literatures
One of the following:3
Film History, Theory, and Criticism
History of Film
Topics in Film
Recommended Electives:
Introduction to Creative Writing
Introduction to Fiction Writing
Introduction to Poetry Writing
Intermediate Writing Workshop: Fiction
Intermediate Writing Workshop: Poetry
History of the English Language
Classroom Teaching
ESL Composition Theory

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Integrated Graduate Studies

The Department of English participates in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program, which makes it possible to complete both a BA and an MA in English in about five years of full-time study. The department particularly recommends the program to qualified students who are interested in seeking admission to highly competitive professional schools or PhD programs. Interested students should note the general requirements and the admission procedures elsewhere in this bulletin.

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Minors

Minor in English

The minor in English consists of at least 15 hours above the 100 level. Students who wish to minor in English arrange their sequence of courses in consultation with the department advisor. Minors are strongly advised to take early in the sequence. They should also keep in mind that the flexibility of the department’s requirements often makes it possible to take English as a second major.

Minor in Film Studies

Like the minor in English, the minor in Film Studies requires 15 hours:

ENGL 367Introduction to Film (Though students are not required to take this course first, it is recommended that they take it first or as early in the sequence as possible.)3
Up to 12 credits in the following:3-12
Film History, Theory, and Criticism
History of Film
Topics in Film
Screenwriting
Up to 6 credits of elective courses *0-6
Total Units6-21

*

Many courses taught across the University can qualify as elective courses, and new ones are coming along all the time. Past courses that would qualify include Latin American Cinema, Religion and Film, The Hollywood Musical, Topics in German Cinema, Film Music, Jewish Image in Popular Film, French Cinema, and Folklore & Myth in Japanese Film.


Graduate Programs

The Department of English offers programs in American and English literature and language leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. At either the MA or PhD level, students may elect a concentration in Writing History and Theory. The department also collaborates with the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures in offering a Master of Arts in world literature.

Candidates for graduate work in English should present an undergraduate major in English or a minimum of 18 semester hours of English (or its equivalent) beyond the freshman level. In some cases, students will be required to make up deficiencies without graduate credit. The department requires all candidates for admission to submit their scores on the aptitude sections of the Graduate Record Examination. Candidates are also required to submit a writing sample, consisting of at least 15 pages of academic writing. Students whose native language is not English are normally admitted only as provisional students. After 12 semester hours of satisfactory work, they are granted regular status.

A maximum of six semester hours of transfer credit will be accepted from another institution, provided they were earned in graduate-level courses, with the approval of the department and the dean of graduate studies. Such courses must have been taken within five years of matriculation at Case Western Reserve University and passed with grades of B or better. The department welcomes part-time students.

Although not formally a requirement for graduate degrees, teaching is viewed as part of the education of every graduate student. The department provides opportunities for graduate assistants to gain teaching experience in a variety of English courses. Other teaching opportunities exist elsewhere in the university and in Greater Cleveland.

New and continuing graduate students may apply for graduate student assistantships, which are awarded by the dean on recommendation of the department. Applicants with previous teaching experience are preferred. Graduate assistants without previous teaching experience will be required to take before the first semester in which they teach.

Courses

ENGL 148. Introduction to Composition. 3 Units.

Practice and training in various modes and genres of writing. Undergraduate CIM students placed into ENGL 148 must complete the course with a grade of C or higher in order to enroll in ENGL 150.

ENGL 150. Expository Writing. 3 Units.

Substantial training and practice in academic writing.

ENGL 180. Writing Tutorial. 1 Unit.

Substantial scheduled tutorial work in writing.

ENGL 181. Reading Tutorial. 1 Unit.

Scheduled tutorial work in reading as well as time management and study strategies for both native and non-native speakers who need work beyond SAGES, or who come to the Writing Resource Center seeking substantial help. May work individually with instructor or in small groups. May be repeated in special instances, but only one semester-hour will count towards the degree.

ENGL 183. Academic Writing Studio. 1 Unit.

Practice and training in various aspects of academic writing in a small group workshop environment. Offered concurrently with First Seminar; provides supplementary instruction to help students meet First Seminar writing objectives. Please note: only one semester hour of English 183 will count toward a degree, but the course may be repeated.

ENGL 184. Research Writing Studio. 1 Unit.

Practice and training in various aspects of research in a small-group workshop environment. Offered concurrently with University Seminar; provides supplementary instruction to help students meet University Seminar writing objectives. Please note: only two semester hours of English 184 will count towards a degree.

ENGL 200. Literature in English. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the reading of literature in the English language. Through close attention to the practice of reading, students are invited to consider some of the characteristic forms and functions imaginative literature has taken, together with some of the changes that have taken place in what and how readers read. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 202. Advanced Expository Writing. 3 Units.

A workshop-style course for students that offers practice and training in genres of nonfiction prose. Special attention paid to style and presentation. Prereq: 100 level first seminar in FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, or FSSY.

ENGL 203. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Units.

A course exploring basic issues and techniques of writing narrative prose and verse through exercises, analysis, and experiment. For students who wish to try their abilities across a spectrum of genres. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 204. Introduction to Journalism. 3 Units.

