2013-14 General Bulletin

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103 Guilford House
www.case.edu/artsci/dmll
Phone: 216.368.8976; Fax: 216.368.2216
Antonio Candau, Department Chair

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures is committed to helping students become informed and liberally educated citizens of the world. Through the acquisition of language skills and cultural awareness, our students prepare for careers that have an international dimension. To that end, we strongly encourage them to spend their junior year abroad in order to immerse themselves in a foreign culture and perfect their language skills. We also run our own study abroad programs: one German program (“The Munich Experience”), two French programs (“The Paris Experience” and “The Montreal Experience”), three Spanish programs ("The Cuban Experience," “The Buenos Aires Experience” and “Advanced Spanish in Spain”), and one in Italy ("The Italian Experience").

We work closely with other university departments and interdisciplinary programs as well as with the cultural institutions of University Circle to provide students with a broad understanding of the many opportunities that language and culture study offer. The department has strong interdisciplinary ties with the college's programs in Asian studies, French and Francophone studies, German studies, international studies, women’s and gender studies, and world literature. Students also gain practical experience in different cultural and language environments through service learning in the Spanish, French, and Russian communities of Cleveland.

Department Faculty

Antonio Candau, PhD
(University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
Associate Professor and Chair
19th- to 21st-century Spanish culture; Golden Age literature

Christine M. Cano, PhD
(Yale University)
Associate Professor
20th- and 21st-century French literature and culture

Denise Caterinacci, MA
(Kent State University)
Instructor
Italian language and culture; language pedagogy; the role of motivation in language learning

M. Gabriela Copertari, PhD
(Georgetown University)
Associate Professor
Latin American literature and film, especially Argentinian; women’s writing; the modernista novel

Margaretmary Daley, PhD
(Yale University)
Associate Professor
18th- and 19th-century German literature; German women writers; women’s studies; feminist literary criticism

Gilbert Doho, Docteur d’Etat
(University of the Sorbonne Nouvelle)
Associate Professor
French drama; African Francophone theater and film; people theater and social movements; playwriting; African performing arts

Linda C. Ehrlich, PhD
(University of Hawaii/East-West Center)
Associate Professor
Asian (Japanese) cinema; traditional Asian theatre; set design, landscape architecture, and film; Japanese poetry; literature and film; cinema of Spain

Cristián G. Gómez Olivares, PhD
(University of Iowa)
Assistant Professor
20th century Latin American narrative and poetry

Takao Hagiwara, PhD
(University of British Columbia)
Associate Professor
Japanese literature, especially modern prose and poetry; classical and modern Japanese literature; pre-modern Japanese sensibilities and (post) modernism

Jutta Ittner, PhD
(University of Hamburg)
Associate Professor
20th-century German literature; contemporary women writers; poetry; literary translation; German culture; representation of animals in contemporary literature

Marie Lathers, PhD
(Brown University)
Elizabeth M. and William C. Treuhaft Professor of Humanities
Women and the visual arts; 19th-century French literature and the arts (painting, sculpture, photography, film); gender, science, and technology; feminist theory; space studies

Jacqueline C. Nanfito, PhD
(University of California, Los Angeles)
Associate Professor
Colonial and 19th-century Latin American literature; Golden Age Hispanic literature; literary theory; Chicano literature; contemporary Latin American women writers

Damaris Punales-Alpizar, PhD
(University of Iowa)
Assistant Professor
20th-century Latin American literature; Latin American cinema; Cuban cinema; contemporary Cuban and Caribbean narrative; 19th- and 20th-century Latin American poetry; 20th-century peninsular literature

Cheryl Toman, PhD
(University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Associate Professor
African and Middle Eastern Francophone literature, especially Cameroon; women’s writing; immigrant communities in France

Susanne Vees-Gulani, PhD
(University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Associate Professor
20th- and 21st-century literature and literary movements; German cultural studies; science and literature; medicine and literature; trauma studies; victim discourses; literary and cultural responses to World War II; German civil defense strategies in World War II

Peter Jianhua Yang, PhD
(University of Utah)
Associate Professor
German literature, emphasis on 20th-century German literature; German theater; technology-enhanced language teaching; teaching pedagogy; business German; theatricality

Tatiana Zilotina, PhD
(University of Virginia)
Instructor
19th- and 20th-century Russian literature; the poetry of Marina Tsvetaeva; women writers; Russian culture; Russian folklore


Lecturers

Man-Lih Chai, MA
(University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Full-time Lecturer (Chinese)

Yoram Daon, MBA
(Keller Graduate School of Management, DeVry University)
Full-time Lecturer (Hebrew)

Elena Fernández, MA
(Cleveland State University)
Full-time Lecturer (Spanish)

Margaret M. Fitzgerald, MA
(The Ohio State University)
Full-time Lecturer (Japanese)

Aiko Ishii, MA
(University of Oregon)
Full-time Lecturer (Japanese)

Ramez Islambouli, MA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Full-time Lecturer (Arabic)

Yoshiko Kishi, MA
(New York University)
Full-time Lecturer (Japanese)

Clara Lipszyc-Arroyo, MA
(University of Western Ontario)
Full-time Lecturer (Portuguese and Spanish)

Enno Lohmeyer, PhD
(University of Kansas)
Full-time Lecturer (German)

Silvia Marotta, MA
(Youngstown State University)
Part-time Lecturer (Italian)

Carolina Perera Olivares, MA
(University of South Florida)
Full-time Lecturer (Spanish)

Fabienne Pizot-Haymore, MA
(Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier III)
Full-time Lecturer (French)

Undergraduate Programs

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures offers courses of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts in French, German, Japanese Studies, and Spanish. In addition, the department offers minors in Chinese, Hebrew, Italian, and Russian, as well as course work in Arabic and Portuguese. Except in the case of courses cross-listed with the World Literature Program, all courses in modern languages and literatures are taught primarily in the target language. In addition to class meetings, work outside of class with audio materials is an integral part of all elementary and intermediate language courses taught by the department. Career opportunities exist in college and university teaching, translation and interpretation, diplomatic and other government service, business, international nonprofit agencies, and the arts, and are often enhanced by a double major.

Placement Procedure

Students with prior experience in French, German, or Spanish, however gained (e.g., in high school, with or without AP courses, at another institution, via study abroad), must take a placement examination before the first week of the semester in which they enroll in one of those languages. Placement depends both on examination results and on consultation with individual faculty members.

Majors

 

French, German, Japanese Studies, and Spanish

Majors in French, German, Japanese Studies, and Spanish are expected: 1) to acquire the ability to understand, speak, read, and write the language(s) of their choice; and 2) to develop a sound understanding of the relevant cultures and literatures. The major in French, German, or Spanish consists of 30-32 hours of course work and will vary based on students’ background in the language. The major in Japanese Studies requires a minimum of 35 credit hours. Individual counseling and placement tests are provided by the department.  

Course requirements are as follows:

  • For students placed into the 200 level: 201-202 and eight courses at the 300 level taught in the target language, or six 300-level courses plus two related courses.
  • For students placed into the 300-level: ten 300-level courses taught in the target language, or eight 300-level courses plus two related courses.

Related courses are those outside the department which are closely related to French, German, Japanese, and Spanish cultures, as well as those departmental courses cross-listed with World Literature.

Additional Information for French Major

Students who take both FRCH 311 and 312 may count only one of these toward the major.

At least two of the 300-level courses should be numbered above 320 and taught in French.

At least two courses numbered 320 or higher should be taken in residence at CWRU.

Integrated Graduate Studies (French)

The department participates in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program, which makes it possible to complete both a BA and an MA in French in about five years of full-time study. The department particularly recommends the program to qualified students who are interested in seeking admission to highly competitive professional schools or PhD programs. Interested students should note the general requirements and the admission procedures listed elsewhere in the general bulletin.

Additional Information for Japanese Major

For additional information for the Japanese major, please see the Japanese Studies Program.

Additional Information for Spanish Major

• At least three of the 300-level courses should be numbered above 320. 

Spanish subject area requirements

SPAN 201Intermediate Spanish I *4
SPAN 202Intermediate Spanish II *4
SPAN 308Advanced Spanish in Spain **3
SPAN 310Advanced Composition and Reading3
SPAN 311Advanced Spanish Conversation3
SPAN 314Practice of Translation3
SPAN 315Latin American Cultural Conflicts **3
SPAN 316Studies in Civilization3
SPAN 317Contemporary Latin American Culture3
SPAN 318Contemporary Spanish Culture3
SPAN 319Spanish for Legal Professionals3
SPAN 320Introduction to Readings in Hispanic Literature3
SPAN 322Latin American Short Story **3
SPAN 331Spanish Golden Age Literature **3
SPAN 340Contemporary Latin-American Narrative **3
SPAN 342Latin American Feminist Voices **3
SPAN 343The New Drama in Latin American **3
SPAN 345Hispanic Autobiographical Writing **3
SPAN 350Spanish Fiction **3
SPAN 351Hispanic Turn of the Century Literature **3
SPAN 353Transatlantic Vanguard **3
SPAN 358Latin American Cinema **3
SPAN 370Special Topics in Spanish **3
SPAN 385Hispanic Literature in Translation **3
SPAN 398Honors Thesis II **3
SPAN 399Independent Study **1 - 3

 

*

Required only for students who begin their Spanish major at the intermediate level.

**

Students at the intermediate (200) level select five courses (15 credit hours); students entering the program at the advanced (300) level select seven courses (21 credit hours).


