Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Room W-G57, School of Medicine
http://epbiwww.case.edu/
Phone: 216.368.5957
Jonathan Haines, PhD, Chair
jonathan.haines@case.edu

The Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences (formerly the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics) draws on the core disciplines of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Public Health to help support students in developing the knowledge, skills and competencies needed to assume positions of leadership with the ultimate goal of advancing the public's health. Through challenging coursework and both independent and collaborative research opportunities, students will develop a thorough understanding of the multiple determinants of population health outcomes; the individual and structural factors that may lead to disparities in those outcomes; and the way in which specific policies and interventions influence the nature and impacts of population health determinants.

The Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences offers the following degrees:

  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
  • Master of Science (MS)
  • Master of Public Health (MPH)

The Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences also offers a Minor in Public Health. 

Faculty and Research

Department faculty are nationally recognized and have more than $9.5 million in grants that support projects including HIV/TB research in Uganda, the search for genes that cause disease, cancer prevention and control, studies of interventions to change human behaviors that promote good health, design of clinical trials, studies to change high-risk behaviors related to AIDS, studies of public policies concerning the health of the elderly, and cost/benefit studies of medical interventions. Many research projects are performed in collaboration with the four affiliated hospitals; the University Hospitals, Metro Health, the Cleveland Clinic and the Veteran Administration. The department has offices in two locations at the university, (Wood Building and Wolstein Research Building) and in the Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods (PRHCN). The department maintains two scientific computer centers comprised of 14 lab computers and over a dozen servers. Several very large national health care and demographic databases are stored on the servers and are used for faculty and student research and educational projects.

Master of Science in Biostatistics

Questions and Information:

Nickalaus Koziura, Ed.M.

Master of Science - Biostatistics
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue, W-G74
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4945
216.368.3128 - phone
216.368.2286 - fax
nickalaus.koziura@case.edu

Statistics is the science of data and a discipline that provides tools for making decisions under conditions of uncertainty. Biostatistics addresses all aspects of statistics that arise from medical and health-related sciences, and is an essential component of most medical, biological, and health care. The study of biostatistics includes design and analysis of both experimental studies, such as clinical trials, and observational studies; the theory of probability and statistics; mathematical and statistical modeling; and knowledge of the methodology used to evaluate the properties of statistical procedures. It also includes a competency in computing, which encompasses programming, statistical software use, and database management. Modern Biostatistics is a dynamic field of study and an integral part of medical and public health research. Those who earn the MS in Biostatistics are equipped for careers in government, industry and academic research centers or to enter doctoral programs in biostatistics.

There are four tracks our students can choose from: Biostatistics, Genomics & Bioinformatics, Health Care Analytics, and Social & Behavioral Science.

The mission of the Masters Program in Biostatistics is to enroll and train outstanding students in the core discipline of biostatistics. The faculty and students in this program are committed to teaching and learning the theory, methodology and application of the essential and modern statistical methods used in the biomedical and related sciences.

Core Courses for this Program:

PQHS 414Data Management and Statistical Programming3
PQHS 431Statistical Methods I3
PQHS 432Statistical Methods II3
PQHS 453Categorical Data Analysis3
PQHS 490Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods3
PQHS 602Practicum (Internship/Practicum)3
PQHS 602Practicum (Introduction to Biostatistical Consulting)1
Total Units19

Biostatistics Track:

PQHS 435Survival Data Analysis3
PQHS 480Introduction to Mathematical Statistics3
PQHS 459Longitudinal Data Analysis3
Select 1 of the following:
PQHS 471Machine Learning & Data Mining3
STAT 426Multivariate Analysis and Data Mining3

Genomics and Bioinformatics Track:

PQHS 471Machine Learning & Data Mining3
PQHS 451A Data-Driven Introduction to Genomics and Human Health3
PQHS 452Statistical Methods for Genetic Epidemiology3
PQHS 457Current Issues in Genetic Epidemiology: Design and Analysis of Sequencing Studies3

Health Care Analytics: 

PQHS 435Survival Data Analysis3
PQHS 515Secondary Analysis of Large Health Care Data Bases3
Select 2 of the following:
PQHS 459Longitudinal Data Analysis3
PQHS 500Design and Analysis of Observational Studies3
PQHS 450Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies3
PQHS 471Machine Learning & Data Mining3

Social and Behavioral Sciences Track:

PQHS 459Longitudinal Data Analysis3
MPHP 482Qualitative and Mixed Methods in Public Health3
NURS 632Advanced Statistics: Structural Equation Modeling3
PSCL 412Measurement of Behavior3

Plentiful research opportunities exist within the department and numerous research centers across the university, and extend to the adjoining University Hospitals, to the nearby Cleveland Clinic, to Cleveland’s MetroHealth Medical Center, and to similar entities across the United States and internationally.

Concurrently, students will master the rigorous scientific and analytic methods necessary to be at the forefront of efforts to not only describe, but effectively evaluate and improve the population’s health, and contribute to both the society and the biostatistics profession. Student- and faculty-led seminars provide an ongoing mechanism for keeping abreast of current literature and identifying important areas of research and collaborative opportunities. The Department operates within a strong interdisciplinary framework involving faculty within the department, the school of medicine, and across the entire university, as well as leaders in health care institutions and health oriented organizations and agencies throughout the wider community.

Graduates from accredited universities and colleges will be considered for admission to the department. All applicants must satisfy both CWRU and department requirements for graduate admission. The MS program in Biostatistics consists of a 16-credit core curriculum, plus a 12 credit major and a 3 credit internship or practicum.

General Requirements

Students must satisfy the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies as stated here, as well as those outlined by the Biostatistics program. The MS program in Biostatistics offers “Plan B”, as defined by the CWRU School of Graduate Studies. For Plan B, the student must successfully submit and pass their written internship/practicum project.

Minor in Public Health

Questions and Information:

Nickalaus Koziura, Ed.M.

Undergraduate Minor in Public Health
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue, W-G74
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4945
216.368.3128 - phone
216.368.2286 - fax
nickalaus.koziura@case.edu

The impact of public health and the need for the general public to know more is periodically highlighted during crises such as epidemics and pandemics like Zika, Ebola, and Avian Flu. Education in public health is not only necessary for those entering the public health workforce, but is a critical complementary subject for all those considering a career in a health related field.

The Undergraduate Minor in Public Health is a 15 credit program that exposes students to the field of public health. This minor is designed to equip students with the core concepts of Public Health and is highly collaborative with many departments to provide a robust option for students who are pre-health or pursuing medical anthropology, medical sociology, mental health, global health, or nutrition and health promotion.

Required Courses (9 Credits):

MPHP 101Introduction to Public Health3
MPHP 301Introduction to Epidemiology3
One of the following courses in Global Health
INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
ANTH 359Introduction to International Health3

Electives (6 credits from one of the following areas):

Global Health
INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
BETH 315BInternational Bioethics Policy and Practice: Public Health in the Netherlands3
ANTH 359Introduction to International Health3
ANTH 354Health and Healing in East Asia3
ANTH 323AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture3
BIOL 352Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases3
Medical Anthropology
ANTH 354Health and Healing in East Asia3
ANTH 326Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health3
ANTH 328Medical Anthropology and Public Health3
ANTH 338Maternal Health: Anthropological Perspectives on Reproductive Practices and Health Policy3
ANTH 359Introduction to International Health3
ANTH 215Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology3
ANTH 323AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture3
Medical Sociology
SOCI 264Body, Culture and Disability3
SOCI 311Health, Illness, and Social Behavior3
SOCI 344Health Disparities3
SOCI 345Sociology of Mental Illness3
SOCI 365Health Care Delivery3
Mental Health
PSCL 315Social Psychology3
PSCL 317Health Psychology3
PSCL 321Abnormal Psychology3
PSCL 344Developmental Psychopathology3
SOCI 345Sociology of Mental Illness3
Nutrition and Health Promotion
NTRN 341Food as Medicine: How what we eat influences how we feel, think, and our health status3
NTRN 343Dietary Patterns3
NTRN 328Child Nutrition, Development and Health3
MPHP 313Health Education, Communication, and Advocacy3

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Questions and Information:

Lisa Miller, MA, CHES

Master of Public Health Program 
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue, W-G74
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4945
216.368.3128 - phone
216.368.2286 - fax
lxm384@case.edu

A Master of Public Health degree is designed to prepare students to address the broad mission of public health, defined as “enhancing health in human populations, through organized community effort,” utilizing education, research and community service. Public health practitioners are prepared to identify and assess the health needs of different populations, and then to plan, implement and evaluate programs to meet those needs. It is the task of the public health practitioner to protect and promote the wellness of humankind. The master of public health program prepares students to enhance health in human populations through organized community effort. Graduates are qualified to work in local and state health departments, universities and colleges, hospitals, ambulatory medical centers, non-profit organizations, and the insurance and pharmaceutical industries. The program seeks to attract a rich mix of students, including those pursuing degrees in medicine, nursing, dentistry, law, social work, anthropology, bioethics, management and other fields, as well as students holding undergraduate degrees.

