2011-12 General Bulletin

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http://www.case.edu/artsci/psychological-sciences
Lee Thompson, Department Chair

This is an archived copy of the 2011-12 Bulletin. To access the most recent version of the bulletin, please visit http://bulletin.case.edu.

Communciation Sciences Program   I  Psychology Program

The Department of Psychological Sciences combines the areas of study found in many psychology departments with those typically found in communication sciences departments. Our distinctive department offers undergraduate majors and minors in communication sciences and in psychology. We also offer a minor in health communications. For graduate students, our psychology program offers accredited doctoral training in clinical psychology and in experimental psychology. Our accredited communication sciences program offers a master’s degree in speech-language pathology as well as a doctorate in communication sciences.

Communication Sciences

Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center, 11635 Euclid Ave, Room 333
Phone: 216-368-2470

The Department of Psychological Sciences offers courses of study in communication sciences leading to Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The communication sciences program prepares undergraduate and graduate students to address broad issues of human communication processes and disorders through the application of cutting-edge technology and rigorous clinical training. We provide a comprehensive foundation in normal and disordered human communication and combine it with innovative interdisciplinary experiences that capitalize on the extensive resources of the university and the surrounding medical community. The department enjoys a particularly close relationship with Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center , an outstanding independent, nonprofit provider of care in speech-language pathology and audiology; in fact, the program is housed within the center.

Many students pursue undergraduate study in communication disorders as preparation for further study in other fields or in conjunction with study in other fields. For example, one can combine a major in communication disorders with a major in sociology or psychology or with a minor in gerontological studies. Professionals in human services fields such as medicine, social work, nursing, or education often work with persons with communication disorders. For students interested in academic or research careers, investigation in the field of communication disorders is often done alongside investigation of normal human behavior. For example, one might study the word learning of children with normal language as well as that of children with language impairment.

Psychology                                                             

103 Mather Memorial Building
Phone: 216-368-2686

The Psychology Program offers the combined advantages of a strong liberal arts college and a major university. There are classes in all major areas of the psychology field. We encourage close student-faculty relationships and offer many opportunities for individualized study and research.

Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. The discipline embraces all aspects of the human experience: from the functions of the brain to the actions of neurons, from child development to care for the aged. In every conceivable setting from scientific research centers to mental health care services, "the understanding of behavior" is the enterprise of psychologists. An undergraduate major in psychology offers a student preparation for a wide variety of careers. Many majors find psychology to be an excellent preparation for such service-oriented professions as social work, counseling and guidance, special education, and management. Those who pursue graduate work in one of the many fields of psychology often seek positions in teaching and research or applied human services. In addition, the study of psychology provides a knowledge and an understanding of behavior that has applications in professions such as nursing, medicine, law, teaching, business, and public relations.

Department Faculty

Lee A. Thompson, PhD
(University of Colorado, Boulder)
Chair; Professor of Psychology
Human behavior genetics; child development

Patrizia Bonaventura, PhD
(The Ohio State University)
Assistant Professor
Simulation of speech production and biomechanical modeling of the vocal tract; motor contorl mechanisms in normal and disordered speech production; speech technology applications

Angela Hein Ciccia, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience of communication and communication disorders in adolescents/adults, with focus on traumatic brain injury

Arin M. Connell, PhD
(Emory University)
Jesse Hauk Shera Assistant Professor
Internalizing problems; coping skills during adolescence

Heath A. Demaree, PhD
(Virginia Tech)
Associate Professor
Cerebral and psychophysiological bases of emotion

Douglas K. Detterman, PhD
(University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa)
Louis D. Beaumont University Professor
Human intelligence and intellectual disability

Anastasia Dimitropoulos, PhD
(Vanderbilt University)
Assistant Professor
Genetic syndromes involving intellectual disabilities; compulsive behavior in MR/DD; functional neuroimaging

Julie J. Exline, PhD
(State University of New York, Stony Brook)
Associate Professor
Social relationships; transgression; moral and religious issues

Joseph F. Fagan III, PhD
(University of Connecticut)
Lucy Adams Leffingwell Professor
Development of and individual differences in cognition, perception, and intelligence

Norah C. Feeny, PhD
(Bryn Mawr College)
Professor
Evaluation of interventions for anxiety (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder) and mood disorders

Grover C. Gilmore, PhD
(Johns Hopkins University)
Professor; Dean, Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences
Perceptual development and aging; visual information processing; memory; psychophysics

Robert L. Greene, PhD
(Yale University)
Professor
Human memory and cognition

Barbara Lewis, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Professor
Familial and genetic bases of speech/language

T. J. McCallum, PhD
(University of Southern California)
Associate Professor
Older adults; caregiving; ethnicity; stress and coping

James C. Overholser, PhD
(Ohio State University)
Professor
Adult psychopathology; depression; suicide; personality disorders

Amy Przeworski, PhD
(Pennsylvania State University)
Assistant Professor
Anxiety disorders; emotion regulation; cultural factors in family interactions

Kathryn (Krya) Rothenberg, PhD
(Kent State University)
Instructor
Health communication

Sandra W. Russ, PhD
(University of Pittsburgh)
Professor
Creativity; affective development in children; personality assessment; coping mechanisms in children

Elizabeth J. Short, PhD
(University of Notre Dame)
Professor
Cognitive psychology; applied developmental; learning disabilities

Jennell Vick, PhD
(University of Washington)
Assistant Professor
Study of movements of the face, lips, and tongue that generate speech; acquisition and development of speech in typically developing infants and children; impact of various disorders on speech acquisition, development, and production


Lecturers

Jennifer L. Butler, PhD
(Case Western Reserve University)
Social psychology

Patricia O. Carothers, MS, CCC-A
(Ithaca College)
Fluency disorders

Tonia Kates Stewart, PhD
(Bowling Green State University)
Health communication

Kathryn (Kay) McNeal, MS, CCC-SLP
(Purdue University)
Clinical Program Director
Speech-language pathology


Adjunct Faculty

Melissa Baker, MS, CCC-SLP
(Bowling Green State University)
Adjunct Instructor; Monarch Center for Autism
Speech-language pathology

Rachel Berkowitz, MA, CCC-SLP
(University of Cincinnati)
Adjunct Instructor, Mayfield Schools
Speech-language pathology

Laura Brady, MA, CCC-A
(Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Audiology

Lisa Breuning, MS, CCC-SLP
(University of Wisconsin)
Adjunct Instructor; ALS Association, Northern Ohio Chapter
Speech-language pathology

Jane R. Buder-Shapiro, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; private practice

Michelle Burnett, MA, CCC-SLP
(Michigan State University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Speech-language pathology

Cameron Camp, PhD
Adjunct Professor; Myers Research Institute

Sandra Caramela-Miller, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Cuyahoga County Coroner’s Office

Barbaara Choudhury, MA, CCC-SLP
(Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Speech-language pathology

Margaret Duff, MA, CCC-SLP
(Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Speech-language pathology

Michelle Foye, MA, CCC-SLP
(Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Speech-language pathology

Nichole Gerami, MA, CCC-SLP
(Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor; private practice
Speech-language pathology

Robert Goldberg, PhD
Adjunct Associate Professor; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center

