Computer Science

The College of Arts and Sciences awards the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in computer science. The required courses for the majors and minor are offered by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the Case School of Engineering.

Undergraduate Programs

The EECS department offers programs leading to degrees in:

  1. Data Science and Analytics (B.S.)
  2. Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
  3. Systems and Control Engineering (B.S.)
  4. Computer Engineering (B.S.)
  5. Computer Science (B.S., B.A.)

These programs provide students with a strong background in the fundamentals of mathematics, science, and engineering. Students can use their technical and open electives to pursue concentrations in bioelectrical engineering, complex systems, automation and control, digital systems design, embedded systems, micro/nano systems, robotics and intelligent systems, signal processing and communications, and software engineering. In addition to an excellent technical education, all students in the department are exposed to societal issues, ethics, professionalism, and have the opportunity to develop leadership and creativity skills.

The Bachelor of Science degree programs in Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Systems and Control Engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Computer Science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.


The Bachelor of Science program in data science and analytics provides our students with a broad foundation in the field and the instruction, skills, and experience needed to understand and handle large amounts of data that transform thinking about a collection of vast amounts of data into one that focuses on the data’s conversion to actionable information.  The degree program has a unique focus on real-world data and real-world applications.

This major is one of the first undergraduate programs nationwide with a unique curriculum that includes mathematical modeling, informatics, data analytics, visual analytics and project-based applications - all elements of the future emerging field of data science.

An undergraduate minor in Applied Data Science is administered in the Materials Science and Engineering Department. 

Bachelor of Science in Data Science and Analytics

In addition to engineering general education requirements and university general education requirements, the major requires the following courses:

Major Requirements

CHEM 111Principles of Chemistry for Engineers4
DSCI 133Introduction to Data Science and Engineering for Majors3
DSCI 234Structured and Unstructured Data3
DSCI 341Introduction to Databases: DS Major3
DSCI 342Introduction to Data Science Systems3
DSCI 343Introduction to Data Analysis3
DSCI 344Scalable Parallel Data Analysis3
DSCI 345Files, Indexes and Access Structures for Big Data3
EECS 132Introduction to Programming in Java3
EECS 302Discrete Mathematics3
EECS 340Algorithms3
EECS 393Software Engineering3
ENGL 398Professional Communication for Engineers2
ENGR 398Professional Communication for Engineers1
MATH 201Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications3
MATH 121Calculus for Science and Engineering I4
MATH 122Calculus for Science and Engineering II4
MATH 223Calculus for Science and Engineering III3
MATH 224Elementary Differential Equations3
PHYS 121General Physics I - Mechanics4
PHYS 122General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism4

Core courses provide our students with a strong background in signal processing, systems, and analytics. Students are required to develop depth in at least one of the following technical areas: signal processing, systems, and analytics. Each data science and analytics student must complete the following requirements:

Technical Elective Requirement

Each student must complete 8 courses (24 credit-hours) of approved technical electives. Technical electives shall be chosen to fulfill the probability/statistics elective (1 course), the computer and data security elective (1 course), the depth requirement (3 courses), and 3 courses otherwise chosen to increase the student’s understanding of data science and analytics. Technical electives not used to satisfy the probability/statistics elective, the computer and data security elective, or the depth requirement are more generally defined as any course related to the principles and practice of data science and analytics. This includes all DSCI courses at the 200 level and above and can include courses from other programs. All non-DSCI technical electives must be approved by the student’s academic advisor.

Depth Requirement

Each student must show a depth of competence in one technical area by taking at least three courses from one of the following three areas. Additional courses, beyond those that are listed, may be approved by the student’s academic advisor.

Area I: Signal Processing
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 313Signal Processing3
STAT 332Statistics for Signal Processing3
Area II: Systems
EECS 325Computer Networks I3
or EECS 425 Computer Networks I
EECS 338Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming4
EECS 600Special Topics ( Cloud Computing)1 - 18
Area III: Analytics
DSCI 390Machine Learning for Big Data3
DSCI 391Data Mining for Big Data3
EECS 339Web Data Mining3
EECS 346Engineering Optimization3
EECS 440Machine Learning3
EECS 442Causal Learning from Data3

Computer and Data Security Elective Requirement

EECS 444Computer Security3
MATH 408Introduction to Cryptology3

Statistics Requirement

MATH 380Introduction to Probability3
STAT 325Data Analysis and Linear Models3

Design Requirement

DSCI 398 Engineering Projects I
DSCI 399 Engineering Projects II

Suggested Program of Study: Bachelor of Science in Data Science and Analytics

The following is a suggested program of study.  Current students should always consult their advisers and their individual graduation requirement plans as tracked in SIS.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES First Year Seminar*4  
Principles of Chemistry for Engineers (CHEM 111)4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering I (MATH 121)4  
Introduction to Programming in Java (EECS 132)3  
PHED (2 half semester courses)*0  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
General Physics I - Mechanics (PHYS 121)  4
Calculus for Science and Engineering II (MATH 122)  4
Introduction to Data Science and Engineering for Majors (DSCI 133)  3
PHED (2 half semester courses)*  0
Open Elective  3
Year Total: 15 17
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES University Seminar*3  
General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 122)4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering III (MATH 223)3  
Structured and Unstructured Data (DSCI 234)3  
Discrete Mathematics (EECS 302)3  
Introduction to Databases: DS Major (DSCI 341)  3
Elementary Differential Equations (MATH 224)  3
Algorithms (EECS 340)  3
HM/SS elective  3
Probability/Statistics Electivea  3
Year Total: 16 15
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
Introduction to Data Science Systems (DSCI 342)3  
Software Engineering (EECS 393)3  
HM/SS elective3  
Introduction to Data Analysis (DSCI 343)3  
Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications (MATH 201)3  
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGL 398)  2
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGR 398)  1
Scalable Parallel Data Analysis (DSCI 344)  3
Computer and Data Security Electiveb  3
Files, Indexes and Access Structures for Big Data (DSCI 345)  3
Technical Electived  3
Year Total: 15 15
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
Technical Electived3  
Technical Electivec3  
DSCI 398 Senior Project I4  
Technical electivec3  
HM/SS elective3  
HM/SS elective  3
DSCI Technical electivec  3
DSCI 399 Senior Project II  4
Technical electived  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 16 16
 
Total Units in Sequence:  125
*

University general education requirement 

a

 Probability and statistics elective (MATH 380, STAT 325)

b

 Computer and data security elective (EECS 444, MATH 408)

c

Technical electives in signal processing, systems, and analytics (see lists of approved courses under program requirements)

d

Technical electives 

Minor in Data Science

An undergraduate minor in applied data science is administered in the Materials Science and Engineering Department.  


Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

The Bachelor of Science program in electrical engineering provides our students with a broad foundation in electrical engineering through combined classroom and laboratory work, and prepares our students for entering the profession of electrical engineering, as well as for further study at the graduate level.

Mission

The educational mission of the electrical engineering program is to graduate students who have fundamental technical knowledge of their profession and the requisite technical breadth and communications skills to become leaders in creating the new techniques and technologies that will advance the general field of electrical engineering.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Graduates will be successful professionals obtaining positions appropriate to their background, interests, and education.
  2. Graduates will use continuous learning opportunities to improve and enhance their professional skills.
  3. Graduates will demonstrate leadership in their profession.

Student Outcomes

As preparation for achieving the above educational objectives, the BS degree program in Electrical Engineering is designed so that students attain:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • an ability to communicate effectively
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Core courses provide our students with a strong background in signals and systems, computers, electronics (both analog and digital), and semiconductor devices. Students are required to develop depth in at least one of the following technical areas: signals and systems, solid state, computer hardware, computer software, control, circuits, robotics, and biomedical applications. Each electrical engineering student must complete the following requirements.

Major in Electrical Engineering

In addition to engineering general education requirements and university general education requirements, the major requires the following courses:

Major Requirements

EECS 245Electronic Circuits4
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 309Electromagnetic Fields I3
EECS 313Signal Processing3
EECS 321Semiconductor Electronic Devices4

Core courses provide our students with a strong background in signals and systems, computers, electronics (both analog and digital), and semiconductor devices. Students are required to develop depth in at least one of the following technical areas: signals and systems, solid state, computer hardware, computer software, control, circuits, robotics, and biomedical applications. Each electrical engineering student must complete the following requirements:

Technical Elective Requirement

Each student must complete eighteen (18) credit-hours of approved technical electives. Technical electives shall be chosen to fulfill the depth requirement (see next) and otherwise increase the student’s understanding of electrical engineering. Technical electives not used to satisfy the depth requirement are more generally defined as any course related to the principles and practice of electrical engineering. This includes all EECS courses at the 200 level and above and can include courses from other programs. All non-EECS technical electives must be approved by the student’s academic advisor.

Depth Requirement

Each student must show a depth of competence in one technical area by taking at least three courses from one of the following eight areas. This depth requirement may be met using a combination of the above core courses and a selection of open and technical electives.

Area I: Signals & Systems
EECS 313Signal Processing3
EECS 351Communications and Signal Analysis3
EECS 354Digital Communications3
EECS 490Digital Image Processing3
MATH 307Linear Algebra3
Area II: Computer Software
EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4
EECS 293Software Craftsmanship4
EECS 302Discrete Mathematics3
EECS 338Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming4
EECS 340Algorithms3
EECS 373/473 Modern Robot Programming (Fall 2017)4
EECS 391Introduction to Artificial Intelligence3
EECS 393Software Engineering3
Area III: Solid State
PHYS 221Introduction to Modern Physics3
EECS 321Semiconductor Electronic Devices4
EECS 322/415Integrated Circuits and Electronic Devices3
EECS 422Solid State Electronics II3
Area IV: Control
EECS 304Control Engineering I with Laboratory3
EECS 346Engineering Optimization3
EECS 374Advanced Control and Energy Systems3
EECS 375Applied Control3
Area V: Circuits
EECS 245Electronic Circuits4
EBME 310Principles of Biomedical Instrumentation3
EECS 326Instrumentation Electronics3
EECS 344Electronic Analysis and Design3
EECS 371Applied Circuit Design4
EECS 426MOS Integrated Circuit Design3
Area VI: Computer Hardware
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 301Digital Logic Laboratory2
EECS 314Computer Architecture3
EECS 315Digital Systems Design4
EECS 316Computer Design3
EECS 318VLSI/CAD4
Area VII: Biomedical Applications
EBME 201Physiology-Biophysics I (and 2 of the following 4 courses)3
EBME 310Principles of Biomedical Instrumentation3
EBME 320Medical Imaging Fundamentals3
EBME 327Bioelectric Engineering3
EBME 401DBiomedical Instrumentation and Signal Processing3
Area VIII:  Robotics
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 275Fundamentals of Robotics4
EECS 304Control Engineering I with Laboratory3
EECS 373/473 Modern Robot Programming (Fall 2017)4
EECS 376Mobile Robotics4
EECS 484Computational Intelligence I: Basic Principles3
EECS 489Robotics I3

Statistics Requirement

STAT 332Statistics for Signal Processing *3
*

STAT 333 Uncertainty in Engineering and Science may be substituted with approval of advisor

Design Requirement

EECS 398Engineering Projects I4
EECS 399Engineering Projects II3

In consultation with a faculty advisor, a student completes the program by selecting technical and open elective courses that provide in-depth training in one or more of a spectrum of specialties, such as, control, signal processing, electronics, integrated circuit design and fabrication, and robotics. With the approval of the advisor, a student may emphasize other specialties by selecting elective courses from other programs or departments.

Additionally, math and statistics classes are highly recommended as an integral part of the student's technical electives to prepare for work in industry and government and for graduate school. The following math/statistics classes are recommended and would be accepted as approved technical electives:

- MATH 201 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

- MATH 330 - Introduction to Scientific Computing

- MATH 380 - Introduction to Probability

- STAT 412 - Statistics for Design in Engineering and Science

Other Math/Statistics may be used as technical electives with the approval of the student's academic advisor.

Many courses have integral or associated laboratories in which students gain “hands-on” experience with electrical engineering principles and instrumentation. Students have ready access to the teaching laboratory facilities and are encouraged to use them during nonscheduled hours in addition to the regularly scheduled laboratory sessions. Opportunities also exist for undergraduate student participation in the wide spectrum of research projects being conducted in the department.