The CWRU MPH Program has a two-year curriculum requiring 42 credit hours. Twenty-one credits are accumulated in seven core required courses, representing the fundamental domains of public health: biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, health services administration, public health history and social and behavioral sciences. Students receive nine credits for three courses in the major of their choice, three credits for one elective course, and nine credits for the “Culminating Experience,” a 3 credit public health field practicum and a 6 credit capstone project. Previous experience or education pertaining to public health may increase the student’s flexibility in course selection. Students may also enroll part-time and take courses over a three to five year period.

Requirements: Course List

Core required courses (21 credits)
MPHP 403Research & Evaluation Methods3
MPHP 405Statistical Methods in Public Health3
MPHP 406History and Philosophy of Public Health3
MPHP 411Introduction to Health Behavior3
MPHP 429Introduction to Environmental Health3
MPHP 439Public Health Management and Policy3
MPHP 483Introduction to Epidemiology for Public Health Practice3
Culminating Experience
MPHP 652Public Health Capstone Experience6
MPHP 650Public Health Practicum3
Complete 9 credits within chosen major 29
Elective3
Total Units42
 
1

 Students in the Population Health Research major should strongly consider taking MPHP 431 Statistical Methods I in place of MPHP 405.

2

 Choices for major are Population Health Research, Global Health, Health Policy & Administration, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, or Health Informatics.

MPH Sample Plan of Study (full-time):

First YearUnits
FallSpring
Research & Evaluation Methods (MPHP 403)3  
History and Philosophy of Public Health (MPHP 406)3  
Introduction to Health Behavior (MPHP 411)3  
Introduction to Epidemiology for Public Health Practice (MPHP 483)3  
Major course 1  3
Statistical Methods in Public Health (MPHP 405)  3
Introduction to Environmental Health (MPHP 429)  3
Public Health Management and Policy (MPHP 439)  3
Year Total: 12 12
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
Major course 23  
Major course 33  
Elective course3  
Public Health Practicum (MPHP 650) (Public Health Capstone Experience)3  
Public Health Capstone Experience (MPHP 652) (Public Health Capstone Experience)3  
Public Health Capstone Experience (MPHP 652) (Public Health Capstone Experience)  3
Year Total: 15 3
 
Total Units in Sequence:  42

Concentrations

Currently, five different concentrations (a.k.a. tracks) are offered by the CWRU MPH Program: Population Health Research, Global Health, Health Policy & Administration, Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, and Health Informatics. Each concentration has a required course or courses (in addition to the core required courses), plus selective offerings to be combined for a total of 9 credit hours in major coursework. Students develop a Capstone project relevant to the concentration area to expand and apply the knowledge of the subject. Individual emphasis will differ from student to student within each concentration.

MPH students can also choose to expand the emphasis and depth of their program of study by electing to do a double concentration plan of study. For the double concentration, the student chooses two areas (two concentrations) of equal emphasis and takes 3 courses in each area (this requires the student to take a minimum of 48 credit hours). The student’s Capstone project must embrace and integrate both emphases, and no double-counting of credits can take place. Students choosing to do the double concentration plan of study should also work closely with an advisor to ensure optimal course selection and foster the evolution of a successful Capstone project.

Population Health Research Concentration

Coordinator - Mendel Singer, PhD, MPH

Learning Objectives:

  • Working knowledge of epidemiologic principles, terminology, and tools
  • Working knowledge of the primary analytic methods employed in both prospective and retrospective studies relating to population health
  • Understand the most common study designs used in public health and/or clinical research
  • Gain familiarity with some of the key advanced concepts in one of the subspecialties of population health (e.g. epidemiology, health services research, outcomes research.
MPHP 421Health Economics and Strategy3
MPHP 432Statistical Methods II3
MPHP 450Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies3
PQHS 465Design and Measurement in Population Health Sciences3
MPHP 467Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research (Section 100)1
MPHP 467Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research (Section 101)1
MPHP 467Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research (Section 102)1
MPHP 484Global Health Epidemiology1 - 3
PQHS 414Data Management and Statistical Programming3
PQHS 451A Data-Driven Introduction to Genomics and Human Health3
PQHS 452Statistical Methods for Genetic Epidemiology3
PQHS 459Longitudinal Data Analysis3
PQHS 515Secondary Analysis of Large Health Care Data Bases3
NURS 631Advanced Statistics: Multivariate Analysis3
NURS 632Advanced Statistics: Structural Equation Modeling3
 

Global Health Concentration

Coordinator - Daniel Tisch, PhD, MPH

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop a global perspective on health and diseases
  • Learn to design, execute, analyze, and evaluate global health research or projects
  • Acquire skills to understanding and communicate meaningfully with colleagues from distant fields of global health
  • Learn to integrate multiple objectives in global health across academic and applied disciplines
  • Understand ethical and regulatory issues for global health research
Select two out of the following three courses as required major courses:
INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
MPHP 447Global Health: Outbreak Investigation in Real-Time3
MPHP 484Global Health Epidemiology1 - 3
Select remaining major course from below:
MPHP 467Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research1
MPHP 475Management of Disasters Due to Nature, War, or Terror3
MPHP 510Health Disparities3
ANTH 461Urban Health3
ANTH 480Medical Anthropology and Global Health I3
ANTH 481Medical Anthropology and Global Health II3
ANTH 511Seminar in Anthropology and Global Health: Topics3
LAWS 4101International Law3
LAWS 5123International Trade Law and Policy3
MGMT 460Managing in a Global Economy3
 

Health Care Policy & Administration Concentration

Coordinator - TBA

Learning Objectives:

To improve population health through leadership by developing knowledge, ability and skills to lead care improvement, including:

  • Knowledge of social science through theories and how they can be used to understand the organization of health care (health economics, sociology, organization theory, social psychology)
  • To understand the role of the manager, organizational control and design, relationships with professional workers, adaptation to change and public accountability
  • To understand and be able to use management techniques including quality improvement, small group leadership, budgeting, cost effectiveness, and decision supports
  • Able to analyze a public health problem, recommend solutions, make a public presentation, and carry out improvements
Required major course:
MPHP 468The Continual Improvement of Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary Course3
Select remaining major courses from the list below:
MPHP 421Health Economics and Strategy3
MPHP 456Health Policy and Management Decisions3
MPHP 467Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research1
MPHP 475Management of Disasters Due to Nature, War, or Terror3
MPHP 510Health Disparities3
MPHP 532Health Care Information Systems3
POSC 483Health Policy and Politics in the United States3
HSMC 420Health Finance3
LAWS 5205Public Health Law2
BETH 417Introduction to Public Health Ethics3
 

Health Informatics Concentration

Coordinator - Siran Koroukian, PhD

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how clinical data are collected and coded

  • Aggregate, normalize, and integrate clinical and/or claims data originating from disparate forms
  • Understand standard health data exchange formats and vocabularies, including Health Level 7 (HL7, designed to transfer clinical and administrative data across different applications), the Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC, for encoding laboratory test and result information), the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED, clinical terminology designated as a US standard for electronic health information exchange).
  • Understand the ethical, regulatory, and practical aspects of data security
  • Know how to retrieve and use data from social media/mobile health
Select remaining major courses from the list below:
PQHS 432Statistical Methods II3
MPHP 532Health Care Information Systems3
PQHS 515Secondary Analysis of Large Health Care Data Bases3
EECS 480MIntroduction to Medical Informatics3
EECS 480OIntroduction to Health Information Technology Implementation3
IIME 473Fundamentals of Clinical Information Systems3
NUND 510Application of Health Information Technology and Systems1
HSMC 446Models of Health Care Systems1.5
HSMC 457Health Decision Making & Analytics3

Health Promotion & Disease Prevention Concentration

Coordinator - Erika Trapl, PhD

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe models and theories of health behavior as they relate to health promotion and disease prevention
  • Identify multi-factorial causes of health behavior and disease
  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to support behavior change
  • Apply principles and practice of effective health communication
  • Describe development, implementation, and evaluation of programs that promote healthy lifestyle and behaviors
Required major course:
MPHP 433Community Interventions and Program Evaluation3
Select remaining major courses from the list below:
MPHP 413Health Education, Communication, and Advocacy3
PQHS 423Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health Promotion3
MPHP 464Obesity and Cancer: Views from Molecules to Health Policy3
MPHP 475Management of Disasters Due to Nature, War, or Terror3
MPHP 485Adolescent Development3
MPHP 510Health Disparities3
ANTH 461Urban Health3

Intensive Research Pathway

The MPH is not a research degree, yet many use it as a springboard for a career in research.  Some continue on for a PhD in a related field, such as Epidemiology.  Others look for jobs as research assistants and compete for these jobs with people who have obtained a research master's degree - often at a disadvantage due to their limited number (and level) of advanced research methods courses. The MPH degree offers a broad foundation in public health and experience in community settings and has great value both as a secondary degree (e.g. MD/MPH) and as a primary terminal degree. Yet even within the framework of an MPH degree, more can be done to accommodate those intending to pursue a career in research, either directly or by first pursuing a PhD. In addition to better preparing these students for research careers and PhD programs, students wishing to continue for a PhD (at CWRU or elsewhere) can, with by doing the IRP, get more credit towards their PhD degrees.