 

Departmental Honors

The departmental honors program is for especially dedicated majors. Requirements for honors in modern languages and literatures are: 1) a GPA of at least 3.5 in the major, and 2) an honors thesis (FRCH, GRMN, JAPN, or SPAN 397 and 398, beyond the 30-32 hours required for the major) devoted to the investigation of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic. The thesis is written in the target language, except in the case of Japanese Studies, which may permit papers in English. It must be read and approved by two readers and will be accepted for honors only if it achieves a grade of B or better. Students who qualify receive their degree “with Honors in Modern Languages and Literatures.” A registration form for students electing honors is available in the departmental office.

 

Minors

Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese Studies, Russian, Spanish

Course requirements for the minors are as follows:

  • For students placed into the introductory level (no previous knowledge of the language): 101, 102, 201, 202, and one 300-level course (for the French minor, the 300-level course must be taught in French).  
  • For students placed into the 200 level or higher: five courses at the 200 and 300 levels.

Hebrew language courses may also count toward the minor in Judaic Studies.

Graduate Programs

The department offers the Master of Arts degree in French and, together with the Departments of English and Classics, the Master of Arts degree in world literature.

  • The standard MA in French requires 27-28 semester hours. An MA in French with a minor concentration in German, Japanese, or Spanish requires 36 hours.
  • The MA in world literature requires 27 hours.

Full-time students are expected to complete the MA within two academic years.

ARAB Courses

ARAB 101. Beginning Arabic I. 4 Units.

The course introduces learners of Arabic to the sound and writing systems of this language and provides them with basic structural and lexical knowledge to enable them to say things in Arabic, such as greeting others, thanking someone, introducing oneself, describing one's background, seeking and providing info and so forth. The ability to perform these language functions in real-life or lifelike situations is developed by engaging the learner in structured functional activities and grammatical exercises.

ARAB 102. Beginning Arabic II. 4 Units.

ARAB 102 builds on the proficiency that students should have acquired in ARAB 101. The course follows a student-centered communicative approach in which class time is used in active learning through pair or group activities, role-play, games, selective listening and reading and other activities. The course emphasizes the four basic skills, reading, speaking, listening and writing. Students will be exposed to real audiovisual material in order to enhance comprehension and they will have to develop short oral and written responses about it. Aspects of culture across the Arab world will be included as an element of learning the language. Recommended preparation: ARAB 101

ARAB 201. Intermediate Arabic I. 4 Units.

Intensive review of grammar and conversational skills in modern Arabic through readings, discussions and other activities that explore contemporary Arab life and culture. Recommended preparation: ARAB 102 or equivalent.

ARAB 202. Intermediate Arabic II. 4 Units.

ARAB 202 is a continuation of ARAB 201 and will enable the students to develop advanced communicative skills for the use of Modern Arabic. It will focus on speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, and emphasize creative use of the language. Recommended preparation: ARAB 201 or equivalent.

ARAB 301. Advanced Arabic I. 3 Units.

This is a higher level of Arabic study. The course objectives are to enhance the student's language skills and to develop ability to use high-level Arabic effectively. It is designed to help students move from the intermediate level of proficiency, which centers on daily life and the immediate world, to the advanced, which broadens to include topics of general and professional interest. Recommended preparation: ARAB 202 or equivalent.

ARAB 337. Women in the Arab World. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is twofold: It is a course that allows students an in-depth look at the diverse women who represent a number of cultures in the Arab world in nations from the Mashrek to the Maghreb. The second primary goal of the course is to study such women through the eyes of leading Arab women theorists who have made an impact not only in their own countries, but also on disciplines intersecting with women's studies worldwide. We will study the Arab woman's place in her respective society, in political and economic systems, in education, and in the family. We will also analyze her contributions to art and literature as well as to the sciences. The course will provide an overview of the Arab woman throughout history, from her origins to her place within recent movements within the Arab Spring and other current world events. As Arab women are Muslim, Christian, and Jewish, views of women within these major world religions will also be taken into account as we study the Arab woman as well as religion's impact on culture in the Middle East and in the Maghreb in particular. In the course, we will utilize theoretical texts, but also case studies as well as examples from media and the arts. During the semester, we will take advantage of teleconferencing opportunities between CWRU and two major academic units for Women's Studies in the Arab world: The Institute for Women's Studies in the Arab World (IWSAW) in Beirut, Lebanon, and the University of Jordan's Center for Women's Studies in Amman. Offered as FRCH 337, FRCH 437, ARAB 337, ETHS 337 and WGST 337.

ARAB 399. Independent Study in Arabic. 1 - 3 Unit.

Topics will be constructed to fit the interest of a student who has already taken an advanced course in Arabic. Prereq: ARAB 301.

CHIN Courses

CHIN 101. Elementary Chinese I. 4 Units.

Introductory course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Chinese. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence patterns of standard Mandarin Chinese. The course emphasizes speaking and aural comprehension.

CHIN 102. Elementary Chinese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of CHIN 101. Recommended preparation: Consent of department.

CHIN 201. Intermediate Chinese I. 4 Units.

Emphasizes basic structures of standard Mandarin Chinese; helps students improve reading, writing, listening and speaking abilities. Chinese culture, society, and people introduced through supplementary materials and activities. Recommended preparation: CHIN 102 or equivalent.

CHIN 202. Intermediate Chinese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of CHIN 201. Students must use course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings. Recommended preparation: CHIN 201.

CHIN 203. Intermediate Chinese III. 4 Units.

As the continuation of CHIN 202, CHIN 203 is the third course at the intermediate level in Chinese language at CWRU. In this course, students focus on conversation combined with further study of grammatical and syntactic rules, and of cultural elements. The objective is a further development of communicative skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Upon completion of this course, students' proficiency will be optimal for entering CHIN 301. The course is a 4 credit course. The course uses integrated Chinese Level 2, Part 1, from the same series of textbooks for CHIN 201 and 202. The course covers 7 lessons of the book, two weeks for each lesson, in average. Students are expected to preview each lesson before class, to complete the assigned homework, and to study after class the content covered that day. The final grade will be based on the mid-term and final exams, and on quizzes. There will be a quiz at the end of each lesson. Chinese word-processing ability is one of the objectives of this course. Students will learn how to type Chinese texts using the Pinyin input method. Prereq: CHIN 202, or two years of study, or requisites not met permission.

CHIN 301. Advanced Chinese I. 4 Units.

Students work to achieve fluency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students must attend Language Resource Center in addition to class meetings. Recommended preparation: CHIN 202 or equivalent.

CHIN 302. Advanced Chinese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of CHIN 301.

CHIN 303. Topics in Chinese. 3 Units.

Work with authentic materials to improve proficiency in Chinese. Emphasis on contemporary culture of China. Recommended preparation: CHIN 302.

CHIN 304. Topics in Chinese. 3 Units.

Work with authentic materials to improve proficiency in Chinese. Emphasis on contemporary culture of China. Recommended preparation: CHIN 303.

CHIN 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

Directed study for those students who have progressed beyond available course offerings. Prereq: CHIN 202.

FRCH Courses

FRCH 101. Elementary French I. 4 Units.

Emphasizes conversational skills. Students are expected to achieve control of sound system and basic sentence structures of French. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to attending scheduled class meetings.

FRCH 102. Elementary French II. 4 Units.

Continuation of FRCH 101. Recommended preparation: FRCH 101.

FRCH 201. Intermediate French I. 4 Units.

Intensive review of grammar and usage through readings, discussions and other activities that emphasize contemporary French life. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to attending scheduled class meetings. Recommended preparation: FRCH 102 or equivalent.

FRCH 202. Intermediate French II. 4 Units.

A continuation of FRCH 201, the course focuses on the acquisition of intermediate-level skills in language and culture. Students must complete assignments at the Online Language Learning Center in addition to attending scheduled class meetings. Recommended preparation: FRCH 201 or equivalent.

FRCH 208. The Montreal Experience. 1 Unit.

One-week immersion learning experience performing community service in Montreal, Canada. Students meet several times for orientation before spending spring break in French-speaking Montreal. Community service may include volunteering in a homeless center, a hospital, or school. Application available from Department office. This course may be repeated once. Permit required. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 295. The Francophone World. 3 Units.

The course offers an introduction to the Francophone World from a historical, cultural, and literary perspective. The Francophone World includes countries and regions around the globe with a substantial French-speaking population (and where French is sometimes, but not always, an official language): North America (Louisiana, Quebec, and Acadia); North Africa (Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt); the Middle-East (Lebanon, Syria); the Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti); Southeast Asia (Vietnam); and Europe (France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Luxembourg). FRCH 295 provides a comprehensive overview of the Francophone World, while focusing on a particular area or areas in any given semester. Offered as ETHS 295, FRCH 295, and WLIT 295. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

FRCH 308. The Paris Experience. 3 Units.

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 310. Advanced Composition and Reading. 3 Units.

An initiation to the literature of Francophone expression with a focus on close reading. Texts may include short stories, essays, and novels. Students engage in the discussion of their readings and learn how to express their ideas both orally and in written form. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 311. Advanced Conversation I. 3 Units.

Designed to enhance pronunciation, speaking and listening-comprehension through the discussion of French literature and media for children. Required for Teacher Licensure candidates. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 312. Advanced Conversation II. 3 Units.

A functional approach to conversation. Students work to develop fluency in spoken French using current colloquial vocabulary and focusing on current issues. Practice in using speech appropriate to a variety of situations, including public debates. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 314. Translation Techniques. 3 Units.