Students will learn the basics of reporting and writing news stories, but also the traditions behind the craft and the evolving role of journalism in society. Instruction will include interviewing skills, fact-checking, word choice and story structure--all framed by guidance on making ethically sound decisions. Assignments could include stories from a variety of beats (business, entertainment, government, science), along with deadline stories and breaking news Web updates, profiles and obituaries.

ENGL 213. Introduction to Fiction Writing. 3 Units.

A beginning workshop in fiction writing, introducing such concepts as voice, point of view, plot, characterization, dialogue, description, and the like. May include discussion of literary examples, both classic and contemporary, along with student work. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 214. Introduction to Poetry Writing. 3 Units.

A beginning workshop, focusing on such elements of poetry as verse-form, syntax, figures, sound, tone. May include discussion of literary examples as well as student work. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 217A. Business and Professional Writing. 3 Units.

An introduction to professional communication in theory and practice. Special attention paid to audience analysis, persuasive techniques in written and oral communication, document design strategies, and ethical communication practices. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 217B. Writing for the Health Professions. 3 Units.

This course offers practice and training in the professional and technical writing skills common to health professions (e.g., medicine, nursing, dentistry). Attention will be paid to the writing processes of drafting, revising, and editing. Typical assignments include: letters, resumes, personal essays, professional communication genres (e.g., email, reports, patient charts, and histories), and scholarly genres (e.g., abstracts, articles, and reviews). Recommended preparation: FSCC 100 or equivalent.

ENGL 255. Major British Writers. 3 Units.

Introduction to literary studies and survey of selected English authors from the Medieval period to the present. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 256. Major American Writers. 3 Units.

Introduction to literary studies and survey of literature of United States from colonial times to the present. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 257A. The Novel. 3 Units.

Introductory readings in the novel. May be organized chronologically or thematically. Some attention to the novel as a historically situated genre.

ENGL 257B. Poetry. 3 Units.

Introductory readings in poetry. May be organized chronologically or thematically. Attention to the formal qualities of poetry in relation to meaning, expressivity, etc.

ENGL 270. Introduction to Gender Studies. 3 Units.

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women's studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, art history, and religion. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women's and gender studies major. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 270, HSTY 270, PHIL 270, RLGN 270, SOCI 201, and WGST 201.

ENGL 285. Special Topics Seminar. 1 Unit.

One-credit seminars on special topics in literature or language; see departmental listings for topics each term. Maximum of 3 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 290. Masterpieces of Continental Fiction. 3 Units.

Major works of fiction from the 19th century and earlier. Offered as ENGL 290 and WLIT 290.

ENGL 291. Masterpieces of Modern Fiction. 3 Units.

Major works of fiction of the 20th century. Offered as ENGL 291 and WLIT 291.

ENGL 300. English Literature to 1800. 3 Units.

A survey of major British authors from Chaucer to Milton and Dryden. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 301. Linguistic Analysis. 3 Units.

Analysis of modern English from various theoretical perspectives: structural, generative, discourse analytical, sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and cognitive linguistic. Some attention to the major dialects of American English. Offered as ENGL 301 and ENGL 401. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 302. English Literature since 1800. 3 Units.

A survey of major British authors from Wordsworth to the present. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 303. Intermediate Writing Workshop: Fiction. 3 Units.

Continues developing the concepts and practice of the introductory courses, with reading, writing, and discussion of fiction in various forms, including the short story, the novella and the novel. Maximum 6 credits. Prereq: ENGL 203 or ENGL 213.

ENGL 304. Intermediate Writing Workshop: Poetry. 3 Units.

Continues developing the concepts and practice of the introductory courses, with emphasis on experiment and revision as well as consideration of poetic genres through examples from established poets. Maximum 6 credits. Prereq: ENGL 203 or ENGL 214.

ENGL 305. Playwriting. 3 Units.

Theory and practice of dramatic writing, in the context of examples, classic and contemporary. Recommended preparation: ENGL 203 or ENGL 213 or ENGL 214 or ENGL 303 or ENGL 304. Offered as ENGL 305 and THTR 312.

ENGL 306. Intermediate Writing Workshop: Creative Non-Fiction. 3 Units.

A writing workshop that focuses on non-fiction. Students will study and write narrative journalism, the memoir, and the personal essay. Prereq: ENGL 203 or ENGL 213 or ENGL 214.

ENGL 307. Intermediate Writing Workshop: Journalism. 3 Units.

Continues developing the concepts and practices of the introductory course, with emphasis on feature writing for magazines, story structure, and repertorial techniques. Prereq: ENGL 204 and either ENGL 150 or 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS.

ENGL 308. American Literature. 3 Units.

A survey of major American authors from the Puritans to the present. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 309. Topics in Journalism. 3 Units.

Study and practice of specialized forms of journalism. Maximum of six credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 310. History of the English Language. 3 Units.

An introductory course covering the major periods of English language development: Old, Middle, and Modern. Students will examine both the linguistic forms and the cultures in which the forms were used. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 310 and ENGL 410.