The goal is to create a unique hybrid that combined the benefits of a research level Master’s degree with the broader professional public health training of the MPH degree. This optional program of study can be completed with any of the MPH concentrations by completing the course list below (33 credits) plus any of the 9 credit concentration sequences

MPHP 406History and Philosophy of Public Health3
MPHP 411Introduction to Health Behavior3
MPHP 439Public Health Management and Policy3
MPHP 650Public Health Practicum3
MPHP 652Public Health Capstone Experience6
PQHS 414Data Management and Statistical Programming3
PQHS 431Statistical Methods I3
PQHS 432Statistical Methods II3
PQHS 465Design and Measurement in Population Health Sciences3
PQHS 490Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods3
Concentration Course Sequence9
Total Units42

PhD Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Questions and Information:

Nickalaus Koziura, EdM

Master of Science - Biostatistics
Case Western Reserve University
10900 Euclid Avenue, W-G74
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4945
216.368.3128 - phone
216.368.2286 - fax
nickalaus.koziura@case.edu

The PhD Program in Epidemiology and Biostatistics draws on the core disciplines of biostatistics and epidemiology to support students in developing the knowledge, skills and competencies needed to assume positions of leadership with the ultimate goal of advancing population health. Students accepted into the PhD program will master the rigorous scientific and analytic methods necessary to be at the forefront of efforts to not only describe, but effectively evaluate and improve the public’s health. The Department operates within a strong interdisciplinary framework involving faculty within the department, the school of medicine, and across the entire university, as well as leaders in health care and public health institutions and health oriented organizations and agencies locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

The educational mission of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics PhD Program is to train students using an integrated approach that draws broadly from the population and quantitative health sciences.  These include global, population, public, and community health, biostatistics, epidemiology, health behavior and prevention, genomic epidemiology, bioinformatics, and computational biology. This training provides the foundation for trainees to play integral roles in successfully solving our most pressing health problems.

To develop into the research leaders expected of our graduates, each student will take a common set of first and second year courses that provides extensive exposure to each of the areas noted above. By the end of their first year students will choose a mentor and laboratory in which to do their dissertation work. Research areas span all of the above and often combine these approaches with the expectation that cross-disciplinary studies will result in broader and more complete solutions to complex public health problems.

As part of their training all students will develop both a broad set of skills and competencies needed to perform cutting edge research as well as in-depth expertise in specific areas of particular relevance to their program of research. These will be developed through a combination of didactic coursework as well as individualized training within research teams led by their mentor.

A key component of our training program is to engage students in as many collaborative roles as practical. This will serve the important goal of giving each student a means to understand how to study the multiple determinants of health risk and outcomes, including biological and non-biological (environmental and social) influences, and the variation and disparity in outcomes.

Exposure to cutting edge research will be facilitated by our department-wide seminar that includes talks by world-leading experts both from off- and on-campus. As part of their training all students will participate in these seminars, including as speakers. This will help develop the necessary communication skills that is expected of successful researchers.

Graduates from accredited universities and colleges will be considered for admission to the department. All applicants must satisfy both CWRU and department requirements for graduate admission. Upon acceptance into the PhD program, each student will be assigned an academic advisor, who will guide the student through department and graduate school regulations, assist him or her in designing the initial planned program of study, and track the student’s progress toward degree completion.

Research and training will be guided by a committee of faculty including the student’s research advisor. The research advisor will have the major responsibility for facilitating, guiding, and advising the student in his or her research, but this will be done in consultation with the faculty committees.  A Mentoring committee, selected after first year of Ph.D. training, will help students select courses and educational goals most useful for their research interests. This committee will be replaced at the end of the second year by a Dissertation committee that will play an important role in guiding the student’s research project.

On completion of all Core Curriculum course requirements, students take a qualifying examination that is necessary to remaining and advancing in the program. Exceptions to required courses based on prior course work will be decided on a case by case basis.

Curriculum

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences comprises 42 credits from the following components:

  • Core Curriculum (22 credits)
  • Electives (20credits)
  • Department Research Seminar (6 semesters)
  • Passing the Qualifying Exam
  • Dissertation Research (18 credits)

Core Curriculum

The Core Curriculum is designed to provide PhD students with a strong foundation in epidemiology and biostatistics and related areas - the fields that comprise population and quantitative health sciences - and the methodological and analytic training to conduct a rigorous, high quality research in the student’s selected specialization or concentration.

Core required courses include: Statistical Methods I & II, Introduction to Public Health, Introduction to Epidemiology, Design and Measurement in Population Health Sciences, Integrated Thinking in Population and Quantitative Health Sciences I & II, and Communicating in Population Health Science I & II.

Electives

Electives are chosen in consultation with the student’s mentor and mentoring committee.

Seminars (0 credits)

Attending research seminars is integral to our graduate program and student’s professional development. Students are required to attend weekly research seminars. These seminars provide a forum for students to develop skills in scientific presentation, thought and communication, and balance general and concentration-specific speakers and topics. Meeting locations may vary from week to week depending upon the speaker. Each student is required to attend in person six semesters of seminars. All students are required to present once a year during research seminars after their first year in the program.

Qualifying Exam

Following the completion of the core required courses at the end of their second year; students will take an oral exam based on required coursework that involves analyses of a novel data set. This will include a description of the results, their interpretation and a short proposal on alternative or future research directions based on these findings. Students will be given two attempts to pass this examination. A second failure will result in dismissal from the program.

Dissertation (18 credits)

After passing the qualifying examination and completing second year course work, students will select a dissertation committee and develop a thesis proposal, based on anticipated research for their dissertation. This will be presented to the student’s Dissertation committee that will evaluate the written document and an oral defense of the document. This will be completed no later than the end of the fall semester of the third year. Successful completion of this exam will move the student to candidacy. Each student will be allowed two attempts to pass the oral defense of the proposal.

Students are required to complete 18 credits of dissertation (EPBI 701) prior to graduation.

MPHP Courses

MPHP 101. Introduction to Public Health. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the science and art of public health through understanding historical and current issues through public health case histories and controversies. Students will be introduced to social, behavioral, cultural, and environmental influences on population health. Emphasis is placed on social justice as a central component of public health, with an overview of health inequity and commitment to vulnerable populations. Core public health practices relating to health promotion program design, community assessment and improvement planning, health communication, health policy and enforcement, and health behavior change will be featured. The course will promote understanding of health care and public health systems domestically and globally, including preparedness for and response to public health emergencies.

MPHP 301. Introduction to Epidemiology. 3 Units.

This course begins with the exploration of the history, philosophy and uses of epidemiology. It then moves to the basic descriptive functions of epidemiology such as condition, frequency and severity. Data is used to describe qualitatively and quantitatively diseases and injuries in a population. Applications include identifying patterns of disease and injury over time and geography The course them moves to analytical epidemiology with focus on estimation, inference, bias, confounding and adjustment in the determination of what factors are associated with, or cause disease or injury. The different kinds of study designs are introduced including ecologic, cross-sectional, case-control, retrospective and prospective cohort, and experimental designs such as clinical trials. Students are introduced to evidence-based public health with analysis of harm, benefit and cost, and intervention effectiveness. The course concludes with applications to policy, covering outbreak investigation/testing/screening, public health policy and special epidemiologic applications including molecular and genetic epidemiology, environmental health and safety, unintentional injury and violence prevention and behavioral sciences. Recommended preparation: A course in statistics taken before or concurrently with MPHP 301.

MPHP 306. History and Philosophy of Public Health. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the science and art of public health through an understanding of the history and philosophies that represent its foundation. Students will learn about the essentials of public health and applications of those precepts throughout history and in the present. The course will examine public health case histories and controversies from the past and present, in order to better understand solutions for the future. Offered as MPHP 306 and MPHP 406. Prereq: Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors only.

MPHP 313. Health Education, Communication, and Advocacy. 3 Units.

Historical, sociological, and philosophical factors that have influenced definitions and the practice of health education and health promotion are studied. Advanced concepts in health communication theory will also be explored. This course is designed to educate, motivate, and empower undergraduate and graduate students to become advocates for their own health, the health of their peers, and the health of the community. Offered as MPHP 313 and MPHP 413.

MPHP 403. Research & Evaluation Methods. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide an overview of research and evaluation methods for first-year MPH students. Through lecture, discussion and application exercises, students are introduced to the principles and processes of research and evaluation methods in public health, including formulation of research questions, aims and hypotheses and evaluation goals and objectives; literature review; development/selection of conceptual and theoretical models; quantitative, qualitative and evaluation project management; and application of ethical principles and protection of human subjects in public health research and evaluation.

MPHP 405. Statistical Methods in Public Health. 3 Units.

This one-semester survey course for public health students is intended to provide the fundamental concepts and methods of biostatistics as applied predominantly to public health problems. The emphasis is on interpretation and concepts rather than calculations. Topics include descriptive statistics; vital statistics; sampling; estimation and significance testing; sample size and power; correlation and regression; spatial and temporal trends; small area analysis; statistical issues in policy development. Examples of statistical methods will be drawn from public health practice. Use of computer statistical packages will be introduced. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students only. All others require instructor consent.

MPHP 406. History and Philosophy of Public Health. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the science and art of public health through an understanding of the history and philosophies that represent its foundation. Students will learn about the essentials of public health and applications of those precepts throughout history and in the present. The course will examine public health case histories and controversies from the past and present, in order to better understand solutions for the future. Offered as MPHP 306 and MPHP 406. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students or instructor consent.

MPHP 411. Introduction to Health Behavior. 3 Units.

