2013-14 General Bulletin

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201 Haydn Hall
http://music.case.edu
Phone: 216.368.2400; Fax: 216.368.6557
Ross W. Duffin, Interim Department Chair

The Department of Music offers a range of degree programs and ensemble experiences for undergraduate and graduate students. Thanks to the diverse interests of our faculty, our students can explore everything from medieval music to rock and pop. The department offers the following degree programs:

  • Music (Bachelor of Arts within the context of liberal arts; see list of concentrations under “Majors” below)
  • Music Education (Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Arts for Teacher Licensure, Doctor of Philosophy)
  • Historical Performance Practice (Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical Arts)
  • Music History and Literature (Master of Arts)
  • Musicology (Doctor of Philosophy)

Since 1968, the department has participated in a Joint Music Program (JMP) with the Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM). Through our JMP, students enjoy the advantages of a top research university while receiving conservatory-level training in theory and performance. They also benefit from our active collaborations with the Cleveland Orchestra, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Music Settlement, and other local cultural and educational institutions.

The Department of Music offers private instruction. Music majors should consult with their program advisor before registering for lessons. Non-major students interested in private instruction should visit the department office (Haydn 201) to begin the lesson registration process and learn further details.

A number of music ensembles are open to all students. Entrance into the primary ensembles may be subject to a gateway audition; others require an audition for part assignment. Students may elect to earn one credit unit per semester for participation. Auditions for ensembles are held during the first week of classes each semester. Further information is available on the department website.

Facilities

Haydn Hall

Haydn Hall houses the Department of Music faculty and staff offices, classrooms, the Kulas Music Library, the Music Education Resource Center, and The Core (see below). It is located in the heart of the Mather Quad. Originally a combination of a dormitory and classrooms, this building served as the only student center on campus. It was given to the college by Flora Stone Mather and named in honor of Hiram Collins Haydn, fifth president of Western Reserve University, pastor of the Old Stone Church, and the individual most active in convincing Western Reserve College to move to Cleveland. Charles F. Schweinfurth, the premier residential architect of Euclid Avenue ("Millionaires' Row") mansions, who also rebuilt the interior of the Old Stone Church in 1884 and designed Trinity Cathedral, designed Haydn Hall.

Florence Harkness Memorial Chapel

Harkness Chapel, built in 1902, features neo-Gothic architecture, antique oak and Georgia pine woodwork, and Tiffany windows. It is a warm, intimate, and acoustically resonant space for the performance of vocal and instrumental chamber music. The building provides space for concerts, music classes, and department recitals. Harkness Chapel was built to honor Florence Harkness Severance, the only daughter of Stephen Harkness and his second wife, Anna M. Richardson Harkness.

Kulas Music Library

Kulas Music Library is a satellite library of Kelvin Smith Library, the university’s main library. It contains more than 45,000 items, including music scores, books on music, sound recordings, video recordings, microforms, and music periodicals. The library also contains a listening room for use of the sound recording and video collections. Music majors at the university also have access to the Robinson Music Library of the Cleveland Institute of Music. The Case Western Reserve Kulas Music Library and the CIM Robinson Music Library coordinate acquisitions and services, and their collections reflect institutional strengths as well as support the CWRU-CIM Joint Music Program.

The Core

The Core is a Macintosh computer classroom and lab dedicated to mind, sound, and vision. The Core is a collaborative space for all CWRU students, faculty and staff, as well as the University Circle community, to gather and collaborate, design in visual and aural mediums, and create masterpieces. It offers not only computers and software, but also video and digital cameras and microphones for checkout, one-on-one tutorial time, classes, and a meeting space. The Core is actively involved in bringing technology to the community, particularly younger children, and it works closely with faculty in providing support facilities for the department's technology-related courses.

Denison/Wade Rehearsal Facility

The Denison/Wade Rehearsal Facility, located on East 115th Street, is used primarily for ensemble rehearsals. This facility houses several Wenger practice rooms, one of which is a "virtual reality" acoustic room; a percussion studio; and a music library.  Classrooms include the Wade Rehearsal Hall, Denison Rehearsal Hall, and Denison Chamber Room. The facility also has storage lockers available on a first-come first-serve basis. In general, Denison/Wade facilities are to be utilized by students who are music majors or are enrolled in Department of Music ensembles.

Kulas Collection of Early Instruments

The department maintains an impressive collection of modern reproductions of early instruments. The instruments are used by the Collegium Musicum, the Case/CIM Baroque Orchestra, and the department’s program in historical performance practice. The collection includes medieval, Renaissance, and baroque strings, as well as brass, woodwinds, and keyboards.