Contrastive grammar analysis and stylistics are used to foster linguistic awareness and to introduce students to the methods and skills of translation. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 315. Business French. 3 Units.

Business French is an upper-level course with a focus on the economic life of France and other Francophone countries. Students gain knowledge of the economic structures and the business organization of Francophone countries as they enhance the linguistic skills used in professional communication. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 316. Contemporary France. 3 Units.

A study of contemporary France, this course features discussions and lectures on a variety of topics (geography, political and social life, contemporary culture) to develop factual knowledge about France and a sound understanding of current issues as presented in the media. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 317. French Cinema. 3 Units.

An exploration of modern France, its images and values as presented in French films. French press reviews are used for discussion. A unique linguistic and cultural immersion. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 318. The Origins of France. 3 Units.

Examination through texts, films, and other media of major historical, intellectual, and artistic influences that have shaped the evolution of French civilization. Students will attempt to identify the values and myths that have contributed to the ongoing formation of modern France. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 319. Modern France. 3 Units.

A study of France's political, social and cultural history from the French Revolution to World War II, with emphasis on the events, movements, and people that have shaped Modern France. Highly recommended for students of Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French culture. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 320. Introduction to French Literature. 3 Units.

Taught in French. An introduction to literary analysis through the study of important works of French literature. Written assignments are designed to develop skills in close reading, to introduce students to literary terminology in French, and to develop a capacity for clear, precise communication of an argument. Classes are discussion-based. Recommended preparation: FRCH 310. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: FRCH 202 or equivalent.

FRCH 331. Seventeenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.

The Age of Classicism, from Racine to Mme de Lafayette. Authors, works and topics may vary. Prereq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 335. Women in Developing Countries. 3 Units.

This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Seminar-style format, taught in English, with significant disciplinary writing in English for WGST, ETHS, and some WLIT students, and writing in French for FRCH and WLIT students. Writing assignments include two shorter essays and a substantial research paper. Offered as ETHS 335, FRCH 335, WLIT 335, WGST 335, FRCH 435 and WLIT 435. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

FRCH 337. Women in the Arab World. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is twofold: It is a course that allows students an in-depth look at the diverse women who represent a number of cultures in the Arab world in nations from the Mashrek to the Maghreb. The second primary goal of the course is to study such women through the eyes of leading Arab women theorists who have made an impact not only in their own countries, but also on disciplines intersecting with women's studies worldwide. We will study the Arab woman's place in her respective society, in political and economic systems, in education, and in the family. We will also analyze her contributions to art and literature as well as to the sciences. The course will provide an overview of the Arab woman throughout history, from her origins to her place within recent movements within the Arab Spring and other current world events. As Arab women are Muslim, Christian, and Jewish, views of women within these major world religions will also be taken into account as we study the Arab woman as well as religion's impact on culture in the Middle East and in the Maghreb in particular. In the course, we will utilize theoretical texts, but also case studies as well as examples from media and the arts. During the semester, we will take advantage of teleconferencing opportunities between CWRU and two major academic units for Women's Studies in the Arab world: The Institute for Women's Studies in the Arab World (IWSAW) in Beirut, Lebanon, and the University of Jordan's Center for Women's Studies in Amman. Offered as FRCH 337, FRCH 437, ARAB 337, ETHS 337 and WGST 337.

FRCH 338. The Cameroon Experience. 3 Units.

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338/438 or ETHS 338/438. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, WLIT 338, ETHS 438, FRCH 438, and WLIT 438. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

FRCH 341. Eighteenth Century French Literature. 3 Units.

Topics from the Age of Enlightenment, from libertinage to revolution. Authors and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 341 and FRCH 441. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 351. Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.

Romanticism, realism, and naturalism in the novel and the dramatic tradition. Authors, works, and topics may vary. Offered as FRCH 351 and FRCH 451. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 361. Twentieth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.

A study of representative novelists (e.g., Proust, Gide, Colette, Sartre, Beauvoir) and playwrights (e.g., Claudel, Beckett, Genet) in historical context. Authors, works, and topics may vary. Offered as FRCH 361 and FRCH 461. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 372. Topics in French Drama. 3 Units.

A topical approach to issues and problems specific to drama. Plays, playwrights, aesthetic theories, and historical periods studied in this course may vary. Offered as FRCH 372 and FRCH 472. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 373. The Novel and the Novella. 3 Units.

A study of narrative fiction focused on either a particular genre (the novel, the short story) or a particular type of novel (psychological novel, realist novel, detective novel), tale (the fantastic tale, the fairytale), or novella. Offered as FRCH 373 and FRCH 473. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 374. Major Writers and Literary Movements. 3 Units.

In-depth study of the work of a major writer, film director, or intellectual figure; or of a significant literary, intellectual, or artistic movement. Approaches, content, and instructor will vary. Offered as FRCH 374 and FRCH 474. Prereq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 375. Francophone Literature. 3 Units.

An examination of Francophone literature focused on the problematics of identity within the colonial and post-colonial context. Writers and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 375 and FRCH 475. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 376. Women Writers. 3 Units.

An examination of important literary texts by French and Francophone women writers. Critical essays are also studied to introduce historical and theoretical perspectives. Offered as FRCH 376 and FRCH 476. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 377. Special Topics. 3 Units.

The special topics course is designed to provide a forum for specific themes or subjects not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Approaches and content will vary. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as FRCH 377 and FRCH 477. Prereq or Coreq: FRCH 320.

FRCH 395. French Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Francophone literature, literature and cinema, women writers, contemporary literature. Counts toward French major only as related course. No knowledge of French required. Offered as FRCH 395, WLIT 395, FRCH 495, and WLIT 495.

FRCH 396. Senior Capstone - French. 3 Units.

The Senior Capstone in French in an independent study project chosen in consultation with a capstone advisor. The capstone project should reflect both the student's interest within French and/or Francophone Studies and the courses he or she has taken to fulfill the major. The project requires independent research using an approved bibliography and plan of action. In addition to written research, the student will also present the capstone project in a public forum that is agreed upon by the project advisor and the student. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Senior status required. Major in French or Francophone Studies required.

FRCH 397. Honors Thesis I. 3 Units.

Intensive study of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic with a faculty member, leading to the writing of a research paper in French. Limited to senior majors. Permit required.

FRCH 398. Honors Thesis II. 3 Units.

Continuation of FRCH 397. Limited to senior majors. Permit required. Prereq: FRCH 397.

FRCH 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

The course is for students who have special interests and commitments that are not addressed in regular courses, and who wish to work independently.

FRCH 408. The Paris Experience. 3 Units.

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 435. Women in Developing Countries. 3 Units.

This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Seminar-style format, taught in English, with significant disciplinary writing in English for WGST, ETHS, and some WLIT students, and writing in French for FRCH and WLIT students. Writing assignments include two shorter essays and a substantial research paper. Offered as ETHS 335, FRCH 335, WLIT 335, WGST 335, FRCH 435 and WLIT 435. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

FRCH 437. Women in the Arab World. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is twofold: It is a course that allows students an in-depth look at the diverse women who represent a number of cultures in the Arab world in nations from the Mashrek to the Maghreb. The second primary goal of the course is to study such women through the eyes of leading Arab women theorists who have made an impact not only in their own countries, but also on disciplines intersecting with women's studies worldwide. We will study the Arab woman's place in her respective society, in political and economic systems, in education, and in the family. We will also analyze her contributions to art and literature as well as to the sciences. The course will provide an overview of the Arab woman throughout history, from her origins to her place within recent movements within the Arab Spring and other current world events. As Arab women are Muslim, Christian, and Jewish, views of women within these major world religions will also be taken into account as we study the Arab woman as well as religion's impact on culture in the Middle East and in the Maghreb in particular. In the course, we will utilize theoretical texts, but also case studies as well as examples from media and the arts. During the semester, we will take advantage of teleconferencing opportunities between CWRU and two major academic units for Women's Studies in the Arab world: The Institute for Women's Studies in the Arab World (IWSAW) in Beirut, Lebanon, and the University of Jordan's Center for Women's Studies in Amman. Offered as FRCH 337, FRCH 437, ARAB 337, ETHS 337 and WGST 337.

FRCH 438. The Cameroon Experience. 3 Units.

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Coursework is in French. To do coursework in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338/438 or ETHS 338/438. Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, WLIT 338, ETHS 438, FRCH 438, and WLIT 438. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

FRCH 441. Eighteenth Century French Literature. 3 Units.

Topics from the Age of Enlightenment, from libertinage to revolution. Authors and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 341 and FRCH 441.

FRCH 451. Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.

Romanticism, realism, and naturalism in the novel and the dramatic tradition. Authors, works, and topics may vary. Offered as FRCH 351 and FRCH 451.

FRCH 461. Twentieth-Century French Literature. 3 Units.

A study of representative novelists (e.g., Proust, Gide, Colette, Sartre, Beauvoir) and playwrights (e.g., Claudel, Beckett, Genet) in historical context. Authors, works, and topics may vary. Offered as FRCH 361 and FRCH 461.

FRCH 472. Topics in French Drama. 3 Units.

A topical approach to issues and problems specific to drama. Plays, playwrights, aesthetic theories, and historical periods studied in this course may vary. Offered as FRCH 372 and FRCH 472.

FRCH 473. The Novel and the Novella. 3 Units.

A study of narrative fiction focused on either a particular genre (the novel, the short story) or a particular type of novel (psychological novel, realist novel, detective novel), tale (the fantastic tale, the fairytale), or novella. Offered as FRCH 373 and FRCH 473.

