SASS (SASS)

SASS 284. Oppression and Privilege in a Multicultural Society. 3 Units.

Privilege flings open the doors of opportunity in a multicultural society. Oppression jams those doors tightly shut. This course provides students with understandings of how oppression and privilege operate in a multicultural society to restrict the life chances of minority and disenfranchised group members. Increasing knowledge about the nature and dynamics of oppression and privilege are fundamental dimensions of the ability to value a diverse world. This undertaking requires self-assessment and reflection on discrimination, oppression, and privilege as components of individual awareness. Such insight will help students to live, work, study, and play well with "others" who are culturally different from themselves with respect to race/ethnicity, religion, class, gender, sexual orientation/gender identity, ability, and age. Beyond increasing respectful social interaction, it is hoped that students will be motivated to work towards dismantling systems that perpetuate de-valuing, exploitation, marginalization, and violence against members of subordinate groups. Major consideration will be given to structures of oppression and privilege related to racism, classism, religious bigotry, sexism, heterosexism/transgenderism, ableism, and ageism. Note: A student cannot receive degree credit for both SASS 284 and SOCI 349.

SASS 315. Adoption Practice and Policy. 3 Units.

This course covers the concepts, knowledge, skills, and policies associated with contemporary adoption practice. The practice method reflects a constellation perspective, meaning that adoption is examined from the viewpoints of birth families, adoptees, and adoptive families. Exemplars and case studies are presented for illustration purposes. Consideration of constellation members' needs at different life cycle stages are presented. Ethical issues and dilemmas related to adoption are emphasized throughout the course in each content area. Course content is covered via lectures and classroom discussions, as well as appropriate guest speakers. Students are expected to participate fully through field trips and classroom discussions.

SASS 318. Death, Grief, and Loss. 3 Units.

This course provides students the opportunity to become informed, aware citizens understanding human issues related to end-of-life decision making, dying, and experiencing grief and loss. Topics focus on death and grief across the lifespan; the role of death in American culture; understanding individual and family challenges with decision making at the end of life; and the experience of grieving across life stages, cultures, gender, and spiritual difference. The course provides exposure to the experience of death as it relates to the self of the student; the terminally ill person, and the bereaved. Students will gain insight into their own values and beliefs in this area, as well as understanding the needs of terminally ill people, those who need support in their grief and mourning, and persons dealing with challenging life and death decisions regarding self or loved ones. Creation of a personal learning objective is an additional focus. Course content is implemented via lectures, class discussion, individual and small group work, audio-visuals, and guest speakers.

SASS 325. The Netherlands Social Justice: Health and Violence. 3 Units.

Social justice issues including violence prevention and health care services/policies will be explored via agency visits, lectures, and discussion with Dutch experts. The pervasive use of a harm reduction policy in the Netherlands will be examined. The course will help students develop the analytical skills necessary for evaluating social policy and practice issues related to a range of health care services as well as social justice issues that pertain to health care, prostitution and substance use. Students will familiarize themselves with the United States and Dutch social policies and practices related to issues such as: right to die, euthanasia for terminally ill, those in chronic pain or severely ill newborns; access to healthcare and health disparities; addictions; and prostitution. The manner in which a society treats its citizens least capable of taking care of themselves reveals many of the core values of its cultural system of social justice and approaches to health care. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 350. Seminars in Applied Social Sciences. 3 Units.

Survey of special subject areas. Topics vary in response to faculty and student interests. Small group discussion. Prerequisite depends on content.

SASS 355. Drugs and Youth. 3 Units.

Drug abuse is a more acute problem and more widespread than in any previous era of our country. Just as technology continues to evolve, drug use follows similar paths of evolution. Today, there are thousands of new drugs available that are used for medicinal purposes, recreational purposes, and other uses that affect the health of our citizens. The impact of drug use and/or abuse on the lives of ordinary people with be explored both through academic readings as well as biographies of young people who have dealt with the problem of drug abuse. Material will be presented from a wide range of disciplines and theoretical perspectives highlighting the bio-psycho-social nature of the problem--both the etiology as well as the effects of addiction. The impact of both macro (society) and micro (family and friends) on drug use of both licit (alcohol, over the counter drugs, and prescription) and illicit (marijuana, hallucinogens, and cocaine) on various subcultures such as sports/athletics, college students, women, adolescents, etc. will be explored. Course content will be covered via lectures, classroom discussions as well as appropriate guest speakers.

SASS 367. Poverty, Wealth Building, and Social Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

With poor communities and individuals across the world aspiring for higher standards of living and quality of life, monolithic development strategies are proving to be insufficient. Microenterprise and social entrepreneurship are among the latest strategies for poverty alleviation. New strategies that are grass-roots, multi-dimensional, entrepreneurial, and engage stakeholders as partners are gaining ground. They seek to fundamentally transform the roles and relationships of the stakeholders in the economy. While social entrepreneurship is revolutionizing the practice of development work, the micro-enterprise sector plays an important role for some of the poorest sectors of society who gain employment, connection to the market, and opportunities for innovation through it. In this course, we will examine social entrepreneurship, the change it brought about in how development is viewed, conceived, and implemented. Some of the examples that will provide core content include economic development strategies that promote asset building among the poor; Mandragon in Spain (and other similar institutions from across the world), Greyston Bakery (and other similar examples from around the United States) and Evergreen Cooperative (and other relevant local examples).

SASS 368. Whatever it Takes: Creating Paths Out of Poverty for Children. 3 Units.

This course will examine current community based strategies for providing young people living in high poverty, multiple needs, urban areas with the educational, social and economic support they need for a stronger future. The course will begin with a review of the debated root causes of poverty in the United States and an exploration of the short and long term effects of poverty on children. Students will understand how poverty differentially affects different populations and geographic areas across the United States and globally. Special attention will be given to the complexity of urban poverty issues and the corresponding need for holistic Interventions. The course will further explore the concepts and strategies underlying innovative community-based initiatives being implemented across the country including the theories, programming content, inclusion criteria and outcomes of these efforts. Students will have to critically think through the cost/benefits of this programming considering economic, political and social justice issues. Special attention will be given to the Harlem Children Zone's (HCZ) model. The HCZ has achieved successes in boosting college attendance and closing the racial and socioeconomic achievement gap among youth in a high-poverty target area in New York City. The HCZ is the model for the Obama Administration's Promise Neighborhoods Initiative to support comprehensive neighborhood development programs for children and youth. It includes efforts for social, educational and medical support designed sequentially to keep up with youth's developmental needs. Students will critically analyze this model and its applicability across other geographic areas and populations. Students will also learn from local best practice Initiatives in education attempting to provide a path out of poverty for Cleveland's children through site visits at local schools. This will include experiential opportunities for firsthand contact with program staff and youth.

SASS 369. Social Networking and Community Organizing in the 21st Century. 3 Units.

This course will examine the changing nature of place, given increased mobility and diversity in communities within the United States and the emergence of a truly global economy and communication network due to the revolution in information technology. Community itself is being redefined as many members of society consider their most important relationships are primarily virtual in nature. The forms of engaging citizens are also changing as old models of community organizing give way to new approaches that focus on connectivity through social networks. This course will examine various new approaches to engagement, from political or campaign organizing to social networking around mutual interest to mobilizing people for a cause. We will examine the Obama presidential campaign as an example of a new mobilization strategy that emphasizes choice, flexibility, value, and the ability to influence through organic informal networks. The course will also explore case studies, such as network centric organizing as developed by Bill Traynor and Lawrence (MA) Community Works. Special attention will be given to controversial efforts criticized by the right or the left, such as the ACORN voter registration initiative. Students will also explore the changing nature of community in Northeast Ohio and how this new approach might lead to social change and economic development for greater Cleveland.

SASS 375. International Travel and Study Seminar. 3 Units.

The course provides an intensive experiential learning experience that take students to a Non-Western European country for appropriately 10-12 days to explore social and community development issues, policies and practices. There will be at least 42 hours of contact time with the instructors in Cleveland and the Non-Western European country. The program explores innovative approaches to social development and draws parallels to that of the United States. The purpose of the trip is to familiarize students with social development and social policy issues. Topics appropriate to the targeted country, such as poverty alleviation, non-formal education, prostitution, HIV-AIDS, multicultural aspects of healthcare, international adoption, and possible application of information communication technologies in addressing social problems will be addressed. The trip will include guided tours to neighborhoods, field-action project workers, healthcare professionals, government officials, scholars, and researchers will further enhance students' understanding. Students are required to attend a minimum of two pre-trip seminars, write and/or present pre-trip assignment(s), attend a post-trip meeting, and complete a final written assignment. The course requires an additional cost for travel.

SASS 375A. International Travel & Study Abroad: Health, Human and Social Development in Urban & Rural Ecuador. 3 Units.

The study abroad program to Quito, Ecuador and surrounding rural areas will acquaint students with the history and culture of Ecuador, its social, political and economic development, and the impact it has on the delivery of social services. Ecuador's historical and current relationship with the United States will also be explored. This course is designed for students and professionals who are interested in developing an international perspective for the study of social work and related health services. It will expose students to helping modalities within a cultural context and provide opportunities for cross cultural comparison. The course will be taught using both lecture and experiential modalities. Along with interaction with a variety of social service agencies, students will visit historical sites and attend cultural events. They will be introduced to the art and culture of the area and explore the region's economic development. Lectures by guest speakers on topics regarding family systems, culture, and history, social and political issues will provide students with learning opportunities. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375B. International Travel & Study Abroad: Mental Health Issues & Practice Netherlands. 3 Units.