ENGL 312. Chaucer. 3 Units.

An introduction to the work of Geoffrey Chaucer, with emphasis on "The Canterbury Tales." Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 314. Advanced Playwriting. 3 Units.

Theory and practice of dramatic writing with special focus on the craft of writing a full-length play. Offered as ENGL 314 and THTR 314. Prereq: ENGL 305 or THTR 312.

ENGL 316. Screenwriting. 3 Units.

A critical exploration of the craft of writing for film, in which reading and practicum assignments will culminate in the student submitting an original full-length screenplay. Offered as ENGL 316 and THTR 316.

ENGL 320. Renaissance Literature. 3 Units.

Aspects of English Renaissance literature and its contexts from 1500-ca. 1620. Genres studied might include poetry, drama, prose fiction, expository and polemic writing, or some works from Continental Europe. Writers such as Skelton, More, Erasmus, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Lanier, Wroth, Shakespeare, Donne. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 320 and ENGL 420. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 323. Milton. 3 Units.

Poetry and selected prose, including the careful study of "Paradise Lost." Offered as ENGL 323 and ENGL 423. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 324. Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies. 3 Units.

Close reading of a selection of Shakespeare's tragedies and history plays (e.g., "Richard the Third," "Julius Caesar," "Hamlet," "King Lear"). Topics of discussion may include Renaissance drama as a social institution, the nature of tragedy, national history, gender roles, sexual politics, the state and its opponents, theatrical conventions. Assessment may include opportunities for performance. Offered as ENGL 324, ENGL 424, and THTR 334. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 325. Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances. 3 Units.

Close reading of selected plays of Shakespeare in the genres of comedy and romance (e.g., "The Merchant of Venice," "Twelfth Night," "Measure for Measure," "The Tempest"). Topics of discussion may include issues of sexual desire, gender roles, marriage, the family, genre conventions. Assessment may include opportunities for performance. Offered as ENGL 325, ENGL 425, and THTR 335. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 327. Eighteenth-Century Literature. 3 Units.

Survey of a variety of writings from or relevant to the eighteenth century. Writers discussed may include Dryden, Behn, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Gay, Fielding, Richardson, Burney, Wollstonecraft and others working in drama, lyric and epic poetry, biography and autobiography, political and philosophical writings and prose fiction. Thematic approaches may include: satire, journalism and literature, the rise of the novel. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 327 and ENGL 427. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 328. Studies in the Eighteenth Century. 3 Units.

This course examines selected topics in the English literary culture of the eighteenth century, a culture which extended to the Americas and to other English colonies. Literary writings will be examined in relation to other aspects of the century culture, which may include visual arts, marital institutions, the printing industry, property law, medicine, and other topics. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 328 and ENGL 428. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 329. English Literature, 1780-1837. 3 Units.

Aspects of English literature and its contexts in the early 19th century. Genres might include poetry, prose fiction, political and philosophical writing, literary theory of the period. Writers such as the Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Austen, Byron, the Shelleys. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 329 and ENGL 429. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 330. Victorian Literature. 3 Units.

Aspects of English literature and its contexts during the reign of Queen Victoria. Genres studied might include poetry, prose fiction, political and philosophical writing. Writers such as the Brontes, Gaskell, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, Carlyle, Ruskin, Gosse, Swinburne, and Hopkins. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 330 and ENGL 430. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 331. Studies in the Nineteenth-Century. 3 Units.

Individual topics in English literary culture of the 19th century. Topics might be thematic or formal, such as literature and science; medicine; labor; sexuality; Empire; literature and other arts; Gothic fiction; decadence. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 331 and ENGL 431. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 332. Twentieth-Century British Literature. 3 Units.

Aspects of British literature (broadly interpreted) and its contexts during the 20th century. Genres studied might include poetry, fiction, and drama. Such writers as Joyce, Woolf, Conrad, Ford, Lawrence, Mansfield, Shaw, Beckett, Stoppard, Yeats, Edward or Dylan Thomas, Stevie Smith, Bowen, Spark. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 332 and ENGL 432. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 333. Studies in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries. 3 Units.

Individual topics in twentieth-and twenty-first century literary culture. Particular issues and topics may cross national boundaries and genre lines as well as exploring political, psychological, and social themes, such as movements, comparative studies across the arts, literature and war, literature and occultism. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 333 and ENGL 433. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 341. Rhetoric of Science and Medicine. 3 Units.

This course explores the roles language and rhetoric play in constructing, communicating, and understanding science and medicine. It surveys current and historical debates, theories, research, and textual conventions of scientific and medical discourse. May be taught with a specific focus, such as scientific controversies, concepts of health and illness, visualizations of science, the body in medicine, and the history of scientific writing. Offered as: ENGL 341 and ENGL 441. Prereq: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 343. Language and Gender. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the study of language and gender by exploring historical and theoretical trends, methods, and research findings on the ways gender, sexuality, language, and discourse interact with and even shape each other. Topics may include "grammatical" versus "biological" gender, feminine ecriture, the women and language debate, speech acts and queer performativity, nonsexist language policy, discourses of gender and sexuality, feminist stylistics, and LGBT sociolinguistics. Offered as: ENGL 343, ENGL 443, and WGST 343. Prereq: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

ENGL 353. Major Writers. 3 Units.