Bernard P. Henri, PhD
(Northwestern University)
Adjunct Associate Professor; Director, Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Fluency disorders; professional issues in speech-language pathology; health care management

Douglas Hicks, PhD
(Vanderbilt University)
Adjunct Professor; Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Voice disorders

Vanessa Jensen, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Cleveland Clinic

Karen Kantzes, AuD, CCC-A
(A.T. Stills University)
Adjunct Instructor, Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Audiology

Susan M. Knell, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Spectrum Psychological Associates

Marilyn Malkin, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; private practice

Lauren Masuga, MA, CCC-SLP
(Miami University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Speech-language pathology

Darlene Moenter-Rodriguez, PhD
(Ohio State University)
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center
Auditory potentials

Jane Nisenboum, MA
(Miami University)
Adjunct Instructor
Dysphagia; diagnoses of speech-language pathology; communication and aging

Shirley Prok
Adjunct Instructor; Sign Language Instructor, Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center

Aarti Pyati, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; University Counseling Services

Philip Safford, PhD
Adjunct Professor; Emeritus, Kent State University

Ethan Schafer, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Spectrum Psychological Associates

Jes Sellers, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Director, University Counseling Services

Jeremy Shapiro, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Advanced Therapy Center

Harry Sivec, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Northcoast Behavioral Healthcare

Kenneth Weiss, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center

Brigid Whitford, AuD, CCC-A
(A.T. Stills University)
Adjunct Instructor; Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center
Audiology

Lucene Wisniewski, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Cleveland Center for Eating Disorders

Eric Youngstrom, PhD
Adjunct Professor; Associate Professor of Psychology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill


Secondary Faculty

Richard E. Boyatzis, PhD
Professor of Organizational Behavior, Weatherhead School of Management

Alan Castro, PhD
Senior Instructor; University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Howard Hall, PsyD, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Medicine/Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital

Rebecca Hazen, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Medicine/Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital

Leslie L. Heinberg, PhD
Associate Professor, The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Carolyn Landis, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Medicine/Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital

Britt A. Nielsen, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine

Lynn Singer, PhD
Professor, School of Medicine/University Hospitals

Terry Stancin, PhD
Professor, School of Medicine/MetroHealth Medical Center

Thomas P. Swales, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Medicine/MetroHealth Medical Center

Gerry Taylor, PhD
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine

Carol Sue White, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Medicine/MetroHealth Medical Center

Abraham Wolf, PhD
Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine

James M. Yokely, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine


Clinical Faculty

Laura Abood, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center

Karen Kernberg Bardenstein, PhD
Adjunct Assistant Professor; private practice

Richard A. Cirillo, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor; Cuyahoga County Board of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities

Sandra L. Curry, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor; Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine

Lori L. D’Angelo, PhD
Clinical Instructor; International Center for Clubhouse Development

Lisa Damour, PhD
Clinical Instructor; private practice

Mathew A. Fuller, PhD
Clinical Instructor; Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center

Maureen Kreick, PhD
Clinical Instructor; private practice

Maryann McGlenn, PhD
Clinical Instructor; University Counseling Services

Pamela Nilsson, PhD
Clinical Instructor; University Counseling Services

Richard Pazol, PhD
Clinical Instructor; University Counseling Services

Joy Pengilly-Wyatt, PhD
Clinical Instructor; University Counseling Services

David Pincus, DMH
Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine

Robert Smith, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor; Behavorial Mangement Associates, Inc.

Terry Tobias, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor; Private Practice

 Communication Sciences Program   |  Psychology Program

Communication Sciences

Major

The major in communication sciences leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. For many students, a BA in communication sciences is a pre-professional degree in preparation for graduate study in speech-language pathology or audiology. The undergraduate course work emphasizes the basic processes and acquisition of normal communication in children and adults. Graduate study then focuses on the study of disordered communication. (Please see the description of the Integrated Graduate Studies Program below.)

Students pursuing the BA are required to take 45 credit hours of course work which includes study in communication sciences and disorders, psychology, and English/linguistics, as well as in statistics and research design. A recommended course sequence is shown below. Please note, however, that an individual student's sequence may differ from this one. For example, undergraduate students may elect to take 400- or 500-level graduate courses with departmental/instructor permission.

Suggested Sequence of Required Courses for the Bachelor of Arts Degree (45 credits)

First YearUnits
FallSpring
General Psychology I (PSCL 101)3  
Introduction to Communication Disorders (COSI 109)  3
Year Total: 3 3
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
Phonetics and Phonology (COSI 211)3  
Multicultural Aspects of Human Communication (COSI 260)3  
Child Psychology (PSCL 230)3  
Introduction to American Sign Language I (COSI 220)  3
Quantitative Methods in Psychology (PSCL 282)  3
Introduction to Linguistics (COSI 355)  3
Year Total: 9 9
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
Language Development (COSI 313)3  
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism (COSI 325)3  
Research Design and Analysis (PSCL 375)3  
Speech and Hearing Science (COSI 321)  3
Year Total: 9 3
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
Introduction to Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology (COSI 352)3  
Introduction to Audiology (COSI 370)3  
Communication and Aging (COSI 345)  3
Year Total: 6 3
 
Total Units in Sequence:  45

*

*COSI 109 is offered in the fall and spring semesters. All other COSI courses are offered only one semester per year, as indicated above.


Departmental Honors

Juniors with a 3.0 overall grade point average and a 3.25 average in communication sciences are encouraged to apply to the honors program. The honors program consists of one three-credit course, , in which the student carries out an independent project in an area of interest, under the direction of a COSI faculty member. Satisfactory completion of the project qualifies the student to receive the Bachelor of Arts degree with departmental honors noted on the transcript. Admission to the honors program is by faculty approval.

The following are prerequisites to :

STAT 201Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences3
or PSCL 282 Quantitative Methods in Psychology
PSCL 375Research Design and Analysis3

Additional information is available from the academic advisor.

Integrated Graduate Studies

The Integrated Graduate Studies (IGS) Program is intended for undergraduate students who are interested in obtaining a graduate degree in communication disorders (speech-language pathology). Qualified students may be accepted for admission to the School of Graduate Studies after completing 90 hours of undergraduate course work.

Typically, a master's degree requires two additional years of study beyond the bachelor's degree. Through the IGS Program, however, a student can complete an undergraduate degree in communication disorders and a master's degree in communication disorders in five years. The recommended undergraduate sequence for students interested in the IGS Program is somewhat different from the recommended sequence presented above. Students should consult their academic advisor and the Office of Undergraduate Studies for additional information concerning IGS requirements.

Minor in Communication Sciences

The minor in communication sciences requires a minimum of 15 credit hours. It focuses on normal processes of speech, language, and hearing, as well as on the speech, language, and hearing disorders that result from breakdowns in these processes. Interested students should meet with an advisor for specific course requirements.

COSI 109Introduction to Communication Disorders3
COSI 313Language Development3
COSI 325Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism3
Two of the following courses:6
Phonetics and Phonology
Introduction to American Sign Language I
Speech and Hearing Science
Communication and Aging
Total Units15

 

Minor in Health Communication

The minor in health communication offers introductory and advance study in theoretical and practical application of communication within a health context. It includes a variety of additional courses that students can choose according to their specific areas of interest. The course work is designed to appeal to students in such fields as pre-med, nursing, pre-law, public policy, public health, communication disorders, gerontological studies, nutrition, health management, and social work.