This 3-credit course will be at least 42 hours of contact time, and include a trip to the Netherlands over Spring Break. The course will acquaint the participant (undergraduate and graduate) with the socio-political factors that influence policy development and the delivery of mental health care and services to the citizens of the Netherlands. The role of the social work profession in mental health care and service delivery will be explored via agency visits, lectures, and discussion with Dutch consumers and experts in the area of mental healthcare. This course will help students develop the analytical skills necessary for evaluating social policy and practice issues related to mental health. Students will familiarize themselves with the United States and Dutch social policies and practices related to specific mental health issues such as: treatment of severe mental illness, community mental health systems and community reintegration of the those with mental illness, psychosocial rehabilitation, the treatment of people with dual diagnoses of substance dependence and abuse and mental illness, homelessness and the mentally ill, psychiatric hospitalization, employment, education and issues of quality of life for people living with mental illness. Prior to the trip, students will attend a pre-trip session, will be expected to become familiar with the literature on concepts in social policy and practices relevant to mental health issues in both countries, and following the trip, meet for a post-trip session. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375C. International Travel & Study Abroad: Invisible Groups in a New Poland. 3 Units.

This 3 hour Spring Break for the undergraduate and graduate students introduces students and faculty to Polish culture and Polish social policies and practices concerning those social groups that are disenfranchised, stigmatized, and disempowered, including the poor, the unemployed, the homeless, the elderly, victims of domestic violence, and people affected by substance abuse and mental health problems. In cooperation with the Institute of Sociology at the University of Poznan, students and faculty will examine the issues of multiculturalism, social integration, feminism studies, and determinants of social exclusion in the context of the economic and social forces that are shaping a new Poland. The trip includes guided tours of neighborhoods and social institutions and daily lectures and workshops with government officials, practicing social workers, and many of Poland's most prominent scholars in residence at the University of Pozman. The experience will challenge students to recognize how the recent political and economic transformation of the country has affected the entire society and how certain groups have paid a higher price. Students and faculty will also participate in cultural events to gain a greater understanding of Polish society. Prior to the trip, students will attend two pre-trip sessions, will be expected to become familiar with the literature on concepts in social policy and practices relevant to social welfare issues in both countries, and following the trip, meet for a post trip session. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375D. International Travel & Study Abroad: Child Welfare in Guatemala. 3 Units.

This program is designed to familiarize participants with child welfare issues, social services, and indigenous community development, particularly women cooperatives. The plan is for participants to learn Spanish each morning, followed by guided tours of various programs. The experience challenges participants to compare Guatemala with the United States, and to understand the strengths and weaknesses of social policies and human services in both countries. This course acquaints participants with the socio-political factors that influence the development of child welfare programs in the nongovernmental sector (private, nonprofit) and governmental sector in Guatemala. The role of the helping professions in child welfare are explored via agency visits, lectures, and collaboration with Guatemalan professionals. The program is an intense small group experience in living, learning, traveling, and studying. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375E. International Travel & Study Abroad: Microcredit, Microfinance, and Social Development in Bangladesh. 3 Units.

This International travel/study course to Bangladesh is taught by SUIC School of Social Work, Case Western Reserve's Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (MSASS), and Independent University, Bangladesh. Many international scholars and leaders will be involved, including 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus, as well as other officials in Bangladesh. The program will provide an intensive learning experience that will take students to Bangladesh for 12 days. The course to Bangladesh will be focusing on the role of Micro-credit and Microfinance and Social Developments to alleviate poverty and nurture social entrepreneurship. Students will spend 8 days in Dhaka, the Bangladesh capital, and 4 days in the villages visiting field projects. The program will provide lectures and field trips involving social, political, economic and developmental aspects of Micro-Credit and Micro-Finance. The trip will explore the basic ideas behind the Microcredit revolution in Bangladesh, its historical precedence, and will study it's relation to health, finance, management, politics, social entrepreneurship and development. Student will learn about the mechanisms of micro-credit in social development and execute the knowledge in their own practice. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375F. Gender and Sexuality Justice: LGBTQ life in Contemporary Dutch Culture. 3 Units.

This experiential and hands-on course explores the Dutch concept of "tolerance" through the lenses of sexuality, gender identity and gender expression. The course will investigate the Dutch concept of "tolerance" as it applies to non-heteronormative sexualities, as well as the range of gender identities and expressions outside of a binary of male/female, man/woman. Focusing on, but not limited to, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) community, the course will interrogate the ways in which the social discourse of acceptance is complicated by other salient sociopolitical factors present in the Netherlands such as historical and contemporary realities about immigration, religious diversity, age, ethnicity and race. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375G. Global Health and Social Development in India. 3 Units.

The study abroad program explores the innovative approaches to health and social development in India and draws parallel to that of the United States. The purpose of the trip is to familiarize students with Indian social development and social policy issues in regards to multicultural aspects of healthcare, poverty alleviation, non-formal education, and application of information communication technologies in addressing social problems. The trip will include guided tours to neighborhoods, field-action project sites, health, social and educational institutions and government establishments. Daily lectures by practicing social workers, healthcare professionals, policy advocates, field workers, government officials and eminent Indian scholars and researchers will further enhance students' understanding. This study abroad course will also acquaint students with history and culture of India, its social, political and economic development and the impact it has on the delivery of social services The course will be taught using both lecture and experiential modalities. Along with visiting a variety of governmental and non-governmental institutions, health care facilities, organizations and projects, students will visit historical sites and attend cultural events. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375H. 21st Century Ghana: Culture, Institutions & Development in West Africa. 3 Units.

This two-week study abroad program to Ghana, West Africa will introduce students to the history and culture of Ghana, its social, political and economic development, and current social issues and institutional responses. Among the specific social issues to be examined in the course are health, education and community development. We will pay particular attention to understanding how the role of culture, faith and religion is shaping institutional, community and individual responses to the challenges and opportunities of globalization and development. The course will be taught using a combination of lectures, individual and group exercises and experiential learning, including a community service project, a brief home-stay for each student with a Ghanaian family and a day of work shadowing with a Ghanaian professional. Along with lectures from local academics and interaction with a variety of institutions and agencies, students will visit historical sites and attend cultural events. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375I. Global Issues, Health, & Sustainability in India. 3 Units.

Global Issues, Health, & Sustainability in India is an interdisciplinary social work and engineering collaboration that includes a short-term cross-cultural immersion. This course brings together social work (knowledge, values, and skills) and health care (promotion, education, and community) perspectives to the understanding of technical project assessment, selection, planning and implementation in India. The course is also designed to help students understand culturally relevant community engagement strategies to ensure project acceptance in underserved and developing communities. Many field sites will be visited in order to observe first-hand the community assessment and development of projects that engineers implement. An example of these projects could include infrastructure to support green energy and water (resource planning, development, conservation, and sanitation). This study abroad course will acquaint students with history and culture of India, its social, political and economic development and the impact it has on health and the delivery of social services. Participants will learn about factors affecting the abilities to reach, treat, educate, and equip communities to improve health outcomes. Engineering students will learn the quantitative aspects using a paradigm of hierarchical systems, mathematical modeling, and scenario analysis using a 'reasoning support' system. Together the engineering, social work, and health sciences students in disciplinary-balanced teams will jointly work on real and meaningful projects marrying the descriptive scenarios (that is the 'subjective' aspect) with the numerical scenario analysis based on mathematical modeling (or 'objective' aspect) to form a coherent view of the future. The course will be taught using both lecture and experiential modalities. Engineering students will conduct computer modeling work. Along with visiting a variety of governmental and non-governmental institutions, organizations and projects, students will visit historical sites and attend cultural events. Offered as EECS 342I and SASS 375I. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375J. International Travel & Study Abroad: Child Development/Child Welfare Nicaragua. 3 Units.

This four-week study abroad program to Nicaragua, Central America will introduce students to the history and culture of Nicaragua, its social, political and economic development, and current child development/health/child welfare issues. The program will focus on Spanish language acquisition or mastery along with substantive study in either child development & health or child welfare, depending on student interest. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SASS 375L. South Africa / Social Justice/S.W., International Learning through Community Immersion & Internship. 3 Units.

This three-credit course will be conducted in partnership with Educo Africa in Cape Town, South Africa. The course will provide experiential and service learning social work experiences in a nation still experiencing the lingering effects of decades of apartheid rule as well as the co-existence of developed and developing worlds within the boundaries of the country. Course activities will encourage cross cultural learning experiences to increase knowledge pertinent to South Africa's social, cultural, environmental, political and historical reality. It will expose students to community development challenges as well as environmental and social justice issues in a South African context. The goal of the course is to increase personal, community and global leadership potential of social work and social development professionals. This course in partnership to Educo Africa will use a community-based context to increase the effectiveness and expertise of students and will support student's engagement in program development and building international networks and partnerships.

SASS 385. Social Welfare Capstone Seminar. 3 Units.

This seminar course will revolve around the identification and critical investigation of current social problems. Insights gained from social welfare research will be applied to better understand these problems. Successful completion of the course will require critical analysis of published research, integration of information from social work and different disciplines, an oral presentation and a final written research report including a literature review. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

SASS 390. Independent Study for Undergraduates. 1 - 3 Units.

Individual study in Applied Social Sciences involving specific programs of reading, research, and special projects. Requires prior approval of faculty member directing the project. Recommended preparation: 12 hours of social science courses; approval of MSASS Associate Dean.

SASS 405. Nonprofit Ethics and Professionalism. 3 Units.

This course is an application of ethical frameworks and analysis to nonprofit organizations. Using cases and essays, the course will help nonprofit managers become better equipped to address ethical problems and dilemmas in their work in the following areas: ethics of boards, ethics and leadership, ethics and organizational culture, professional ethics, and ethics and fundraising.

SASS 406. Nonprofit Public Policy and Advocacy. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the institutions and processes that make up the political environment of nonprofit organizations in the United States. The course will examine the role of civil society in a democracy, take a general overview of American political institutions and the cultural beliefs that undergird them, and examine the important elements of the public policy process: the framing of issues, the role of political entrepreneurs and organized interests, elections, the legislative process and strategies for influencing it, and the roles of executive institutions and the courts. Emphasis will be placed on the ways that nonprofit advocates can advance their goals in the public policy process.

SASS 407. Nonprofit Revenue Planning and Development. 3 Units.