Close and detailed study of the work of one or two writers: development, social and aesthetic contexts, reception, interpretation, significance. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 353 and ENGL 453. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 356. American Literature Before 1865. 3 Units.

Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the colonial period through the end of the Civil War. Writers such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Franklin, Poe, Stowe, Alcott, Melville, Hawthorne, Emerson, Douglass. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 356 and ENGL 456. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 357. American Literature 1865-1914. 3 Units.

Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the Civil War to the First World War. Writers such as Whitman and Dickinson, Twain, Howells, James, Chopin, Wharton. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 357 and ENGL 457. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 358. American Literature 1914-1960. 3 Units.

Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the First World War to the Cold War. Genres studies might include fiction, poetry, drama, polemics. Writers such as T.S. Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Moore, W.C. Williams, Dos Passos, West, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, Faulkner, Barnes, Miller, T. Williams, O'Neill. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 358 and ENGL 458. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 359. Studies in Contemporary American Literature. 3 Units.

Individual topics in literary culture since the 1960s. Topics may include the Beats, literature of the Vietnam war, post-modern fiction, contemporary poetry, the documentary novel. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 359 and ENGL 459. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 360. Studies in American Literature. 3 Units.

Individual topics in American literary culture such as regionalism, realism, impressionism, literature and popular culture, transcendentalism, the lyric, proletarian literature, the legacy of the Civil War. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 360 and ENGL 460. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 363H. African-American Literature. 3 Units.

A historical approach to African-American literature. Such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Jacobs, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Ellison, Morrison. Topics covered may include slave narratives, African-American autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Aesthetic, literature of protest and assimilation. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 363H, ETHS 363H, WLIT 363H, ENGL 463H, and WLIT 463H.

ENGL 365E. The Immigrant Experience. 3 Units.

Study of fictional and/or autobiographical narrative by authors whose families have experienced immigration to the U.S. Among the ethnic groups represented are Asian-American, Jewish-American, Hispanic-American. May include several ethnic groups or focus on a single one. Attention is paid to historical and social aspects of immigration and ethnicity. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 365E, WLIT 365E, ENGL 465E, and WLIT 465E.

ENGL 365N. Topics in African-American Literature. 3 Units.

Selected topics and writers from nineteenth,twentieth, and twenty-first century African-American literature. May focus on a genre, a single author or a group of authors, a theme or themes. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 365N, ETHS 365N, WLIT 365N, ENGL 465N, and WLIT 465N. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 365Q. Post-Colonial Literature. 3 Units.

Readings in national and regional literatures from former European colonies such as Australia and African countries. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 365Q, ETHS 365Q, WLIT 365Q, ENGL 465Q, and WLIT 465Q.

ENGL 366G. Minority Literatures. 3 Units.

A course dealing with literature produced by ethnic and racial minority groups within the U.S. Individual offerings may include works from several groups studied comparatively, or focus on a single group, such as Native Americans, Chicanos/Chicanas, Asian-Americans, Caribbean-Americans. African-American works may also be included. May cover the entire history of the U.S. or shorter periods. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 366G, WLIT 466G, ENGL 466G, and WLIT 466G.

ENGL 367. Introduction to Film. 3 Units.

An introduction to the aesthetics of film form. We will analyze the elements that make up a film, screening films that facilitate our discussion of how these elements interact with one another to constitute whole formal systems that generate meanings and other effects. We will bring various theoretical and historical considerations to bear as we explore and appreciate the art of cinema. Offered as ENGL 367 and ENGL 467.

ENGL 368A. Film History, Theory, and Criticism. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the three major approaches to cinema that together constitute the field of film studies. The course will be broken into three units: film theory; film criticism; and film history. Screening one film per week, we will consider each film in light of the particular unit's and week's focus. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 368A, WLIT 368A, ENGL 468A, and WLIT 468A.

ENGL 368B. History of Film. 3 Units.

Analysis of selected topics in film history, such as film before 1940, American cinema 1940 to the present, European or Asian cinema since 1940. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 368B and ENGL 468B.

ENGL 368C. Topics in Film. 3 Units.

Individual topics in film, such as a particular national cinema, horror films, films of Alfred Hitchcock, images of women in film, film comedy, introduction to film genres, Asian-cinema and drama, dance on screen, science fiction films, storytelling and cinema, and literature and film. Maximum 12 credits. Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C.

ENGL 369. Children's Literature. 3 Units.

Individual topics in 19th-, 20th-, and 21st century children's literature. Topics may focus on narrative and thematic developments in the genre, historical contexts, literary influences, or adaptations of children's literature into film and other media. Offered as ENGL 369 and ENGL 469. Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSCS or ENGL 150.

ENGL 371. Topics in Women's Studies. 3 Units.

Individual topics and issues in women's studies relating to writing by and about women, such as feminist theory and criticism; the politics of gender and sexuality; women in popular culture; women in the writing business. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 371 and ENGL 471. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 372. Studies in the Novel. 3 Units.