The minor requires 15 credit hours of course work, of which 9 credit hours come from required courses:

COSI 101Introduction to Health Communication3
COSI 109Introduction to Communication Disorders3
COSI 340Health Communication3
Two of the following:6
Interpersonal Communication
Multicultural Aspects of Human Communication
Organizational Communication
Persuasion
Communication and Aging
Total Units15

 

 

 

 


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Psychology

Undergraduate Programs

Major

Psychology majors must complete 30 hours of course work in the department.

Required Courses
PSCL 101General Psychology I3
PSCL 282Quantitative Methods in Psychology3
Three of the following:9
Social Psychology
Physiological Psychology
Psychology of Learning
Sensation and Perception
Cognitive Psychology
Human Intelligence
Research Design and Analysis
Psychological Measurement
Experimental Child Psychology
Minimum of 15 credit hours of elective course work chosen in consultation with advisor. No more than 9 hours of practicum courses (PSCL 231, 334, 335, 336, 338, 339, or 340) may be applied to the major.15
Total Units30

 

Departmental Honors

Junior majors with a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.25 GPA in psychology are encouraged to apply to the department’s honors program. This program consists of one three-credit course, , in which students carry out, under faculty supervision, an independent project in their area of interest. Satisfactory completion of a paper based on this research qualifies students to receive their degree with honors in psychology noted on their academic transcript. is a prerequisite to .

Integrated Graduate Studies

The Department of Psychology participates in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program. Interested students should note the general requirements and the admission procedures in this bulletin and may consult the department for further information.

Minor

Required Courses:
PSCL 101General Psychology I3
Four electives chosen in consultation with advisor12
Total Units15

 

Communication Sciences Program   |  Psychology Program  

Communication Sciences

Master of Arts

The principal goal of the Master of Arts program is to develop clinical scientists who are skilled in the management of individuals with speech and language disorders. The master’s program is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Upon successful completion of the Master of Arts degree, students will also meet the academic and clinical practicum requirements for certification by ASHA and licensure in the State of Ohio.

Degree requirements include completion of 42 credit hours of course work, including a clinical practicum in communication disorders. In addition, students must satisfactorily complete a clinical research project or write a master’s thesis.

Clinical Opportunities in Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders

The program is affiliated with, and located in, the Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC), a nonprofit agency that serves children and adults with communication disorders. CHSC serves as the primary training site for graduate students enrolled in clinical practica. Its personnel and facilities provide exceptional clinical experiences for students seeking clinical certification in speech-language pathology.

The program also draws on clinical resources in University Circle and the Greater Cleveland area. In addition to clinical practicum experiences at CHSC, graduate students complete at least two externships at sites including University Hospitals of Cleveland, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cuyahoga County Board of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, Cleveland Clinic Center for Autism, Legacy Health Services, and Western Reserve Speech and Language Partners.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy is awarded in recognition of (1) mastery, at an advanced level, of a body of knowledge in the disciplines of communication sciences and speech-language pathology, and (2) a demonstrated ability to perform independent research and communicate the results of that research. With the major advisor, the student designs an individual plan of study based on his/her professional goals and previous experience. Doctoral students choose a content area (such as communication and aging, medically based speech disorders, or child language development and disorders) as their primary focus of study. However, they are also encouraged to enhance their scholarly preparation by completing course work outside of their primary content area.

In addition to course work within the department, doctoral students may choose courses from graduate programs in other departments of the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as from several professional schools at the university, including the School of Medicine (e.g., neuroscience, genetics), the Case School of Engineering (e.g., biomedical engineering), the School of Dental Medicine, the Weatherhead School of Management, and the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. Additional information about graduate studies and research opportunities is available on the communication sciences program's Web site.Requirements for the doctoral program include course work, research rotations, a supervised classroom teaching experience, written and oral comprehensive examinations, and a dissertation.

  • A minimum of 36 hours of course work is required, including 9 credit hours in statistics and research design and 3 credit hours of directed study and research. Fifteen credit hours in the primary content area are required.
  • Two research rotations are required. One rotation is completed in the primary content area with the major advisor. The second rotation is completed with a faculty member other than the major advisor. The dissertation research is not included in either of the two research rotations.
  • A supervised classroom teaching experience () is completed under the guidance of a faculty member in the program.
  • Written and oral examinations are taken after all course work and research rotations are completed.
  • A dissertation prospectus is prepared under the guidance of a committee consisting of the dissertation advisor and two additional faculty members. A defense of the dissertation prospectus is required prior to commencing the dissertation study.
  • An oral defense of the dissertation takes place at the end of the doctoral program.

 


Psychology

The Department of Psychological Sciences offers full-time programs leading to a PhD in clinical or experimental psychology. These programs give students a thorough grounding in basic areas of psychological fact and theory and prepare them for careers as researchers, teachers, and practitioners. The Master of Arts degree can be earned in the department as part of work toward a doctorate.

Clinical Psychology. The department’s program in clinical psychology, which has been approved by the American Psychological Association, emphasizes the scientist-practitioner model. Students participate in an integrated curriculum of basic and applied courses, research activities, and practicum and pre-internship placements. The program’s goal is to prepare students to make meaningful contributions to the science and profession of psychology by instructing them in broad applications of clinical skills and research methods.

Experimental Psychology. Doctoral training in experimental psychology prepares the student for an academic career in teaching and research. It offers concentrations in developmental psychology, adulthood and aging, cognitive psychology, mental retardation research, and social psychology. Faculty members help students develop flexible programs of study, according to individual interests.

Additional information about graduate work in psychology is available at the departmental website: http://www.case.edu/artsci/psychological-sciences/ .

COSI Courses

COSI 101. Introduction to Health Communication. 3 Units.

An introductory examination of the influences associated with the functions of human life, communication processes, and research related to health and the health care industry from interpersonal, cultural, and organizational communication perspectives. The course will include a review of the history and development of health communication and the understanding and application of communication theories.

COSI 109. Introduction to Communication Disorders. 3 Units.

Forty-two million Americans have some type of communication disorder. How does a person with a communication disorder cope with the challenges of daily living? This course will examine the characteristics of communication disorders via first hand and fictionalized accounts in books, films, and simulated communication disorders experiences. Topics will include disorders of speech, language, and hearing in children and adults. Effects of communication disorders on families.

COSI 200. Interpersonal Communication. 3 Units.

Communication is a primary means of initiating, maintaining, and dissolving relationships. Managing interpersonal relationships is a human concern across several contexts. Interpersonal communication is a highly interactive course whereby participants investigate the foundations, processes, and issues associated with communication in relationships. The student will become sensitized to theories and processes via traditional lectures and textbook readings. The student is also expected to participate in group discussions. The result is a continuous dialogue with others about communication processes, and outcomes. The goal of this course is to provide a forum for both investigation and increased competence.

COSI 211. Phonetics and Phonology. 3 Units.