FRCH 474. Major Writers and Literary Movements. 3 Units.

In-depth study of the work of a major writer, film director, or intellectual figure; or of a significant literary, intellectual, or artistic movement. Approaches, content, and instructor will vary. Offered as FRCH 374 and FRCH 474. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 475. Francophone Literature. 3 Units.

An examination of Francophone literature focused on the problematics of identity within the colonial and post-colonial context. Writers and works may vary. Offered as FRCH 375 and FRCH 475. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

FRCH 476. Women Writers. 3 Units.

An examination of important literary texts by French and Francophone women writers. Critical essays are also studied to introduce historical and theoretical perspectives. Offered as FRCH 376 and FRCH 476.

FRCH 477. Special Topics. 3 Units.

The special topics course is designed to provide a forum for specific themes or subjects not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Approaches and content will vary. Maximum 6 credits. Offered as FRCH 377 and FRCH 477.

FRCH 495. French Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Francophone literature, literature and cinema, women writers, contemporary literature. Counts toward French major only as related course. No knowledge of French required. Offered as FRCH 395, WLIT 395, FRCH 495, and WLIT 495. Coreq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 590. Seminar: Topics in Modern Literature and Culture. 3 Units.

French literature and culture since the Revolution of 1789. Topics vary depending on student and instructor interests; may include realism and naturalism, Proust, contemporary film, or French philosophy. Maximum 9 credits. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 595. Independent Research. 1 - 3 Unit.

Graded independent work on a literary topic arranged individually with the instructor. Prereq: Graduate standing.

FRCH 601. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Unit.

For individual students or larger groups with special interests.

FRCH 651. Thesis M.A.. 6 - 9 Units.

Thesis M.A. serves the graduate plan A of the Graduate Handbook.

GRMN Courses

GRMN 101. Elementary German I. 4 Units.

Introductory course emphasizing conversational skills. Students achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence structures of spoken and written German. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

GRMN 102. Elementary German II. 4 Units.

Continuation of GRMN 101, emphasizing conversational skills. Prereq: GRMN 101 or equivalent.

GRMN 201. Intermediate German I. 4 Units.

Emphasizes both language and culture and is taught in German. Review of grammar and usage of German while studying texts and videotapes which focus on contemporary life in Germany. Prereq: GRMN 102 or equivalent.

GRMN 202. Intermediate German II. 4 Units.

Continuation of GRMN 201; conducted in German. Study of texts and videotapes which focus on contemporary life in Germany. Prereq: GRMN 201 or equivalent.

GRMN 303. German Culture & Civilization. 3 Units.

Examines aspects of contemporary Germany, including political and social systems and cultural life through seminar discussions of texts, films, and other media. Along with oral presentations and essay tests, students must select a research topic of interest to the discipline and write an analytic essay in German on the topic. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: GRMN 202.

GRMN 308. The Munich Experience: Spring Course/Summer Study Advanced Level. 3 Units.

A semester seminar class, conducted in German, which culminates with a three-week immersion learning experience spent living and studying in Munich. Students reside with German families, study German daily in a formal setting, and practice comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Regular visits to museums, galleries, and cultural events; first-hand observation of history, life, and architecture of a major cultural center; day trips to cultural phenomena and events in the German countryside. Prereq or Coreq: GRMN 202 or equivalent.

GRMN 310. Advanced German Reading and Composition. 3 Units.

An advanced-level skills course focusing on reading and writing for students who have already studied intermediate German. Develops abilities to read authentic, unabridged texts, such as contemporary newspaper and magazine articles; readings increase progressively in length and vary in genre. Also practices composition skills by composing academic prose such as objective summaries, reviews, precis, letters, short creative texts, and analytic written forms such as short essays to produce increasingly sophisticated analytical compositions in German. Includes instruction on use of English- and German-language research tools, German-German dictionaries, and study guides. Taught in German. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: GRMN 202 or equivalent.

GRMN 311. Advanced Conversation. 3 Units.

Students work to improve fluency in spoken German. Topics include contemporary issues; current vocabulary is stressed. Students practice using speech appropriate to various situations. Prereq: GRMN 202 or equivalent.

GRMN 312. German Proficiency Through Drama. 3 Units.

Readings begin with single scenes and progress to full length radio plays and theater plays which gradually increase in linguistic difficulty and complexity of central themes. Introduction to the elements of drama such as dialogue, character and dramatic structure, as well as the genres of tragedy, comedy, and tragicomedy. Focus: effective communication of critical, interpretative, and analytic ideas in discussion and in writing. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: GRMN 202 or equivalent.

GRMN 313. Intro to German Literature. 3 Units.

Introduction to German literature and the cultural issues it addresses. Readings include the main literary and folk genres (short texts or excerpts), gradually increasing in linguistic difficulty and complexity of central themes. They cover the major literary periods from the 18th to the 21st centuries. Focus: effective communication of critical, interpretative, and analytic ideas in discussion and in writing. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: GRMN 202 or equivalent.

GRMN 315. Business German. 3 Units.

This course is taught in German. It is designed to enhance students' German listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. It also aims at developing students' cross-cultural awareness and communicative competence in the specialized field of German for Business and Economics in an increasingly global workplace. The course will explore German demography and economic geography; the European Union, the Euro, and Germany's role in this union; German economic systems, industries, banking systems, advertising and sales, transportation and tourism; Germany's corporate culture, industrial relations, codetermination in German companies, etc. Prereq: GRMN 202 or equivalent.

GRMN 320. Topics in Narrative. 3 Units.

This course examines representative prose works (tales, novellas, short novels, letters, and essays) chosen to present reactions and impressions to social and aesthetic conditions in German-speaking countries and to introduce students to different styles and varieties of German prose. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 326. Witches, Weddings, and Wolves. 3 Units.

Intensive study of German Folk Tales as collected and altered by the Brothers Grimm. The Maerchen as both children's and adult literature. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 330. Topics in German Cinema. 3 Units.

Overview of German Cinema from the beginning to the present. Film selection representative of major directors, major periods (such as expressionism or The New German Cinema), particular themes from different historical perspectives, and literature in film. All films are in German. Taught in German. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 340. Topics in German Drama. 3 Units.

Overview of German drama from the beginning to the present. Explores German plays by applying different disciplinary approaches such as historical, cultural, and literary analyses. All plays are in German. Taught in German. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 350. Topics in German Lyric. 3 Units.

This course presents a detailed study of German lyric through the frequent writing of critical papers and literary analysis of the formal elements of poetry: rhyme schemes, diction, meter, figures of speech. The poems selected cover a variety of styles, a range of historical periods, and a sampling of authors. Readings and discussions in German. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 360. Topics in Major German Authors. 3 Units.

Concentrates on a specific author or small group of authors within an aesthetic or historical context, for example: Goethe, Heine, Bachmann, Junges Deutschland, or die Gruppe 47. Examines the breadth of themes and styles and may include literary, philosophical, biographical, and other kinds of texts. Readings and discussions in German. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 365. German Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Goethe defined "World Literature" (Weltliteratur) as "Intellectual Trade Relations" (geistiger Handelsverkehr). This course gives students the opportunity to study German literary works in translation and thus to trade intellectual relations with a literary culture previously unknown to them. Counts toward the German major only as a related course. No knowledge of German required. Offered as GRMN 365 and WLIT 365.

GRMN 367. German Classicism/Romanticism. 3 Units.

Selected works of Goethe, Schiller, Hoelderlin, von Kleist, and others. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 370. Topics in Literary Periods. 3 Units.

Overview of German literary periods from the beginning to the present. Explores German literary works in all three major genres from the historical, social, and literary perspectives. All works are in German. Taught in German. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 380. Topics in Advanced German Culture Studies. 3 Units.

Exploration of the culture of the arts, political culture, and the cultural self-expression of the German-speaking countries from their beginnings to the present. Focus: The cultural changes within certain historical periods. Examination of particular aspects such as culture as mass deception in fascist Germany and the GDR, the reflection of contemporary culture in literature and cinema, problems of cultural identity and multiculturalism, and the role of postmodern culture industry and the critical discourse today. Taught in German. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 395. Special Topics in German Literature. 3 Units.

For majors and advanced students upon presentation of a written plan of investigation. Consent of department required. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 396. Senior Capstone - German. 3 Units.

The Senior Capstone in German in an independent study project chosen in consultation with a capstone advisor. The capstone project should reflect both the student's interest within German and/or German studies and the courses he or she has taken to fulfill the major. The project requires independent research using and approved bibliography and plan of action. In addition to written research, the student will also present the capstone project in a public forum that agreed upon by the project advisor and the students. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Senior status required. Major in German required.

GRMN 397. Honors Thesis I. 3 Units.

Intensive study of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic with a faculty member, leading to the writing of a research paper in German. Limited to senior majors. Permit required. Prereq: One 300-level GRMN course.

GRMN 398. Honors Thesis II. 3 Units.

Continuation of GRMN 397. Limited to senior majors. Permit required. Prereq: GRMN 397.

GRMN 399. Independent Study in German. 1 - 3 Unit.

For majors and advanced students under special circumstances. Permit required.

HBRW Courses

HBRW 101. Elementary Modern Hebrew I. 4 Units.

The course objective is to enable students to develop basic communicative skills in standard Modern Hebrew. Students will become acquainted with the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, and with basic grammar and vocabulary.

HBRW 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew II. 4 Units.

The course objective is to continue to develop the students' basic communicative skills in standard Modern Hebrew. Students will be introduced to more complex grammatical constructs, linguistic forms and vocabulary. Prereq: HBRW 101 or consent of department.