Selected topics in the history and formal development of the novel, such as detective novels; science fiction; epistolary novels; the rise of the novel; the stream of consciousness novel; the Bildungsroman in English. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 372 and ENGL 472. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 373. Studies in Poetry. 3 Units.

Selected topics and issues in the study of poetry, such as reading poetry, the elegy, pastoral poetry, love poetry, the long poem, form and meter in poetry. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 373 and ENGL 473. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 374. Internship in Journalism. 3 - 6 Units.

Students work as interns at area newspapers, magazines, trade publications, radio or television and meet as a class to share their experiences as interns and to focus on editorial issues--reporting, writing, fact-checking, editing--that are a part of any journalistic enterprise. Students are responsible for pre-arranging their internship prior to the semester they intend to take the class but can expect guidance from the instructor in this regard. Recommended preparation: ENGL 204 or permission of the department.

ENGL 375. Internship in Technical Communication. 3 - 6 Units.

Students create technical and professional documents in a selected corporate or organizational setting, do assigned reading, and meet as a class to participate in seminar discussions and review of work. Students must pre-arrange internship assignment with instructor prior to semester. Recommended preparation: ENGL 317 or ENGL 398N and permission of department.

ENGL 376. Studies in Genre. 3 Units.

Topics in literary genres, such as comedy, biography and autobiography, satire, allegory, the short story, the apologue, narrative poetry. May cross over the prose/poetry boundary. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 376 and ENGL 476. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 378. Topics in Visual and New Media Studies. 3 Units.

This course will focus on selected topics in the study of visual rhetoric and/or new media, including theoretical, critical, and historical issues raised by texts and media platforms that communicate largely through visual means or through the interaction of visual and verbal modes. Possible syllabi may focus on topics such as visual rhetoric; new media story-telling; historical perspectives on visual rhetoric and/or new media; concentrations on a particular genre (for instance, the graphic novel, video games, etc); visual narrative; theories of new media; etc. Offered as ENGL 378 and ENGL 478. Prereq: ENGL 150 or first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSSO, FSSY, FSCS, or FSTS.

ENGL 379. Topics in Language Studies. 3 Units.

Aspects of contemporary language studies. Topics might include history/theories of rhetoric, discourse studies, cognitive linguistics, metaphor, language acquisition, stylistics. Maximum 9 credits. Offered as ENGL 379 and ENGL 479. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 380. Departmental Seminar. 3 Units.

A topical course, emphasizing disciplinary forms of writing. Required of all English majors, preferable in the junior year; also fulfills a SAGES requirement. Prereq: ENGL 300.

ENGL 385. Special Topics in Literature. 3 Units.

Close study of a theme or aspect of literature not covered by traditional generic or period rubrics, such as "spatial imagination," "semiotics of fashion in literature," "epistolarity." Maximum 9 credits. Offered as ENGL 385 and ENGL 485. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 386. Studies in Literature and Culture. 3 Units.

Boundary-crossing study of the relations between literary and other aspects of a particular culture or society, including theoretical and critical issues raised by such study. For example, literature and medicine, law and literature, gay and lesbian literature, Asian/Western literary relations, emotion in literature, philosophy and literature, literature and music. Maximum 9 credits. Offered as ENGL 386 and ENGL 486. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 387. Literary and Critical Theory. 3 Units.

A survey of major schools and texts of literary and critical theory. May be historically or thematically organized. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 387, WLIT 387, ENGL 487, and WLIT 487. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 390. Independent Study and Creative Projects. 1 - 3 Unit.

Up to three semester hours of independent study may be taken in a single semester. Must have prior approval of faculty member directing the project. Projects may be critical or creative in nature.

ENGL 392. Classroom Teaching. 3 Units.

For undergraduate students who assist in the teaching of ENGL 150, 180, or 181. Interested students should check with the director of composition (for ENGL 150, 180, 181) before the beginning of the semester in which they wish to participate. May be repeated only once; not more than three semester hours in ENGL 392 may be counted toward the major. May also include up to three semester hours of supervised peer tutoring at the University Writing Center.

ENGL 395. Capstone Seminar. 3 Units.

Capstone course, to be taken in the senior year. Open to non-English majors. Required for all English majors in senior year. Features individual projects in a workshop environment; students have the option of a research-based or a creative writing project. Approved SAGES capstone. Prereq: ENGL 300 and ENGL 302 or ENGL 308 and ENGL 380.

ENGL 398. Professional Communication for Engineers. 2 Units.

A writing course for Engineering students only, covering academic and professional genres of written and oral communication. Taken in conjunction with Engineering 398, English 398 constitutes an approved SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS. Coreq: ENGR 398.

ENGL 398N. Professional Communication for Engineers. 3 Units.

Principles and practices of effective communication in the workplace, with an emphasis on computer-mediated communication. Topics include analyzing audience needs in context, visual communication, computer-mediated documents, ethics, and team writing. Typical assignments include e-mail, memos, letters, reports, documentation, and oral presentations. Prereq: ENGL 150 or passing letter grade in a 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS.