Revenue strategy and development are critical in advancing the mission and core work of a nonprofit organization, and are among the most strategic responsibilities held by an executive director and his/her board. Nonprofits face a myriad of revenue options which could be pursued but each of these has implications for how the organization advances it mission and its sustainability. The course will examine how to assess these revenue sources and evaluate how they can contribute to an organization's overall financial vitality.

SASS 408. Nonprofit Philanthropic Fundraising. 3 Units.

This course will provide current and future nonprofit leaders with a detailed survey of the practices, principles, and process of fundraising, enabling them to effectively create, participate in, and manage fund development programs and staff. Successful fundraising is shown to be communication-based and built upon solid relationships with defined constituencies of donors and potential donors.

SASS 409. Nonprofit Strategic Planning. 3 Units.

This is an integrated practicum designed to provide "hands-on" experience in planning for, designing, and conducting strategic planning in nonprofit organizations. Students will learn to assess organizational readiness, facilitate the design of strategic planning processes, create a variety of approaches involving key stakeholders, and finalize a planning design suited to organizational culture.

SASS 410. Nonprofit Databased Decision-Making. 3 Units.

Nonprofit leaders face a wide range of data needs and opportunities to use data to inform strategy and practice. This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of data analysis, statistical concepts, research designs for program planning and evaluation, and techniques for problem solving. By exploring a continuum of decision making opportunities in the nonprofit sector, the course will present methods and frameworks for collecting and interpreting data to inform organizational action.

SASS 411. Nonprofit Leadership Dialogs. 1 - 3 Units.

This course is intended to enable students to learn about major nonprofit leadership issues and trends through interaction and dialog with successful nonprofit leaders. It is also designed to provide outside nonprofit leaders with the opportunity to learn about the quality of the Mandel Center's student body.

SASS 420. Nonprofit Organization and Management. 3 Units.

This course will focus on theories of organizations and general concepts and principles of management, governance, and leadership. Organizational design, behavior, performance, and effectiveness will be studied, and the special character and management problems of nonprofit organizations will be highlighted and analyzed.

SASS 422. Nonprofit Assessment and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

The course is designed to introduce students to the approaches to organizational assessment and evaluation of organizational issues and problems. The class will explore a variety of ways of viewing organizations, assessing their stage of development, look at factors that influence or interfere with their forward progress, review the dimensions essential to nonprofit organizations and explore some processes useful to enable change. In addition, the course will focus on the process of creating and measuring program outcomes.

SASS 424. Nonprofit Economics. 3 Units.

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic ideas of microeconomic analysis so that they may apply this reasoning to important resource-related decisions facing contemporary nonprofit organizations. This introductory course will orient the student to the role of nonprofit organizations in a market economy, familiarizing the student with basic concepts of microeconomic analysis and how they apply to resource-related decisions, and provide the student with tools and concepts for analyzing pricing, compensation, outsourcing, investment of funds, and engaging in partnerships.

SASS 425. Nonprofit Financial Management. 3 Units.

This course focuses on techniques and principles of financial management including budgeting, finance and investment decision making. Topics include budget formulation, analysis and planning, present value analysis, cost-effectiveness, cash flow analysis, portfolio management, and venture planning. Special emphasis will be given to the unique problems of nonprofits in capital formation, generating earned income, managing endowments, gifts and grants, and tax planning.

SASS 426. Research Methods in Social Work. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts used in the conduct of scientific inquiry and the tools of research methodology. It introduces students to the issues involved in the design, implementation, analysis and utilization of social research. Students are encouraged to focus on a practice-related research problem in their individual or group research projects, as well as to focus on research issues relevant to their specialization, field of practice, or field of practicum setting. Students are alerted to the risks of cultural bias in research throughout the course through examples and scientific readings.

SASS 427. International Non-Governmental Organizations. 3 Units.

This course examines the role of voluntary associations in the international arena and, in particular, the multiple roles of international non-governmental organizations in affecting international political and economic outcomes. The course also examines the theoretical issues surrounding NGOs and international relations, particularly the relationship between global civil society and international political outcomes.

SASS 428. Trusteeship: Nonprofit Governance. 3 Units.

This elective course deals with the definition, history and concept of trusteeship, the areas of responsibilities of Boards of Trustees, the authority of Boards and the limits on its exercise, the organization of Boards and their committees, and the Board's relationships with the Executive Director, the staff and the organization's constituencies. Eligible for M.B.A. credit.

SASS 430. Nonprofit Human Resources. 3 Units.

Theories and principles of managing people in organizations are addressed in this course, including motivation theory and human resource development strategies. Particular attention is devoted to issues critical to nonprofit organizations, such as the management of volunteers, management of professionals, working with trustees, and staff/board relationships.

SASS 432. Nonprofit Marketing. 3 Units.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the principles and techniques of nonprofit marketing and with an understanding of the multiple contexts in which they are applicable--marketing of products and services, marketing to potential funders, marketing of ideas and behaviors (social marketing and advocacy). The focus of the course is on managerial decision-making to achieve organizational objectives and enhance organizational viability.

SASS 440. Human Development I: Child and Adolescent. 3 Units.

This course offers an overview of normal individual development throughout the life cycle. Psychosocial theory, learning theories, and social role theory constitute the theoretical base for this foundation course. Developmentally determined objectives and tasks for every life stage are examined in the context of biological, genetic, psychological, familial, and sociocultural factors. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of gender, health, and minority status, and on community institutions of human development. This course supports the foundation social work methods course by introducing substantive content on human development as a framework for assessment, prevention, and intervention with psychosocial problems. Curricularly related to the advanced sociobehavioral courses on human development and developmental dysfunction, this course provides a basic understanding of normal human development, which can serve as a contextual framework for developmental deviations from the norm.

SASS 441. Human Development II: Adult. 3 Units.

This course builds on SASS 440 Human Development I (child & adolescent) by compassing the general themes of feeling (emotion), thinking (cognition), and acting (behavior) with adult emotional, cognitive, and behavioral development. Students will understand the differences and similarities between earlier (child and adolescent) and later (adult, including older adult) emotional, cognitive, and behavioral development by examining, across the life-span, the idea/concept of: (1) adult development as gains/losses, (2) adult development as plasticity and variation (i.e., development can take many forms and can change), (3) adult development as risks, conflicts, protective factors, and resilience and (4) adult development as context (e.g., family, society, gender culture, ethnicity, social class, discrimination, sexual orientation, and socio-historical (i.e., cohort contexts). Prereq: SASS 440.

SASS 450. Nonprofit Law. 3 Units.

This course provides the student with a basic grounding in the laws and regulations governing nonprofit organizations. Content will include the procedures for incorporating, reporting, and maintaining tax-exempt status as a nonprofit organization, a familiarity with legal principles and research methods, and an overview of the legal, regulatory, and policy issues facing contemporary nonprofit organizations.

SASS 470. Social Policy. 3 Units.

This course provides basic perspectives on social policies related to poverty, health, aging, mental health, substance abuse, and discrimination. An analytical framework is used to systematically identify, define, and analyze social problems and policies. The course also introduces the student to social planning and service delivery.

SASS 477. Direct Practice Generalist Methods & Skills. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to develop culturally competent social work generalist practitioners who are armed with the knowledge and skills necessary to practice ethically with individuals and families in diverse social work practice settings. The course introduces major social work theories (i.e., systems-ecological theory) and intervention approaches (i.e., problem-solving). Understanding and practicing the skills necessary to carry out generalist practice will be a major focus on both lectures and skills lab.

SASS 478. Macro and Policy Practice Skills. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the development and application of practice skills in work with task groups, communities, and social policy institutions. It includes both didactic and experiential teaching and learning. The course is built on first semester foundation learning, particularly in the areas of social policy, diversity, discrimination, and oppression, and the direct practice skills lab. It will also draw on knowledge taught in the second semester course on theories of groups, organizations, and communities. Finally, there will be interaction with the field seminar and the field practicum. Prereq: SASS 477.

SASS 484. Theories of Oppression and Social Justice. 3 Units.

This course provides students with a basis for developing their ability to value a diverse world and to understand how discrimination and oppression operate to limit the life opportunities of members of minority and disenfranchised groups. Students will have the opportunity to develop and enhance their personal and professional awareness of their own cultural identity and to use this as a basis for developing their competence to work with individuals and groups different from themselves. Selected theoretical perspectives will provide a descriptive and explanatory framework for critically analyzing the manifestation of discrimination and oppression and their impact on the affected populations. Social work's response to discrimination and oppression within the profession and in society at large will also be examined.

SASS 495. Field Education Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar prepares students for entry into field education. The course introduces students to a number of topics that are considered basic to beginning the social work field practicum.

SASS 495V. Field Education Seminar. 1 Unit.

The Field Education Seminar provides the support and guidance necessary to assist foundation social work students to identify and finalize a field placement location. This course also prepares students for the upcoming field experience through self-assessments, discussions and reflective activities. This is a 16 week course.

SASS 500. Special Topics in Applied Social Sciences. 1 - 6 Units.


SASS 501. Nonprofit Practicum. 0 - 6 Units.

The overall goal of this course is to provide MNO students the opportunity to develop a practicum experience in a non-profit organizational setting. The course is designed to enhance knowledge acquired in the classroom by allowing students the flexibility to develop an individualized plan that will integrate professional practice skill development. The students will work closely with their Academic Advisor to determine whether a practicum meets the student's learning needs. The student will also be assigned a Practicum Instructor, who is based at the non-profit setting and provides the direct instruction of the student. Finally, the student will work with the Faculty Advisor, who is based at the School and serves as a link between all parties, oversees the requirements and standards of the School, and participates and consults in the design of the student's learning experience. The Student, Practicum Instructor, and Faculty Advisor all participate in various ways in the evaluation of student's practicum; the Faculty Advisor is responsible for assigning the grade.

SASS 505. Adoption: Practice and Policy. 3 Units.