Theoretical and applied study of the speech sounds of language. The use of the international phonetic alphabet as a tool for characterizing normal and deviant sound patterns. The linguistic structure and function of speech sound systems of both the adult and developing child.

COSI 220. Introduction to American Sign Language I. 3 Units.

This course offers basic vocabulary training and conversational interaction skills in American Sign Language. Syntactic and semantic aspects of American Sign Language will be addressed.

COSI 221. Introduction to American Sign Language II. 3 Units.

This class is taught without voice, using functional, whole language approaches and in situ experiences, emphasizing communicative competency. It emphasizes sentence structure development, classifiers, and conversational regulating behaviors. It also covers inflection, role shifting, adverbial non-manual behaviors, temporal aspects, sequencing, and includes a brief introduction to ASL English diglossia and biolingual aspects. There will be opportunities for discussion of deaf culture. Prereq: COSI 220.

COSI 260. Multicultural Aspects of Human Communication. 3 Units.

Introduces intercultural/interracial communication by discussing specific communication principles and by putting theory into practice by exploring differences in perception, and verbal and nonverbal communication messages. Course emphasizes relationship between communication, race, culture; nature of race and culture; and how they influence the communication process. Various theories and approaches to study of intercultural/interracial communication will be discussed, along with significant concepts, processes and considerations. Practical outcomes of intercultural/interracial encounters also will be discussed.

COSI 280. Organizational Communication. 3 Units.

This course includes a review of the development of organizational communication theories and how application of theories enhances our understanding of various types of organizations. COSI 280 addresses the communication challenges faced by contemporary organizational leaders and members. Knowledge of the theories and development of analytical skills should improve students' chances for successful interactions in diverse organizational situations and cultures.

COSI 300. Theories of Human Communication. 3 Units.

An introduction to theories and scholarship of communication. Addresses development and evaluation of theories. The focus is on explaining communication phenomena from a variety of perspectives and philosophies. Communication theories are presented via text, seminal articles, lectures, and discussion. Through discussion and case studies students discover new dimensions in their communicative lives, both personal and professional. Recommended preparation: COSI 100.

COSI 301. Professional Speaking. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to theories and practices and to develop their abilities to speak effectively in public. Students will develop skills in organization and presentation of ideas for public and conference forums, in critical listening, and in proper use of technology. Students demonstrate abilities via written assignments, skill building exercises, oral presentations, rhetorical analysis, and group projects. The expectations in this course include high levels of participation and interaction. This is a departmental seminar course with a focus on formal presentation in settings related to health care. This course will be beneficial to students planning professions in the health sciences where responsibilities include public instruction and exposition and for those preparing for capstone presentations in the Department of Psychological Sciences programs. Activities include: 1. Readings from McKerrow et al. text 2. Class discussions related to communication competence in differing communication settings, 3. Application opportunities to give speeches, to work in groups, and relate with others in one-on-one situations, 4. Written assignments Prereq: Completion of 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, or FSCS and either COSI 109 or PSCL 101.

COSI 302. Instrumental Measurements in Speech Sciences. 3 Units.

This course will provide hands on experience on techniques for instrumental measurements of speech and voice parameters, for applications to assessment and diagnosis of speech and voice disorders, to linguistic analysis of speech parameters (prosodic and segmental), and to speech production modeling. In particular, instrumental measures of voice parameters will be carried out by Electroglottography; evaluation of Voice Range Profile and of perturbation of frequency (jitter) and amplitude (shimmer) of the laryngeal waveform, by dedicated KayPentax software (Visi-pitch and Voice Range Profile) and by Praat software; spectrographic analyses will be carried out by Praat software, and articulographic measurements will be performed by an AG200 Electromagnetic Articulograph. Nasalance will be measured by a KapyPentax nasometer. Emphasis on use rather than theory. All instrumentation is available at the Case Speech Production Lab. Recommended preparation: COSI 211, COSI 321/421 and COGS 203, or bases in phonetics, linguistics and speech science; also Physics and Engineering instrumentation courses are good preliminaries to this course. Offered as: COSI 302 and COSI 402.

COSI 305. Neuroscience of Communication and Communication Disorders. 3 Units.

The course focus is neuroanatomy and neurophysiology related to motor control and cognition, particularly aspects of cognition involved in language functions. Topics to be addressed include: principles of neurophysiology and neurochemistry; functional neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems; neurological and neuropsychological assessment of communication; neurodiagnostic methods. In part, the course material will be presented in a problem-based learning format. That is, normal aspects of human neuroscience will be discussed in the context of neurological disorders affecting communication. COSI 405 is an introduction to COSI 557 and COSI 561. Offered as BIOL 379 and COSI 305 and COSI 405.

COSI 310. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Units.

Most people are familiar with the idea of "body language," but fewer realize the intricacy and potential of nonverbal messages. Nonverbal communication is rule governed, culturally determined, and dependent on encoding and decoding ability. Studying nonverbal communication sensitizes the student to a channel of communication vital to accomplishing shared meaning. Because nonverbal communication is closely related to emotional processes, this course also addresses basic ideas surrounding communication and emotion. Students will read seminal and current literature, make naturalistic observation, and report their findings throughout the semester. Students who take COSI 310 may not receive credit for USSO 204. Students who take USSO 204 may not receive credit for COSI 310. Offered as COSI 310 and USSO 204.

COSI 313. Language Development. 3 Units.

Language acquisition theory and stages of development of syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and phonology in children. Contributions of biological, social, cognitive and environmental factors to process of language development. Information on language variation in multicultural populations. Open to majors and non-majors. Recommended prerequisite: Child Psychology. Offered as COSI 313 and COSI 413.

COSI 321. Speech and Hearing Science. 3 Units.

The course will focus on the aspects of normal speech production and perception and hearing perception. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation in normal aspects of oral communication that will prepare students for advance study in the assessment and management of disorders of speech and hearing perception. Topics to be covered include motor speech control, aeromechanics, basic acoustics, phonatory acoustics, speech and hearing acoustics, psychoacoustics, and speech and hearing perception. Recommended preparation: COSI 325. Offered as COSI 321 and COSI 421.

COSI 325. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism. 3 Units.

The course will focus on normal anatomy and physiology of the body systems involved in the processes of speech, language, hearing, and swallowing including the following: the auditory, respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, resonatory, and nervous systems. In part, the course material will be presented in a problem-based learning format. That is, normal aspects of human anatomy and physiology will be discussed in the context of the disorders that affect the processes of human communication and swallowing.

COSI 326. Anatomy and Physiology of Singing Voice. 1 Unit.

For music students with interest in the use of the vocal mechanism in singing. The systems and processes that contribute to a normal voice for speaking and singing. Focus on normal respiration and phonation, with consideration of disorders resulting from vocal abuse.

COSI 332. Persuasion. 3 Units.

This survey course explores the history, theories, and dynamics of persuasion. There is an extensive focus on theoretical models of attitude change. Persuasion also plays a strong role in everyday aspects of our culture. Along these lines, we will investigate persuasion activities in everyday life from compliance gaining to media campaigns. Learning is conveyed through lecture, activities, and observation of the student's everyday life. At the end of the semester, the astute student will be literate in a variety of persuasion strategies and dynamics.

COSI 340. Health Communication. 3 Units.