ENGL 400. Rhetoric and Teaching of Writing. 3 Units.

Classical and modern theories of rhetoric; their application in the classroom. Required of graduate assistants and tutors who have had no prior experience in the teaching of composition. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ENGL 401. Linguistic Analysis. 3 Units.

Analysis of modern English from various theoretical perspectives: structural, generative, discourse analytical, sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and cognitive linguistic. Some attention to the major dialects of American English. Offered as ENGL 301 and ENGL 401.

ENGL 406. Advanced Creative Writing. 3 Units.

Workshop for serious undergraduate and graduate writers. Offered alternate years; alternates between poetry and fiction. Admission requires review of writing sample by faculty. Maximum 6 credits.

ENGL 410. History of the English Language. 3 Units.

An introductory course covering the major periods of English language development: Old, Middle, and Modern. Students will examine both the linguistic forms and the cultures in which the forms were used. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 310 and ENGL 410.

ENGL 420. Renaissance Literature. 3 Units.

Aspects of English Renaissance literature and its contexts from 1500-ca. 1620. Genres studied might include poetry, drama, prose fiction, expository and polemic writing, or some works from Continental Europe. Writers such as Skelton, More, Erasmus, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Lanier, Wroth, Shakespeare, Donne. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 320 and ENGL 420.

ENGL 423. Milton. 3 Units.

Poetry and selected prose, including the careful study of "Paradise Lost." Offered as ENGL 323 and ENGL 423.

ENGL 424. Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies. 3 Units.

Close reading of a selection of Shakespeare's tragedies and history plays (e.g., "Richard the Third," "Julius Caesar," "Hamlet," "King Lear"). Topics of discussion may include Renaissance drama as a social institution, the nature of tragedy, national history, gender roles, sexual politics, the state and its opponents, theatrical conventions. Assessment may include opportunities for performance. Offered as ENGL 324, ENGL 424, and THTR 334.

ENGL 425. Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances. 3 Units.

Close reading of selected plays of Shakespeare in the genres of comedy and romance (e.g., "The Merchant of Venice," "Twelfth Night," "Measure for Measure," "The Tempest"). Topics of discussion may include issues of sexual desire, gender roles, marriage, the family, genre conventions. Assessment may include opportunities for performance. Offered as ENGL 325, ENGL 425, and THTR 335.

ENGL 427. Eighteenth-Century Literature. 3 Units.

Survey of a variety of writings from or relevant to the eighteenth century. Writers discussed may include Dryden, Behn, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Gay, Fielding, Richardson, Burney, Wollstonecraft and others working in drama, lyric and epic poetry, biography and autobiography, political and philosophical writings and prose fiction. Thematic approaches may include: satire, journalism and literature, the rise of the novel. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 327 and ENGL 427. Prereq: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 428. Studies in the Eighteenth Century. 3 Units.

This course examines selected topics in the English literary culture of the eighteenth century, a culture which extended to the Americas and to other English colonies. Literary writings will be examined in relation to other aspects of the century culture, which may include visual arts, marital institutions, the printing industry, property law, medicine, and other topics. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 328 and ENGL 428.

ENGL 429. English Literature, 1780-1837. 3 Units.

Aspects of English literature and its contexts in the early 19th century. Genres might include poetry, prose fiction, political and philosophical writing, literary theory of the period. Writers such as the Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Austen, Byron, the Shelleys. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 329 and ENGL 429.

ENGL 430. Victorian Literature. 3 Units.

Aspects of English literature and its contexts during the reign of Queen Victoria. Genres studied might include poetry, prose fiction, political and philosophical writing. Writers such as the Brontes, Gaskell, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, Carlyle, Ruskin, Gosse, Swinburne, and Hopkins. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 330 and ENGL 430. Prereq: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 431. Studies in the Nineteenth-Century. 3 Units.

Individual topics in English literary culture of the 19th century. Topics might be thematic or formal, such as literature and science; medicine; labor; sexuality; Empire; literature and other arts; Gothic fiction; decadence. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 331 and ENGL 431.

ENGL 432. Twentieth-Century British Literature. 3 Units.

Aspects of British literature (broadly interpreted) and its contexts during the 20th century. Genres studied might include poetry, fiction, and drama. Such writers as Joyce, Woolf, Conrad, Ford, Lawrence, Mansfield, Shaw, Beckett, Stoppard, Yeats, Edward or Dylan Thomas, Stevie Smith, Bowen, Spark. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 332 and ENGL 432.

ENGL 433. Studies in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries. 3 Units.

Individual topics in twentieth-and twenty-first century literary culture. Particular issues and topics may cross national boundaries and genre lines as well as exploring political, psychological, and social themes, such as movements, comparative studies across the arts, literature and war, literature and occultism. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 333 and ENGL 433.

ENGL 441. Rhetoric of Science and Medicine. 3 Units.