This course covers the concepts, knowledge, skills, and policies associated with contemporary adoption practice. The practice method reflects a triad perspective, meaning that adoption is examined from the viewpoints of birth parents, adoptees, and adoptive parents. For each topic area, social work roles, activities, tasks, and skills are explored along with policy issues. Exemplars and case studies are presented for illustration purposes. Consideration of triad needs at different life cycle stages are presented. The issues of ethnically competent adoption practice are emphasized throughout the course in each content area.

SASS 506. Perspectives on Management and Leadership. 0 Unit.

This course is designed to explore management and leadership capabilities. The class explores personal and organizational aspects of leadership and management examining theoretical perspectives and models, governance, communication, advocacy, ethics and accountability. In addition, the course examines key tools for effective management and leadership to manage risk, challenges, building consensus and collaboration. The course also guides students through a personal leadership development journey. The classroom will serve as an interactive learning environment. Students will learn management and leadership abilities from readings, lecture, group discussion, reflection, assessment, planning and application. The content of the course integrates research across social work, business, the nonprofit sector, and literature to inform a solid perspective to enhance management and leadership capabilities. This course includes activities and feedback for students to facilitate growth and development, and is appropriate for students who want to become effective managers and leaders, growing related abilities and knowledge.

SASS 510. Health Disparities. 3 Units.

This course aims to provide theoretical and application tools for students from many disciplinary backgrounds to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The course will be situated contextually within the historical record of the United States, reviewing social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to disparities in general, with a central focus on health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities among other subgroups (e.g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed. Students will be expected to develop a research proposal (observational, clinical, and/or intervention) rooted in their disciplinary background that will incorporate materials from the various perspectives presented throughout the course, with the objective of developing and reinforcing a more comprehensive approach to current practices within their fields. Offered as CRSP 510, PQHS 510, MPHP 510, NURS 510, and SASS 510.

SASS 511. Issues in Health Policy and Service Delivery. 3 Units.

This course examines health care policy issues and options, and highlights the development of health care policy in the U.S., the influence of health policy development, and the role of social work. It also examines the problems, policy, and program issues in the subsidy, financing, reorganization, and regulatory capacity of health policy. National, state, and local issues will be stressed. The course is for students in the health concentration but also welcomes students from other areas. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 512. Legislative and Political Process. 3 Units.

This course focuses on how to deal effectively with legislators, their staff, and legislative systems. The roles of money and information in legislative and political systems are examined. The process through which a bill moves to become law is explored, including critical points of intervention in that process. Lobbying legislators, including presentation of testimony and use of coalitions, is featured. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 513. Aging Policy and Service Delivery. 3 Units.

This course reviews current income, health, and social service policies for older Americans. It also investigates patterns and levels of care for the elderly. Trends and issues in policies and programs for seniors are analyzed in the context of the dimensions and differential characteristics of the aging population in the country. Some cross-national comparisons of services for the elderly are included in this analysis. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 514. Mental Health Policy and Service Delivery. 3 Units.

This course is designed for students preparing for careers as social workers in the mental health field with an understanding of mental health policy and service delivery at the federal, state, and local levels. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and written assignments, the course will aid students in developing a macro-level perspective of mental health policies and programs. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 515. Family Caregiving. 3 Units.

The purpose of this interdisciplinary graduate-level seminar is to explore the theoretical research, policy, and practice issues related to informal caregiving of the elderly. Topics will include the historical and cultural context of family caregiving, theoretical paradigms (i.e., adult development, stress and coping), characteristics of caregivers (i.e., gender, relationship, race, ethnicity, employment status, geographical setting), characteristics of the elderly care-receiver (i.e., type of cognitive and physical impairments), ethics, physical and mental health outcomes, service delivery issues, institutionalization, and bereavement. Through readings, discussions, guest lectures, and paper presentations, students will learn about the complexities of informal caregiving of the elderly from a range of disciplinary perspectives in order to improve assessment and practice skills in a variety of settings. Students are encouraged to focus on issues relevant to their discipline, specialization, or field of practice for their seminar papers.

SASS 516. Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Policy and Service Delivery. 3 Units.

This course explores selected current alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) problems using a problem analysis framework. Emphasis is placed on current and past AODA problem definitions as they affect policy and program development. Conceptualization of the problems resulting from AODA patterns of use and abuse, causation theories, the impact of cultural and social diversity as well as discrimination upon all client systems, and the role of local and national institutions which advocate for this population group are reviewed. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 517. Family System Interventions. 3 Units.

This course covers the knowledge, concepts, and skills associated with working families. The practice method will reflect a family systems approach, integrating theories and approaches within a systemic perspective. It will build practice skills in assessing, interviewing, and intervening with families and emphasize a strength-based perspective on intervention with families. Considerations of family issues at different developmental stages will be presented. The issue of ethically competent and community-based social work practice with families will be stressed throughout the course for each content area. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 518. Social Work with Death, Grief and Loss. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the concept of death and related topics from a social work perspective. Such topics include the role of death in American culture; the dying process and its institutions; assessment and intervention strategies; life span and family life considerations; and end-of-life decisions. The course provides both theoretical and experiential exposure to the dying process as it relates to self, the dying person, and the bereaved. Students will gain insight into serving the terminally ill, those who need assistance with mourning and grief, and clients dealing with difficult life-and-death decisions regarding loved ones. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 519. Children and Families in the School Setting. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to be certified school social workers. The course addresses major issues in American schools; a theoretical framework for school social work services; design, deliverance, and evaluation of school social work services; legal and ethical issues; and the roles and intervention strategies of school social workers. It covers student and family problems and areas of need such as disability, truancy, divorce, teen pregnancy, youth depression and suicide, substance abuse, violence, and dropping out of school. This course is required for those participating in a planned program of study leading to state certification as a school social worker. If space permits, other students may enroll if they have or have had school social work experience. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 520. Homelessness Policy and Service Delivery. 3 Units.

This course provides an understanding of homelessness and its incidence and prevalence, its origins, both historical and social, its consequences, and policy-based strategies for its prevention. The course investigates the impact of homelessness on single individuals, families with children, minorities, and vulnerable populations such as the mentally ill and alcoholics. Students, organized into a task force, examine a range of professional and community-based responses to the problem. The task force method enables students to assess the effects of public policy on homeless people, critique the effectiveness and adequacy of local shelter and service programs, and propose community-based strategies to prevent, stop, and better homelessness. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 521. Supervision. 3 Units.

The course focuses on the role of strength-based supervision in improving outcomes clients served in the various social service and nonprofit systems, and on developing the skills necessary for effective supervision and leadership. The course examines the context of contemporary supervision, and presents models of supervision grounded in systems theory, developmental theory, and social justice theory. This course is also designed to build practical skills for organizational leadership, focusing on adaptive leadership.

SASS 522. Motivational Interviewing. 3 Units.

This advanced methods course provides a basic orientation to the concepts in Motivational Interviewing, which is a collaborative, person-centered form of eliciting and strengthening motivation for change. It is a way of working with persons to assist them in accessing their intrinsic motivation to change behaviors that contradict their essential values and interfere with the achievement of their life goals. Motivational Interviewing is both a philosophy and a set of strategic techniques. It is an evidence-based treatment with a broad range of applications. The course will place an emphasis on individuals with severe and persistent mental illness and/or substance use disorders. Specific techniques to recognize, elicit and strengthen change talk, as well as responding to resistance and consolidating a person's commitment to change will be explored. Exercises and examples specific to the unique practice setting of participants will be incorporated. Students will have an opportunity to practice these techniques in role/real-play and other group exercises as well as measure skill application and provide meaningful feedback to their peers. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 524. Social Work with Military Veterans and their Families. 3 Units.

Military Social Work is an advanced direct practice concentration course designed to educate social workers in the needs of military service members on active duty and during transition to civilian life. SASS 477, SASS 547 and SASS 549 are pre-requisites for this course. The course is based on the guidelines released in 2010 by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and on the NASW educational program for social workers developed as part of the Joining Forces initiative. The course takes the perspective that uniformed forces have a specific culture, rules of conduct, and identifiable bio-psycho-social concerns related to military service. This specificity requires social worker to learn about evidence-based military practice behaviors and core competencies working with members of any branch of the Department of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA). This course will help students to understand military culture, to recognize stressors related to military service and to address mental health problems affecting military personnel and their families. The course will use case materials to illustrate similarities and differences among various populations including minority/ethnic identity groups. Students will have opportunities to work on the following abilities: The Revised MSASS Abilities: 1. Identify as a Reflective Professional Social Worker 2. Advocate for Social, Economic and Environmental Justice 3. Apply Social Work Methods 4. Uphold Social Work Values and Ethics 5. Integrate Cultural, Economic, and Global Diversity 6. Think Critically about Theory and Research Knowledge 7. Communicate Effectively 8. Develop as a Social Work Leader Prereq: SASS 477, SASS 547 and SASS 549.

SASS 525. AIDS Seminar. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide an understanding of HIV/AIDS. The nature and prevalence of the disease, including its impact upon vulnerable populations such as children and youth, women, gay and lesbian populations, people of color, prisoners, IV drug users, and street people are examined. The course focuses on public policies, programs, and service delivery for HIV/AIDS at local, state, and national levels. Topics include the policy-making role of advocacy groups, the function of AIDS service organizations, and the design of educational and preventive programs. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 527. The Theory and Practice of Leadership. 3 Units.

This course assists students preparing for management and leadership roles in social service organizations to understand theories of leadership and translate them into effective leadership practices. The class explores leadership definitions, tasks and responsibilities, and the development of leadership capabilities. Students also examine their personal values, beliefs, skills, and understanding of ethical principles underlying leadership. Prereq: SASS 440 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 529. Child and Family Policy and Service Delivery. 3 Units.

This course focuses on major federal legislation impacting children, youth, and families, examined in the context of community based social work policy/practice. It builds upon the foundation course in social welfare policy and enables students to use an advocacy approach to provide policy-informed services and to participate in policy and implementation and change. Prereq: SASS 470 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 530. Practice Evaluation. 3 Units.