HBRW 201. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I. 4 Units.

The course objective is to advance the students' Hebrew communicative skills by studying the language in its cultural context. The focus will be on speaking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on the use of the language as reflected in Israeli culture. Prereq: HBRW 102 or consent of department.

HBRW 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. 4 Units.

The course objectives are to enhance and strengthen the students' Hebrew language skills, and to develop the ability to express thoughts, ideas and opinions freely, in both verbal and written forms. Prereq: HBRW 201or consent of department.

HBRW 301. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. 3 Units.

The course objectives are to enhance the students' language skills and to develop their ability to use an advanced level of Hebrew effectively. Classes will be conducted in Hebrew, and will focus on speaking, reading, and writing with an emphasis on active and creative use of the language. Prereq: HBRW 202 or consent of department.

HBRW 302. Advanced Modern Hebrew II. 3 Units.

The course objectives are to enhance the students' language skills within the domain of Modern Hebrew literature, and to enable them to use their Hebrew skills to perform detailed literary analyses in Hebrew. Classes will be conducted in Hebrew. Prereq: HBRW 301 or consent of department.

HBRW 399. Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Unit.

The course is for students with special interests and commitments that are not fully addressed in regular courses, and who wish to work independently. Prereq: HBRW 301 or consent of department.

ITAL Courses

ITAL 101. Elementary Italian I. 4 Units.

Introductory course; stress on mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Italian. Independent laboratory practice is a requirement.

ITAL 102. Elementary Italian II. 4 Units.

Continuation of ITAL 101; independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings. Prereq: ITAL 101.

ITAL 201. Review and Progress in Italian. 4 Units.

Emphasizes language and culture. Review of Italian grammar and usage while studying written forms. Independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings. Prereq: ITAL 102 or equivalent.

ITAL 202. Read and Discuss Italian Texts. 4 Units.

Focus on increasing proficiency acquired in elementary Italian and on mastering short narratives. Review of Italian grammar and usage through reading, conversation, and media. Independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings. Prereq: ITAL 201 or equivalent.

ITAL 308. The Italian Experience. 3 Units.

A three-week summer study abroad course spent at a university in an Italian city well-known for its cultural and linguistic heritage and at other important sites during travel. Focus: Language immersion and processing of cultural experience. Main features: 1. Intense collaboration with an Italian university. Students interact with Italian peers; seminars are co-taught by Italian faculty. 2. Creation of an individual journal that synthesizes students' perception of and reflections on their experience, records the progress of their final project, and documents their improvement in language proficiency. 3. Final project. Students meet M-F in a formal setting for advanced language study designed to improve proficiency in speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. They attend seminars on varied topics in literature, history, and civilization. Visits to museums, galleries, and attendance at cultural events are included. Prereq: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

ITAL 311. Conversation in Italian. 3 Units.

Focused on oral communication, ITAL 311 is designed to enhance listening/comprehension skills in Italian. Using audio-visual materials, students acquire the skills necessary to understand conversations between native-speakers and to emulate them. The situational and functional approach to the course facilitates progress towards advanced-level fluency in Italian. Prereq: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

ITAL 370. Special Topics in Italian Literature. 3 Units.

Special topics in Italian literature, literary criticism, and culture. Prereq: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

ITAL 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

The course is for students with special interests and commitments that are not fully addressed in regular courses, and who wish to work independently.

JAPN Courses

JAPN 101. Elementary Japanese I. 4 Units.

Introduction to understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese. Students learn to read and write hiragana and katakana syllabaries and 50 kanji characters. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system and basic structure of the language. Emphasizes aural comprehension and speaking.

JAPN 102. Elementary Japanese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of JAPN 101. Emphasizes aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn approximately 100 new kanji characters. Recommended preparation: JAPN 101.

JAPN 201. Intermediate Japanese I. 4 Units.

Further study of fundamental structures of Japanese. Students improve aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing abilities and learn approximately 100 new characters. Recommended preparation: JAPN 102 or equivalent.

JAPN 202. Intermediate Japanese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of JAPN 201. Students learn an additional 100 kanji characters. With the completion of JAPN 201 - 202, students should have control of the fundamentals of modern Japanese and a firm foundation in the writing system. Recommended preparation: JAPN 201 or equivalent.

JAPN 225. Japanese Popular Culture. 3 Units.

This course highlights salient aspects of modern Japanese popular culture as expressed in animation, comics and literature. The works examined include films by Hayao Miyazaki, writings by Kenji Miyazawa, Haruki Murakami and Banana Yoshimoto, among others. The course introduces students to essential aspects of modern Japanese popular culture and sensibility. Offered as JAPN 225 and WLIT 225. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

JAPN 245. Classical Japanese Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Readings, in English translation, of classical Japanese poetry, essays, narratives, and drama to illustrate essential aspects of Japanese culture and sensibility before the Meiji Restoration (1868). Lectures explore the sociohistorical contexts and the character of major literary genres; discussions focus on interpreting the central images of human value within each period. Japanese sensibilities compared to and contrasted with those of Western and other cultures. Offered as JAPN 245 and WLIT 245.

JAPN 255. Modern Japanese Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Focus on the major genres of modern Japanese literature, including poetry, short story, and novel (shosetsu). No knowledge of Japanese language or history is assumed. Lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. Films and slides complement course readings. Offered as JAPN 255 and WLIT 255.

JAPN 301. Advanced Japanese I. 4 Units.

Emphasizes conversational proficiency and reading. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings. Recommended preparation: JAPN 202 or equivalent.

JAPN 302. Advanced Japanese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of JAPN 301; emphasizes conversational proficiency and reading. Japanese life and culture introduced through supplemental materials and activities. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings. Recommended preparation: JAPN 301 or equivalent.

JAPN 345. Japanese Women Writers. 3 Units.

Contributions of women writers to the literature of pre-modern and modern Japan; investigations of how their works exemplify and diverge from "mainstream" literary practices. Emphasis on the social and cultural contexts of the texts. Offered as JAPN 345 and WLIT 345.

JAPN 350. Contemporary Japanese Texts I. 3 Units.

The primary aim of this course is to develop communication skills in Japanese based on those that the students have acquired in JAPN 302 or equivalent. The students will read and discuss various texts such as daily conversations, essays, and news scripts with the assistance of vocabulary and kanji (Chinese character) lists and formal grammar explanations. Attention also will be given to enhancing the students' writing and aural/oral proficiencies through regularly assigned homework, presentations, tape listening, video viewing, and classroom discussion. Recommended preparation: JAPN 302 or equivalent.

JAPN 351. Contemporary Japanese Texts II. 3 Units.

This course is a continuation of JAPN 350 and its primary aim overlaps with that of JAPN 350: to develop more sophisticated communication skills in Japanese. Students will read and discuss various texts such as daily conversations, essays, and news scripts largely with the assistance of vocabulary and kanji (Chinese character) lists. Attention will be given to enhancing the students' writing and aural/oral proficiencies through regularly assigned homework, presentations, tape listening, video viewing, and classrooms discussion. Prereq: JAPN 350 or consent of instructor.

JAPN 355. Modern Japanese Novels and the West. 3 Units.

This course will compare modern Japanese and Western novellas, drama, and novels. Comparisons will focus on the themes of family, gender and alienation, which subsume a number of interrelated sub-themes such as marriage, home, human sexuality, amae (dependence), innocence, experience, death, God/gods, and nature (the ecosystem). Offered as JAPN 355, WLIT 355. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

JAPN 396. Senior Capstone - Japanese. 3 Units.

The Senior Capstone in Japanese is an independent study project chosen in consultation with a capstone advisor. The capstone project should reflect both the student's interest within Japanese and the courses he or she has taken to fulfill the major. The project requires independent research using an approved bibliography and plan of action. In addition to written research, the student will also present the capstone project in a public forum that is agreed upon by the project advisor and the student. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Senior status required. Major in Japanese required.

JAPN 397. Senior Thesis I. 3 Units.

Intensive study of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic with a faculty member, leading to the writing of a research paper in English or Japanese. Limited to senior majors. Permit required.

JAPN 398. Senior Thesis II. 3 Units.

Continuation of JAPN 397. Limited to senior majors. Prereq: JAPN 397.

JAPN 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

Directed study for students who have progressed beyond available course offerings.

JAPN 450. Japanese in Cultural Context I. 3 Units.

The primary aim of this graduate course is to develop sophisticated communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in Japanese. The students will read and discuss various texts in the original, such as essays, news scripts, and literary works. Classroom instruction and discussion will be conducted in Japanese. The students also will be required to write a research paper of 4000-6000 letters/characters (10-15 genkoyoshi pages) in Japanese on a topic related to Japan and the student's specialty. Recommended preparation: JAPN 351 or equivalent.

JAPN 451. Japanese in Cultural Context II. 3 Units.

This course is a continuation of JAPN 450 and it aims at a further development of sophisticated communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in Japanese. The students will read and discuss various texts in the original, such as essays, news scripts, and literary works both classical and modern. Classroom instruction and discussion will be conducted in Japanese. The students also will be required to write a research paper of 6000-8000 letters/characters (15-20 genkoyoshi pages) in Japanese on a topic related to Japan and the student's specialty. Recommended preparation: JAPN 450 or equivalent.

MLIT Courses

MLIT 315. Mysticism and Literature. 3 Units.