Various communication processes assume a central role in the acquisition and enactment of health care. This course examines communication activity across a broad range of health care contexts. Attention will be given to provider-client communication, communication, and ethical concerns, persuasive health promotion efforts, media impact on health, and basics in health communication methodology and research. Students will consider source, message, and receiver aspects of health communication as well as cultural and illness-specific issues. Prerequisite of COSI 101 for 300 - level only. Offered as COSI 340 and COSI 440. Prereq: COSI 101.

COSI 345. Communication and Aging. 3 Units.

The normal and abnormal psychobiological changes that occur during aging and their effects on communication are addressed, as are communicative interaction styles, disordered communication, and rehabilitation practices. Graduate students are given an opportunity to incorporate information from their own disciplines in a special project, where appropriate. Offered as COSI 345 and COSI 445.

COSI 352. Introduction to Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology. 3 Units.

Clinical assessment and teaching procedures as well as the role of research/theory in clinical practice. Procedures to observe, measure, analyze communication skills. Practical application through case studies. Students complete 25 hours of observation of speech/language assessment and intervention. Prereq: COSI 211 or COSI 313.

COSI 355. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to linguistics, with application to clinical assessment, diagnosis and therapy of language disorders. In particular, the course provides an introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar.

COSI 357. Acquired Neurogenic Communication Disorders. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide knowledge about the theoretical foundations, etiologies, and characterizations of acquired language-based and cognitive-communication disorders in adults. The organization of the course is designed so that we will discuss communication disorders typically associated with left hemisphere lesions (e.g., aphasia), right hemisphere lesions (e.g.,RHD), frontal lobe lesions (e.g., traumatic brain injury) and mesial temporal lesions (e.g.,, dementia). This course is intended to provide students with a framework for considering communication disorders of diverse medical etiologies rather than specific impairment types. The course is meant to provide information that can be used as a foundation for a clinically applied course in acquired language disorders. The course will focus on critical thinking, professional presentation (both oral and written), and critical consumption of research. Recommended preparation: Instructor consent for COSI 457 only. Offered as COSI 357 and COSI 457. Prereq: COSI 109.

COSI 370. Introduction to Audiology. 3 Units.

Disorders of hearing, assessment of hearing; including behavioral and objective measures; intervention strategies; and identification programs. Offered as COSI 370 and COSI 470. Prereq: COSI 325.

COSI 390. Independent Study. 1 - 6 Unit.

Individual study, under the guidance of a faculty member, involving specific programs of reading, research and special projects.

COSI 395. Honors Program. 3 Units.

Student completes an independent project in the student's area of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Prereq: STAT 201 or PSCL 282, and PSCL 375.

COSI 402. Instrumental Measurements in Speech Sciences. 3 Units.

This course will provide hands on experience on techniques for instrumental measurements of speech and voice parameters, for applications to assessment and diagnosis of speech and voice disorders, to linguistic analysis of speech parameters (prosodic and segmental), and to speech production modeling. In particular, instrumental measures of voice parameters will be carried out by Electroglottography; evaluation of Voice Range Profile and of perturbation of frequency (jitter) and amplitude (shimmer) of the laryngeal waveform, by dedicated KayPentax software (Visi-pitch and Voice Range Profile) and by Praat software; spectrographic analyses will be carried out by Praat software, and articulographic measurements will be performed by an AG200 Electromagnetic Articulograph. Nasalance will be measured by a KapyPentax nasometer. Emphasis on use rather than theory. All instrumentation is available at the Case Speech Production Lab. Recommended preparation: COSI 211, COSI 321/421 and COGS 203, or bases in phonetics, linguistics and speech science; also Physics and Engineering instrumentation courses are good preliminaries to this course. Offered as: COSI 302 and COSI 402.

COSI 405. Neuroscience of Communication and Communication Disorders. 3 Units.

The course focus is neuroanatomy and neurophysiology related to motor control and cognition, particularly aspects of cognition involved in language functions. Topics to be addressed include: principles of neurophysiology and neurochemistry; functional neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems; neurological and neuropsychological assessment of communication; neurodiagnostic methods. In part, the course material will be presented in a problem-based learning format. That is, normal aspects of human neuroscience will be discussed in the context of neurological disorders affecting communication. COSI 405 is an introduction to COSI 557 and COSI 561. Offered as BIOL 379 and COSI 305 and COSI 405.

COSI 413. Language Development. 3 Units.

Language acquisition theory and stages of development of syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and phonology in children. Contributions of biological, social, cognitive and environmental factors to process of language development. Information on language variation in multicultural populations. Open to majors and non-majors. Recommended prerequisite: Child Psychology. Offered as COSI 313 and COSI 413.

COSI 421. Speech and Hearing Science. 3 Units.

The course will focus on the aspects of normal speech production and perception and hearing perception. The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation in normal aspects of oral communication that will prepare students for advance study in the assessment and management of disorders of speech and hearing perception. Topics to be covered include motor speech control, aeromechanics, basic acoustics, phonatory acoustics, speech and hearing acoustics, psychoacoustics, and speech and hearing perception. Recommended preparation: COSI 325. Offered as COSI 321 and COSI 421.

COSI 440. Health Communication. 3 Units.

Various communication processes assume a central role in the acquisition and enactment of health care. This course examines communication activity across a broad range of health care contexts. Attention will be given to provider-client communication, communication, and ethical concerns, persuasive health promotion efforts, media impact on health, and basics in health communication methodology and research. Students will consider source, message, and receiver aspects of health communication as well as cultural and illness-specific issues. Prerequisite of COSI 101 for 300 - level only. Offered as COSI 340 and COSI 440.

COSI 445. Communication and Aging. 3 Units.

The normal and abnormal psychobiological changes that occur during aging and their effects on communication are addressed, as are communicative interaction styles, disordered communication, and rehabilitation practices. Graduate students are given an opportunity to incorporate information from their own disciplines in a special project, where appropriate. Offered as COSI 345 and COSI 445.

COSI 452A. Graduate Clinical Practicum I: Case Management. 1 Unit.

Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, clinical effectiveness, counseling and working with families from diverse backgrounds. Four to ten hours of clinic contact per week at the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352 and COSI 413.

COSI 452B. Graduate Clinical Practicum II: Professional Issues. 1 Unit.

Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, managed health care, ethics and interviewing. Four to ten hours of clinic contact per week at the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352, COSI 413, COSI 452A, and COSI 453.

COSI 452C. Graduate Clinical Practicum III: Special Populations. 1 Unit.

Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, special clinical populations, collaborating with other professionals, teaming, leadership, and use of technology. Fifteen to thirty hours of clinic contact per week at area skilled nursing facilities, hospitals, rehab centers, early intervention centers, centers for developmentally disabled, private practices, etc. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352, COSI 452A, COSI 452B, COSI 453, and COSI 456.

COSI 452E. Graduate Clinical Practicum V: Medical Speech Pathology. 1 Unit.

Addresses professional issues in speech-language pathology including case management, special clinical populations, collaborating with other professionals, documentation, managed health care, and use of technology. Fifteen to thirty hours of clinic contact per week at area skilled nursing facilities, hospitals. (Maximum of 2 credits.) Recommended preparation: COSI 352, COSI 452A, COSI 452B, COSI 452C, COSI 453, and COSI 456.