Using a biopsychosocial perspective, an overview of the measurement and modeling of behavioral, social, psychological, and environmental factors related to disease prevention, disease management, and health promotion is provided. Offered as PQHS 411 and MPHP 411. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students or consent.

MPHP 413. Health Education, Communication, and Advocacy. 3 Units.

Historical, sociological, and philosophical factors that have influenced definitions and the practice of health education and health promotion are studied. Advanced concepts in health communication theory will also be explored. This course is designed to educate, motivate, and empower undergraduate and graduate students to become advocates for their own health, the health of their peers, and the health of the community. Offered as MPHP 313 and MPHP 413.

MPHP 421. Health Economics and Strategy. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to develop the analytical skills necessary for understanding how the U.S. health care sector operates, how it has evolved, the forces at work behind perceived deficiencies (in quality and cost control), and the impact of alternative policy proposals. Special attention is giving to recent developments in the healthcare marketplace, and the strategic considerations they create for providers and insurers. These issues are addressed through the lens of microeconomic theory. Under this framework, outcomes result from the interaction of decisions made by participants in the healthcare economy (e.g. patients, providers, insurers, government), with those decisions governed by the preferences, incentives and resource constraints facing each decision-maker. Principles of microeconomics will be reviewed as necessary to ensure consistent understanding of basic concepts. The course is designed to appeal to a broad audience, particularly students interested in healthcare management, public health, medical innovation, health law, and public policymaking. Offered as HSMC 421 and MPHP 421.

MPHP 429. Introduction to Environmental Health. 3 Units.

This survey course will introduce students to environmental and occupational health topics including individual, community, population, and global issues. Students will develop an understanding of the human health impacts of physical, biological, and chemical agents in the environment and workplace including basic principles of toxicology. Presentation of concepts including risk assessment, communication and management as well as discussion of environmental and occupational practices, policies and regulations that promote public and population health is included.

MPHP 431. Statistical Methods I. 3 Units.

Application of statistical techniques with particular emphasis on problems in the biomedical sciences. Basic probability theory, random variables, and distribution functions. Point and interval estimation, regression, and correlation. Problems whose solution involves using packaged statistical programs. First part of year-long sequence. Offered as ANAT 431, BIOL 431, CRSP 431, PQHS 431 and MPHP 431.

MPHP 432. Statistical Methods II. 3 Units.

Methods of analysis of variance, regression and analysis of quantitative data. Emphasis on computer solution of problems drawn from the biomedical sciences. Design of experiments, power of tests, and adequacy of models. Offered as BIOL 432, PQHS 432, CRSP 432 and MPHP 432. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 431 or equivalent.

MPHP 433. Community Interventions and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to design, conduct, and assess community-based health interventions and program evaluation. Topics include assessment of need, evaluator/stakeholder relationship, process vs. outcome-based objectives, data collection, assessment of program objective achievement based on process and impact, cost-benefit analyses, and preparing the evaluation report to stakeholders. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 490, PQHS/EPBI 431, or MPHP 405. Offered as PQHS 433 and MPHP 433. Prereq: MPHP 411

MPHP 439. Public Health Management and Policy. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of health policy-making and includes a background on the basic structure and components of the US Health Care System (such as organization, delivery and financing). It will also cover introductory concepts in public health management, including the role of the manager, organizational design and control, and accountability. We will address relevant legal, political and ethical issues using case examples. At the end of the course, students will understand how health policy is developed and implemented in various contexts, and the challenges facing system-wide efforts at reform. This is a required course for the MPH degree. Grades will be based on a series of assignments. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI Students or instructor consent.

MPHP 447. Global Health: Outbreak Investigation in Real-Time. 3 Units.

This course provides a trans-cultural, trans-disciplinary, multimedia learning experience by analyzing historical and real-time data from the annual dengue endemics and sporadic epidemics in Puerto Rico and Brazil. A rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases using real-time and historical surveillance data of endemic and epidemic Dengue in Bahia, Brazil. This is an advanced epidemiology course in which core material will be primarily taught through reading assignments, class discussion, group projects, and class presentations. The course will utilize the online web-based communication and learning technology to create a single classroom between the CWRU and international partners with unique and complementary skills. In addition to joint classroom lectures across sites, student groups will also perform smaller-scale videoconference meetings for assigned group projects, thus creating strong international connections for the students, faculty, and our institutions. Note: Due to the complexities of time zones for this international course, the course will begin at 8:00a.m. until the U.S.A. adjusts clocks for Daylight Savings Time (unlike Brazil). Therefore, classes after the second week of March will begin at 9:00a.m. Offered as PQHS 447, INTH 447 and MPHP 447.

MPHP 450. Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies. 3 Units.

Issues in the design, organization, and operation of randomized, controlled clinical trials and intervention studies. Emphasis on long-term multicenter trials. Topics include legal and ethical issues in the design; application of concepts of controls, masking, and randomization; steps required for quality data collection; monitoring for evidence of adverse or beneficial treatment effects; elements of organizational structure; sample size calculations and data analysis procedures; and common mistakes. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 431 or consent of instructor. Offered as PQHS 450 and MPHP 450.

MPHP 451. A Data-Driven Introduction to Genomics and Human Health. 3 Units.

This course introduces the foundational concepts of genomics and genetic epidemiology through four key principles: 1) Teaching students how to query relational databases using Structure Query Language (SQL); 2) Exposing students to the most current data used in genomics and bioinformatics research, providing a quantitative understanding of biological concepts; 3) Integrating newly learned concepts with prior ones to discover new relationships among biological concepts; and 4) providing historical context to how and why data were generated and stored in the way they were, and how this gave rise to modern concepts in genomics. Offered as PQHS 451, GENE 451, and MPHP 451.

MPHP 456. Health Policy and Management Decisions. 3 Units.

This seminar course combines broad health care policy issue analysis with study of the implications for specific management decisions in organizations. This course is intended as an applied, practical course where the policy context is made relevant to the individual manager. Offered as HSMC 456 and MPHP 456.

MPHP 460. Introduction to Health Services Research. 3 Units.

This survey course provides an introduction to the field of Health Services Research and an overview of key health services research concepts and methods, including conceptual frameworks and models; outcomes research; risk adjustment; disparities in health care; policy/health care systems; cost and cost-effectiveness; quality of life, process improvement; patient satisfaction; patient safety; health economics; statistical modeling techniques; and qualitative research methods. Offered as PQHS 460 and MPHP 460.

MPHP 464. Obesity and Cancer: Views from Molecules to Health Policy. 3 Units.

This course will provide an overview of the components of energy balance (diet, physical activity, resting metabolic rate, dietary induced thermogenesis) and obesity, a consequence of long term positive energy balance, and various types of cancer. Following an overview of energy balance and epidemiological evidence for the obesity epidemic, the course will proceed with an introduction to the cellular and molecular biology of energy metabolism. Then, emerging research on biologically plausible connections and epidemiological associations between obesity and various types of cancer (e.g., colon, breast) will be presented. Finally, interventions targeted at decreasing obesity and improving quality of life in cancer patients will be discussed. The course will be cooperatively-taught by a transdisciplinary team of scientists engaged in research in energy balance and/or cancer. Didactic lectures will be combined with classroom discussion of readings. The paper assignment will involve application of course principles, lectures and readings. Offered as PQHS 464 and MPHP 464.

MPHP 466. Promoting Health Across Boundaries. 3 Units.

This course examines the concepts of health and boundary spanning and how the synergy of the two can produce new, effective approaches to promoting health. Students will explore and analyze examples of individuals and organizations boundary spanning for health to identify practice features affecting health, compare and contrast practices and approaches, and evaluate features and context that promote or inhibit boundary spanning and promoting health. Offered as MPHP 466, PQHS 466, SOCI 466, NURS 466 and BETH 466. Prereq: Graduate student status or instructor consent.

MPHP 467. Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research. 1 Unit.

Comparative effectiveness research is a cornerstone of healthcare reform. It holds the promise of improved health outcomes and cost containment. This course is presented in a convenient 5-day intensive format in June. There are reading assignments due prior to the 1st session. Module A, Days 1-2: Overview of comparative effectiveness research (CER) from a wide array of perspectives: individual provider, institution, insurer, patient, government, and society. Legal, ethical and social issues, as well as implications for population and public health, including health disparities will also be a component. Module B, Day 3: Introduction to the various methods, and their strengths, weaknesses and limitations. How to read and understand CER papers. Module C, Days 4-5: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. This will cover costing, cost analysis, clinical decision analysis, quality of life and cost-effectiveness analysis for comparing alternative health care strategies. Trial version of TreeAge software will be used to create and analyze a simple cost-effectiveness model. The full 3-credit course is for taking all 3 modules. Modules A or C can be taken alone for 1 credit. Modules A and B or Modules B and C can be taken together for a total of 2 credits. Module B cannot be taken alone. If taking for 2 or 3 credits, some combination of term paper, project and/or exam will be due 30 days later. Offered as PQHS 467 and MPHP 467.

MPHP 468. The Continual Improvement of Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary Course. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to be members of interprofessional teams to engage in the continual improvement in health care. The focus is on working together for the benefit of patients and communities to enhance quality and safety. Offered as PQHS 468, MPHP 468, and NURS 468.