This co-taught seminar will explore and compare mystical elements in selected literary and theoretical works from the West and the East. Comparisons will focus on a number of interrelated sub-themes such as mind, language, alienation, innocence, experience, life, death, cosmogony, cosmology, good, evil, God/gods, and nature (the ecosystem). Offered as MLIT 315, WLIT 315, MLIT 415 and WLIT 415.

MLIT 325. Seminar in Cognitive Poetics and Text Analysis. 3 Units.

This seminar will cover the methodology of text analysis and the theory of cognitive poetics. The latter includes the study of formal semantic structures occurring in the primarily aesthetic aspects of written language. The seminar will cover narratology, metaphor, metonymy, and related conceptual phenomena in texts and discourse. Offered as MLIT 325 and MLIT 425.

MLIT 327. Gesture in Cognition and Communication. 3 Units.

Most people never notice that when they are talking, they're also gesturing. Why do we produce these gestures? What can studying them tell us about the human mind? This course surveys scientific research on gesture, exploring topics such as the role of gesture in communication, cross-cultural differences in gesture, and the relationship between gesture and signed languages. The course will focus on gestures produced with speech, but will cover symbolic and ritualized gesture in the visual arts and in dance. Offered as COGS 327 and COGS 427 and MLIT 327.

MLIT 328. Seminar in Intercultural Communication: A Multilingual Media Approach. 3 Units.

This seminar will study communication, especially news communication, through current media in different languages and cultures. It will compare discourse, terminology, vocabulary, and general rhetorical features of the genres of media-borne languages taught in the department. It will enhance the student's general knowledge of contemporary use of discourse in the foreign language.

MLIT 415. Mysticism and Literature. 3 Units.

This co-taught seminar will explore and compare mystical elements in selected literary and theoretical works from the West and the East. Comparisons will focus on a number of interrelated sub-themes such as mind, language, alienation, innocence, experience, life, death, cosmogony, cosmology, good, evil, God/gods, and nature (the ecosystem). Offered as MLIT 315, WLIT 315, MLIT 415 and WLIT 415.

MLIT 425. Seminar in Cognitive Poetics and Text Analysis. 3 Units.

This seminar will cover the methodology of text analysis and the theory of cognitive poetics. The latter includes the study of formal semantic structures occurring in the primarily aesthetic aspects of written language. The seminar will cover narratology, metaphor, metonymy, and related conceptual phenomena in texts and discourse. Offered as MLIT 325 and MLIT 425.

PORT Courses

PORT 101. Elementary Portuguese I. 4 Units.

Introductory course. Students achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence structures of spoken and written Portuguese. Students use materials offered through the Language Center in addition to class meetings.

PORT 102. Elementary Portuguese II. 4 Units.

Continuation of PORT 101, emphasizing conversational skills. Prereq: PORT 101 or equivalent.

PORT 201. Intermediate Portuguese I. 4 Units.

PORT 201 is an intermediate language course. It assumes a fair knowledge of basic grammar that is reviewed and expanded. The course needs the student to show a strong determination to engage in conversation in Portuguese, and to commit to develop better writing in Portuguese. The student learns more about cultural aspects in the Portuguese-speaking world. The course is taught completely in Portuguese. Prereq: PORT 102 or equivalent.

PORT 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

This course is for students with special interests and commitments that are not addressed in regular courses and who wish to work independently.

RUSN Courses

RUSN 101. Elementary Russian I. 4 Units.

Introductory course emphasizing conversational skills. Students achieve control of alphabet, sound system, and basic sentence structures in spoken and written Russian. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

RUSN 102. Elementary Russian II. 4 Units.

Continuation of RUSN 101, emphasizing audiolingual practice. Recommended preparation: RUSN 101.

RUSN 201. Intermediate Russian. 4 Units.

Furthers students' ability in four basic language skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing; expands knowledge of Russian grammar and vocabulary. Recommended preparation: RUSN 102.

RUSN 202. Introduction to Contemporary Civilization. 4 Units.

Continuation of RUSN 201; introduces contemporary Russian culture through readings and discussion. Recommended preparation: RUSN 201.

RUSN 210. Russian for Russian heritage speakers who had no exposure to formal education in Russian. 3 Units.

The course is aimed at "heritage speakers" of Russian who grew up speaking Russian in the family without a full Russian educational and cultural background. The course is designed for students who have speaking and comprehension abilities in Russian but have minimum exposure to writing and reading. Students will learn about Russian grammar (spelling rules, punctuation, word-formation, parts of speech). Readings include the works of Russian classical and contemporary authors. Multimedia materials will enhance cultural awareness.

RUSN 311. Advanced Conversation. 3 Units.

Students work to improve fluency in spoken Russian. Topics of conversation include aspects of contemporary civilization; current vocabulary is stressed. Recommended preparation: RUSN 202.

RUSN 319. Life in Modern Russia. 3 Units.

Examines aspects of life in modern Russia, between the 1917 Revolution and the present, including political and social systems and cultural life through the study of texts, films and other media. Recommended preparation: RUSN 202.

RUSN 320. Introduction to Russian Literature. 3 Units.

Introduction to major literary movements, principal writers, and outstanding works of Russian literary works. Recommended preparation: RUSN 202 or equivalent.

RUSN 375. Russian Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Russian classical and modern literature, cinema, women writers, individual authors. May count towards Russian minor. No knowledge of Russian required. Offered as RUSN 375 and WLIT 375.

RUSN 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.


SPAN Courses

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I. 4 Units.

Introductory course. Students achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence structures of spoken and written Spanish. Students must use the course material offered by the Online Language Learning Center in addition to class meetings.

SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish II. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPAN 101, emphasizing conversational skills. Recommended preparation: SPAN 101.

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I. 4 Units.

Intensive review of grammar and usage through readings, discussions, and other activities. Recommended preparation: SPAN 102 or equivalent.

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II. 4 Units.

Continues grammar review of SPAN 201. Students will study texts and cultural documents which focus on contemporary life in Hispanic countries. Recommended preparation: SPAN 201 or equivalent.

SPAN 285. The Hispanophone World. 3 Units.

A survey of the imaginative literatures in a variety of genres from the Spanish-speaking world, including texts authored by Hispanics living in the United States. The selections will help students gain a greater understanding and appreciation of the impact and adaptation of Spanish language and culture among widely diverse populations of the world over the past centuries. Counts towards Spanish major as related course. No knowledge of Spanish required. Offered as SPAN 285 and WLIT 285.

SPAN 303. Latin American History through Art, Literature and Cinema. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of Latin America and the Caribbean through art, film and literature. Although it will address pertinent historical aspects related to its social, political, cultural and economic development, the course will focus on relevant contemporary issues affecting and transforming the region, such as the role of women, dictatorships vs. democracy, revolutionary movements, endemic poverty, the Indian communities, the role of art and culture, migration to urban centers, the drug war, the role of the Catholic Church and liberation theology, and the presence and intervention of the United State in the region. The course will be taught in English.

SPAN 305. Spanish for Political Science and International Relations. 3 Units.

Spanish 305 is an upper-level Spanish language course designed to give students interested in political science and international relations specific field-related vocabulary and cultural information not found in basic textbooks. The course is divided into two parts: the first deals with political science; the second with international relations. Readings, discussions, and lectures are conducted in Spanish. Prereq: SPAN 202 or requisites not met permission.

SPAN 306. The Cuban Experience: an immersion in its culture and society. 3 Units.

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306, SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 307. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. 3 Units.

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology is designed to introduce students to the study and practice of the sound system of Spanish. The course will focus on the articulatory descriptions of native pronunciations, the differences between letters and sounds, and the classification of sounds. The course will focus mainly on the sounds of Spanish but will also include the differences with English Language sounds. It will also develop awareness of the different dialectal variations of Spanish across the world. In addition, cultural competency will be achieved through a contextualized approach. The main goal of this course is to improve pronunciation and intonation in Spanish with special emphasis in the production of native-like sounds. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 308. Advanced Spanish in Spain. 3 Units.

Three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place in Valladolid, Spain. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes grammar review, conversation practice, and study of relevant cultural issues. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Spain's key historical moments through the city of Valladolid and nearby communities: their literature, visual arts, films, and music. The cultural component is enhanced by visits to historic and cultural sites and museums. Four different one-hour orientation meetings during Spring semester. Prereq: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 309. The Buenos Aires Experience. 3 Units.

Three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes grammar review, conversation practice, and study of relevant cultural issues. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of the city of Buenos Aires' history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. The cultural component is enhanced by visits to historic and cultural sites and museums. Four different one-hour orientation meetings during Spring semester. Prereq: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 310. Advanced Composition and Reading. 3 Units.

Designed to facilitate the transition between lower and upper division courses in Spanish, and focus upon the simultaneous development of the reading and writing skills expected of students in all advanced Spanish courses. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 311. Advanced Spanish Conversation. 3 Units.

Engages students in conversation so that they develop oral proficiency. Short essays and newspaper articles dealing with everyday activities, socio-cultural roles and experiences, and self-awareness and life goals discussed; some literary materials discussed. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 312. Business Spanish. 3 Units.

Spanish for business is an upper-level language and culture course which is designed for students at the advance intermediate level. The course stresses the vocabulary and expressions used to describe economic and commercial structure, the language to solve problems and conduct negotiations, and the culture of specific aspects of the Spanish world of the business. Students will continue being exposed to listening, speaking, reading and writing through a variety of activities. Prereq: SPAN 202 or permission.

SPAN 313. Spanish for Health Professionals. 3 Units.