Music Education Resource Center

The department provides a resource center for music education students to prepare educational materials and research projects. The center is in Haydn Hall, Room 12, and contains a variety of audiovisual media, including a library of education-oriented music software. Students may borrow items from a large collection of music textbooks, educational recordings, testing materials, vocal and instrumental books, curriculum guides, and classroom instruments. Use of this center is encouraged, and sometimes required, for many of the projects and assignments in courses throughout the music education curriculum.

 


 

Department Faculty

David A. Ake, PhD
(University of California, Los Angeles)
Professor and Chair

L. Peter Bennett, D Phil
(Oxford University)
Associate Professor
17th-century French music; historical performance

Francesca Brittan, PhD
(Cornell University)
Assistant Professor
19th-century France; Romantic aesthetics; popular music

Gary M. Ciepluch, PhD
(University of Wisconsin, Madison)
Associate Professor
Director of bands; conducting; music teacher education

Georgia J. Cowart, PhD
(Rutgers University)
Professor
17th and 18th centuries; music, the arts, and politics

Ross W. Duffin, DMA
(Stanford University)
Fynette H. Kulas Professor of Music
Historical performance practice; Shakespeare

Paul S. Ferguson, MM
(Eastman School of Music)
Instructor
Jazz studies and contemporary media

Matthew L. Garrett, PhD
(Florida State University)
Assistant Professor
Choral music education; conducting

Daniel Goldmark, PhD
(University of California, Los Angeles)
Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies
American popular music; film music; history of the music industry

Stephen E. Hefling, PhD
(Yale University)
Professor
Mahler; 18th and 19th centuries; chamber music; analysis

Kathleen A. Horvath, PhD
(The Ohio State University)
Associate Professor; Director of Undegraduate Studies in Music Education
Music teacher education; string education and pedagogy

Lisa L. Koops, PhD
(Michigan State University)
Associate Professor
Music teacher education; general music

Nathan Kruse, PhD
(Michigan State University)
Associate Professor
Foundations of music education; instrumental music education; secondary methods; qualitative research methods; sociology of music; school-university partnerships; student teaching supervision; adult music education; community music; informal music learning; conducting and wind literature; new horizons band

Susan McClary, PhD
(Harvard University)
Professor
Musicology

David J. Rothenberg, PhD
(Yale University)
Associate Professor; Director of Undegraduate Studies, BA Music
Medieval; Renaissance; musical symbolism

Robert Walser, PhD
(University of Minnesota)
Professor
American music; jazz history; popular music studies; implications of recent neuroscience for humanistic scholarship; contemporary music production technology


Full-time Lecturers

Julie Andrijeski, DMA
(Case Western Reserve University)
Director, Case/CIM Baroque Orchestra
Performance practices; dance

Eric Charnofsky, MM
(The Juilliard School)
20th-century music; piano accompanying; keyboard repertoire

Juanita Karpf, DMA
(University of Georgia)
Music history; Undergraduate Admission and First-Year Advisor

BA in Music  |  BS in Music Education  |  Minor

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Students who wish to major in music must pass a performance audition on an acceptable instrument or in voice and take a music theory placement test. Arrangements for this audition and test must be made directly through the department website. All performance  and course requirements are detailed in the Undergraduate Music Handbook.

Double Major and Dual-Degree Opportunities. The department encourages qualified students to consider a double or dual major in music and another subject. More than one half of music majors at Case Western Reserve pursue a double major. Typical combinations include the Bachelor of Arts in music with theater, English, classics, psychology, sociology, or the natural sciences. Once the Arts and Sciences SAGES requirements (39 hours) have been met, a BA student can add another major by meeting the course and hour requirements found in this bulletin under the appropriate department. In most cases, it is possible to finish a double major with music in four years.

It is also possible to receive two degrees, although this usually takes five years. Typical combinations of dual degrees include the Bachelor of Arts in music with the Bachelor of Science in engineering, or the Bachelor of Science in music education with the Bachelor of Music degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music. All admissions requirements must be met for each school, and course and hour requirements for each degree must be fulfilled. Students interested in dual degrees should declare their intent as early as possible and receive advice from faculty about both degrees.

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Bachelor of Arts in Music

The Bachelor of Arts degree in music stresses a humanistic orientation and situates music study in the context of the liberal arts.

Approximately one half of the total 120 semester credit hours necessary for the degree are devoted to music study, with the remaining credits devoted to the SAGES and general education requirements (39 hours), a possible minor program, and a liberal selection of elective courses. The specific program of study differs from student to student.