This advanced course prepares direct practice students to examine their own practice with individuals, families, and groups. Attention is given to basic principles of measurement and selection of appropriate measurement instruments for use in direct practice settings. The course is intended to provide students with the technical skills necessary to investigate the components of social work practice and contribute to an empirically validated social work knowledge base. The student is asked to determine the efficacy of his/her practice intervention in field placement by using a suitable design and method. A hands-on project is required using clinical experience from field practice. Prereq: SASS 426 and SRCH 426 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 531. Collaboration & Strategic Partnerships. 3 Units.

The development of strategic alliances is being used increasingly as a key for nonprofit organizations to carry out their missions. This course is designed to provide students with the conceptual and practical resources necessary for leadership in the formation and maintenance of such alliances. Various models and strategies for creating and sustaining local, community-based, and national relationships are explored. The course is based on "practical theory," builds on current knowledge about creating mulch-organizational partnerships, and expands capabilities to participate in these efforts. The overarching goals of this course are that students, as members of this "learning community," will (a) develop a deeper understanding of the core knowledge required for successful collaboration, (b) deepen their appreciation of the values and ethics involved in creating strategic alliances, and (c) enhance their ability to apply acquired skills in the area of inter-organizational relations. Prereq: SASS 477 and SASS 478 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 532. Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation. 3 Units.

This course covers research methods and analytic tools that are used in communities and organizations to plan, monitor and evaluate programs, projects and initiatives. It builds upon the research methods course in the foundation curriculum and deepens and expands this content at the advanced level. The content prepares students to use quantitative and qualitative research methods to plan and evaluate programs, policies and practices. The class covers the conceptual and technical aspects of conducting needs assessment in and applying the tools and findings to the community, program and organizational development process. The course employs a circle perspective with the goal that students will be able to judge the strengths and weaknesses of various tools and approaches and the degree to which ethical standards have been met. Students are introduced to a variety of methods for community and needs assessment, demographic, statistical and geographic analysis, qualitative and quantitative data gathering methods, and program and policy evaluation designs. The importance of conducting research in ways that respect cultural diversity and are valid across diverse populations is emphasized. The practical aspects of using data to drive decision making, quality improvement, outcomes management and the engagement of partners and stakeholders are also covered in the course. This course is structured to have a strong emphasis on skill development in data gathering, analysis and application. Prereq: SASS 426 or SRCH 426 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 534. Theoretical Contexts Shaping Community Practice. 3 Units.

The aim of the course is to provide students in the Community Practice for Social Change concentration with a thorough overview and analysis of the range of individual, group, organizational and community-level theories that inform our practice with organizations, neighborhoods, communities, social institutions and policies. The course seeks to help students: (1) develop an appreciation of the main traditions, theoretical debates, experiences and research findings in community practice both as a change process and as an interdisciplinary field; (2) identify the key ideological assumptions underlying these theories with attention to the broader historical, economic, social, demographic, institutional and political influences that affect these assumptions as well as resultant practice both in the United States and internationally; (3) identify, articulate and apply theories of change through the practice of theorizing; and (4) understand and apply logic models for community problem solving. The course emphasizes application of theory to practice settings and developing skills and competencies for community work in diverse settings.

SASS 535. Human Sexuality. 3 Units.

The course addresses sexuality as an integral part of human functioning and human relationships throughout the life cycle. The formation of sexual identity is addressed, including gender identity, sexual orientation, and sexual intention. The physiological and psychological aspects of sexual behavior are covered, including the effects of aging, chronic illness, and sexually transmitted diseases. The course concludes with practical applications for social work, including an overview of assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunction. Prereq: SASS 440 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 536. Individual Research Practicum. 3 Units.

With instructor and research sequence chair approval, an individual program of supervised research experience may be undertaken. This course allows the student to tailor a program of applied research to a specific practice issue or program. Prereq: SASS 426 or SASS 400-TR

SASS 538. Evidence-Based Practice: Selection, Implementation, and Practice Issues. 3 Units.

This course prepares students to critically assess and reflect on evidence-based practice theory, principles, and practice issues as they relate to social work. Students will integrate knowledge of assessment and clinical treatment theories with the growing research and science base of evidence-based practice. The course will focus on multiple levels of evidence-based practice promotion including the individual level, the programmatic and agency level, and the broader market place contexts. In the beginning of the course, students will be introduced to the history and background of the evidence-based practice movement, including definitions and terms. Students will also examine how to incorporate strategies optimizing client needs and circumstances into the EBP decision-making process, and to think critically about how to ensure that their practice adheres to social work values and ethics. Students will learn issues and strategies for locating, selecting, and evaluating EBP practice research, including the selection of EBPs tailored to a specific client or population. On the programmatic and agency levels, students will examine core implementation components and challenges (e.g., planning, educating, financing, restructuring, managing quality, attending to policy) commonly faced in agency practice by clinicians, supervisors and administrators. As students are exposed to the implementation science literature and research, they will appreciate how key multilevel implementation approaches can be designed and applied to promote health and behavioral health innovation on both the prevention and intervention levels. Finally, students will review that EBP landscape from a broader perspectives including prevention science, and the diffusion of innovations, examining important controversies and market trends that influence and impact contemporary evidence-based practice in social work. Prereq: SASS 477 and SASS 478.

SASS 539. Early Intervention: Theories and Practice. 1 - 3 Units.

This course both describes the characteristics of young children with disabilities and examines the intervention models and practices that are used to address the developmental and social-emotional needs of these children. The course describes the legislative and philosophical foundations for contemporary early intervention practice. It discusses the meaning of evidence based practice and examines contemporary early intervention practices from this perspective. The readings and assignments for this course have been designed to reflect the course objectives.

SASS 539A. Early Intervention Practicum. 0 Unit.

This practicum course is zero academic credit hour for students who have been selected for the Early Intervention Traineeship program. Students will work with the practicum instructor to complete 60 hours of experience in early intervention.

SASS 545. Program Design. 3 Units.

Program design and development are of critical importance in nonprofit organizations. In this course students will gain a practical, hands-on understanding of strategies for designing programs. The course focuses on program development approaches that attempt to maximize a program's relevance to the need being addressed and increase the likelihood that the program will attain its identified outcomes. Emphasis is placed on learning to understand a community's need/problem, reviewing evidence on potential strategies and identifying promising practices, anticipating potential implementation challenges and addressing them, and identifying potential funders. The link between program design and the development of effective program proposals is stressed. Through this course students will have the opportunity to design a program using a specific analytic framework. Students will learn: (1) to address the demands of multiple constituencies and competing values in program development process, (2) skills for developing and implementing programs in the nonprofit sector, and (3) to examine issues of diversity as they affect organizations and community efforts and explore personal values and ethics as these influence programs and interventions.

SASS 546. Poverty Strategies for Social Workers. 3 Units.

This course provides an understanding of poverty. It examines poverty through an exploration of its causes, theory, policy strategies for its amelioration and practice implications. The course investigates the impact of poverty on single individuals, families with children, minorities, and vulnerable populations. The course will examine welfare reform and its impact in bringing people out of poverty. Students, in teams, will examine one facet of poverty--its theories, policies, impacts on individuals and families, potential solutions, and our approaches to the issues as social workers. In addition to assigned texts and readings, the course will be supplemented by practitioners, organizers, and low-income persons addressing the issues of poverty. Prereq: SASS 440 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 547. Problem Identification, Screening and Assessment/Diagnosis. 3 Units.

This course will provide a bio-psycho-social approach to identification, screening, assessment and diagnoses of common psychosocial problems/dysfunctions experienced clients. This course introduces the student to the etiology, recognition and diagnoses of these problems in the context of social work practice. Through use of a competency-based model, students will be introduced to techniques used to screen, assess and diagnose problems such as serious mental illness, suicidality, depression and anxiety, substance abuse, child abuse, elder abuse, and exposure trauma. Students will also become familiar with the use of the DSM IV TR in providing axis I diagnostic formulations. A skills-based approach will be used in presenting students with specific screening, assessment and diagnostic protocols. This course is designed to incorporate a range of issues associated with stages across the lifespan from childhood to late life. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 548. International Social Work. 3 Units.

This is an advanced seminar designed for students interested in the international dimensions of the social work profession and social work practice. The seminar focuses on commonalities and differences in the roles and functions of social workers in different nations. It also gives attention to social work as a global profession and social work practice on an international level. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 549. Theory/Practice Approaches in Direct Practice Social Work. 3 Units.

This required, three credit course introduces selected theories and practice approaches commonly used in social work with individuals, families and groups. The course is designed to provide students with knowledge of theoretical explanations and practice frameworks commonly used in direct social work practice. The course also encourages students to apply critical thinking skills to theory and its practical applications. Case presentations, class discussions and assignments will require students to apply various theoretical perspectives to common problems and issues in social work practice. The course will highlight the use of professional social work values and attention to human development issues, diversity and cultural perspectives as they apply in each theory or framework. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 550. Trauma Informed Social Work Practice with Children & Families. 3 Units.

This course builds on foundation direct practice courses and focuses specifically on children, adolescents and families affected by trauma. It uses both a developmental and an ecological systems perspective recognizing that in order to successfully treat trauma, it is important to not only focus on the individual but also on the family and the larger community environment of which the child or adolescent is a part. It is designed to foster an understanding of the neurobiology of trauma as well as to develop specific skills in interviewing children, child assessment including case formulation, selection of appropriate interventions, and using specific intervention strategies at different levels of the trauma system. Rather than teaching one specific intervention model, students will develop an understanding the importance of using the empirical literature, critical thinking skills, and clinical judgment to determine how to best intervene. The issues of ethically and culturally competent practice are emphasized throughout the course in each content area. Finally, the impact of secondary trauma on the practitioner is acknowledged and students develop plans for self-care.

SASS 555. Women's Issues. 3 Units.