COSI 453. Articulation and Phonology Disorders. 3 Units.

Overview of normal speech sound development and characterization of children with speech sound disorders. Distinctions between phonology and articulation are drawn. Theoretical as well as assessment and treatment issues are addressed.

COSI 455. Fluency Disorders. 3 Units.

Stuttering and related disorders of rhythm and prosody in terms of the symptomatology, etiology, measurement, and treatment of nonfluent speaking behavior.

COSI 456. Child Language Disorders. 3 Units.

Nature and characteristics of language disorders in children. Theoretical and clinical issues related to effective intervention with children and their families. Assessment and treatment of disorders of syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Strategies for intervention with children from special populations and multicultural populations.

COSI 457. Acquired Neurogenic Communication Disorders. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide knowledge about the theoretical foundations, etiologies, and characterizations of acquired language-based and cognitive-communication disorders in adults. The organization of the course is designed so that we will discuss communication disorders typically associated with left hemisphere lesions (e.g., aphasia), right hemisphere lesions (e.g.,RHD), frontal lobe lesions (e.g., traumatic brain injury) and mesial temporal lesions (e.g.,, dementia). This course is intended to provide students with a framework for considering communication disorders of diverse medical etiologies rather than specific impairment types. The course is meant to provide information that can be used as a foundation for a clinically applied course in acquired language disorders. The course will focus on critical thinking, professional presentation (both oral and written), and critical consumption of research. Recommended preparation: Instructor consent for COSI 457 only. Offered as COSI 357 and COSI 457.

COSI 463. Language and Literacy Across Content Areas. 3 Units.

This course focuses on research-based theories of reading, cognition, language, and learning. The student will use the content of their area (art, music, or speech-language pathology) as the target for organizing explicit instruction and strategies for word skills, reading comprehension, oral expression, vocabulary, and written language development as they apply to the culturally and linguistically diverse populations present in today's schools. Curriculum planning and assessment strategies for instructional purposes are addressed. Federal legislation pertaining to the education of children with disabilities is included.

COSI 464. Case Studies in Communication Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment. 3 Units.

Diagnosis as a clinical skill involving scientific hypothesis testing with clinical problem solving. The course includes academic learning combined with diagnostic clinic experiences. Overview of psychometric principles, survey of psychological communication tests, and measurements. Section on non-biased assessment. Instruction and practice in effective family interviewing techniques. Prereq: COSI 453 and COSI 456

COSI 470. Introduction to Audiology. 3 Units.

Disorders of hearing, assessment of hearing; including behavioral and objective measures; intervention strategies; and identification programs. Offered as COSI 370 and COSI 470. Prereq: COSI 325.

COSI 497. Methods of Research. 3 Units.

Pure and applied research design for speech language pathologists. Focus on evaluation of research methodology and the formulation of testable research questions.

COSI 557. Acquired Adult Language Disorders. 3 Units.

A model relating communication impairment to activities of daily living and quality of life will serve as the study of acquired neurogenic communication disorders in adults. The focus will be on dementia, aphasia, and the communication disorders associated with traumatic brain injury and right hemisphere stroke. Knowledge about the biological basis of neurogenic communication disorders will be applied in discussion on assessment and intervention for these disorders. Prereq: COSI 405 or equivalent.

COSI 560. Medical Aspects of Speech Pathology I: Voice Disorders. 3 Units.

Aspects of normal and abnormal voice production, evaluation and management of various voice and resonance disorders.

COSI 561. Med Aspects of Speech Path II: Neuromotor and Craniofacial Anomalies. 3 Units.

Speech disorders resulting from conditions acting on motor speech production including dysarthria and apraxia will be discussed. The speech production system, diseases and acquired and congenital neuropathological conditions that affect motor process and resulting speech disorders of phonation, articulation, resonance and prosody will be reviewed. Also covered will be the speech, language and hearing disorders stemming from craniofacial anomalies; cleft lip and palate. Principles and methods of assessment and treatment within an interdisciplinary rehabilitation framework will be reviewed for both types of disorders. Prereq: COSI 321 or COSI 421 and COSI 405 or equivalent.

COSI 562. Medical Aspects of Speech Pathology III: Dysphagia. 2 Units.

Survey of clinical problems involving dysphagia in medical speech pathology. Normal swallowing, pediatric dysphagia, adult dysphagia, the clinical swallowing assessment, the modified barium swallow study, and therapeutic intervention for dysphagia for both adults and children will be addressed.

COSI 580. Aural Rehabilitation. 3 Units.

The effects of hearing impairment, especially related to speech perception and language processing. Remediation and intervention strategies for hearing impaired children and adults, including speech reading, auditory training, and the use of hearing aids.

COSI 600. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 3 Unit.

Topics and instructors by arrangement of the department chair.

COSI 601. Directed Study and Research. 1 - 6 Unit.

Individual study and research under the direction of a faculty member.

COSI 651. Thesis M.A.. 1 - 6 Unit.


COSI 690. Supervised Classroom Teaching. 3 Units.

Required of all doctoral students. Teaching of an undergraduate course planned in conjunction with a supervising faculty member. Follows the doctoral student's earlier experience of observing and assisting a faculty member in classroom teaching.

COSI 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

PSCL Courses

PSCL 101. General Psychology I. 3 Units.

Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

PSCL 102. General Psychology II. 3 Units.

The applications of psychological research in normal problems of adjustment. Topics include: coping with anxiety, romance and marriage, and interpersonal behavior.

PSCL 230. Child Psychology. 3 Units.

Basic facts and principles of psychological development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 282. Quantitative Methods in Psychology. 3 Units.

The theory and application of basic methods used in the analysis of psychological data. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or ANTH 319.

PSCL 313. Psychology of Personality. 3 Units.

The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

PSCL 315. Social Psychology. 3 Units.

Empirical studies of typical human responses to situations. First impressions, attitude change, effects of cash incentives, behavior in emergencies, interpersonal attraction, impression management, crowding, stress, vices. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 317. Health Psychology. 3 Units.

Examines psychological processes that affect physical health. Covers the physiological factors affecting the immune system, chronic physical disorders, pain, compliance with prescribed medical treatments, the effects of stress and coping, the effects of the patient-physician interaction, and the psychological aspects of the hospital and the health care systems. Recommended preparation : PSCL 101.

PSCL 321. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Units.

Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 325. Psychotherapy and Personality Change. 3 Units.

Three methods of psychotherapy (behavioral, psychoanalytic, and client-centered) are discussed. The therapy techniques and the manner by which personality change is effected are examined. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 329. Adolescence. 3 Units.

Psychological perspectives on physical, cognitive, and social development. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 334C. Seminar and Practicum: Hospitalized Children. 3 Units.

Supervised field placement and attendance at staff conferences in various child and adolescent settings. Regular seminar meetings. Prereq: PSCL 230.

PSCL 335C. Seminar and Practicum: Hospitalized Child. 3 Units.

Supervised field placement and attendance at staff conferences in various child and adolescent settings. Regular seminar meetings. Prereq: PSCL 230 and Junior or Senior Status.