MPHP 475. Management of Disasters Due to Nature, War, or Terror. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to make participants aware of the special needs of children and families in disaster situations and understand public health approaches to address these needs. The learning objectives for this course are: 1) Identify the most important problems and priorities for children in disaster situations, 2) Identify the organizations most frequently involved in providing assistance in disaster situations and define their roles and strengths, 3) Describe the reasons why children are among the most vulnerable in disaster events, 4) Conduct emergency nutritional assessments for children, 5) Develop health profiles on displaced children and plan interventions based on results, 6) Define common psychosocial issues of children and the means to address them, 7) List basic points of international law including the Geneva Convention that relate to all persons involved in disaster situations, 8) List important security issues, 9) Appreciate ethical issues involved in disaster situations and employ skills of cross cultural communication, 10) Recognize and respond to special issues for children involved in biological and chemical terrorist attacks.

MPHP 477. Internship at Health-Related Government Agencies. 3 Units.

This independent study course will incorporate a one-semester-long internship at health-related government agencies (Ohio Department of Health, Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, or Cleveland City Health Department). The choice of the agency will depend on the student's academic interests and research goals. The objective is to develop a level of familiarity with the organizational and operational aspects of such agencies, and to gain an understanding of agencies' and bureaus' interactions with the legislative body, as well as the processes of developing, implementing, managing, and monitoring health initiative. The instructor and the liaison persons at the agencies will be responsible for planning structured encounters of interns with key administrators and policy makers, and to select a research project, based on the intern's research interests and the agencies' research priorities. Interns will be required to submit a draft of the report to the instructor at the end of the semester. The approved, final report will be submitted to the agency. The project will be evaluated for its methodological soundness and rigor. Students will be required to be at the agency one day a week. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 515.

MPHP 482. Qualitative and Mixed Methods in Public Health. 3 Units.

Understanding complex public health issues requires both qualitative and quantitative inquiry. The exploration of the perceptions and experiences of people is as essential as analyzing the relationships among variables. Often, the integration of the two methods is required in order to effectively address the significant health issues faced by today's society. It is the purpose of this course to facilitate a meaningful and substantive learning process around engaging in, and critically analyzing, qualitative and mixed methods research in public health. This includes gaining first-hand experience in research design and collecting, managing, analyzing, and interpreting data for the purposes of making data-driven program and policy recommendations. In addition, students will have the opportunity to engage with local professionals engaged in qualitative and mixed methods research.

MPHP 483. Introduction to Epidemiology for Public Health Practice. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce the basic principles and methods of epidemiology. Epidemiology has been referred to as the basic science for public health. Application of epidemiologic principles is critical to disease prevention, as well as in the development and evaluation of public policy. The course will emphasize basic methods (study design, measures of disease occurrence, measures of association, and causality) necessary for epidemiologic research. It is intended for students who have a basic understanding of the principals of human disease as well as statistics. Prereq: Must be an MPHP Plan A or MPHP Plan B, or EPBI student in order to enroll in the course.

MPHP 484. Global Health Epidemiology. 1 - 3 Units.

This course provides a rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases and, more generally, global health. This is an advanced epidemiology that embraces an active learning environment. Students are expected to invest time out of the classroom reading and working with classmates. Classes will be conducted with discussions, debates, group projects, and group presentations. By taking this course, students will develop a framework for interpreting, assessing, and performing epidemiologic research on issues of global importance. The course will be divided into three modules:1) Global Health Epidemiology 2) Helminth Epidemiology, and 3) Epidemiology of Disease Elimination. Each module is worth 1 credit hour and may be taken separately. Each module will have a separate project and/or exam. The final exam time will be used for group presentations and panel discussion. Active class participation is required through discussions, case studies, and group projects. Offered as PQHS 484, INTH 484, and MPHP 484.

MPHP 485. Adolescent Development. 3 Units.

Adolescent Development can be viewed as the overriding framework for approaching disease prevention and health promotion for this age group. This course will review the developmental tasks of adolescence and identify the impact of adolescent development on youth risk behaviors. It will build a conceptual and theoretical framework through which to address and change adolescent behavior to promote health.

MPHP 490. Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the principles of epidemiology covering the basic methods necessary for population and clinic-based research. Students will be introduced to epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of risk estimation, and casual inference (bias, confounding, and interaction) with application of these principles to specific fields of epidemiology. Classes will be a combination of lectures, discussion, and in-class exercises. It is intended for students who have a basic understanding of the principals of human disease and statistics. Offered as PQHS 490 and MPHP 490. Prereq or Coreq: PQHS/EPBI 431 or Requisites Not Met permission.

MPHP 494. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. 3 Units.

This course focuses on tuberculosis (TB) and HIV epidemiology, including perspectives on these diseases in the US and globally. It is a follow-up to PQHS/MPHP 484: Global Health Epidemiology, but these courses do not necessarily need to be taken in sequence. This is an advanced course, focusing on methods and approaches in epidemiology and public health. Offered as PQHS 494, INTH 494 and MPHP 494. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 490.

MPHP 499. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Units.


MPHP 510. Health Disparities. 3 Units.

This course aims to provide theoretical and application tools for students from many disciplinary backgrounds to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The course will be situated contextually within the historical record of the United States, reviewing social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to disparities in general, with a central focus on health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities among other subgroups (e.g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed. Students will be expected to develop a research proposal (observational, clinical, and/or intervention) rooted in their disciplinary background that will incorporate materials from the various perspectives presented throughout the course, with the objective of developing and reinforcing a more comprehensive approach to current practices within their fields. Offered as CRSP 510, PQHS 510, MPHP 510, NURS 510, and SASS 510.

MPHP 532. Health Care Information Systems. 3 Units.

This course covers concepts, techniques and technologies for providing information systems to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of health care organizations. Offered as HSMC 432 and MPHP 532.

MPHP 540. Operational Aspects of Global Health and Emergency Response. 3 Units.

Among professional in the medical field and the field of public health, there is a gap in knowledge, structure and research in best practices surrounding emergency response. This gap results from the limited number of training programs in the United States that focus on this very specialized field and the limited number of academic partnerships with international non-governmental organizations (NGOs). This course helps remedy this gap by introducing public health students and international emergency medicine fellows to the overall structure and operations of international humanitarian coordination systems, types of emergency response, morbidity and mortality associated with various emergencies, and the actors and institutions involved. The course highlights, through reading, workshops, and examples, the real world issues that must be faced and overcome in the field during emergency response operations.

MPHP 650. Public Health Practicum. 1 - 3 Units.

The Public Health Practicum is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, supervised, and evaluated community-based experience. The Practicum is designed to move students beyond the walls of academia, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health activities are conducted. To complete the Practicum, students must complete three credits of MPHP 650, dedicating at least 120 hours to a substantial public health experience, and attend Community Health Research and Practice (CHRP) group meetings. Prereq: Complete at least 9 credit hours in the MPH program and be in good academic standing.

MPHP 652. Public Health Capstone Experience. 1 - 9 Units.

Public health field practicum, involving a placement at a community-based field site, and a Master's essay. The field placement will provide students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired through their Master of Public Health academic program to a problem involving the health of the community. Students will learn to communicate with target groups in an effective manner; to identify ethical, social, and cultural issues relating to public health policies, research, and interventions; to identify the process by which decisions are made within the agency or organization; and to identify and coordinate use of resources at the placement site. The Master's essay represents the culminating experience required for the degree program and may take the form of a research thesis, an evaluation study, or an intervention study. Each student is required to formally present the experience and research findings. In any semester in which a student is registered for MPHP 652 credit, it is required that the student attend the Community Health Research and Practice (CHRP) group at a minimum of two sessions per 3 credits. CHRP is held once a week for approximately an hour and a half for the duration of fall, spring, and summer semesters. MPHP 652 credit is available only to Master of Public Health students.

MPHP 655. Dual Degree Field Practicum II. 3 Units.

This course is designed to be taken by MSSA/MPH joint degree students as the second field period of their master's program. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The Field Practicum is an integral component of the MSASS and MPH curriculums, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, supervised, and evaluated community-based experience. The Practicum is designed to move students beyond the walls of academia, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which social work and public health activities are conducted. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. (EPAAS Program Objective M6 and EPAAS Content Area 4.7) The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level MSSA/MPH joint degree students with field related opportunities to continue to develop foundation level competencies in the eight MSSAS abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work and public health theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. Offered as MPHP 655 and SASS 655.

MPHP 656. Dual Degree Field Capstone III. 3 Units.

The Public Health Capstone Project is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, mentored, and evaluated public health scholarly project. This course is designed to be taken by advanced level students. It consists of a 288 hour field based Capstone experience and participation in 12 hours of professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is designed to move students beyond the walls and constraints of the classroom, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health and social work activities are conducted. It is also designed to provide graduate level dual degree students with field related opportunities to begin to develop advanced level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to continue to develop and hone social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. (EPAS Program Objective M6 and EPAS Content Area 4.7) Offered as SASS 656 and MPHP 656. Prereq: MPHP 655.

MPHP 657. Dual Degree Field Capstone IV. 3 Units.

The Public Health Capstone Project is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, mentored, and evaluated public health scholarly project. This course is designed to be taken by advanced level students. It consists of a 288 hour field based Capstone experience and participation in 12 hours of professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is designed to move students beyond the walls and constraints of the classroom, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health and social work activities are conducted. It is also designed to provide graduate level dual degree students with field related opportunities to begin to develop advanced level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. Offered as MPHP 657 and SASS 657.