This course examines theories that are relevant to the development and socialization of women, and discusses issues that are relevant to women's lives within the context of oppression based on sexism, racism, ageism, homophobia, and other forms of discrimination. Emphasis is placed on assisting students in becoming more aware of the issues that are specifically relevant to their own development and socialization, and preparing for effective and sensitive professional practice by increasing knowledge about the issues facing women. Prereq: SASS 440 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 561. Community Practice Policy: Analyzing and Changing Social Policy. 3 Units.

This course teaches knowledge, values and skills for analyzing and changing social policy. The course uses a policy practice framework to examine the development and implementation of community and social policy and to prepare students to participate in policy change. A Policy Practice Project provides an opportunity for students to develop skills in planning, advocacy, and policy development. Students work in groups to develop and implement a change strategy targeted at the agency or community level. Course content includes policy analysis, logic models, and advocacy methods. The course will also cover essential social policies relevant to community practice including place based and population based policies for improving communities such as community development, employment and housing policies.

SASS 562. Social Work Intervent in Co-occurring Mental and Substance Abuse Disor. 3 Units.

This advanced methods course provides a basic orientation to substance use disorders in persons with mental illness (SAMI). A biopsychosocial framework will be used to explore the etiology, the maintenance and the recovery of both mental and substance use disorders. The historical background of practitioner, programmatic, and institutional barriers that impede the development and application of clinical skills to dually diagnosed individuals will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for the implementation of services to deal with individuals with co-occurring problems and their families using the evidence-based New Hampshire-Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center Integrated Treatment (IT) Model. Current assessment techniques and treatment of special populations including, but not limited to: women, minorities, and adolescents will be discussed. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 563. Resources for Community And Social Development. 3 Units.

Students will be able to understand and utilize the methods to identify, garner, and effectively use resources that promote community and social development. These methods can be applied to expanding resources for individuals, families, communities, and society, as well as to generate resources for organizations. While primarily focusing on financial resources, the course will also consider the important means of positioning an agency or organization to attract and receive resources and collaborate with others to put those resources to their most effective use. The skills that students practice in the course will include fund raising, grant development, financing, strategic partnerships and business deals, marketing, etc. The course will introduce proven models, such as low income tax credits, micro-enterprise, individual development accounts, and revolving loan programs. Students will also learn how to analyze and understand key domestic and international policies and institutions (e.g., foundations, banks, businesses, governments, associations) that relate to resources for community and social development.

SASS 564. Social Work Practice in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. 3 Units.

SASS 564 is an advanced direct practice concentration course focused upon knowledge, skills and values important for social work practice with people who abuse and/or are dependent on alcohol and other drugs. The content of SASS 564 directly builds upon the foundation direct practice course (SASS 477) and the required advanced course in screening and assessment (SASS 576). SASS 564 takes a bio-psycho-social approach to prevention, assessment and treatment of alcohol and other drug abuse and dependency (AODA) problems. This course introduces the student to the etiology and treatment of alcohol and other drug abuse in the context of social work practice. The historical background and the development of the evidence base of alcohol and other drug treatment interventions, self-help groups, and conceptual models of addiction will be presented. Students will explore their own attitudes and values toward AODA problems and how these affect treatment outcome as well as commonly used prevention and treatment approaches in social work with people who abuse and/or are dependent upon alcohol and other drugs. The course will use case materials to illustrate similarities and differences among various populations including minority/ethnic identity groups. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 567. Assessing, Building & Organizing Community. 3 Units.

This course will examine strategies of community and social development, focusing on community as a means of impacting social change and improving the quality of life for individuals and families in low-income urban communities. Students will learn the history, frameworks and models of community building and community organizing. The course will include critical analysis of the goals, strategies, and the potential and the challenges that these efforts have faced and the lessons learned to date. Students will also learn practice skills in the related social processes in the United State and Internationally, such as strategic planning, participatory action research, consciousness-raising, and direct action. As community and social development models are presented, students will participate in a comparative analysis of the roles played by community organizers, community builders, community-based organizations, and community initiatives. Through real world experience and case studies, students will develop skills in neighborhood assessment, civic engagement, empowerment, leadership development, group work, relationship building, social capital formation, conflict resolution, democratic process, social policy analysis and change, and other methods.

SASS 569. Planning & Implementing Social Change. 3 Units.

This course builds skills for the design, planning and implementation of social change. The focus of this course is on promoting social change through more strategic and impactful planning, positioning and partnerships. The premise of this course is that the impact and sustainability of programs, initiatives and other change efforts can be strengthened through more effective planning, better strategic positioning and organizational adaptation to external circumstances and trends, and stronger collaborations and partnerships. Students will strengthen their ability to work effectively within organizations, in collaborations and coalitions, and within communities and systems. Course content includes the development of theories of change and action, logic, models, strategic planning, organizational assessment, strategic positioning, collaboration and coalition building, systems reform, and effective working relationships with funders and local intermediaries. A service learning assignment with a community partner. Prereq: SASS 567

SASS 574. Legal Issues in Social Work. 3 Units.

This course explores the legal issues that permeate the social work profession. Starting with a historical examination of our legal systems, the course will illustrate how social work is influenced and shaped by constitutional, statutory, and legal policy constructs. Students will learn about the skills necessary to provide testimony and to conduct forensic interviews, and we will discuss the legal foundation of ethical considerations and social work values. Students will also learn basic skills in how to utilize the law and legal processes to best advocate for clients and address larger social justice issues. By the end of the course, students will understand how social workers can competently navigate the choppy waters of the law in an interdisciplinary professional environment.

SASS 575. Travel and Study Seminar. 3 Units.

This course acquaints the student with the socio-political factors that influence the development of social welfare systems in a selected country and the impact of these systems on the development and functioning of individuals, families, groups, or communities. The role of the emerging social work profession in social change is explored via the social welfare system. Topics focus on the health care, mental health, aging, child, and/or educational systems and are oriented towards direct practice, management, or community development.

SASS 576. Integrative Seminar in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Treatment. 3 Units.

This course is an advanced level course in the Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Specialization that provides opportunities for students to increase their knowledge of topics in the areas of assessment, diagnosis and treatment of alcohol and other drug disorders. The seminar builds upon course material in Foundation Methods (477) and in the advanced methods course (SASS 549 and SASS 564). The seminar is intended to help students understand the evidence base for the treatment of substance use disorders and to explore selected areas of social work practice in intervention in the context of that evidence. Community applications of theory and techniques are stressed. The integrative Seminar in AODA Treatment uses a seminar format and provides students the opportunity to interact with treatment professionals from various treatment and practice settings. The seminar formal also facilitates individual learning: each student selects his or her own topic to pursue in depth. Each student is responsible for leading a minimum of one seminar presentation. Each student will select the topic for the seminar in consultation with the instructor. Coreq: SASS 477 and SSWM 564 or SASS 564.

SASS 579. Cognitive Behavioral Interventions. 3 Units.

This course acquaints students with the theoretical, conceptual, and skill bases of several cognitive-behavioral approaches to practice. Topics include assessment, use of tasks and homework, coping skills, cognitive restructuring, and problem solving approaches to practice. The course draws upon students' field and work experiences to illustrate the application of the concepts and skills under discussion. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR

SASS 580. Social Work Practice in Mental Health: Children and Adolescents. 3 Units.

This advanced methods course builds on the content from required foundation social work methods, policy and human development courses including Direct Practice Methods and Skills, Mental Health Policy and Service Delivery. This course complements the content of advanced methods courses including Social Work with People Who Have Chronic Mental Illness, Social Work in Child Abuse and Family Violence, and Interventions in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. This course develops biopsychosocial knowledge and intervention techniques related to professional settings specializing in child and adolescent mental health: hospitals, child guidance agencies, family service agencies, mental health centers, and residential treatment centers. Students learn to use development and clinical theory to guide interventions while, maximizing individual strengths, social work treatment centers. Students learn to use development and clinical theory to guide interventions while, maximizing individual strengths, social work values and ethics, and empowerment. Social and economic risk factors, such as poverty, discrimination, and oppression, are considered in the intervention process and in the utilization of mental health services. In addition, students learn to think critically about the myriad ways cultural diversity influences parenting, child and adolescent norms and expectations. Students utilize assessment skills, coupled with knowledge of development and clinical theory to explore clinical case studies. Prereq: SASS 440 and SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 581. Social Work Practice with Older Adults. 3 Units.

This course is an advanced methods course that builds on the knowledge gained in Foundation Methods. The content of SASS 581 directly builds upon the foundation direct practice course (SASS 477) and the required advanced course in screening and assessment (SASS 576). It is also a required course in the Aging Specialization for the MSSA. The course will focus on the persistent principles and emerging emphases in direct practice with older adults and their families. Students will be asked to develop a model of practice based on knowledge of this unique population, social work values, and practice concepts. The course includes special issues in assessment, strengths-base case management, and intervention approaches known to be effective with emotional disorders in older adults. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 582. Social Work in Child Abuse and Family Violence. 3 Units.

This course addresses the etiology, investigation, and treatment of child abuse including sexual abuse and the roles of child welfare, health, and mental health agencies. Particular attention is given to direct work with children and adults who have experienced abuse, and to interventions in instances of family violence. Prereq: SASS 440 and SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 583. Social Work Practice in Mental Health Adults. 3 Units.

This advanced methods course builds on the content from required foundation social work methods, policy, and advanced sociobehavioral theory courses including Direct Practice Methods and Skills, Mental Health Policy and Service Delivery, Advanced Child and Adolescent Development and Dysfunction, and Adult Psychopathology. This course complements the content of advanced methods courses including Social Work with People Who Have Chronic Mental Illness, Social Work in Child Abuse and Family Violence, and Interventions in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. This course develops biopsychosocial knowledge and intervention techniques related to professional settings specializing in child and adolescent mental health: hospitals, child guidance agencies, family service agencies, mental health centers, and residential treatment centers. Students learn to use development and clinical theory to guide interventions while, maximizing individual strengths, social work values and ethics, and empowerment. Social and economic risk factors, such as poverty, discrimination, and oppression, are considered in the intervention process and in the utilization of mental health services. In addition, students learn to think critically about the myriad ways cultural diversity influences parenting, child and adolescent norms and expectations. Students utilize assessment skills, coupled with knowledge of development and clinical theory to explore clinical case studies. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 584. Integrative Seminar in Mental Health: Children and Adolescents. 3 Units.