This course explores the roles language and rhetoric play in constructing, communicating, and understanding science and medicine. It surveys current and historical debates, theories, research, and textual conventions of scientific and medical discourse. May be taught with a specific focus, such as scientific controversies, concepts of health and illness, visualizations of science, the body in medicine, and the history of scientific writing. Offered as: ENGL 341 and ENGL 441. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ENGL 443. Language and Gender. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the study of language and gender by exploring historical and theoretical trends, methods, and research findings on the ways gender, sexuality, language, and discourse interact with and even shape each other. Topics may include "grammatical" versus "biological" gender, feminine ecriture, the women and language debate, speech acts and queer performativity, nonsexist language policy, discourses of gender and sexuality, feminist stylistics, and LGBT sociolinguistics. Offered as: ENGL 343, ENGL 443, and WGST 343. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ENGL 453. Major Writers. 3 Units.

Close and detailed study of the work of one or two writers: development, social and aesthetic contexts, reception, interpretation, significance. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 353 and ENGL 453.

ENGL 456. American Literature Before 1865. 3 Units.

Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the colonial period through the end of the Civil War. Writers such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Franklin, Poe, Stowe, Alcott, Melville, Hawthorne, Emerson, Douglass. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 356 and ENGL 456.

ENGL 457. American Literature 1865-1914. 3 Units.

Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the Civil War to the First World War. Writers such as Whitman and Dickinson, Twain, Howells, James, Chopin, Wharton. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 357 and ENGL 457.

ENGL 458. American Literature 1914-1960. 3 Units.

Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the First World War to the Cold War. Genres studies might include fiction, poetry, drama, polemics. Writers such as T.S. Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Moore, W.C. Williams, Dos Passos, West, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, Faulkner, Barnes, Miller, T. Williams, O'Neill. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 358 and ENGL 458.

ENGL 459. Studies in Contemporary American Literature. 3 Units.

Individual topics in literary culture since the 1960s. Topics may include the Beats, literature of the Vietnam war, post-modern fiction, contemporary poetry, the documentary novel. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 359 and ENGL 459.

ENGL 460. Studies in American Literature. 3 Units.

Individual topics in American literary culture such as regionalism, realism, impressionism, literature and popular culture, transcendentalism, the lyric, proletarian literature, the legacy of the Civil War. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 360 and ENGL 460. Prereq: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 463H. African-American Literature. 3 Units.

A historical approach to African-American literature. Such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Jacobs, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Ellison, Morrison. Topics covered may include slave narratives, African-American autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Aesthetic, literature of protest and assimilation. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 363H, ETHS 363H, WLIT 363H, ENGL 463H, and WLIT 463H.

ENGL 465E. The Immigrant Experience. 3 Units.

Study of fictional and/or autobiographical narrative by authors whose families have experienced immigration to the U.S. Among the ethnic groups represented are Asian-American, Jewish-American, Hispanic-American. May include several ethnic groups or focus on a single one. Attention is paid to historical and social aspects of immigration and ethnicity. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 365E, WLIT 365E, ENGL 465E, and WLIT 465E.

ENGL 465N. Topics in African-American Literature. 3 Units.

Selected topics and writers from nineteenth,twentieth, and twenty-first century African-American literature. May focus on a genre, a single author or a group of authors, a theme or themes. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 365N, ETHS 365N, WLIT 365N, ENGL 465N, and WLIT 465N.

ENGL 465Q. Post-Colonial Literature. 3 Units.

Readings in national and regional literatures from former European colonies such as Australia and African countries. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 365Q, ETHS 365Q, WLIT 365Q, ENGL 465Q, and WLIT 465Q.

ENGL 466G. Minority Literatures. 3 Units.

A course dealing with literature produced by ethnic and racial minority groups within the U.S. Individual offerings may include works from several groups studied comparatively, or focus on a single group, such as Native Americans, Chicanos/Chicanas, Asian-Americans, Caribbean-Americans. African-American works may also be included. May cover the entire history of the U.S. or shorter periods. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 366G, WLIT 466G, ENGL 466G, and WLIT 466G.

ENGL 467. Introduction to Film. 3 Units.

An introduction to the aesthetics of film form. We will analyze the elements that make up a film, screening films that facilitate our discussion of how these elements interact with one another to constitute whole formal systems that generate meanings and other effects. We will bring various theoretical and historical considerations to bear as we explore and appreciate the art of cinema. Offered as ENGL 367 and ENGL 467.

ENGL 468A. Film History, Theory, and Criticism. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the three major approaches to cinema that together constitute the field of film studies. The course will be broken into three units: film theory; film criticism; and film history. Screening one film per week, we will consider each film in light of the particular unit's and week's focus. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 368A, WLIT 368A, ENGL 468A, and WLIT 468A.

ENGL 468B. History of Film. 3 Units.

Analysis of selected topics in film history, such as film before 1940, American cinema 1940 to the present, European or Asian cinema since 1940. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100. Offered as ENGL 368B and ENGL 468B.

ENGL 468C. Topics in Film. 3 Units.

Individual topics in film, such as a particular national cinema, horror films, films of Alfred Hitchcock, images of women in film, film comedy, introduction to film genres, Asian-cinema and drama, dance on screen, science fiction films, storytelling and cinema, and literature and film. Maximum 12 credits. Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C.

ENGL 469. Children's Literature. 3 Units.