PSCL 338. Seminar and Practicum in Adolescents. 3 Units.

Supervised field placement and attendance in early childhood, child, and adolescent settings including preschools, schools, hospitals, and neighborhood centers. This class is used to fulfill requirements by the Ohio Department of Education teacher licensure program. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101, EDUC 301, EDUC 304, and permission of program director. Offered as EDUC 338, PSCL 338, and SOCI 338.

PSCL 344. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Units.

This course will focus on the interplay of biological, psychological, familial, and social determinants of disorders ranging from autism to delinquency and bulimia. Recommended preparation: PSCL 230 or PSCL 321. Offered as PSCL 344 and PSCL 444.

PSCL 350. Behavior Genetics. 3 Units.

Examines the impact of both nature and nurture on human behavior. Basic quantitative genetic methodology will be covered. Current family, twin and adoption studies in the areas of personality, intelligence, alcoholism, criminality, and psychopathology will be reviewed. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 352. Physiological Psychology. 3 Units.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of neural communication and central nervous system structure. Special attention is placed on common neurological illnesses and their psychopharmacological treatments. Neural systems underlying sensory/perceptual, motor, and higher-order cognitive processes are also explored. Prereq: PSCL 101.

PSCL 353. Psychology of Learning. 3 Units.

The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. Recommended Preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 355. Sensation and Perception. 3 Units.

The psychological and physiological processes entering into perception. Current research and theory in the light of classical statements of the problems. The role of learning in perceptual functioning. Reading, lectures, demonstrations, and problems. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 357. Cognitive Psychology. 3 Units.

How individuals encode, store, organize, and use information. Pattern recognition, attention, memory, and problem solving. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 369. Adult Development and Aging. 3 Units.

An overview of concepts and research relating to adult development and aging. The lifespan perspective will be used in examining major developmental paradigms. Personality and cognitive lines of development will be traced across the lifespan. Data from both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies will be analyzed. Both normal and pathological aging will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to areas of cognitive deterioration in aging. Implications for optimal adult development and aging will also be discussed.

PSCL 370. Human Intelligence. 3 Units.

Survey of individual differences in human intellect including construction and administration of intelligence tests, theories and models of intelligence, and the role of heredity and environment in intelligence and the development of intelligence. This course will also examine the relationships of cognitive abilities to intelligence and human to artificial intelligence. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 375. Research Design and Analysis. 3 Units.

Conceptual and methodological issues confronted by the behavioral scientist conducting research. Major experimental designs and statistical procedures. Intuitive understanding of the mathematical operations. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282.

PSCL 379. Neurodevelopmental Disabilities. 3 Units.

Ways in which neurobehavioral development can go awry, the causes of such deviations, and their consequences. The course builds on basic psychological and neuroscience concepts to explore the manner in which developmental disabilities occur, ways of preventing disabilities, and approaches to ameliorating and managing disabling conditions. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101 and PSCL 230.

PSCL 382. Psychological Measurement. 3 Units.

The problems and methods of measuring behavior. Scaling theory, rating methods, and the theoretical basis of psychological testing. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282.

PSCL 388. Human Sexual Behavior. 3 Units.

Sex is approached as a form of personal and interpersonal behavior. A broad range of theories from social psychology will be used to explain human sexual behavior, and these will be evaluated by using facts and findings from recent research studies. Topics include sexual relationships, gender differences, promiscuity, rape and coercion, finding and choosing sex partners, sexual risk-taking, harassment, sexual identity and orientation, cultural influences and differences, evolution of sexual motivations, prostitution, pornography, and love. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101 and PSCL 315.

PSCL 389. Emotion and Emotion Regulation. 3 Units.

This course will focus on academic research associated with emotional processes and emotion regulation. Specifically, we will answer questions like: What are emotions, and why are they important? How are emotions communicated, and how do researchers measure them? How do emotions influence one's thinking ability, and visa-versa? What is emotion regulation? How do people differ in terms of their overall happiness and well-being, the degree to which they seek/avoid positive/negative experiences, and how they try to control their emotions? And what brain mechanisms are involved in emotional processing and emotion regulation? This course is also intended to help students read research in a thorough, critical manner, which may have a positive impact on students considering an academic career. Prereq: PSCL 101 and PSCL 352.

PSCL 390. Seminars in Psychology. 1 - 3 Unit.

Surveys of special subject areas. Topics vary in response to faculty and student interests. Small group discussion. Prerequisite depends on content.

PSCL 391. Psychology Capstone Research Using Data Archives. 3 Units.

In this course, each student will derive and address a research question by identifying and analyzing archived publicly available data. Successful completion of the course will require: training in ethical research involving human participants; a critical review of the literature on a specific area of psychology with the goal of creating a research question; identification of a set of variables in a publicly available data set that can be used to address the research question, a final written research report in a format acceptable for publication in a psychological research journal, and an oral presentation of the research. Prereq: PSCL 101 and PSCL 282 or equivalent (ANTH 319, STAT 201), and PSCL 375.

PSCL 393. Experimental Child Psychology. 3 Units.

The development of behavior from birth to adolescence. Growth of basic processes such as perception, learning, memory, intelligence, and language in the light of current theoretical models. Recommended preparation: PSCL 101.

PSCL 394. Psychology Capstone Seminar: Current Problems. 3 Units.

This seminar course will revolve around the identification and critical examination of current problems in society. Insights gained from psychological research will be applied to better understand these problems. Successful completion of the course will require critical analysis of published research, integration of information from different areas of psychology and from different disciplines, an oral presentation, and a final written research report including a literature review. Prereq: PSCL 375.

PSCL 395. Capstone and Honors Program. 3 Units.

Supervision in carrying out an independent research study in the student's area of interest. Prereq: PSCL 375.

PSCL 396. Anxiety and Depression: Symptoms, Etiology, and Treatment. 3 Units.

A research-based and writing-intensive presentation of current knowledge regarding the symptom, etiology, and treatment of anxiety disorders and mood disorders.

PSCL 397. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

Individual study involving specific programs of reading, research, and special projects. Prereq: PSCL 101.

PSCL 398C. Child Policy Externship and Capstone. 3 Units.

Externships offered through CHST/ANTH/PSCL 398C give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as childcare, education, juvenile justice, and physical and mental health. Students apply for the externships, and selected students are placed in local child policy agencies. Each student develops an individualized learning plan in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty and the supervisor in the agency. Offered as CHST 398C, ANTH 398C, and PSCL 398C.

PSCL 401. Sensation and Perception. 3 Units.

Role of sensory and perceptual processes in adjustment. Theories and experimental work dealing with such topics as nativism vs. empiricism, perception without awareness, perception and personality, effects of drugs on personality, effects of drugs on perception, pathology of perception. Limited to graduate students.

PSCL 402. Cognition and Information Processing. 3 Units.

Aspects of cognition beyond the area of sensation and perception, involving symbolic processes, especially problems of meaning, conceiving, reasoning, judging, and thinking.

PSCL 403. Physiological Foundations of Behavior. 3 Units.

Fundamental neurological processes controlling behavior.

PSCL 404. Learning Theory. 3 Units.

The research literature in learning; theoretical formulations of contemporary learning theorists. Limited to graduate students.