Integrative Seminar in Mental Health: Children and Adolescents is an advanced level course, a capstone course in the Mental Health Child and Adolescent Specialization, that provides opportunities for students to increase their knowledge of assessment, diagnosis and treatment. This course builds on the course material in SASS 580, SASS 477, SASS 549, and SASS 576. The seminar is intended to help students integrate theory and practice, especially in the context of public mental health and community-based, social service practice. The integrative Seminar in Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents uses a seminar format facilitates individual learning and promotes a learning-to practice, reflective approach. The seminar assumes there are numerous evidenced-based models and practices and focuses student learning on the role of the professional use of self in the implementation of theory, technique, model, or intervention.

SASS 585. Social Work with Groups. 3 Units.

A theoretical formulation of the social group work method as a problem solving process is addressed. Exercises are presented in the use of diagnostic skills to determine individual needs and problems for which groups may be helpful, the worker's role in facilitating group functioning through his/her use of various program media. Attention is given to the significance of goals, agency environment, and policy for direct work with groups. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 586. Social Work with Couples. 3 Units.

This course provides an overview of assessment and intervention methods for working with couples around issues of marriage, divorce, and remarriage. Alternate couple forms are discussed. The course emphasizes systems and social learning approaches, communication and negotiation in problem solving and its relevance to assessment, treatment structure, and techniques. Special attention will be given to problem areas such as commitment, sexual dysfunction, chemical dependency, and destructive communication patterns. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 587. Integrative Seminar in Mental Health: Adults. 3 Units.

The Integrative Seminar in Social Work Practice with Adults is an advanced level course, a capstone course in the Mental Health Adult Specialization, that provides opportunities for students to increase their knowledge of assessment, diagnosis and treatment. This course builds on course material in SASS 583, SASS 477, and SASS 576. The seminar is intended to help students integrate theory and practice, especially in the context of public mental health and community-based, social service practice. The Integrative Seminar in Social Work Practice with Adults uses a seminar format and provides students the opportunity to interact with professionals, from various treatment and practice settings. The seminar format facilitates individual learning and promotes a learning to practice, reflective approach. The seminar assumes there are numerous evidenced-based models and practices and focuses student learning on the role of the professional use of self in the implementation of theory, technique, model, or intervention. Prereq: SASS 583 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 589. Advanced Social Work Practice In Integrated Healthcare. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to introduce social work students to the direct practice of integrated behavioral health in primary care settings. Students will become knowledgeable of the roles of behavioral health providers working in healthcare settings, theories and models of care, and cross-cultural issues. They will develop skills in engagement, assessment, intervention, planning and implementation, and practice evaluation. Because the populations served in primary care settings span the continuum of severity in both the physical and behavioral health dimensions, students will develop competencies in engaging and supporting diverse patients across a range of health conditions. Prereq: SASS 477 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 590. Field Practice. 1 - 12 Units.


SASS 594. Independent Study Abroad. 1 - 12 Units.

(Credit as arranged.)

SASS 598. Individual Reading. 1 - 12 Units.

Special written permission needed. See MSASS registrar.

SASS 601. Field Education I. 2 Units.

The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. The field instructor is based at the social service setting and provides the direct instruction of the student. The faculty advisor, who is based at the School, serves as a link between all parties, interprets the requirements and standards of the School, and participates and consults in the design of the student's learning experience. The field instructor assigns tasks to the student according to the requirements of the School and the educational and experiential level of the student. Student, field instructor, and faculty field advisor all participate in various ways in the evaluation of the student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade.

SASS 602. Field Education II. 3 Units.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Advanced Standing students in the first semester of their master's program and by Foundation level social work students in the second semester of their master's program. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. For students entering the program with advanced standing, there is an additional requirement of four logs and an integrative assignment, and periodic meetings with a field faculty advisor in addition to the field conference. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values, and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Students spend 336 hours in field and professional development in SASS 602. Prereq: SASS 601 or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 603. Field Education III. 3 Units.

The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop advanced level competencies in their area of concentration in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Students spend 336 hours in field and professional development in SASS 603. Prereq: SASS 602 or equivalent.

SASS 604. Field Education IV. 3 Units.

This course is designed to be taken by students in their advanced course of study. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop advanced level competencies in their area of concentration in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Student, field instructor, and field faculty advisor all participate in the evaluation of the student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 336 hours in field and professional development in SASS 604. Prereq: SASS 603 or equivalent.

SASS 608. Philosophy of Science and Theory Building. 3 Units.

This is a required foundation course. The nature of theory is examined. Inductive and deductive methods for knowledge building are reviewed. Course content draws from philosophy of science as well as empirical and phenomenological research.

SASS 609. Theories of Social Welfare and Social Justice. 3 Units.

This is a foundation course required for all students. Theories of social welfare and social justice are examined. Course content draws from moral philosophy, economics, political science, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, psychology, and social welfare theory and provides students with a broad orientation to the field of theoretical social welfare.

SASS 610. Theories of Human Behavior: Macro and Micro Dimensions. 3 Units.

This is a required, foundation course and is designed to help students acquire a critical and reflective approach to theory in social work research and practice. The course provides a broad overview of theoretical perspectives at the individual, group, community, organizational and/or societal levels and addresses major theoretical perspectives used in social work and social welfare research.

SASS 613. Advanced Research Design. 3 Units.

This foundation course in research methods is required of all students. It is a prerequisite to the quantitative and qualitative courses. Topics covered include operationalization of variables, threats to validity, and experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental research design.

SASS 614. Models of Qualitative Research. 3 Units.

This required course introduces students to the principles, approaches, methods, and analytical techniques utilized when conducting qualitative research in the social sciences. Five models of qualitative research design and methodology are studied, including narrative analysis, case study, ethnography, and grounded theory and phenomenology. This course is designed to provide students with the tools to critically evaluate as well as to enhance the academic rigor or "quality" of qualitative data. Prereq: SASS 608 and SASS 613.

SASS 615. Social Statistics and Data Analysis. 3 Units.

This foundation course (or its equivalent) is required of all students. Content includes univariate, bivariate and inferential statistics, and the use of electronic data processing technology to manage and analyze data. Prereq: SASS 613.

SASS 616. Applied Regression and the Linear Model. 3 Units.

This is a required course in the research methods sequence for MSASS doctoral students. At the end of this course, students will be able to apply ordinary least squares regression and logistic regression in the analysis of social science data. They will learn to formulate research questions and hypotheses, specify statistical models, carry out the appropriate analyses, interpret their findings, and communicate their results clearly and effectively. Prereq: SASS 613 and SASS 615.

SASS 617. Specialization Seminar. 3 Units.

This elective course is a graduate level seminar; students and instructors share in the responsibility for presenting information and constructive criticism on the material. Topics include the selection and description of a social welfare topic, the theoretical explanations of that topic and the development of a focused, empirically-based literature review resulting in research questions and hypothesis.

SASS 618. Measurement Issues in Quantitative Research. 3 Units.

This required course covers the operationalization of social science concepts and development of methods for their measurement. Issues covered include index and scale construction, validity, reliability, questionnaire design, factor analysis, measurement error, and missing data. Prereq: SASS 613, SASS 615 and SASS 616.

SASS 619. Structural Equation Modeling. 3 Units.

This advanced-level, elective statistics course focuses on the family of analytical techniques referred to as structural equation modeling (SEM). SEM covers both measurement models (e.g., confirmatory factor analysis) and structural models. The course covers theoretical and methodological considerations and preliminary data screening necessary to ascertain whether SEM would be an appropriate technique; terminology and notation specific to SEM; statistical assumptions and strategies for assessing and remedying possible violations; use of SEM to conduct confirmatory factor analysis; use of SEM to test structural models, including mediation models; advanced models (e.g., multiple-group, longitudinal, dyadic, to be determined by student interests); how to critique SEM analyses and identify common problems; statistical power; and best practices for reporting SEM analyses and results. AMOS will be used to conduct the SEM analyses and SPSS to conduct preliminary analyses. The course uses a combination of readings, class discussion, lecture, written assignments, and hands-on computer labs. Prereq: SASS 613, SASS 615, SASS 616 and SASS 618.

SASS 620. Intervention Research for Social Work Practice. 3 Units.

This course provides a critical overview of the major theories and the body of research informing contemporary social work practice. Theories will include the foundational, such as psychodynamic, ego-psychological, ecological and systems, along with trans-theoretical and post-modern theories. The course will integrate a discussion of the history of scientific inquiry in social work, particularly focusing on practice or intervention studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Criteria for evaluating individual studies and the evidence base in specific practice areas will be included, along with material on the current state of Evidence-Based Practice. Recommended preparation: SASS 610.

SASS 621. Social Welfare Policy. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the critical review and application of policy analysis frameworks related to social welfare policy. The conceptual, historical, ideological, and political foundations contributing to the development, formulation, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation of social welfare policies will be critiqued. Social welfare policies intended to ameliorate social ills (e.g., poverty, education, housing) will be analyzed using policy analysis frameworks in a critical and comparative fashion. Policy alternatives to respond to current and future social problems will be critically discussed for feasibility, viability and economic effects. Recommended preparation: SASS 610.

SASS 622. Designing Mixed Methods Research. 3 Units.

This advanced doctoral-level seminar is designed to introduce students to the principles, methods, and analytical techniques utilized when conducting mixed methods research in social work and social welfare. The course is designed to provide substantive methodological content for various phases of the research process accompanied by experiential learning opportunities. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to select and implement mixed methods research designs that are appropriate and adequate for answering contemporary social work practice and social welfare policy research questions. Four domains of knowledge are addressed in the course: (1) the historical, philosophical and theoretical foundations of mixed methods research; (2) methods and strategies behind designing mixed methods research studies; (3) the major data collection techniques employed in mixed methods research; and (4) strategies for analyzing, interpreting and reporting mixed methods data. Six models of mixed methods research (convergent parallel design, explanatory sequential design, exploratory sequential design. Prereq: SASS 608, SASS 613, SASS 614 and SASS 615

SASS 630. Seminar on Social Work Education. 3 Units.