The department offers several concentrations within the music portion of the degree: music history, music theory, historical performance practice, performance, general musicianship, popular music and audio recording technology. The general musicianship concentration is particularly suitable for students interested in music as part of a double major or dual degree.

Core courses for the Bachelor of Arts in music are as follows:

Music theory:
MUTH 107Theory for Music Majors I (CIM class)3-4
or MUTH 101 Harmony-Keyboard I
MUTH 108Theory for Music Majors II (CIM class)3-4
or MUTH 102 Harmony-Keyboard II
MUTH 207Theory for Music Majors III (CIM class)3-4
or MUTH 201 Harmony-Keyboard III
MUTH 208Theory for Music Majors IV (CIM class)3-4
or MUTH 202 Harmony-Keyboard IV
MUTH 320Form and Analysis (CIM class)3
MUDE 101Eurhythmics I0
MUDE 102Eurhythmics II0
Music history/literature:
MUHI 301History of Western Music I3
MUHI 302History of Western Music II3
MUHI 303History of Western Music III3

Performance instruction: MUAP (applied music) for a minimum of 10 semester hours

Additional requirements:

  1. Participation in assigned musical ensemble every semester of major (6 semesters for audio concentration)
  2. Participation in additional musical ensemble for one year (audio concentration excepted)
  3. Recital class attendance and performance every year of principal MUAP study (auto-enrolled with MUAP course)
  4. Perform Jury Examinations at designated times during the applied lesson sequence for each concentration.
  5. Two semesters of eurhythmics (fulfills physical education requirement)

Additional course requirements for each concentration are as follows:

Music History

Additional applied music study at the 200 level2
Three electives from music history courses at the 300 level or above9
Foreign Language6-8
Total Units17-19

 

Music Theory

Additional applied music study at the 200 level.2
MUTH 31116th Century Counterpoint (CIM class)2
MUTH 312Eighteenth Century Counterpoint (CIM class)3
One elective from music history courses at the 300 level or above3
Total Units10

 

Historical Performance Practice

Additional applied music study at the 200 level2
MUHI 341Introduction to Historical Performance Practice3
MUHI 342Seminar in Historical Performance Practice3
One elective from music history courses at the 300 level or above3
Foreign Language6-8
Total Units17-19

 

Performance

Additional applied music study at the 300 and 400 levels6
One elective from music history courses at the 300 level or above3
Foreign Language6-8
Total Units15-17

 

General Musicianship

One elective from music history courses at the 300 level or above (3).

Popular Music

Four additional courses in Popular Music Studies, drawn from the following courses:12
Digital Music: Composition and Production
Audio Production in Pro Tools
History and Styles of Jazz
Jazz Skills I
Jazz Skills II
History of Rock and Roll: The Deep View
American Popular Song to 1950
History of Jazz and American Popular Music
Global Pop
Undergraduate Seminar in Music History (Popular Music Topics)
Total Units12

 

Audio Recording Technology

MUAR 151BCase Audio Internship I1
MUAR 152BCase Audio Internship II1
MUAR 153BCase Audio Internship III1
MUAR 154BCase Audio Internship IV1
MUAR 200Audio Recording I (CIM class)2
MUAR 201Audio Recording II (CIM class)2
MUAR 251BCase Audio Recording Internship I0
MUAR 252BCase Audio Recording Internship II0
MUAR 253BCase Audio Recording Internship III0
MUAR 254BCase Audio Recording Internship IV0
MUAR 300Advanced Recording Techniques I (CIM class)2
MUAR 301Advanced Recording Techniques II (CIM class)2
MUAR 302Multitrack Recording Techniques I (CIM class)2
MUAR 303Multitrack Recording Techniques II (CIM class)2
MUAR 310Recording Studio Maintenance I (CIM class)1
MUAR 311Recording Studio Maintenance II (CIM class)1
MUAR 320Acoustics of Music I (CIM class)1
MUAR 321Acoustics of Music II (CIM class)1
MUAR 322Recording Workshop I (CIM class)1
MUAR 323Recording Workshop II (CIM class)1
MUAR 380Junior Recording Techniques Thesis (CIM class)3
MUAR 385Recording Studio Internship (CIM class)4
MUAR 390Senior Recording Tech Thesis/Senior Capstone (CIM class)6

A minor in electronics is available from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the Case School of Engineering. A five-year, dual-degree program is also available in which the student earns a BA in music/audio and a BS in an elective field of engineering.

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Bachelor of Science in Music Education

The mission of the Music Education Program is to prepare proactive scholar-practitioners who will develop into leaders, teachers, and talented musicians in the field of music education. The nationally recognized program faculty specialize in research in music education, music technology, string pedagogy, and wind conducting and repertoire. The faculty are active in their respective professional organizations and as clinicians, conductors, lecturers, and authors.

