LING (LING)

LING 301. Second Language Acquisition I. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the growing field of second language acquisition (SLA). SLA seeks to understand the linguistic, psychological and social processes that underlie the learning and use of second language(s). The goal of research is to identify the principles and processes that govern second language learning and use. SLA is approached from three perspectives in the course: 1) as linguistic knowledge;2) as a cognitive skill; and 3) as a socially and personality-meditated process. Important factors in second language learning will be identified and discussed. These include: age-related differences, the influence of the first language, the role played by innate (universal) principles, the role of memory processes, attitudes, motivation, personality and cognitive styles, and formal versus naturalistic learning contexts. The objective of this course is to survey the principal research in second language acquisition. Students will become familiar with the major research issues through their reading of both primary and secondary sources, as well as through lectures and class discussions. Offered as COGS 312, COGS 412, LING 301 and LING 401.

LING 302. Second Language Acquisition II: Second Language Acquisition Research and Second Language Teaching. 3 Units.

This course will examine various issues in second language acquisition research that are particularly relevant to foreign language teaching and learning. Topics covered will include: the role of input (listening/reading) vs. output (speaking/writing); implicit vs. explicit learning; negative vs. positive evidence (including the role of error correction); affective factors (motivation, anxiety); individual differences; teachability hypothesis and syllabus construction, program design/evaluation, language testing, among others. The purpose of this course is to survey the principal research in the acquisition of second language that is relevant to second language teaching in a classroom setting, and to obtain the state-of-the-art knowledge of the SLA research literature that is relevant to L2 teaching. The focus is not necessarily on the practical application of the SLA research, although we will not exclude discussion of classroom application. Rather, we critically examine and evaluate SLA research and come up with our own syntheses with respect to various issues. To achieve this goal, we should ask following questions in reading and discussing the relevant literature: 1) What are the main claims that the author(s) make(s)? 2) Are the author's claims sound? If not why? 3) What further research is needed to answer remaining questions? Students will become familiar with the major research issues through their reading of both primary and secondary sources, as well as through lectures and class discussions. The students are required to complete a term project that addresses the issues treated in the course. Offered as LING 302, LING 402, COGS 314 and COGS 414. Prereq: LING 301 or requisites not met permission.

LING 401. Second Language Acquisition I. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the growing field of second language acquisition (SLA). SLA seeks to understand the linguistic, psychological and social processes that underlie the learning and use of second language(s). The goal of research is to identify the principles and processes that govern second language learning and use. SLA is approached from three perspectives in the course: 1) as linguistic knowledge;2) as a cognitive skill; and 3) as a socially and personality-meditated process. Important factors in second language learning will be identified and discussed. These include: age-related differences, the influence of the first language, the role played by innate (universal) principles, the role of memory processes, attitudes, motivation, personality and cognitive styles, and formal versus naturalistic learning contexts. The objective of this course is to survey the principal research in second language acquisition. Students will become familiar with the major research issues through their reading of both primary and secondary sources, as well as through lectures and class discussions. Offered as COGS 312, COGS 412, LING 301 and LING 401.

LING 402. Second Language Acquisition II: Second Language Acquisition Research and Second Language Teaching. 3 Units.

This course will examine various issues in second language acquisition research that are particularly relevant to foreign language teaching and learning. Topics covered will include: the role of input (listening/reading) vs. output (speaking/writing); implicit vs. explicit learning; negative vs. positive evidence (including the role of error correction); affective factors (motivation, anxiety); individual differences; teachability hypothesis and syllabus construction, program design/evaluation, language testing, among others. The purpose of this course is to survey the principal research in the acquisition of second language that is relevant to second language teaching in a classroom setting, and to obtain the state-of-the-art knowledge of the SLA research literature that is relevant to L2 teaching. The focus is not necessarily on the practical application of the SLA research, although we will not exclude discussion of classroom application. Rather, we critically examine and evaluate SLA research and come up with our own syntheses with respect to various issues. To achieve this goal, we should ask following questions in reading and discussing the relevant literature: 1) What are the main claims that the author(s) make(s)? 2) Are the author's claims sound? If not why? 3) What further research is needed to answer remaining questions? Students will become familiar with the major research issues through their reading of both primary and secondary sources, as well as through lectures and class discussions. The students are required to complete a term project that addresses the issues treated in the course. Offered as LING 302, LING 402, COGS 314 and COGS 414. Prereq: LING 401 or requisites not met permission.