This required seminar examines the structure and content of social work education within the context of higher education in American society. Emphasis is placed on curriculum design and course development. The course also is designed to help students develop a strategic approach to teaching based on learning theory. Finally, attention is given to current issues and future directions for social work education.

SASS 631. Job Seekers Seminar. 3 Units.

This dynamically dated seminar is designed to prepare doctoral students for a successful academic job search. The course objectives include: Obtaining knowledge about where to find academic job postings and how to determine appropriate fit; understanding the job search process; developing application materials; practicing mock interviews and mock job talks; and, developing a strategy for a successful first year as a professor. Prereq: Advanced to Candidacy.

SASS 632. Research Project. 3 Units.

This elective course provides students with the opportunity to work with specific faculty engaged in research studies either on an individual or group basis. Prereq: 614 and SASS 615.

SASS 635. Advanced Quantitative Methods : Special Topics. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide opportunities for doctoral students to learn advanced. cutting-edge quantitative methods. The course content will vary depending on the expertise of the instructor and education needs of the student. Possible topics might include structural equation modeling, multilevel modeling, longitudinal analysis (e.g., survival analysis, event history analysis),or meta-analysis. Course format (e.g., readings, seminar discussions, hands-on computer labs, number and frequency of class sessions) will be determined collaboratively by the instructor and students; however, the course is designed to be completed within one semester. Prereq: SASS 613, SASS 615, SASS 616, and SASS 618 or requisites not met permission.

SASS 637. Individual Reading. 1 - 18 Units.

This is an elective individual reading course permitting students to select areas of interest and pursue these interests with specific faculty.

SASS 651A. Field Education I-A. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Non-Advanced Standing social work students in the first semester of their master's program. Students enrolled in SASS 651A take SASS 495, Field Education Seminar concurrently for the entire field period. The SASS 651A course is 16 weeks in duration. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. The field instructor is based at the social service setting and provides the direct instruction of the student. The faculty advisor, who is based at the School, serves as a link between all parties, interprets the requirements and standards of the School, and participates and consults in the design of the student's learning experience. The field instructor assigns tasks to the student according to the requirements of the School and the educational and experiential level of the student. Student, field instructor, and faculty field advisor all participate in various ways in the evaluation if student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 75 hours in field and professional development in SASS 651A

SASS 651AV. Field Education I-AV. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Non-Advanced Standing or foundation social work students after the successful completion of SASS495V of their master's program. The SASS 651AV course is 8 weeks in duration. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. The field instructor is based at the social service setting and provides the direct instruction of the student. The faculty advisor, who is based at the School, serves as a link between all parties, interprets the requirements and standards of the School, and participates and consults in the design of the student's learning experience. The field instructor assigns tasks to the student according to the requirements of the School and the educational and experiential level of the student. Student, field instructor, and faculty field advisor all participate in various ways in the evaluation if student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 75 hours in field and professional development in SASS 651AV. Prereq: SASS 495V.

SASS 651B. Field Education I-B. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Non-Advanced Standing social work students in the second semester of their master's program. The SASS 651B course is 16 weeks in duration. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. The field instructor is based at the social service setting and provides the direct instruction of the student. The faculty advisor, who is based at the School, services as a link between all parties, interprets the requirements and standards of the School, and participates and consults in the design of the student's learning experiences. The field instructor assigns tasks to the student according to the requirement of the School and the educational and experiential level of the student. Student, field instructor, and faculty field advisor all participate in various ways in the evaluation of student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 75 hours in field and professional development in SASS 651B. Prereq: SASS 651A.

SASS 651BV. Field Education I-BV. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Non-Advanced Standing social work students in the second semester of their master's program. The SASS 651BV course is 8 weeks in duration. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. The field instructor is based at the social service setting and provides the direct instruction of the student. The faculty advisor, who is based at the School, services as a link between all parties, interprets the requirements and standards of the School, and participates and consults in the design of the student's learning experiences. The field instructor assigns tasks to the student according to the requirement of the School and the educational and experiential level of the student. Student, field instructor, and faculty field advisor all participate in various ways in the evaluation of student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 75 hours in field and professional development in SASS 651BV. Prereq: SASS 651AV.

SASS 652A. Field Education II-A. 1.5 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Advanced Standing students in the first semester of their master's program and by Non-Advanced Standing social work students in the third semester of their master's program. The SASS 652A course is 16 weeks in duration. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. For students entering the program with advanced standing, there is an additional requirement of four logs and an integrative assignment, and periodic meetings with a field faculty advisor in addition to the field conference. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values, and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Students spend 150 hours in field and professional development in SASS 652A. Prereq: SASS 651A and SASS 651B or SASS 400-TR.

SASS 652B. Field Education II-B. 1.5 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by entering Advanced Standing students in the second semesters of their master's program and by Non-Advanced Standing social work students in the fourth semester of their master's program. The SASS 652B course is 16 weeks in duration. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. For students entering the program with advanced standing, there is an additional requirement of four logs and an integrative assignment, and periodic meetings with a field faculty advisor in addition to the field conference. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop foundation level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values, and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Students spend 150 hours in field and professional development in SASS 652B. Prereq: SASS 652A.

SASS 653A. Field Education III-A. 1.5 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by students in their advanced course of study. Advanced Standing social work students take this course in the third semester of their master's program. Non-Advanced Standing social work students take it in the fifth semester of their master's program. The SASS 653A course is 16 weeks in duration. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop advanced level competencies in their area of concentration in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Student spend 150 hours in field and professional development in SASS 653A. Prereq: SASS 652A and SASS 652B.

SASS 653B. Field Education III-B. 1.5 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by students in their advanced course of study. Advanced Standing social work students take this course in the fourth semester of their master's program. Non-Advanced Standing social work students take it in the sixth semester of their master's program. The SASS 653B course is 16 weeks in duration. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop advanced level competencies in their area of concentration in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Students spend 150 hours in field and professional development in SASS 653B. Prereq: SASS 653A.

SASS 654A. Field Education IV-A. 1.5 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by students in their advanced course of study. Advanced Standing social work students take this course in the fifth semester of their master's program. Non-Advanced Standing social work students take it in the seventh semester of their master's program. The SASS 654A course is 16 weeks in duration. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop their advanced level competencies in their area of concentration in the eight abilities by helping students apply ethic acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Student, field instructor, and field faculty advisor all participate in the evaluation of the student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 150 hours in field and professional development in SASS 654A. Prereq: SASS 653A and SASS 653B.

SASS 654B. Field Education IV-B. 1.5 Unit.

This course is designed to be taken by students in their advanced course of study. Advanced Standing social work students take this course in the sixth semester of their master's program. Non-Advanced Standing social work students take it in the eight semester of their master's program. The SASS 654B course is 16 weeks in duration. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level social work students with field related opportunities to continue to develop their advanced level competencies in their area of concentration in the eight abilities by helping students apply ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. The periodic meetings with the field faculty advisor are designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom and field learning. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent, developing practitioners. Student, field instructor, and field faculty advisor all participate in the evaluation of the student's work; the faculty advisor is responsible for assigning the grade. Students spend 150 hours in field and professional development in SASS 654B. Prereq: SASS 654A.

SASS 655. Dual Degree Field Practicum II. 3 Units.

This course is designed to be taken by MSSA/MPH joint degree students as the second field period of their master's program. It consists of a field practicum and participation in professional development opportunities. The Field Practicum is an integral component of the MSASS and MPH curriculums, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, supervised, and evaluated community-based experience. The Practicum is designed to move students beyond the walls of academia, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which social work and public health activities are conducted. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to develop skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. (EPAAS Program Objective M6 and EPAAS Content Area 4.7) The overall goal of this course is to provide graduate level MSSA/MPH joint degree students with field related opportunities to continue to develop foundation level competencies in the eight MSSAS abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work and public health theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. Offered as MPHP 655 and SASS 655. Prereq: SASS 601.

SASS 656. Dual Degree Field Capstone III. 3 Units.

The Public Health Capstone Project is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, mentored, and evaluated public health scholarly project. This course is designed to be taken by advanced level students. It consists of a 288 hour field based Capstone experience and participation in 12 hours of professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is designed to move students beyond the walls and constraints of the classroom, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health and social work activities are conducted. It is also designed to provide graduate level dual degree students with field related opportunities to begin to develop advanced level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. These collective experiences provide students with a forum to continue to develop and hone social work skills, integrate and operationalize the values and ethics inherent in professional practice, and confront social injustice as self-reflective, competent developing practitioners. (EPAS Program Objective M6 and EPAS Content Area 4.7) Offered as SASS 656 and MPHP 656. Prereq: SASS 655.

SASS 657. Dual Degree Field Capstone IV. 3 Units.

The Public Health Capstone Project is an integral component of the MPH curriculum, allowing students to apply, develop, and refine their conceptual knowledge and skills as part of a planned, mentored, and evaluated public health scholarly project. This course is designed to be taken by advanced level students. It consists of a 288 hour field based Capstone experience and participation in 12 hours of professional development opportunities. The overall goal of this course is designed to move students beyond the walls and constraints of the classroom, to understand the political, economic, social, and organizational contexts within which public health and social work activities are conducted. It is also designed to provide graduate level dual degree students with field related opportunities to begin to develop advanced level competencies in the eight abilities by helping students apply knowledge of social work theory, skills, values and ethics acquired in the classroom in an agency setting. Offered as MPHP 657 and SASS 657. Prereq: SASS 656 or MPHP656.

SASS 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Units.

This course is intended for students who have passed the qualifying examination and are actively working on their dissertation. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.