Suggested Program of Study: Major in Electrical Engineering

The following is a suggested program of study.  Current students should always consult their advisers and their individual graduation requirement plans as tracked in SIS.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES First Year Seminar*4  
Principles of Chemistry for Engineers (CHEM 111)**4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering I (MATH 121)**4  
Elementary Computer Programming (ENGR 131)**3  
Open elective 3  
PHED (2 half semester courses)*0  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
General Physics I - Mechanics (PHYS 121)**,b  4
Calculus for Science and Engineering II (MATH 122)**  4
Chemistry of Materials (ENGR 145)**  4
PHED (2 half semester courses)*  0
Year Total: 18 15
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 122)**,b4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering III (MATH 223)**3  
Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation (ENGR 210)**4  
Logic Design and Computer Organization (EECS 281)4  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer (ENGR 225)**  4
Elementary Differential Equations (MATH 224)**  3
Electronic Circuits (EECS 245)  4
Electromagnetic Fields I (EECS 309)  3
Year Total: 15 17
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
HM/SS elective**,a3  
Statics and Strength of Materials (ENGR 200)**3  
Signals and Systems (EECS 246)4  
Statistics for Signal Processing (STAT 332)c3  
Approved technical electived3  
HM/SS elective**,a  3
Semiconductor Electronic Devices (EECS 321)  4
Signal Processing (EECS 313)  3
Approved technical electived  3
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGL 398)**  2
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGR 398)**  1
Year Total: 16 16
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
HM/SS elective**,a3  
Engineering Projects I (EECS 398)f4  
Approved technical electived3  
Approved technical electived3  
Open elective3  
HM/SS elective**,a  3
Engineering Projects II (EECS 399)  3
Approved technical electived  3
Approved technical electived  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 16 15
 
Total Units in Sequence:  128

Hours Required for Graduation: 128g

*

University general education requirement 

**

Engineering general education requirement 

a

Humanities/Social Science course

b

Selected students may be invited to take PHYS 123 Physics and Frontiers I - Mechanics and PHYS 124 Physics and Frontiers II - Electricity and Magnetism in place of PHYS 121 General Physics I - Mechanics and PHYS 122 General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism.

c

Students may replace STAT 332 Statistics for Signal Processing with STAT 333 Uncertainty in Engineering and Science if approved by their advisor.

d

Technical electives will be chosen to fulfill the depth requirement and otherwise increase the student’s understanding of electrical engineering. Courses used to satisfy the depth requirement must come from the department’s list of depth areas and related courses. Technical electives not used to satisfy the depth requirement are more generally defined as any course related to the principles and practice of electrical engineering. This includes all EECS courses at the 200 level and above, and can include courses from other programs. All non-EECS technical electives must be approved by the student’s advisor.

e

B.S./M.S. students may double count EECS 651 M.S. Thesis to fulfill the EECS 399 requirement.

f

CO-OP students may obtain design credit for EECS 399 if their co-op assignment included significant design responsibility; however, the student is still responsible for such course obligations as reports, presentations, and ethics assignments. Design credit and fulfillment of remaining course responsibilities are arranged through the course instructor.

g

 At least 10 of the 14 required Electrical Engineering courses (EECS 281, 245, 246, 309, 313, 321, 398, 399 and the six technical electives) in the Electrical Engineering B.S. program must be satisfied by courses in the EECS department.

Double Major: Systems and Control & Electrical Engineering

The department also offers a double major in Systems and Control and Electrical Engineering.  Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering can take the following courses as technical and open electives to earn a second major in Systems and Control engineering:

EECS 216Fundamental System Concepts (S&CE)3
EECS 304Control Engineering I with Laboratory (EE, Area IV: Control), and (SC&E)3
EECS 305Control Engineering I Laboratory (This is the additional 1 credit-hour course needed (S&CE))1
EECS 324Modeling and Simulation of Continuous Dynamical Systems (S&CE)3
EECS 342Introduction to Global Issues (S&CE)3
EECS 346Engineering Optimization (EE, Area IV: Control), and (SC&E)3
EECS 352Engineering Economics and Decision Analysis (S&CE)3
EECS 375Applied Control (EE, Area IV: Control), and (SC&E)3
MATH 201Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications (S&CE)3
OPRE 432Computer Simulation (S&CE)3

Cooperative Education Program in Electrical Engineering

Opportunities are available for students to alternate studies with work in industry or government as a co-op student, which involves paid full-time employment over seven months (one semester and one summer). Students may work in one or two co-ops, beginning in the third year of study. Co-ops provide students the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in their field by completing a significant engineering project while receiving professional mentoring. During a co-op placement, students do not pay tuition, but maintain their full-time student status while earning a salary. Learn more at engineering.case.edu/coop. Alternatively or additionally, students may obtain employment as summer interns.

BS/MS Program in Electrical Engineering

The department encourages highly motivated and qualified students to apply for admission to the five-year BS/MS Program in the junior year. This integrated program, which permits up to 9 credit hours of graduate level coursework to be counted towards both BS and MS degree requirements (including an option to substitute MS thesis work for EECS 399, the second senior project). It also offers the opportunity to complete both the Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Master of Science degrees within five years.  Review the Office of Undergraduate Studies BS/MS program requirements here.

Minor in Electrical Engineering

Students enrolled in degree programs in other engineering departments can have a minor specialization by completing the following courses:

EECS 245Electronic Circuits4
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 309Electromagnetic Fields I3
Approved technical elective3
Total Units18

Minor in Electronics

The department also offers a minor in electronics for students in the College of Arts and Sciences. This program requires the completion of 31 credit hours, of which 10 credit hours may be used to satisfy portions of the students’ skills and distribution requirements. The following courses are required for the electronics minor:

MATH 125Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I4
MATH 126Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II4
PHYS 115Introductory Physics I4
PHYS 116Introductory Physics II4
ENGR 131Elementary Computer Programming3
ENGR 210Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation4
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
Total Units31

Bachelor of Science in Systems and Control Engineering

The Bachelor of Science program in systems and control engineering provides our students with the basic concepts, analytical tools, and engineering methods which are needed in analyzing and designing complex technological and non-technological systems. Problems relating to modeling, simulation, decision-making, control, and optimization are studied. Some examples of systems problems which are studied include: modeling and analysis of complex biological systems, computer control of industrial plants, developing world models for studying environmental policies, and optimal planning and management in large-scale systems. In each case, the relationship and interaction among the various components of a given system must be modeled. This information is used to determine the best way of coordinating and regulating these individual contributions to achieve the overall goal of the system.

Mission

The mission of the Systems and Control Engineering program is to provide internationally recognized excellence for graduate and undergraduate education and research in systems analysis, design, and control. These theoretical and applied areas require cross-disciplinary tools and methods for their solution.

Program Educational Objectives

1. Graduates will have applied systems methodology to multi-disciplinary projects that include technical, social, environmental, political, and/or economic factors.

2. Graduates will use systems understanding, critical thinking and problem solving skills to analyze and design engineering systems or processes that respond to technical and societal needs as demonstrated by their measured professional accomplishments in industry, government and research.

3. Graduates will facilitate multidisciplinary projects that bring together practitioners of various engineering fields in an effective, professional, and ethical manner as demonstrated by their teamwork, leadership, communication, and management skills.