The Bachelor of Science degree in music education requires a total of 122 credits and is designed to educate professional teachers of music education for public and private schools. The program meets the requirements of the Ohio Department of Education to prepare students to take the state-mandated teacher exam (Praxis II) and apply for teaching licensure. Most states recognize the Ohio teaching license through reciprocity.

Music education students benefit from a wide range of instrumental, vocal, and general classroom methods courses. As an additional part of the program, students benefit from plentiful hands-on experiences by teaching sample lessons and conducting rehearsals in actual teaching situations.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in music education are as follows:

A. Core courses:

A. Core Courses (42)
Music theory/Musicianship; eurythmics:19
Theory for Music Majors I (CIM class)
Harmony-Keyboard I
Theory for Music Majors II (CIM class)
Harmony-Keyboard II
Theory for Music Majors III (CIM class)
Harmony-Keyboard III
Theory for Music Majors IV (CIM class)
Harmony-Keyboard IV
Form and Analysis (CIM class)
Eurhythmics I (Fulfills SAGES Phys Ed requirement; CIM class)
Eurhythmics II (Fulfills SAGES Phys Ed requirement; CIM class)
Music history/literature:9
History of Western Music II (Fulfills SAGES Arts and Humanities requirement)
History of Western Music III (Fulfills SAGES Arts and Humanities requirement)
World Music in Education (Fulfills SAGES Global and Cultural Diversity requirement)
Applied music lessons (every semester except student teaching):14
Principal Performance Area I
Principal Performance Area II
Principal Performance Area III
Principal Performance Area IV
Principal Level Performance Area V
Principal Level Performance Area VI
Ensembles:
Required Home Ensemble (every semester except student teaching) 1
Added ensemble (one full year, keyboard students may sign up for MUEN 386 as their added ensemble)
B. Music Education Sequence (40)
Methods: 215
Foundations of Music Education
Technology Assisted Music Teaching and Learning
General Music Methods A
Instructional Design in Music Education (Fulfills SAGES Departmental Seminar requirement)
Instrumental Methods and Materials
Choral Methods and Materials
Conducting and arranging:7
Elements of Conducting
Advanced Conducting
Instrumental and Choral Arranging
Secondary instrument classes: 26
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Voice
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Guitar
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Upper Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Lower Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Clarinet and Saxophone
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Double Reeds and Flute
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Violin
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Strings
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Percussion
Student teaching:12
Student Teaching in Music Education
Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education
C. Professional Education Courses (9)9
Introduction to Education
Educational Psychology 3
Literacy Across the Content Areas
SAGES Requirements (22)22
22 hours in addition to those major courses that fulfill SAGES requirements

1
2

 See: Required Methods and Secondary Instrument Courses by Music Education Focus Area, below

3

 PSCL 101 General Psychology I is a prerequisite

 

Required Methods and Secondary Instrument Courses by Music Education Focus Area

Choral/General Focus
Required Methods Specialization Class:
Choral Methods and Materials
Secondary Instruments:
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Voice
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Guitar
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Percussion
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Strings
Two of the following:
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Upper Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Lower Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Clarinet and Saxophone
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Double Reeds and Flute
Instrumental Focus - Winds/Percussion
Required Methods Specialization Class:
Instrumental Methods and Materials
Secondary Instruments:
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Voice
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Violin
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Strings
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Percussion
Three of the following:
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Upper Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Lower Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Clarinet and Saxophone
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Double Reeds and Flute
Instrumental Focus - Strings
Required Methods Specialization Class:
Instrumental Methods and Materials
Secondary Instruments:
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Voice
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Upper Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Lower Brass
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Clarinet and Saxophone
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Double Reeds and Flute
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Violin
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Strings
Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Percussion

 

Admission and Retention in Music Education

There are four decision points in the Music Education Program. For each of the decision points, there are three possible outcomes: unconditional admission; conditional admission with a prescribed remedial plan which when successfully completed will result in unconditional admission; or denial of admission. Denial of admission at any decision point means the student is no longer able to pursue a music education degree at Case Western Reserve.