PQHS Courses

PQHS 411. Introduction to Health Behavior. 3 Units.

Using a biopsychosocial perspective, an overview of the measurement and modeling of behavioral, social, psychological, and environmental factors related to disease prevention, disease management, and health promotion is provided. Offered as PQHS 411 and MPHP 411. Prereq: Enrollment limited to MPH students (Plan A or Plan B) and EPBI students or consent.

PQHS 414. Data Management and Statistical Programming. 3 Units.

This is an online course that offers no in-person meetings. This course serves as a general introduction to the use of computer systems in epidemiologic investigations and biostatistical applications. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of data types, basic data structures, relational database systems and data normalization, data warehousing, control statements, and programming logic. Further, students will develop basic scripting skills and will learn to read in, manipulate, and perform basic descriptive analyses on research data using the SAS programming language. Primary emphasis in this course is on developing the knowledge and familiarity required to work with data in a statistical programming context. Basic familiarity with statistics is beneficial, as this course does not teach inferential statistical analysis in detail, but it is not vital to learning the course material.

PQHS 415. Statistical Computing and Data Analytics. 3 Units.

Statistical computing is an essential part of modern statistical training. This course emphasizes on statistical and data analytic problem solving skills, covers elements of statistical computing, and special topics in modern data analytics. This includes numerical methods for statistics, stochastic simulation, symbolic and graphical computation, plus special topics in resampling methods, EM algorithms, Gibbs Sampling/MCMC, projection pursuit, Laplace approximation, parallel computing, and selected methods for big and high dimensional data. The course will use R/Splus predominantly. However, interface of R with another high level programming language such as C, C++, Fortran, JAVA or Python will be essential for Big Data and intensive computation. Some Matlab, Mathematica, and graphviz will be used for symbolic and graphical computation. Prerequisite: Knowledge in statistics, equivalent to that in either STAT 325/425, or STAT 345/445, or PQHS/EPBI 481, or PQHS/EPBI 431, or by permission. Experience with at least one programing language is required: R/Splus, Matlab, C/C++, Fortran, JAVA, or Python. Prereq: STAT 312, STAT 325, STAT 425, STAT 345, STAT 445, PQHS/EPBI 431 or PQHS/EPBI 481.

PQHS 423. Dissemination and Implementation Science for Health Promotion. 3 Units.

This graduate-level course introduces concepts, skills, and methods for systematically disseminating and implementing evidence-based interventions for population health promotion. The course includes a focus on developing partnerships and transdisciplinary research teams, applying theories and frameworks to guide dissemination and implementation (D & I) science, examining research methods and designs appropriate for conducting D & I research at different and multiple levels of intervention (e.g., clinical, community, policy), and exploring channels for effectively communicating evidence to inform decision-making and practice in diverse contexts. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 411 or grad. level behavioral theory equivalent; PQHS/EPBI 490 or MPHP 483 or graduate level research methods equivalent.

PQHS 431. Statistical Methods I. 3 Units.

Application of statistical techniques with particular emphasis on problems in the biomedical sciences. Basic probability theory, random variables, and distribution functions. Point and interval estimation, regression, and correlation. Problems whose solution involves using packaged statistical programs. First part of year-long sequence. Offered as ANAT 431, BIOL 431, CRSP 431, PQHS 431 and MPHP 431.

PQHS 432. Statistical Methods II. 3 Units.

Methods of analysis of variance, regression and analysis of quantitative data. Emphasis on computer solution of problems drawn from the biomedical sciences. Design of experiments, power of tests, and adequacy of models. Offered as BIOL 432, PQHS 432, CRSP 432 and MPHP 432. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 431 or equivalent.

PQHS 433. Community Interventions and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to design, conduct, and assess community-based health interventions and program evaluation. Topics include assessment of need, evaluator/stakeholder relationship, process vs. outcome-based objectives, data collection, assessment of program objective achievement based on process and impact, cost-benefit analyses, and preparing the evaluation report to stakeholders. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 490, PQHS/EPBI 431, or MPHP 405. Offered as PQHS 433 and MPHP 433.

PQHS 435. Survival Data Analysis. 3 Units.

Basic concepts of survival analysis including hazard function, survival function, types of censoring; non-parametric models; extended Cox models: time dependent variables, piece-wise Cox model, etc.; sample size requirements for survival studies. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 432.

PQHS 436. Essence of Multilevel Statistical Modeling, Including Repeated Measures Analysis. 1 Unit.

A brief introduction to statistical models to handle studies having observational units (cases) at multiple levels (hierarchies). In particular, cases are often nested within groups, such as distinct communities, healthcare centers, or schools. Because the cases are not independent, conventional statistical methods assuming single-level data such as ordinary least squares regression are not appropriate. Multilevel designs allow examination of the effects of both individual (micro-level) factors as well as of higher level (macro or contextual) factors, and their interactions, on outcomes of interest. Longitudinal and other repeated measures analyses are a special case of multilevel modeling where the repeated measurements are nested within subjects or cases. Methods covered include use of linear mixed models, including random coefficient regression models, for continuous normally distributed outcomes, and generalized linear mixed modeling techniques for binary and count outcomes. Marginal regression modeling using generalized estimating equations (GEE) techniques, is introduced and contrasted to the use of mixed models. Examples and use of software (primarily SAS) are stressed in order to develop a strong conceptual understanding of the models. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 432 or Requisites Not Met permission.

PQHS 437. Essence of Classical Multivariate Analysis. 1 Unit.

A brief introduction to classical multivariate analysis methods: data visualization, two-group discriminant analysis via Hotelling's test, principal components and exploratory factor analysis, cluster analysis. Examples and wise use of software R are stressed in order to develop a strong conceptual understanding of the methods. This course joins PQHS 436 and 438 as the three-step "essence" series in advanced statistical methods required for the PhD in Population Health Science. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 432 or Requisites Not Met permission.

PQHS 438. Essence of Structural Equation Modeling. 1 Unit.

Brief introduction to classic "linear structural relations" (LISREL) formulation of structural equation models: Building them to address specific research aims. Fitting and assessing the goodness of the fit. Prudent interpretations. Examples and wise use of software are stressed in order to develop a strong conceptual understanding. This course joins PQHS 436 and 437 as the three-step "essence" series in advanced statistical methods required for the PhD in Population Health Science. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 432 or Requisites Not Met permission.

PQHS 440. Introduction to Population Health. 3 Units.

Introduces graduate students to the multiple determinants of health including the social, economic and physical environment, health services, individual behavior, genetics and their interactions. It aims to provide students with the broad understanding of the research development and design for studying population health, the prevention and intervention strategies for improving population health and the disparities that exist in morbidity, mortality, functional and quality of life. Format is primarily group discussion around current readings in the field; significant reading is required.

PQHS 444. Communicating in Population Health Science Research. 2 Units.

Doctoral seminar on writing journal articles to report original research, and preparing and making oral and poster presentations. The end products are ready-to-submit manuscripts and related slide and poster presentations for the required first-year research project in the PhD program in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. While this course provides a nucleus for this endeavor, students work intensively under the supervision of their research mentors, who guide all stages of the work including providing rigorous editorial support. Seminar sessions are devoted to rigorous peer critiques of every stage of the projects and to in-depth discussions of assigned readings. Recommended preparation: PhD students in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology. Non-PhD EPBI students permitted if space available. Fluency in English writing (e.g., in accord with the Harbrace College Handbook). Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 431 and PQHS/EPBI 490. Coreq: PQHS/EPBI 432.

PQHS 445. Research Ethics in Population Health Sciences. 0 Unit.

This zero credit course is a required add-on for PhD students in EPBI. Students will register and fulfill all requirements for IBMS 500 "Being a Professional Scientist". The purpose of PQHS 445 is to address specialized population health topics not covered by IBMS 500, including international research, human genomics, and/or big data/electronic medical records. There will be no meetings/lectures for this course. Students will complete a short written assignment due at the end of the semester.

PQHS 447. Global Health: Outbreak Investigation in Real-Time. 3 Units.

This course provides a trans-cultural, trans-disciplinary, multimedia learning experience by analyzing historical and real-time data from the annual dengue endemics and sporadic epidemics in Puerto Rico and Brazil. A rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases using real-time and historical surveillance data of endemic and epidemic Dengue in Bahia, Brazil. This is an advanced epidemiology course in which core material will be primarily taught through reading assignments, class discussion, group projects, and class presentations. The course will utilize the online web-based communication and learning technology to create a single classroom between the CWRU and international partners with unique and complementary skills. In addition to joint classroom lectures across sites, student groups will also perform smaller-scale videoconference meetings for assigned group projects, thus creating strong international connections for the students, faculty, and our institutions. Note: Due to the complexities of time zones for this international course, the course will begin at 8:00a.m. until the U.S.A. adjusts clocks for Daylight Savings Time (unlike Brazil). Therefore, classes after the second week of March will begin at 9:00a.m. Offered as PQHS 447, INTH 447 and MPHP 447. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 490.

PQHS 450. Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies. 3 Units.

Issues in the design, organization, and operation of randomized, controlled clinical trials and intervention studies. Emphasis on long-term multicenter trials. Topics include legal and ethical issues in the design; application of concepts of controls, masking, and randomization; steps required for quality data collection; monitoring for evidence of adverse or beneficial treatment effects; elements of organizational structure; sample size calculations and data analysis procedures; and common mistakes. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 431 or consent of instructor. Offered as PQHS 450 and MPHP 450.