Designed for students who are majoring in, or considering a major in, a health-related field. Focus on the vocabulary and expressions needed for the workplace, task-based practical skills, and grammatical structures. Prereq: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 314. Practice of Translation. 3 Units.

Students learn necessary skills and techniques for solving linguistic problems in translation. Texts with a variety of contents, including articles from current press, will be translated from English into Spanish and occasionally from Spanish into English. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 315. Latin American Cultural Conflicts. 3 Units.

Evolution of Latin American socioeconomic characteristics and artistic production up to the present. Class discussions of diverse literary works, social research essays, and testimonials focus on conflicting elements in class structures, ethnicity, and urban modernization as well as family ethos, religious trends, cultural identity, and educational problems. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 316. Studies in Civilization. 3 Units.

Major historical, intellectual, and artistic influences that have shaped the evolution of Spanish civilization. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 317. Contemporary Latin American Culture. 3 Units.

An intensive study of Latin American culture and civilization through the examination of its arts: literature, music, film, painting, photography, popular art. Designed to bring together the various strands of Latin American realities, emphasis is placed on the predominant view among Latin American intellectuals that artists and intellectuals have the power and the obligation to modify society. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 318. Contemporary Spanish Culture. 3 Units.

Study of several key historical moments and several key aspects in contemporary Spain: Spanish civil war, Franco's dictatorship, and democratic Spain; rural-urban differences, industrialization and migratory movements; nationalism and terrorism; foreign immigration and tourism, the cultural renaissance and the cultural wars in Madrid and Barcelona. Feature films and literary texts will illustrate the issues under study. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 319. Spanish for Legal Professionals. 3 Units.

Spanish for Legal Professionals is designed to familiarize students with technical language, legal topics and documents used in legal professions. The course will focus in the American common law system but will also include comparison with the civil law tradition as applied in Latin America. It will also develop oral and written communication skills in order to improve the communication with Spanish speaking clients and the Hispanic community as required. In addition, cultural competency will be achieved through a contextualized approach. This course reviews the grammar studied in previous courses and promotes class discussions and includes readings as well as translation of legal documents. Prereq: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 320. Introduction to Readings in Hispanic Literature. 3 Units.

Introduction to major literary movements and genres, and the works of outstanding authors of Spanish and Latin American literature through close readings and seminar-based discussions of the texts, as well as to disciplinary modes of inquiry and presentation. Requirements include active participation in seminar discussions, oral presentations, tests, and several written assignments, such as response papers, in-class writing exercises, and an analytic essay in Spanish on a research topic of interest to the discipline. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 322. Latin American Short Story. 3 Units.

The history and development of the Latin American short story from the nineteenth century to the present. Intertextuality, rise of the Nuevo Cuento, and major characteristics of the works. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 325. Hispanic Intellectuals and Society: A Critical Approach. 3 Units.

This course offers an overview of the most important critical approaches to Spanish American culture and literature, with a socio-historical emphasis. Some of the authors we will discuss are Angel Rama, Jose Antonio Cornejo Polar and Nestor Garcia Canclini. We will analyze how the Latin American intellectuals had thought about specific issues such as identity, race, ideology, colonial and post-colonial relations with the metropolis and the process of formation of the nations in the continent. The class, the discussions, exams, oral presentations and papers will be in Spanish. Some of the readings must be in English, but most of them will be in Spanish. Offered as SPAN 325, SPAN 425, ETHS 325, WLIT 325 and WLIT 425. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 326. The Fantastic in Latin American Prose. 3 Units.

Introduction to a distinctive trend in contemporary Latin American literature, the prose portrayal of the "fantastic," a new narrative mode in Latin America. Critical examination of selected texts reveals new concepts of space and time and an increasing complexity of structure and style, one which juxtaposes and analyzes fantasy and reality. Offered as SPAN 326 and SPAN 426. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 331. Spanish Golden Age Literature. 3 Units.

Through close reading and discussion of representative texts, we will study different examples of Spanish and Latin American writing from the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We will stress connections between Spain and Latin America, as well as cultural and literary topics of special relevance for contemporary Hispanic cultures. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 333. Contemporary Caribbean Literature. 3 Units.

In addition to developing a general familiarity with the literature and history of this region, students will acquire an awareness of the interrelation of national identity, memory, and language in the texts produced by contemporary Caribbean authors, and of the cultural hybridity characteristic of this production. The themes treated by these authors include colonialism and postcolonialism, cultural and religious syncretism, and sexual politics. Offered as SPAN 333, SPAN 433, ETHS 333, WLIT 333 and WLIT 433. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 334. Mexican Literature. 3 Units.

The course studies, through a series of representative literary works, the most significant literary movements and styles in 20th and 21st Centuries Mexican Literature. Special attention will be paid to the political, aesthetic, and philosophical debates that have shaped the development of Mexican literature from the 1920s to the present, and to the different narrative techniques and ideologies that have characterized different historical periods, literary movements, and individual authors' styles in contemporary Mexican literature. Offered as SPAN 334 and SPAN 434. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 339. Latin American Poetic Revolt. 3 Units.

Introduction to most important poets in contemporary Latin America, a region home to a significant number of eminent poets, including Nobel Laureates from Chile, Gabriela Mistral and Pablo Neruda. The course focuses on detailed textual analysis of pivotal works, combined with historical-literary perspective, so students gain insight into the diverse styles and tendencies that reflect the tumultuous history of poetry's development in a relentless search for a Latin American cultural identity. Offered as SPAN 339, SPAN 439, WLIT 339 and WLIT 439. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 340. Contemporary Latin-American Narrative. 3 Units.

Students explore the most significant narrative techniques since 1945 in Latin American fiction: Borges, Cortazar, Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa, Isabel Allende. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 342. Latin American Feminist Voices. 3 Units.

Examination of the awakening of feminine and feminist consciousness in the literary production of Latin American women writers, particularly from the 1920s to the present. Close attention paid to the dominant themes of love and dependency; imagination as evasion; alienation and rebellion; sexuality and power; the search for identity and the self-preservation of subjectivity. Readings include prose, poetry, and dramatic texts of female Latin American writers contributing to the emerging of feminist ideologies and the mapping of feminist identities. Offered as SPAN 342, SPAN 442, ETHS 342, WGST 342, WLIT 342, and WLIT 442. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 343. The New Drama in Latin American. 3 Units.

Representative works of contemporary Latin American drama. Critical examination of selected dramatic works of twentieth-century Latin America provides students insight into the nature of drama and into the structural and stylistic strategies utilized by Latin American dramatists to create the "new theater," one which is closely related to Latin American political history. Offered as SPAN 343, SPAN 434, ETHS 343, WLIT 343 and WLIT 434. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 345. Hispanic Autobiographical Writing. 3 Units.

The course studies issues of self-representation through the reading of autobiographical works from different periods from Latin America, Spain, and the U.S., and of theoretical works that address topics of first-person narratives, autobiography, and sub-alternity. Satisfies Global and Cultural Diversity requirement. Offered as SPAN 345 and SPAN 445. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 350. Spanish Fiction. 3 Units.

Narrative masterpieces from Cervantes and the picaresque (El Lazarillo) to the short stories and novels of 19th and 20th century authors. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 351. Hispanic Turn of the Century Literature. 3 Units.

Cultural and political transitions between 19th and 20th Century, between Spain and Latin America, and between literary models. Study of Spanish and Latin American writers and their literary connections (Generation of 1898, modernistas) in the context of colonial conflicts and economic changes. Offered as SPAN 351 and SPAN 451. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 353. Transatlantic Vanguard. 3 Units.

Presentation of transatlantic tendencies of the early vanguard movements represented by poets from Spain, Central and South America. Beginning with the advent of Modernism in Latin America and Symbolism in Spain, this course will trace the development of resulting movements in the early twentieth century. Surrealism, Creationism, Futurism, Ultraism and Dadaism forged a vital link between poets and artists from the Americas and their European counterparts. We will focus on the similarities and differences between these "isms" while drawing conclusions about the uniqueness of vanguard movements on both sides of the Atlantic. Offered as SPAN 353 and SPAN 453. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 356. Afro-Hispanic Literature. 3 Units.

This course will survey the literary and cultural production of writers and artists of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean, paying attention to both their creative and theoretical texts. Discussion of questions of race and ethnicity will allow students to explore the ways in which these texts reformulate the idea of national identity and cultural belonging in the context of the nation-state, whose traditional centrality is being weakened through the effects of migration and exile. Readings include works by writers from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Colombia, Panama, Ecuador, and Peru. Offered as SPAN 356, SPAN 456, ETHS 356, WLIT 356 and WLIT 456. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 358. Latin American Cinema. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic tools of film analysis as well as to the major trends and movements in Latin American cinema from the 1960s to the present. Through the analysis of representative films from Latin America, the course will examine the development of a variety of cinematic styles, paying particular attention to the historical contexts in which the films were produced and to the political, cultural, and aesthetic debates that surrounded their production. Offered as SPAN 358, SPAN 458, ETHS 358, WLIT 358 and WLIT 458. Prereq: SPAN 320 or equivalent.

SPAN 370. Special Topics in Spanish. 3 Units.

This course is designed to respond to students' and faculty interest in specific themes or issues not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Approaches, content, and instructor will vary and this course may have a focus that crosses generic, artistic, historical, disciplinary, and geographical boundaries. The honing of analytical and interpretative skills as well as the further development of Spanish language skills also are integral objectives of this course. The class is conducted in Spanish. Prereq: SPAN 320 or equivalent.