Student Outcomes

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • an ability to communicate effectively
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

The B.S. degree program in Systems and Control Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Major in Systems and Control Engineering

In addition to engineering general education requirements and university general education requirements, the major requires the following courses:

Major Requirements

EECS 216Fundamental System Concepts3
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 304Control Engineering I with Laboratory3
EECS 305Control Engineering I Laboratory1
EECS 313Signal Processing3
EECS 324Modeling and Simulation of Continuous Dynamical Systems3
EECS 342Introduction to Global Issues3
EECS 346Engineering Optimization3
EECS 352Engineering Economics and Decision Analysis3
OPRE 432Computer Simulation3
EECS 399Engineering Projects II3

Fifteen hours of approved technical electives including at least 9 hours of approved courses to constitute a depth of study

Breadth Requirement

MATH 201Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications3
STAT 332Statistics for Signal Processing3

Statistics Requirement

STAT 332Statistics for Signal Processing *3
*

STAT 333 Uncertainty in Engineering and Science may be substituted with approval of advisor

Design Requirement

EECS 398Engineering Projects I4

Depth Requirement

Each student must show a depth of competence in one technical area by taking at least three courses from one of the three tracks/program concentration areas, namely energy systems, control systems and data analytics, listed below:

Track 1: Energy Systems
EECS 368Power System Analysis I3
EECS 369Power System Analysis II3
EECS 370Smart Grid3
EECS 374Advanced Control and Energy Systems3
EECS 375Applied Control3
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
Track 2: Control Systems
EECS 375Applied Control3
EECS 374Advanced Control and Energy Systems3
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
Technical Elective from the Energy Systems or Data Analytics tracks3
Track 3: Data Analytics
  • "Core Tools" list:
EECS 339Web Data Mining3
STAT 325Data Analysis and Linear Models3
STAT 326Multivariate Analysis and Data Mining3
EECS 435Data Mining3
EECS 452Random Signals3
EECS 490Digital Image Processing3
OPRE 433Foundations of Probability and Statistics3
  • "Application" lists:

Business/Manufacturing Analytics:

EECS 350Operations and Systems Design3
EECS 360Manufacturing and Automated Systems3
BAFI 361Applied Financial Analytics3
MKMR 310Marketing Analytics3
OPMT 475Supply Chain Logistics3
OPMT 477Enterprise Resource Planning in the Supply Chain3
EECS 490Digital Image Processing3

Healthcare Analytics

EECS 319Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes for Biology3
EECS 365Complex Systems Biology3
MATH 378Computational Neuroscience3
EBME 410Medical Imaging Fundamentals3
BIOL 304Fitting Models to Data: Maximum Likelihood Methods and Model Selection3
SYBB 421Fundamentals of Clinical Information Systems3
SYBB 422Clinical Informatics at the Bedside and the Bench (Part II)3

       Energy Systems Analytics

EECS 370Smart Grid3
EECS 3xx Distribution System Modeling and Analysis (In development)3

Suggested Program of Study: Major in Systems and Control Engineering

The following is a suggested program of study. Current students should always consult their advisers and their individual graduation requirement plans as tracked in SIS.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES First Year Seminar*4  
Principles of Chemistry for Engineers (CHEM 111)**4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering I (MATH 121)**4  
Elementary Computer Programming (ENGR 131)**3  
Open elective3  
PHED 101 (Physical Education)*0  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
General Physics I - Mechanics (PHYS 121)**,a  4
Calculus for Science and Engineering II (MATH 122)**  4
Chemistry of Materials (ENGR 145)**  4
PHED 102 (Physical Education)*  0
Year Total: 18 15
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 122)**,a4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering III (MATH 223)**3  
Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation (ENGR 210)**4  
Statistics for Signal Processing (STAT 332)3  
SAGES University Seminar*3  
Fundamental System Concepts (EECS 216)  3
Elementary Differential Equations (MATH 224)**  3
Statics and Strength of Materials (ENGR 200)**  3
Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer (ENGR 225)**  4
Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications (MATH 201)  3
Year Total: 17 16
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
HM/SS elective**3  
Signals and Systems (EECS 246)4  
Modeling and Simulation of Continuous Dynamical Systems (EECS 324)3  
Introduction to Global Issues (EECS 342)3  
Approved technical electivec3  
HM/SS elective**  3
Control Engineering I with Laboratory (EECS 304)  3
Control Engineering I Laboratory (EECS 305)  1
Engineering Optimization (EECS 346)  3
Signal Processing (EECS 313)  3
Computer Simulation (OPRE 432)  3
Year Total: 16 16
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
HM/SS elective**3  
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGL 398)**2  
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGR 398)**1  
Engineering Economics and Decision Analysis (EECS 352)3  
Engineering Projects I (EECS 398)b4  
Approved technical electivec3  
HM/SS elective**  3
Engineering Projects II (EECS 399)b  3
Approved technical electivec  3
Approved technical electivec  3
Approved technical electivec  3
Year Total: 16 15
 
Total Units in Sequence:  129

Hours Required for Graduation: 129

*

 University general education requirement

**

Engineering general education requirement 

a

 Selected students may be invited to take PHYS 123 and 124 in place of PHYS 121 and 122.

b

Co-op students may obtain design credit for one semester of Senior Project Lab if their co-op assignment includes significant design responsibility. This credit can be obtained by submitting a suitable written report and making an oral presentation on the co-op work in coordination with the senior project instructor

c

Technical electives from approved list of courses in the three tracks/program concentration areas (Energy systems, Control systems, and Data Analytics) listed under “Depth Requirement” above.

There are five technical elective courses available within the B.S. program in systems and control engineering curriculum that represent a depth of the discipline. Students can satisfy these four technical elective requirements by choosing three courses from one of the three tracks (to meet the Depth Requirement) with the fourth and fifth courses chosen from any of the three tracks listed under the Depth Requirement section above

Dual Major: Systems and Control Engineering & Electrical Engineering

From Systems and Control Engineering (S&CE) to Electrical Engineering (EE):  S&CE students can earn a double major with EE by taking the following five courses as Technical Electives in the S&CE program:

EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 245Electronic Circuits4
EECS 309Electromagnetic Fields I3
EECS 321Semiconductor Electronic Devices4
EECS 375Applied Control3
As the three courses EECS 281, EECS 245, and EECS 321 are 4 credit-hours instead of 3, the three credit-hour “Open Elective” course in the original S&CE program is not needed.