PQHS 451. A Data-Driven Introduction to Genomics and Human Health. 3 Units.

This course introduces the foundational concepts of genomics and genetic epidemiology through four key principles: 1) Teaching students how to query relational databases using Structure Query Language (SQL); 2) Exposing students to the most current data used in genomics and bioinformatics research, providing a quantitative understanding of biological concepts; 3) Integrating newly learned concepts with prior ones to discover new relationships among biological concepts; and 4) providing historical context to how and why data were generated and stored in the way they were, and how this gave rise to modern concepts in genomics. Offered as PQHS 451, GENE 451, and MPHP 451. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 431 and PQHS/EPBI 490 or Requisites Not Met permission.

PQHS 452. Statistical Methods for Genetic Epidemiology. 3 Units.

Analytic methods for evaluating the role of genetic factors in human disease, and their interactions with environmental factors. Statistical methods for the estimation of genetic parameters and testing of genetic hypotheses, emphasizing maximum likelihood methods. Models to be considered will include such components as genetic loci of major effect, polygenic inheritance, and environmental, cultural and developmental effects. Topics will include familial aggregation, segregation and linkage analysis, ascertainment, linkage disequilibrium, and disease marker association studies. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 431 and PQHS/EPBI 451.

PQHS 453. Categorical Data Analysis. 3 Units.

Categorical data are often encountered in many disciplines including in the fields of clinical and biological sciences. Analysis methods for analyzing categorical data are different from the analysis methods for continuous data. There is a rich a collection of methods for categorical data analysis. The elegant "odds ratio" interpretation associated with categorical data is a unique one. This online course will cover cross-sectional categorical data analysis theories and methods. From this course students will learn standard categorical data analysis methods and its applications to the biomedical and clinical studies. This particular course will focus mostly on statistical methods for categorical data analysis arising from various fields of studies including clinical studies; those who take it will come from a wide variety of disciplines. The course will include video lectures, group discussion and brainstorming, homework, simulations, and collaborative projects on real and realistic problems in human health tied directly to the student's own professional interests. Focus will be given to logistic regression methods. Topics include (but not limited to) binary response, multi-category response, count response, model selection and evaluation, exact inference, Bayesian methods for categorical data, and supervised statistical learning methods. This course stresses how the core statistical principles, computing tools, and visualization strategies are used to address complex scientific aims powerfully and efficiently, and to communicate those findings effectively to researchers who may have little or no experience in these methods. Recommended preparation: Advanced undergraduate students, and graduate students in Biostatistics or other quantitative sciences with a background in statistical methods (at least one statistics course, equivalent to the PQHS/EPBI 431 course experience).

PQHS 454. Population Genetics for Genetic Epidemiology. 3 Units.

Introduce concepts and classical results of mathematical population genetics, with emphasis on the influence of evolutionary forces and population history on contemporary human genetic variation. Survey empirical population variation and their implication for mapping complex traits. How to simulate population sequence data using coalescence models will also be emphasized.

PQHS 457. Current Issues in Genetic Epidemiology: Design and Analysis of Sequencing Studies. 3 Units.

Statistical methods to deal with the opportunities and challenges in Genetic Epidemiology brought about by modern sequencing technology. Some computational issues that arise in the analysis of large sequence data sets will be discussed. The course includes hands-on experience in the analysis of large sequence data sets, in a collaborative setting. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 451 and PQHS/EPBI 452.

PQHS 459. Longitudinal Data Analysis. 3 Units.

This course will cover statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data with an emphasis on application in biological and health research. Topics include exploratory data analysis, response feature analysis, growth curve models, mixed-effects models, generalized estimating equations, and missing data. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 432.

PQHS 460. Introduction to Health Services Research. 3 Units.

This survey course provides an introduction to the field of Health Services Research and an overview of key health services research concepts and methods, including conceptual frameworks and models; outcomes research; risk adjustment; disparities in health care; policy/health care systems; cost and cost-effectiveness; quality of life, process improvement; patient satisfaction; patient safety; health economics; statistical modeling techniques; and qualitative research methods. Offered as PQHS 460 and MPHP 460.

PQHS 464. Obesity and Cancer: Views from Molecules to Health Policy. 3 Units.

This course will provide an overview of the components of energy balance (diet, physical activity, resting metabolic rate, dietary induced thermogenesis) and obesity, a consequence of long term positive energy balance, and various types of cancer. Following an overview of energy balance and epidemiological evidence for the obesity epidemic, the course will proceed with an introduction to the cellular and molecular biology of energy metabolism. Then, emerging research on biologically plausible connections and epidemiological associations between obesity and various types of cancer (e.g., colon, breast) will be presented. Finally, interventions targeted at decreasing obesity and improving quality of life in cancer patients will be discussed. The course will be cooperatively-taught by a transdisciplinary team of scientists engaged in research in energy balance and/or cancer. Didactic lectures will be combined with classroom discussion of readings. The paper assignment will involve application of course principles, lectures and readings. Offered as PQHS 464 and MPHP 464.

PQHS 465. Design and Measurement in Population Health Sciences. 3 Units.

This course focuses on common design and measurement approaches used in population health sciences research. This course covers the preliminary considerations used in selecting qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research approaches including an understanding of different philosophical worldviews, strategies of inquiry and methods and procedures for each approach. The course also includes an introduction to survey design and related concepts of latent variables, factor analysis and reliability and validity. Students will develop an in-depth knowledge of these design and measurement approaches through readings, lectures, group discussions and written and oral project presentations. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 440, PQHS/EPBI 431, PQHS/EPBI 490, PQHS/EPBI 432, PQHS/EPBI 460, PQHS/EPBI 444 and PQHS/EPBI 445.

PQHS 466. Promoting Health Across Boundaries. 3 Units.

This course examines the concepts of health and boundary spanning and how the synergy of the two can produce new, effective approaches to promoting health. Students will explore and analyze examples of individuals and organizations boundary spanning for health to identify practice features affecting health, compare and contrast practices and approaches, and evaluate features and context that promote or inhibit boundary spanning and promoting health. Offered as MPHP 466, PQHS 466, SOCI 466, NURS 466 and BETH 466. Prereq: Graduate student status or instructor consent.

PQHS 467. Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research. 1 Unit.

Comparative effectiveness research is a cornerstone of healthcare reform. It holds the promise of improved health outcomes and cost containment. This course is presented in a convenient 5-day intensive format in June. There are reading assignments due prior to the 1st session. Module A, Days 1-2: Overview of comparative effectiveness research (CER) from a wide array of perspectives: individual provider, institution, insurer, patient, government, and society. Legal, ethical and social issues, as well as implications for population and public health, including health disparities will also be a component. Module B, Day 3: Introduction to the various methods, and their strengths, weaknesses and limitations. How to read and understand CER papers. Module C, Days 4-5: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. This will cover costing, cost analysis, clinical decision analysis, quality of life and cost-effectiveness analysis for comparing alternative health care strategies. Trial version of TreeAge software will be used to create and analyze a simple cost-effectiveness model. The full 3-credit course is for taking all 3 modules. Modules A or C can be taken alone for 1 credit. Modules A and B or Modules B and C can be taken together for a total of 2 credits. Module B cannot be taken alone. If taking for 2 or 3 credits, some combination of term paper, project and/or exam will be due 30 days later. Offered as PQHS 467 and MPHP 467.

PQHS 468. The Continual Improvement of Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary Course. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to be members of interprofessional teams to engage in the continual improvement in health care. The focus is on working together for the benefit of patients and communities to enhance quality and safety. Offered as PQHS 468, MPHP 468, and NURS 468.

PQHS 471. Machine Learning & Data Mining. 3 Units.

Vast amount of data are being collected in medical and social research and in many industries. Such big data generate a demand for efficient and practical tools to analyze the data and to identify unknown patterns. We will cover a variety of statistical machine learning techniques (supervised learning) and data mining techniques (unsupervised learning), with data examples from biomedical and social research. Specifically, we will cover prediction model building and model selection (shrinkage, Lasso), classification (logistic regression, discriminant analysis, k-nearest neighbors), tree-based methods (bagging, random forests, boosting), support vector machines, association rules, clustering and hierarchical clustering. Basic techniques that are applicable to many of the areas, such as cross-validation, the bootstrap, dimensionality reduction, and splines, will be explained and used repeatedly. The field is fast evolving and new topics and techniques may be included when necessary. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 431.

PQHS 480. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. 3 Units.

An introduction to statistical inference at an intermediate mathematical level. The concepts of random variables and distributions, discrete and continuous, are reviewed. Topics covered include: expectations, variance, moments, the moment generating function; Bernoulli, binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, negative binomial, normal, gamma and beta distribution; the central limit theorem; Bayes estimation, maximum likelihood estimators, unbiased estimators, sufficient statistics; sampling distributions (chi-square, t) confidence intervals, Fisher information; hypothesis testing, uniformly most powerful tests and multi-decision problems. Prereq: MATH 122, MATH 124 or MATH 126.

PQHS 481. Theoretical Statistics I. 3 Units.