PSCL 405. Personality Theory. 3 Units.

General problems and systematic points of view in the analysis of personality. Limited to graduate students.

PSCL 407. Research Design and Quantitative Analysis I. 3 Units.

Intermediate research design and statistical analysis used in psychological research. Statistical inference from single variables, elementary principles of probability, correlation and regression. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282.

PSCL 408. Research Design and Quantitative Analysis II. 3 Units.

Advanced research design and statistical analysis used in psychological research. Statistical inference from multiple variables, multiple correlation and regression, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics. Recommended preparation: PSCL 407.

PSCL 409. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Units.

Major theories, methods, and problem areas of social psychology. Psychological development of the individual group structures and dynamics.

PSCL 410. Developmental Psychology. 3 Units.

The research literature and theoretical formulation in the area of developmental psychology. Limited to graduate students.

PSCL 412. Measurement of Behavior. 3 Units.

Theory and methods of human behavior measurements. Reliability, validity, and test construction in the objective assessments of traits and abilities. Recommended preparation: PSCL 282.

PSCL 417. Multivariate Data Analysis. 3 Units.

Major statistical techniques used in experimental and survey research containing more than one dependent variable. Techniques discussed include multiple regression, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, discrimination analysis, cluster analysis and factor analysis. Recommended preparation: PSCL 408.

PSCL 418. History and Systems. 3 Units.

Historical antecedents of modern psychology.

PSCL 424. Clinical Interviewing. 3 Units.

Introduction to diagnostic and therapeutic interviewing.

PSCL 425. Methods of Assessment I. 3 Units.

Limited to graduate students in clinical psychology. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in psychology with department permission.

PSCL 426. Methods of Assessment II. 3 Units.

Methods of psychological assessment, emphasizing personality and family function in childhood and adulthood. Recommended preparation: Limited to Grad students in Clinical Psychology. Requires approval of the Director of Clinical Training.

PSCL 429. Practicum in Assessment I. 1 Unit.

Applied experience for clinical psychology graduate students in the cognitive assessment of children and adults. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in PSCL 425.

PSCL 430. Practicum in Assessment II. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: Approval of the Director of Clinical Training or concurrent enrollment in PSCL 426.

PSCL 431. Supervised Field Placement Year 2. 0 Units.

Supervised training in clinical psychology in agency, hospital, or university settings. Required in Fall and Spring terms of all second year students in the clinical psychology training program. Recommended preparation: PSCL 425, PSCL 426.

PSCL 444. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Units.

This course will focus on the interplay of biological, psychological, familial, and social determinants of disorders ranging from autism to delinquency and bulimia. Recommended preparation: PSCL 230 or PSCL 321. Offered as PSCL 344 and PSCL 444.

PSCL 451. Special Topics in Psychology. 1 Unit.

These 1 credit mini-courses should provide enjoyable opportunities for students to explore interesting material related to clinical psychology that has not been covered in other required courses. A primary goal is to stimulate interest and discussion in the area. Thus, students will not be expected to write term papers or take any exams. In terms of background reading, students should be provided with roughly one journal article per hour of class meeting. The course is graded pass/no pass, and grading will be based on class attendance and class participation.

PSCL 453. Seminars in Psychology. 1 - 3 Unit.

A special problem or topic. Content varies with student and faculty interest. Recent offerings: creative thinking in research, community psychological, evaluation of community processes, experimental and computer methods, consultation, and psychoanalytic ego psychology.

PSCL 469. Psychology of Aging. 3 Units.

Normal psychological development in later life; psychological development in the oldest old; definitions and assessment of successful aging.

PSCL 497. Graduate Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

Independent research and reading programs with individual members of the faculty.

PSCL 501. Seminar: Pediatric Psychology. 1 - 3 Unit.

Seminar on current research topics, research design and methodological issues related to pediatric psychology. Introductory lectures provide an overview of research populations, methods, and practical issues appropriate to research with pediatric populations.

PSCL 502. Seminar: Pediatric Psychology. 1 - 3 Unit.

Seminar examining specific topics in pediatric psychology. Topics will deal with issues of infant development. Infants at risk for disability, neuropsychology and learning disabilities, and childhood psychopathology. Recommended preparation: Limited to Graduate students in Psychology department.

PSCL 510. Psychology and Diversity. 3 Units.

Diversity and multiculturalism in psychological theory, research and practice.

PSCL 524. Advanced Psychopathology. 3 Units.

Theoretical issues and current research data bearing on major patterns of psychological disturbance.

PSCL 525. Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology. 3 Units.

Consideration of legal and ethical principles in research and practice in clinical psychology and contemporary controversies in professional psychology. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in Psychology

PSCL 527. Principles of Intervention. 3 Units.

Review of principles of psychological change, models of intervention, and process/outcome research related to intervention.

PSCL 529A. Practicum in Intervention I: Behavior Therapy. 1 Unit.

Recommended Preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 529C. Practicum in Intervention I: Psychodynamic. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 530A. Practicum in Intervention II: Behavior Therapy. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 530C. Practicum in Intervention II: Psychodynamic. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 531A. Seminar in Intervention I: Behavior Therapy. 2 Units.

Theoretical issues and research on psychological interventions. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 531C. Seminar in Intervention I: Psychodynamic. 2 Units.

Theoretical issues and research on psychological interventions. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 532A. Seminar in Intervention II: Behavior Therapy. 2 Units.

Theoretical issues and research on psychological interventions. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 532C. Seminar in Intervention II: Psychodynamic. 2 Units.

Theoretical issues and research on psychodynamic intervention. Recommended preparation: PSCL 531C and graduate standing in clinical psychology.

PSCL 535. Child and Family Intervention. 2 Units.

A course for advanced clinical graduate students that covers psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches for working with children and adolescents and systems approaches for working with families.

PSCL 536. Advanced Child and Family Intervention. 2 Units.

A course for advanced clinical graduate students that covers evidence-based approaches to child and family therapy as well as parent training. Special emphasis on empirically guided treatment planning and outcome evaluation.

PSCL 537. Child and Family Case Seminar I. 1 Unit.

Clinical graduate students in child and family field placements present and receive group supervision on ongoing cases.

PSCL 538. Child and Family Case Seminar II. 1 Unit.

Clinical graduate students in child and family field placements present and receive group supervision on ongoing cases.

PSCL 539. Supervised Field Placement Year 3. 0 Units.

Supervised training in clinical psychology in agency, hospital, or university settings. Required in Fall and Spring terms of all third year students in the clinical psychology training program. Recommended preparation: PSCL 531A, PSCL 532A.

PSCL 540. Supervised Field Placement Year 4. 0 Units.

Supervised training in clinical psychology in agency, hospital, or university settings. Required in Fall and Spring terms of all fourth year students in the clinical psychology training program. Recommended preparation: PSCL 531A, PSCL 532A.

PSCL 601. Special Problems. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.)

PSCL 651. Thesis M.A.. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.)

PSCL 700. Internship. 0 Units.

Full-time predoctoral internship in clinical psychology. Required of all students in clinical psychology program. Registration requires written consent of director of clinical psychology training and must be for one calendar year.

PSCL 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.