Cooperative Education Program in Systems and Control Engineering

Opportunities are available for students to alternate studies with work in industry or government as a co-op student, which involves paid full-time employment over seven months (one semester and one summer). Students may work in one or two co-ops, beginning in the third year of study. Co-ops provide students the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in their field by completing a significant engineering project while receiving professional mentoring. During a co-op placement, students do not pay tuition, but maintain their full-time student status while earning a salary. Learn more at engineering.case.edu/coop. Alternatively or additionally, students may obtain employment as summer interns.

BS/MS Program in Systems and Control Engineering

The department encourages highly motivated and qualified students to apply for admission to the five-year BS/MS Program in the junior year. This integrated program, which permits up to 9 credit hours of graduate level coursework to be counted towards both BS and MS degree requirements (including an option to substitute MS thesis work for EECS 399 Engineering Projects II, the second senior project). It also offers the opportunity to complete both the Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Master of Science degrees within five years.  Review the Office of Undergraduate Studies BS/MS program requirements here.

Minor Program in Systems and Control Engineering

A total of five courses (15 credit hours) are required to obtain a minor in systems and control engineering. This includes 

  • EECS 246 Signals and Systems
  • Three of the following four courses selected in consultation with the program minor advisor: EECS 304 Control Engineering I with Laboratory/EECS 305 Control Engineering I LaboratoryEECS 324 Modeling and Simulation of Continuous Dynamical Systems; EECS 346 Engineering OptimizationEECS 352 Engineering Economics and Decision Analysis;
  • One of EECS 313 Signal Processing, EECS 351 Communications and Signal Analysis, or EECS 354 Digital Communications.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering

The Bachelor of Science program in Computer Engineering is designed to give a student a strong background in the fundamentals of computer engineering through combined classroom and laboratory work. A graduate of this program will be able to use these fundamentals to analyze and evaluate computer systems, both hardware and software. A computer engineering graduate would also be able to design and implement a computer system for general purpose or embedded computing incorporating state-of-the-art solutions to a variety of computing problems. This includes systems which have both hardware and software component, whose design requires a well-defined interface between the two, and the evaluation of the associated trade-offs.

Mission

The educational mission of the computer engineering program is to graduate students who have fundamental technical knowledge of their profession along with requisite technical breadth and communications skills to become leaders in creating the new techniques and technologies which will advance the general field of computer engineering. Core courses provide our students with a strong background in digital systems design, computer organization, hardware architecture, and digital electronics.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Graduates will be successful professionals obtaining positions appropriate to their background, interests, and education.
  2. Graduates will engage in life-long learning to improve and enhance their professional skills.
  3. Graduates will demonstrate leadership in their profession using their knowledge, communication skills, and engineering ability.

Student Outcomes

As preparation for achieving the above educational objectives, the BS degree program in Computer Engineering is designed so that students attain:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • an ability to communicate effectively
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Major in Computer Engineering

In addition to engineering general education requirements and university general education requirements, the major requires the following courses:

Major Requirements

EECS 132Introduction to Programming in Java3
ENGR 210Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation4
EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 301Digital Logic Laboratory2
EECS 302Discrete Mathematics3
EECS 314Computer Architecture3
EECS 315Digital Systems Design4
One of the following:4
VLSI/CAD
Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming

Statistics Requirement

One Statistics elective may be chosen from:
STAT 312Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science3
STAT 313Statistics for Experimenters3
STAT 332Statistics for Signal Processing3
STAT 333Uncertainty in Engineering and Science3

Design Requirement

EECS 398Engineering Projects I4

In consultation with a faculty advisor, a student completes the program by selecting technical and open elective courses that provide in-depth training in principles and practice of computer engineering. With the approval of the advisor, a student may emphasize a specialty of his/her choice by selecting elective courses from other programs or departments.

Many courses have integral or associated laboratories in which students gain “hands-on” experience with computer engineering principles and instrumentation. Students have ready access to the teaching laboratory facilities and are encouraged to use them during nonscheduled hours in addition to the regularly scheduled laboratory sessions. Opportunities also exist for undergraduate student participation in the wide spectrum of research projects being conducted in the department.

Suggested Program of Study: Major in Computer Engineering

The following is a suggested program of study. Current students should always consult their advisers and their individual graduation requirement plans as tracked in SIS.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES First Year Seminar*4  
Principles of Chemistry for Engineers (CHEM 111)**4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering I (MATH 121)**4  
Introduction to Programming in Java (EECS 132)**3  
Open elective3  
PHED (2 half semester courses)*0  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
General Physics I - Mechanics (PHYS 121)**  4
Calculus for Science and Engineering II (MATH 122)**  4
Chemistry of Materials (ENGR 145)**  4
PHED (2 half semester courses)*  0
Year Total: 18 15
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES University Seminar*3  
General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 122)**4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering III (MATH 223)**3  
Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation (ENGR 210)**4  
Introduction to Data Structures (EECS 233)4  
HM/SS elective**  3
Elementary Differential Equations (MATH 224)**  3
Statics and Strength of Materials (ENGR 200)**  3
Logic Design and Computer Organization (EECS 281)  4
Technical electivea  3
Year Total: 18 16
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
HM/SS elective**3  
Discrete Mathematics (EECS 302)3  
Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer (ENGR 225)**4  
Technical electivea7  
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGL 398)**  2
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGR 398)**  1
Digital Logic Laboratory (EECS 301)  2
Computer Architecture (EECS 314)  3
Digital Systems Design (EECS 315)  4
Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming (EECS 338) (or Technical elective,3)b  4
Year Total: 17 16
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
HM/SS elective**3  
Statistics electivec3  
Technical electivea3  
Technical elective (or EECS 318 VLSI/CAD) b3  
Open elective3  
HM/SS elective**  3
Engineering Projects I (EECS 398)d  4
Technical electivea  3
Open elective  4
Year Total: 15 14
 
Total Units in Sequence:  129

Hours Required for Graduation: 129

*

University general education requirement 

**

Engineering general education requirement 

a

Technical electives are more generally defined as any course related to the principles and practice of computer engineering. This includes all EECS courses at the 200 level and above, and can include courses from other programs. All non-EECS technical electives must be approved by the student’s advisor.

b

The student must take either EECS 318 VLSI/CAD (Fall Semester) EECS 338 Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming (Spring Semester), or a three credit hour technical elective.

c

Chosen from: STAT 312 Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science, STAT 313 Statistics for Experimenters, STAT 332 Statistics for Signal Processing, STAT 333 Uncertainty in Engineering and Science

d

May be taken in the Fall semester if the student would like to take %3Ccourseinline id="8">EECS 399%7C in the Spring semester.