Topics provide the background for statistical inference. Random variables; distribution and density functions; transformations, expectation. Common univariate distributions. Multiple random variables; joint, marginal and conditional distributions; hierarchical models, covariance. Distributions of sample quantities, distributions of sums of random variables, distributions of order statistics. Methods of statistical inference. Offered as STAT 345, STAT 445, and PQHS 481. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 223 or Coreq: PQHS/EPBI 431.

PQHS 482. Theoretical Statistics II. 3 Units.

Point estimation: maximum likelihood, moment estimators. Methods of evaluating estimators including mean squared error, consistency, "best" unbiased and sufficiency. Hypothesis testing; likelihood ratio and union-intersection tests. Properties of tests including power function, bias. Interval estimation by inversion of test statistics, use of pivotal quantities. Application to regression. Graduate students are responsible for mathematical derivations, and full proofs of principal theorems. Offered as STAT 346, STAT 446 and PQHS 482. Prereq: STAT 345 or STAT 445 or PQHS/EPBI 481.

PQHS 484. Global Health Epidemiology. 1 - 3 Units.

This course provides a rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases and, more generally, global health. This is an advanced epidemiology that embraces an active learning environment. Students are expected to invest time out of the classroom reading and working with classmates. Classes will be conducted with discussions, debates, group projects, and group presentations. By taking this course, students will develop a framework for interpreting, assessing, and performing epidemiologic research on issues of global importance. The course will be divided into three modules:1) Global Health Epidemiology 2) Helminth Epidemiology, and 3) Epidemiology of Disease Elimination. Each module is worth 1 credit hour and may be taken separately. Each module will have a separate project and/or exam. The final exam time will be used for group presentations and panel discussion. Active class participation is required through discussions, case studies, and group projects. Offered as PQHS 484, INTH 484, and MPHP 484.

PQHS 490. Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the principles of epidemiology covering the basic methods necessary for population and clinic-based research. Students will be introduced to epidemiologic study designs, measures of disease occurrence, measures of risk estimation, and casual inference (bias, confounding, and interaction) with application of these principles to specific fields of epidemiology. Classes will be a combination of lectures, discussion, and in-class exercises. It is intended for students who have a basic understanding of the principals of human disease and statistics. Offered as PQHS 490 and MPHP 490. Prereq or Coreq: PQHS/EPBI 431 or Requisites Not Met permission.

PQHS 494. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. 3 Units.

This course focuses on tuberculosis (TB) and HIV epidemiology, including perspectives on these diseases in the US and globally. It is a follow-up to PQHS/MPHP 484: Global Health Epidemiology, but these courses do not necessarily need to be taken in sequence. This is an advanced course, focusing on methods and approaches in epidemiology and public health. Offered as PQHS 494, INTH 494 and MPHP 494. Prereq: PQHS/EPBI 490.

PQHS 499. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Units.


PQHS 500. Design and Analysis of Observational Studies. 3 Units.

An observational study investigates treatments, policies or exposures and the effects that they cause, but it differs from an experiment because the investigator cannot control assignment. We introduce appropriate design, data collection and analysis methods for such studies, to help students design and interpret their own studies, and those of others in their field. Technical formalities are minimized, and the presentations will focus on the practical application of the ideas. A course project involves the completion of an observational study, and substantial use of the R statistical software. Topics include randomized experiments and how they differ from observational studies, planning and design for observational studies, adjustments for overt bias, sensitivity analysis, methods for detecting hidden bias, and focus on propensity score methods for selection bias adjustment, including multivariate matching, stratification, weighting and regression adjustments. Recommended preparation: a working knowledge of multiple regression, some familiarity with logistic regression, with some exposure to fitting regression models in R. Offered as CRSP 500 and PQHS 500.

PQHS 501. Research Seminar. 0 Unit.

This seminar series includes faculty and guest-lecturer presentations designed to introduce students to on-going research at the University and elsewhere. Seminars will emphasize the application of methods learned in class, as well as the introduction of new methods and tools useful in research.

PQHS 504. Seminar in Health Care Organization, Outcomes and Policy. 0 Unit.

This seminar is designed to enhance the professional development of students in the Health Care Organization, Outcomes and Policy concentration of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and provide them with practical information, experiences and guidance to foster their academic success. Students will 1) develop the ability to critically appraise the health services research literature; 2) gain experience in organizing and delivering oral presentations based on published literature and their own research endeavors; 3) be exposed to role models and receive coaching on career development through lecture and discussion involving experienced faculty from within and outside the division; 4) receive didactic training and hands-on experience with career-related tasks and skills such as grant writing and proposal evaluation, article review, and effective participation in professional meetings; and hear faculty from within and outside the department describe their research. The specific content of the seminar for any given semester will be determined jointly by HCOOP students and faculty. Enrollment is limited to students in the HCOOP division of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.

PQHS 505. Seminar in Global Health Epidemiology. 0 Unit.

This seminar series examines a broad range of topics related to infectious disease research in international settings. Areas of interest are certain to include epidemiology, bioethics, medical anthropology, pathogenesis, drug resistance, vector biology, cell and molecular biology, vaccine development, diagnosis, and socio-cultural factors contributing to or compromising effective health care delivery in endemic countries. Speakers will include a diverse group of regional faculty and post-doctoral trainees, as well as visiting colleagues from around the world. Students will be asked to read a journal article written by the speaker and then discuss this article with the speaker after their seminar.

PQHS 506. Seminar in Health Behavior and Prevention Research. 0 Unit.

This seminar is designed to enhance the academic and professional development of students in the Health Behavior & Prevention Research (HB&PR) concentration in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. The seminar is comprised of a journal club style in which current and classic research literature in health behavior and prevention research is critically evaluated. Also, talks are given by students, faculty, and invited guests. These activities give students the opportunity to improve their ability to: 1) critically evaluate research literature in HB≺ 2) lead effectively a discussion of a research article; and 3) organize and deliver oral presentations based on published literature and their own research endeavors. Some sessions are devoted to didactic training and hands-on experience with career-related tasks and skills such as grant writing, proposal evaluation, and manuscript review. The specific content of the seminar for any given semester will be determined jointly by the students and faculty in HB&PR. Enrollment is required of all PhD students in the HB&PR concentration of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; however is open to all interested students.

PQHS 510. Health Disparities. 3 Units.

This course aims to provide theoretical and application tools for students from many disciplinary backgrounds to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The course will be situated contextually within the historical record of the United States, reviewing social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to disparities in general, with a central focus on health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities among other subgroups (e.g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed. Students will be expected to develop a research proposal (observational, clinical, and/or intervention) rooted in their disciplinary background that will incorporate materials from the various perspectives presented throughout the course, with the objective of developing and reinforcing a more comprehensive approach to current practices within their fields. Offered as CRSP 510, PQHS 510, MPHP 510, NURS 510, and SASS 510.

PQHS 515. Secondary Analysis of Large Health Care Data Bases. 3 Units.

Development of skills in working with the large-scale secondary data bases generated for research, health care administration/billing, or other purposes. Students will become familiar with the content, strength, and limitations of several data bases; with the logistics of obtaining access to data bases; the strengths and limitations of routinely collected variables; basic techniques for preparing and analyzing secondary data bases and how to apply the techniques to initiate and complete empirical analysis. Recommended preparation: PQHS/EPBI 414 or equivalent; PQHS/EPBI 431 or PQHS/EPBI 460 and PQHS/EPBI 461 (for HSR students).

PQHS 550. Meta-Analysis & Evidence Synthesis. 2 - 3 Units.

Systematic reviews use reproducible methods to systematically search the literature and synthesize the results of a specific topic area. Meta-analysis is a specific analytic technique used to pool results of individual studies. Systematic reviews are useful ways to establish one's knowledge in a particular field of study, and can highlight gaps in research which can be pursued in future work. They can also inform the background of a grant. This course is designed to introduce students to the methods of conducting a high quality systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention studies. We will cover the design, methods, and analytic techniques involved in systematic reviews. These concepts will prepare students to conduct their own systematic review or evaluate the systematic reviews of others. Sessions will be lectures, labs, and presentations. Topics include developing a search strategy, abstracting key data, synthesizing the results qualitatively, meta-analytic techniques, grading the quality of studies, grading the strength of the evidence, and manuscript preparation specific to systematic reviews and meta-analysis of intervention studies. Caveat: If you would like to conduct a systematic review of your own that can be published after the course ends, you will need to have several other class members or colleagues willing to work with you on the project. The systematic review should be on a topic where you expect no more than 20-30 included studies in order to be able to complete the review soon after the course ends. Offered as CRSP 550 and PQHS 550. Prereq: CRSP 401, PQHS/EPBI 431, MPHP 405, NURS 532 or Requisites Not Met permission.

PQHS 601. Master's Project Research. 1 - 18 Units.


PQHS 602. Practicum. 1 - 3 Units.

This course focuses on the skills needed to become an effective statistical consultant. The course objectives are: to learn the role of the consulting statistician and the accompanying responsibilities and ethical considerations, to develop the ability to interact with clients and elicit the information required to provide consulting expertise, to learn general strategies for approaching consulting problems that can be applied to a wide range of problems in medical areas, and to develop expertise in areas needed by the consulting biostatistician. These include database architecture, data quality control, record keeping for potential audits, statistical techniques, and report generation.

PQHS 651. Thesis M.S.. 1 - 18 Units.


PQHS 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Units.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.