SPAN 385. Hispanic Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S. Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period. Counts toward Spanish major only as related course. No knowledge of Spanish required. Offered as ETHS 385, ETHS 485, SPAN 385, SPAN 485, WLIT 385, and WLIT 485. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 396. Senior Capstone - Spanish. 3 Units.

The Senior Capstone in Spanish in an independent study project chosen in consultation with a capstone advisor. The capstone project should reflect both the student's interest within Spanish and the courses he or she has taken to fulfill the major. The project requires independent research using an approved bibliography and plan of action. In addition to written research, the student will also present the capstone project in a public forum that is agreed upon by the project advisor and the student. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Senior status required. Major in Spanish required.

SPAN 397. Honors Thesis I. 3 Units.

Intensive study of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic with a faculty member, leading to the writing of a research paper in Spanish. Limited to senior majors.

SPAN 398. Honors Thesis II. 3 Units.

Continuation of SPAN 397. Limited to senior majors. Permit required. Prereq: SPAN 397.

SPAN 399. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

The course is for students with special interests and commitments that are not fully addressed in regular courses, and who wish to work independently.

SPAN 400. Foreign Language Teaching Methodology Practicum. 3 Units.

This class is a requirement for first year MA students. This class will allow the Graduate students in Hispanic Studies to improve their teaching skills. Students will learn the most recent theories and methodologies regarding the teaching of a foreign language and will have practical experience dealing with pedagogical situations in a classroom while teaching a foreign language. Students will work and study under the supervision of their instructor. The course is designed as a practicum and it will work as an independent study while the student attends different language and culture classes to observe them. The combination of study and practice will allow the students to reflect about the teaching techniques they will learn.

SPAN 401. Introduction to Critical Theory. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the field of critical theory. It examines many of the major theoretical approaches to the study of literary and cultural texts such as Marxism, Post-structuralism, Feminism, and Post-colonial studies. It provides students with a critical map of some of the most influential theoretical approaches to the study of culture as well as with the necessary analytical tools for the interpretation of texts. The course is a requirement for first-year MA students in Hispanic Studies.

SPAN 406. The Cuban Experience: an immersion in its culture and society. 3 Units.

This is a three week study-abroad intensive course that takes place at Editorial Vigía, in Matanzas, Cuba. The course combines the unique advantages of a total immersion environment in Spanish with a classroom curriculum that includes conversation practice and study of relevant cultural, literary and historical issues. Students complete three hours of classroom instruction and an hour and a half of publishing workshop four days per week. In this workshop, they work in the edition of a bilingual book. In addition, they participate in organized visits to historic sites and museums connected to the culture curriculum. The focus of the culture curriculum is the study of Cuban history and culture through its literature, visual arts, films, and music. After applying and being accepted in the program, students meet for personal advising with the program director and attend four different one hour orientation-information meetings in the spring semester. After successful completion of the study-abroad program, students receive 3 upper-level credits in Spanish. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and provides students with the tools they need to analyze and understand the complexities of modern Cuba. Students will have formal classes taught by their professor and talks and meetings with specialists on Cuban literature, art, architecture, history and other aspects of culture and society. In addition, they will attend lectures, participate in discussions, and take field trips that will expose them to many aspects of Cuban culture, such as art, architecture, music, dance, film, literature, artisan work, folklore, history and urban growth. Offered as SPAN 306, SPAN 406, and ETHS 306. Prereq: SPAN 202.

SPAN 425. Hispanic Intellectuals and Society: A Critical Approach. 3 Units.

This course offers an overview of the most important critical approaches to Spanish American culture and literature, with a socio-historical emphasis. Some of the authors we will discuss are Angel Rama, Jose Antonio Cornejo Polar and Nestor Garcia Canclini. We will analyze how the Latin American intellectuals had thought about specific issues such as identity, race, ideology, colonial and post-colonial relations with the metropolis and the process of formation of the nations in the continent. The class, the discussions, exams, oral presentations and papers will be in Spanish. Some of the readings must be in English, but most of them will be in Spanish. Offered as SPAN 325, SPAN 425, ETHS 325, WLIT 325 and WLIT 425.

SPAN 426. The Fantastic in Latin American Prose. 3 Units.

Introduction to a distinctive trend in contemporary Latin American literature, the prose portrayal of the "fantastic," a new narrative mode in Latin America. Critical examination of selected texts reveals new concepts of space and time and an increasing complexity of structure and style, one which juxtaposes and analyzes fantasy and reality. Offered as SPAN 326 and SPAN 426.

SPAN 433. Contemporary Caribbean Literature. 3 Units.

In addition to developing a general familiarity with the literature and history of this region, students will acquire an awareness of the interrelation of national identity, memory, and language in the texts produced by contemporary Caribbean authors, and of the cultural hybridity characteristic of this production. The themes treated by these authors include colonialism and postcolonialism, cultural and religious syncretism, and sexual politics. Offered as SPAN 333, SPAN 433, ETHS 333, WLIT 333 and WLIT 433.

SPAN 434. Mexican Literature. 3 Units.

The course studies, through a series of representative literary works, the most significant literary movements and styles in 20th and 21st Centuries Mexican Literature. Special attention will be paid to the political, aesthetic, and philosophical debates that have shaped the development of Mexican literature from the 1920s to the present, and to the different narrative techniques and ideologies that have characterized different historical periods, literary movements, and individual authors' styles in contemporary Mexican literature. Offered as SPAN 334 and SPAN 434. Prereq: SPAN 320

SPAN 439. Latin American Poetic Revolt. 3 Units.

Introduction to most important poets in contemporary Latin America, a region home to a significant number of eminent poets, including Nobel Laureates from Chile, Gabriela Mistral and Pablo Neruda. The course focuses on detailed textual analysis of pivotal works, combined with historical-literary perspective, so students gain insight into the diverse styles and tendencies that reflect the tumultuous history of poetry's development in a relentless search for a Latin American cultural identity. Offered as SPAN 339, SPAN 439, WLIT 339 and WLIT 439. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 442. Latin American Feminist Voices. 3 Units.

Examination of the awakening of feminine and feminist consciousness in the literary production of Latin American women writers, particularly from the 1920s to the present. Close attention paid to the dominant themes of love and dependency; imagination as evasion; alienation and rebellion; sexuality and power; the search for identity and the self-preservation of subjectivity. Readings include prose, poetry, and dramatic texts of female Latin American writers contributing to the emerging of feminist ideologies and the mapping of feminist identities. Offered as SPAN 342, SPAN 442, ETHS 342, WGST 342, WLIT 342, and WLIT 442. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 443. The New Drama in Latin American. 3 Units.

Representative works of contemporary Latin American drama. Critical examination of selected dramatic works of twentieth-century Latin America provides students insight into the nature of drama and into the structural and stylistic strategies utilized by Latin American dramatists to create the "new theater," one which is closely related to Latin American political history. Offered as SPAN 343, SPAN 434, ETHS 343, WLIT 343 and WLIT 434. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 445. Hispanic Autobiographical Writing. 3 Units.

The course studies issues of self-representation through the reading of autobiographical works from different periods from Latin America, Spain, and the U.S., and of theoretical works that address topics of first-person narratives, autobiography, and sub-alternity. Satisfies Global and Cultural Diversity requirement. Offered as SPAN 345 and SPAN 445. Prereq: SPAN 320.

SPAN 451. Hispanic Turn of the Century Literature. 3 Units.

Cultural and political transitions between 19th and 20th Century, between Spain and Latin America, and between literary models. Study of Spanish and Latin American writers and their literary connections (Generation of 1898, modernistas) in the context of colonial conflicts and economic changes. Offered as SPAN 351 and SPAN 451.

SPAN 453. Transatlantic Vanguard. 3 Units.

Presentation of transatlantic tendencies of the early vanguard movements represented by poets from Spain, Central and South America. Beginning with the advent of Modernism in Latin America and Symbolism in Spain, this course will trace the development of resulting movements in the early twentieth century. Surrealism, Creationism, Futurism, Ultraism and Dadaism forged a vital link between poets and artists from the Americas and their European counterparts. We will focus on the similarities and differences between these "isms" while drawing conclusions about the uniqueness of vanguard movements on both sides of the Atlantic. Offered as SPAN 353 and SPAN 453.

SPAN 456. Afro-Hispanic Literature. 3 Units.

This course will survey the literary and cultural production of writers and artists of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean, paying attention to both their creative and theoretical texts. Discussion of questions of race and ethnicity will allow students to explore the ways in which these texts reformulate the idea of national identity and cultural belonging in the context of the nation-state, whose traditional centrality is being weakened through the effects of migration and exile. Readings include works by writers from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Colombia, Panama, Ecuador, and Peru. Offered as SPAN 356, SPAN 456, ETHS 356, WLIT 356 and WLIT 456. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

SPAN 458. Latin American Cinema. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic tools of film analysis as well as to the major trends and movements in Latin American cinema from the 1960s to the present. Through the analysis of representative films from Latin America, the course will examine the development of a variety of cinematic styles, paying particular attention to the historical contexts in which the films were produced and to the political, cultural, and aesthetic debates that surrounded their production. Offered as SPAN 358, SPAN 458, ETHS 358, WLIT 358 and WLIT 458.

SPAN 485. Hispanic Literature in Translation. 3 Units.

Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S. Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period. Counts toward Spanish major only as related course. No knowledge of Spanish required. Offered as ETHS 385, ETHS 485, SPAN 385, SPAN 485, WLIT 385, and WLIT 485. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: Graduate standing.