Individual topics in 19th-, 20th-, and 21st century children's literature. Topics may focus on narrative and thematic developments in the genre, historical contexts, literary influences, or adaptations of children's literature into film and other media. Offered as ENGL 369 and ENGL 469. Prereq: Graduate Standing or Requisites not met permission.

ENGL 471. Topics in Women's Studies. 3 Units.

Individual topics and issues in women's studies relating to writing by and about women, such as feminist theory and criticism; the politics of gender and sexuality; women in popular culture; women in the writing business. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 371 and ENGL 471.

ENGL 472. Studies in the Novel. 3 Units.

Selected topics in the history and formal development of the novel, such as detective novels; science fiction; epistolary novels; the rise of the novel; the stream of consciousness novel; the Bildungsroman in English. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 372 and ENGL 472.

ENGL 473. Studies in Poetry. 3 Units.

Selected topics and issues in the study of poetry, such as reading poetry, the elegy, pastoral poetry, love poetry, the long poem, form and meter in poetry. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 373 and ENGL 473.

ENGL 476. Studies in Genre. 3 Units.

Topics in literary genres, such as comedy, biography and autobiography, satire, allegory, the short story, the apologue, narrative poetry. May cross over the prose/poetry boundary. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 376 and ENGL 476.

ENGL 478. Topics in Visual and New Media Studies. 3 Units.

This course will focus on selected topics in the study of visual rhetoric and/or new media, including theoretical, critical, and historical issues raised by texts and media platforms that communicate largely through visual means or through the interaction of visual and verbal modes. Possible syllabi may focus on topics such as visual rhetoric; new media story-telling; historical perspectives on visual rhetoric and/or new media; concentrations on a particular genre (for instance, the graphic novel, video games, etc); visual narrative; theories of new media; etc. Offered as ENGL 378 and ENGL 478.

ENGL 479. Topics in Language Studies. 3 Units.

Aspects of contemporary language studies. Topics might include history/theories of rhetoric, discourse studies, cognitive linguistics, metaphor, language acquisition, stylistics. Maximum 9 credits. Offered as ENGL 379 and ENGL 479.

ENGL 480. ESL Composition Theory. 3 Units.

Study of theories related to teaching ESL composition, including second language acquisition; specialized grammar related to common ESL problems; cultural and affective issues; different Englishes; composition theory and research as it relates to ESL.

ENGL 485. Special Topics in Literature. 3 Units.

Close study of a theme or aspect of literature not covered by traditional generic or period rubrics, such as "spatial imagination," "semiotics of fashion in literature," "epistolarity." Maximum 9 credits. Offered as ENGL 385 and ENGL 485.

ENGL 486. Studies in Literature and Culture. 3 Units.

Boundary-crossing study of the relations between literary and other aspects of a particular culture or society, including theoretical and critical issues raised by such study. For example, literature and medicine, law and literature, gay and lesbian literature, Asian/Western literary relations, emotion in literature, philosophy and literature, literature and music. Maximum 9 credits. Offered as ENGL 386 and ENGL 486.

ENGL 487. Literary and Critical Theory. 3 Units.

A survey of major schools and texts of literary and critical theory. May be historically or thematically organized. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as ENGL 387, WLIT 387, ENGL 487, and WLIT 487.

ENGL 501. Theories of Rhetoric. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 502. Critical Theory. 3 Units.

Theories and methods of contemporary literary study. Prereq: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 506. Professional Writing: Theory and Practice. 3 Units.

Prepares graduate students to teach disciplinary forms of writing, including technical and professional writing, in academic and non-academic settings. Prereq: ENGL 400.

ENGL 508. Seminar: English Literature 1550-1660. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 510. Research Methods. 3 Units.

This course focuses on methods and resources for research in English, including substantial treatments of narrative, poetics, and close-reading skills. It also introduces graduate students to questions of textuality, genre, medium, authorship, reception, historiography, and bibliography.. Prereq: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 517. Seminar: American Literature. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 518. Seminar: English Literature 1660-1800. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 519. Seminar: English Literature 1800-1900. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 520. Seminar: 20th Century Literature. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 521. Seminar: The Novel. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 522. Seminar: Topics in Poetry. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 524. Seminar: Criticism and Other Special Topics. 3 Units.

Prereq: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 525. Intellectual Property and the Construction of Authorship. 3 Units.

Study of the concepts, laws, norms, and practices through which writers and other creative producers establish "property" in their work. Offered as ENGL 525 and HSTY 525. Prereq: Graduate standing or permission.

ENGL 550. External Seminar. 3 Units.

Coursework offered in cooperation with participating English departments in the region; content and approach vary. Requires prior approval of the Graduate Director.

ENGL 590. Special Reading or Research. 3 Units.

Independent study as arranged with individual instructors. Prereq: Graduate status or consent of department.

ENGL 601. Directed Reading. 1 - 6 Unit.

Preparation for the Ph.D. general examination. Prereq: Graduate status.

ENGL 651. Thesis M.A.. 1 - 18 Unit.

Prereq: Graduate standing.

ENGL 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.