Cooperative Education Program in Computer Engineering

Opportunities are available for students to alternate studies with work in industry or government as a co-op student, which involves paid full-time employment over seven months (one semester and one summer). Students may work in one or two co-ops, beginning in the third year of study. Co-ops provide students the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in their field by completing a significant engineering project while receiving professional mentoring. During a co-op placement, students do not pay tuition, but maintain their full-time student status while earning a salary. Learn more at engineering.case.edu/coop. Alternatively or additionally, students may obtain employment as summer interns.

BS/MS Program in Computer Engineering

Highly motivated and qualified students are encouraged to apply to the BS/MS Program which will allow them to get both degrees in five years. The BS can be in Computer Engineering or a related discipline, such as mathematics or electrical engineering. Integrating graduate study in computer engineering with the undergraduate program allows a student to satisfy all requirements for both degrees in five years.  Review the Office of Undergraduate Studies BS/MS program requirements here.

Minor in Computer Engineering

The department also offers a minor in computer engineering. The minor has a required two course sequence followed by a two course sequence in either hardware or software aspects of computer engineering. The following two courses are required for any minor in computer engineering:

EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4

Students should note that EECS 132 Introduction to Programming in Java is a prerequisite for EECS 233 Introduction to Data Structures.

The two-course hardware sequence is:

EECS 314Computer Architecture3
EECS 315Digital Systems Design4

The corresponding two-course software sequence is:

EECS 338Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming4
EECS 3XX Approved by advisor4

Computer Science

Mission

The mission of the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts programs in Computer Science is to graduate students who have fundamental technical knowledge of their profession and the requisite technical breadth and communications skills to become leaders in creating the new techniques and technologies which will advance the field of computer science and its application to other disciplines.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. To educate and train students in the fundamentals of computer science and mathematics, in order to analyze and solve computing problems, as demonstrated by their professional accomplishments in industry, government and graduate programs and measured within three to five years after graduation.
  2. To educate students with an understanding of real-world computing needs, as demonstrated by their ability to address technical issues involving computing problems encountered in industry, government and graduate programs and measured within three to five years after graduation.
  3. To train students to work effectively, professionally and ethically in computing-related professions, as demonstrated by their communications, teamwork and leadership skills in industry, government and graduate programs and measured within three to five years after graduation.

Student Outcomes

As preparation for achieving the above educational objectives, the BS and BA degree programs in Computer Science are designed so that Bachelor of Science students attain:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
  • An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  • An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  • An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  • An understanding of professional, ethical, and social responsibilities
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • An ability to analyze the impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society, including ethical, legal, security, and global policy issues
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development
  • An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice
  • An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices
  • An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity

Core and breadth courses provide our students with the flexibility to work across many disciplines and prepare them for a variety of professions. Our curriculum is designed to teach fundamental skills and knowledge needed by all CS graduates, while providing the greatest flexibility in selecting topics. Students are also required to develop depth in at least one of the following technical areas: software engineering; algorithms and theory; computer systems, networks, and security; databases and data mining; bioinformatics; or artificial intelligence.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science program in Computer Science is designed to give a student a strong background in the fundamentals of mathematics and computer science. The curriculum is designed according to the latest ACM/IEEE computer science curriculum guidelines. A graduate of this program should be able to use these fundamentals to analyze and evaluate software systems and the underlying abstractions upon which they are based. A graduate should also be able to design and implement software systems which are state-of-the-art solutions to a variety of computing problems; this includes problems which are sufficiently complex to require the evaluation of design alternatives and engineering trade-offs. In addition to these program specific objectives, all students in the Case School of Engineering are exposed to societal issues, professionalism, and are provided opportunities to develop leadership skills.

Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Arts program in Computer Science is a combination of a liberal arts program and a computing major. It is a professional program in the sense that graduates can be employed as computer professionals, but it is less technical than the Bachelor of Science program in Computer Science. This degree is particularly suitable for students with a wide range of interests. For example, students can major in another discipline in addition to computer science and routinely complete all of the requirements for the double major in a 4 year period. This is possible because over a third of the courses in the program are open electives. Furthermore, if a student is majoring in computer science and a second technical field such as mathematics or physics many of the technical electives will be accepted for both majors. Another example of the utility of this program is that it routinely allows students to major in computer science and take all of the pre-med courses in a four-year period.

Major in Computer Science (BS and BA)

BS Degree. Each student is required to complete a total of 14 CS courses. CS courses consist of the courses listed in the core, breadth, and depth areas below. BS students must complete: all 6 core courses; 5 of 7 breadth courses; and at least 4 courses in one of listed depth areas, including all starred courses in that area (many of these also count toward the breadth requirement). Each student is also required to complete 5 technical electives. These can be satisfied using courses from the list of approved technical electives, additional breadth or depth courses, or from other CS-related courses with prior permission from the student’s academic advisor.

BA Degree. Students are required to complete a total of 9 CS courses. BA students must complete: all 6 core courses; 3 of 7 breadth courses; and 4 technical electives. There is no depth requirement for the BA degree.

Major Requirements

In addition to engineering general education requirements (BS), arts & sciences general education requirements (BA) and  university general education requirements, the major requires the following courses:

EECS 132Introduction to Programming in Java3
EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4
EECS 281Logic Design and Computer Organization4
EECS 302Discrete Mathematics3
EECS 340Algorithms3
EECS 395Senior Project in Computer Science4
---
B.S.
CHEM 111Principles of Chemistry for Engineers4
ENGR 145Chemistry of Materials4
MATH 121Calculus for Science and Engineering I4
MATH 122Calculus for Science and Engineering II4
MATH 223Calculus for Science and Engineering III3
MATH 224Elementary Differential Equations3
PHYS 121General Physics I - Mechanics4
PHYS 122General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism4
ENGR 398Professional Communication for Engineers1
ENGL 398Professional Communication for Engineers2
---
B.A.
MATH 125Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I4
MATH 126Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II4

Breadth Requirement

BS students are required to complete 5 of the 7 following CS breadth courses. BA students are required to complete 3 of 7.

EECS 314Computer Architecture3
EECS 325Computer Networks I3
EECS 338Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming4
EECS 341Introduction to Database Systems3
EECS 345Programming Language Concepts3
EECS 391Introduction to Artificial Intelligence3
EECS 393Software Engineering3

Statistics Requirement

One Statistics elective may be chosen from:

MATH 380Introduction to Probability3
STAT 312Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science3
STAT 313Statistics for Experimenters3
STAT 332Statistics for Signal Processing3
STAT 333Uncertainty in Engineering and Science3

Depth Requirement

Students pursuing the BS degree must demonstrate a depth of competence in one of the technical areas listed below.  There is no depth requirement for the BA degree.  To complete the depth requirement, students must complete four courses in one of the depth areas, including all starred courses.  Recommended general background courses are listed following each area where applicable. 

Breadth courses can also count toward the depth requirement. CS BS students are required to complete a total of 14 CS courses (courses listed in the core, breadth, and depth requirements) to ensure that the total number of required courses is the same irrespective of the depth area.  For depth areas that have two starred courses that are also breadth courses, one additional CS course is required to reach the required total of 14.  Additional CS courses taken beyond the required 14 can count toward the technical elective requirement (see below).


Area 1: Software Engineering
EECS 393Software Engineering *3
EECS 345Programming Language Concepts *3
EECS 293Software Craftsmanship4
EECS 337Compiler Design4
EECS 392App Development for iOS3
EECS 441Internet Applications3
EECS 444Computer Security3
Area 2: Algorithms and Theory
EECS 340Algorithms *3
EECS 343Theoretical Computer Science *3
EECS 440Machine Learning3
EECS 454Analysis of Algorithms3
EECS 477Advanced Algorithms3
MATH 408Introduction to Cryptology3

Recommended preparation: MATH 380, MATH 201 or (MATH 307 and MATH 308), PHIL 306.

Area 3: Computer Systems, Networks and Security
EECS 325Computer Networks I *3
EECS 338Intro to Operating Systems and Concurrent Programming *4
EECS 441Internet Applications3
EECS 337Compiler Design4
EECS 444Computer Security3
MATH 408Introduction to Cryptology3
Area 4: Databases and Data Mining
EECS 341Introduction to Database Systems *3
EECS 339Web Data Mining3
EECS 405Data Structures and File Management3
EECS 433Database Systems3
EECS 435Data Mining3
EECS 440Machine Learning3
Area 5: Bioinformatics
EECS 458Introduction to Bioinformatics *3
EECS 459Bioinformatics for Systems Biology *3
EECS 341Introduction to Database Systems3
EECS 435Data Mining3
EECS 440Machine Learning3
EECS 454Analysis of Algorithms3

Recommended breadth and preparation: STAT 325 or EPBI 431, SYBB 311, BIOL 214. Students completing the bioinformatics depth area are only required to complete two out the three starred courses plus two additional courses on the list.

Area 6: Artificial Intelligence
EECS 391Introduction to Artificial Intelligence *3
EECS 440Machine Learning3
EECS 442Causal Learning from Data3
EECS 484Computational Intelligence I: Basic Principles3
EECS 491Artificial Intelligence: Probabilistic Graphical Models3
EECS 496Artificial Intelligence: Sequential Decision Making3
EECS 497Artificial Intelligence: Statistical Natural Language Processing3
EECS 499Algorithmic Robotics3
EECS 531Computer Vision3

Recommended breadth and preparation: MATH 201, MATH 380, and either EECS 416 or EECS 477.

Technical Electives

Computer Science BS students are required to complete a total of 5 technical electives, totaling at least 14 credit hours; CS BA students are required to complete 4, totaling at least 11 credit hours. Technical electives are divided into two groups according to how closely a course is related to the core knowledge areas as defined in the ACM/IEEE computer science curriculum guidelines. CS students may complete any (or all) of their technical electives from group 1 and have the option to satisfy up to two of their technical electives from group 2. Students may also satisfy any of their technical elective requirements by taking additional breadth or depth courses listed above. CS-related courses not listed below may count toward the technical elective requirement but require prior permission from the student’s academic advisor.

Group 1
EECS 275Fundamentals of Robotics4
EECS 290Introduction to Computer Game Design and Implementation3
EECS 301Digital Logic Laboratory2
EECS 315Digital Systems Design4
EECS 316Computer Design3
EECS 318VLSI/CAD4
EECS 366Computer Graphics3
EECS 376Mobile Robotics4
EECS 390Advanced Game Development Project3
EECS 419Computer System Architecture3
EECS 485VLSI Systems3
EECS 488Embedded Systems Design3
EECS 490Digital Image Processing3
Group 2
EECS 245Electronic Circuits4
EECS 246Signals and Systems4
EECS 304Control Engineering I with Laboratory3
EECS 305Control Engineering I Laboratory1
EECS 309Electromagnetic Fields I3
EECS 313Signal Processing3
EECS 319Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes for Biology3
EECS 324Modeling and Simulation of Continuous Dynamical Systems3
EECS 354Digital Communications3
EECS 375Applied Control3
EECS 408Introduction to Linear Systems3
EECS 413Nonlinear Systems I3
EECS 489Robotics I3
ENGR 210Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation4
MATH 201Introduction to Linear Algebra for Applications3
MATH 303Elementary Number Theory3
MATH 307Linear Algebra3
MATH 308Introduction to Abstract Algebra3
MATH 330Introduction of Scientific Computing3
MATH 406Mathematical Logic and Model Theory3
MATH 413Graph Theory3
MATH 431Introduction to Numerical Analysis I3
PHIL 201Introduction to Logic3
PHIL 306Mathematical Logic and Model Theory3
PHYS 221Introduction to Modern Physics3
PHYS 250Computational Methods in Physics3
STAT 345Theoretical Statistics I3
STAT 346Theoretical Statistics II3

Bachelor of Science

Suggested Program of Study: Major in Computer Science

The following is a suggested program of study. Current students should always consult their advisers and their individual graduation requirement plans as tracked in SIS.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES First Year Seminar*4  
Principles of Chemistry for Engineers (CHEM 111)4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering I (MATH 121)4  
Introduction to Programming in Java (EECS 132)3  
PHED (2 half semester courses)*0  
Open elective3  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
General Physics I - Mechanics (PHYS 121)  4
Calculus for Science and Engineering II (MATH 122)  4
Chemistry of Materials (ENGR 145)  4
PHED (2 half semester courses)*  0
Year Total: 18 15
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES University Seminar*3  
General Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism (PHYS 122)4  
Calculus for Science and Engineering III (MATH 223)3  
Introduction to Data Structures (EECS 233)4  
Discrete Mathematics (EECS 302)3  
Elementary Differential Equations (MATH 224)  3
Logic Design and Computer Organization (EECS 281)  4
Statistics electivea  3
Technical electiveb  3
HM/SS elective  3
Year Total: 17 16
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
Algorithms (EECS 340)3  
Breadth electivec3  
Breadth electivec3  
Technical electiveb3  
HM/SS elective3  
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGL 398)  2
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGR 398)  1
Breadth electivec  3
Breadth electivec  3
Depth electived  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 15 15
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
Breadth electivec3  
Depth electived3  
Technical electiveb3  
Technical electiveb3  
Open elective3  
Senior Project in Computer Science (EECS 395)  4
CS course electivee  3
Technical electiveb  3
Technical electiveb  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 15 16
 
Total Units in Sequence:  127

Hours Required for Graduation: 127

*

 University general education requirement

a

Chosen from: MATH 380 Introduction to Probability, STAT 312 Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science, STAT 313 Statistics for Experimenters, STAT 332 Statistics for Signal Processing, STAT 333 Uncertainty in Engineering and Science

b

Chosen from the list of CS technical electives. All other technical electives must be approved by the student’s advisor.

c

Each student must complete 5 of the 7 following courses: EECS 314, EECS 325, EECS 338, EECS 341, EECS 345, EECS 391, and EECS 393. EECS 338 is a 4 unit course.

d

Each student must complete 4 courses in one of the technical depth areas listed above, including all starred courses.

e

Needed to complete the requirement of 14 CS courses. This can be an additional breadth or depth course, depending on what is needed to satisfy the depth requirement.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested Program of Study: Major in Computer Science

The following is a suggested program of study. Current students should always consult their advisers and their individual graduation requirement plans as tracked in SIS.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES First Year Seminar*4  
Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I (MATH 125)4  
Introduction to Programming in Java (EECS 132)3  
HM/SS elective3  
Open elective3  
PHED (2 half semester courses)*0  
SAGES University Seminar*  3
Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II (MATH 126)  4
HM/SS elective  3
Open elective  3
Open elective  3
PHED (2 half semester courses)*  0
Year Total: 17 16
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
SAGES University Seminar*3  
Logic Design and Computer Organization (EECS 281)4  
HM/SS elective3  
Open elective3  
Open elective3  
Discrete Mathematics (EECS 302)  3
Introduction to Data Structures (EECS 233)  4
HM/SS elective  3
Open elective  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 16 16
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGL 398)2  
Professional Communication for Engineers (ENGR 398)1  
Technical electivea3  
Technical electivea3  
Open elective3  
Breadth electiveb  3
Breadth electiveb  3
Breadth electiveb  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 12 12
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
Algorithms (EECS 340)3  
Technical electivea3  
Open elective3  
Open elective3  
Open elective3  
Senior Project in Computer Science (EECS 395)  4
Technical electiveb  3
Open elective  3
Open elective  3
Open elective  3
Year Total: 15 16
 
Total Units in Sequence:  120

Hours Required for Graduation: 120

*

 University general education requirement

a

Chosen from the list of approved CS technical electives. All other technical electives must be approved by the student's advisor.

b

Each student must complete 3 of the 7 following courses: EECS 314, EECS 325, EECS 338, EECS 341, EECS 345, EECS 391, and EECS 393. EECS 338 is a 4 unit course.

Cooperative Education Program in Computer Science

Opportunities are available for students to alternate studies with work in industry or government as a co-op student, which involves paid full-time employment over seven months (one semester and one summer). Students may work in one or two co-ops, beginning in the third year of study. Co-ops provide students the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in their field by completing a significant engineering project while receiving professional mentoring. During a co-op placement, students do not pay tuition, but maintain their full-time student status while earning a salary. Learn more at engineering.case.edu/coop. Alternatively or additionally, students may obtain employment as summer interns.

BS/MS Program in Computer Science

Students with a grade point average of 3.2 or higher are encouraged to apply to the BS/MS Program which will allow them to get both degrees in five years. The BS can be in Computer Science or a related discipline, such as mathematics or electrical engineering. Integrating graduate study in computer science with the undergraduate program allows a student to satisfy all requirements for both degrees in five years.  Review the Office of Undergraduate Studies BS/MS program requirements here.

Minor in Computer Science (BS or BSE)

For students pursuing a BS or BSE degree, the following three courses are required for a minor in computer science:

EECS 132Introduction to Programming in Java3
EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4
EECS 302Discrete Mathematics3
EECS 340Algorithms3

A student must take an additional 4 credit hours of CS Courses (see Major Requirements) with the exclusion of ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming.

Minor in Computer Science (BA)

For students pursuing BA degrees, the following courses are required for a minor in computer science:

EECS 132Introduction to Programming in Java3
EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4
MATH 125Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I4

Two additional CS Courses (see Major Requirements) are required for this minor.

Minor in Artificial Intelligence

The minor consists of five courses. Every student who takes the minor in artificial intelligence must take the two courses, ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming and EECS 391 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence.  Students who take the Artificial Intelligence minor must also take an additional three courses from one of two minor tracks.

Technology Track (requires 3 of the following courses):

BIOL 373Introduction to Neurobiology3
BIOL 374Neurobiology of Behavior3
EECS 477Advanced Algorithms3
EECS/BIOL 478Computational Neuroscience3
EECS 350Operations and Systems Design3
EECS 352Engineering Economics and Decision Analysis3
EECS 360Manufacturing and Automated Systems3
EECS 375Applied Control3
EECS 411Applied Engineering Statistics3
EECS 475Applied Control3
EECS 484Computational Intelligence I: Basic Principles3
EECS 489Robotics I3
EECS 491Artificial Intelligence: Probabilistic Graphical Models3
EECS 531Computer Vision3
EECS 589Robotics II3
PHIL 201Introduction to Logic3
PHIL 306Mathematical Logic and Model Theory3

Cognitive Science Track (requires 3 of the following courses):

BIOL 373Introduction to Neurobiology3
BIOL 374Neurobiology of Behavior3
ENGL 301Linguistic Analysis3
PHIL 201Introduction to Logic3
PHIL 306Mathematical Logic and Model Theory3
PSCL 101General Psychology I3
PSCL 352Physiological Psychology3
PSCL 353Psychology of Learning3
PSCL 355Sensation and Perception3
PSCL 357Cognitive Psychology3
PSCL 370Human Intelligence3
PSCL 402Cognition and Information Processing3

Minor in Computer Gaming (CGM)

The minor is 16 hours as follows:

EECS 233Introduction to Data Structures4
EECS 290Introduction to Computer Game Design and Implementation3
EECS 366Computer Graphics3
EECS 390Advanced Game Development Project3
EECS 391Introduction to Artificial Intelligence3

It is recommended that one additional open elective be a “content creation” course taken from the following areas: Art, English, or Music.  Students should note that EECS 132 Introduction to Programming in Java is a prerequisite for EECS 233 Introduction to Data Structures.