Decision Point 1: Application for Admission to the Program

Official admission to the Music Education Program generally occurs at the end of the freshman year. Admission to the program requires:

  1. being accepted to Case Western Reserve
  2. being accepted as a music major through an audition process before matriculation
  3. successful completion of MUED 240 Foundations of Music Education, including evaluation of an initial Teaching ePortfolio
  4. a cumulative Case Western Reserve GPA of 2.5 or better
  5. submission of a signed Statement of Assurance of Good Moral Character, and
  6. a satisfactory interview with music education faculty, documented on the Teacher Licensure Admission Assessment Form

Decision Point 2: Application for Advanced Standing

Application for Advanced Standing should be submitted by week 10 of the second semester after Decision Point 1 (usually the spring of the sophomore year). Application for Advanced Standing requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current Academic Requirements Report documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, a music GPA of 2.5 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory completed by the music education faculty

Decision Point 3: Application for Student Teaching

Application for Student Teaching should be completed by Week 4 of the semester prior to student teaching. The application requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current Academic Requirements Report documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, a music GPA of 2.5 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory completed by the music education faculty
  4. passing a TB test
  5. presenting documentation of Hepatitis B vaccination
  6. passing an official criminal background check

Decision Point 4: Application for Initial Licensure

Application for Initial Licensure occurs after successful completion of all degree requirements. This application requires:

  1. a successful review of the updated Teaching ePortfolio
  2. submission of a current Academic Requirements report documenting the following: a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better, a music GPA of 2.5 or better, and an education GPA of 3.0 or better
  3. a passing score on the Candidate Disposition Assessment Inventory completed by the music education faculty
  4. achievement of state-mandated scores on the two Praxis II national teacher exams
  5. completion of the Case Teacher Licensure Exit Interview and Survey
  6. completion of the Case Student Teaching Final Assessment by the cooperating teacher and university supervisor with a grade of B or better:
MUED 396A
  & MUED 396B
Student Teaching in Music Education
   and Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education
12
MUED 496A
  & MUED 496B
Student Teaching in Music Education
   and Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education (for master's students seeking licensure)
12

After successfully completing all requirements at the four decision points, the student is recommended by the university’s director of teacher education for the Ohio Provisional Music (Pre-K-12) License to teach music in the public schools in Ohio and more than 40 reciprocating states.

Completion of the Bachelor of Science degree does not ensure that the State of Ohio music teacher license will be awarded. Additional information is available from the Teacher Licensure section in this bulletin.

Departmental Honors

Departmental honors programs for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees have the following admission and completion requirements:

For all students, admission to honors status requires an overall GPA of at least 3.2, a music GPA of at least 3.5, evidence of exceptional musicianship and scholarly interests, petition to the music faculty, nomination by a faculty member, and acceptance by the music faculty. The honors project must first be approved by the faculty project advisor, with the specific project timeline to be determined in consultation with the advisor. The student must submit a proposal to the faculty before the project start date, typically by the midpoint of the spring semester preceding the senior year.

For BA students, second-semester sophomore or junior standing is required for admission to honors status. The honors project should then be completed as part of the SAGES Capstone Seminar. For BS students, admission to honors status requires advanced standing in music education. The student must register for independent study or an approved seminar during the project period, and the honors project may not be pursued or completed during student teaching.

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Minor

The music minor requires 15 credits units: 6 in music theory (MUTH), 6 in music history or appreciation (MUHI or MUGN) and 3 others, which may include MUAP or MUEN.  For questions regarding eligible course substitutions, please contact the Department of Music Minor Advisor.

Music Theory:6
Theory I
Theory II
Music History: Any two MUHI, MUGN, or MUPM courses6
At least 3 additional hours, either in MUAP or MUEN3
Total Units15

A minor in music education may be devised in consultation with a music education advisor. CIM students may pursue a minor in music history by taking 15 hours of MUHI courses. The department welcomes students’ initiative in the development of minor programs suited to their needs.  Courses can be substituted with the approval of the music minor program advisor.

Electives for Non-Music Majors

Electives designed for students not majoring in music are:

MUTH 103Theory I3
MUTH 104Theory II3
MUGN 201Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I3
MUGN 202Introduction to Music: Listening Experience II3
MUGN 250Topics in Music for non-majors3
MUGN 308Digital Music: Composition and Production3
MUGN 309Audio Production in Pro Tools3
MUPM 212History of Rock and Roll3
MUPM 215History and Styles of Jazz3

Ensembles (MUEN) are open to all non-majors.  Gateway auditions (for enrollment) or placement auditions (for part assignment) may be required in most cases.  For more information about the department's ensemble offerings, please contact the Music Office 216.368.2400 or music@case.edu

Individual instruction (MUAP) in keyboard, voice, and all instruments is available with consent of the department (additional fee for non-major).  For more information about the department's applied music offerings, please contact the Music Office 216.368.2400 or music@case.edu

Non-music majors may also audition for admission to music ensembles (MUEN).

MA ProgramsPhD and DMA Programs  |  Applied Music

Graduate Programs

General descriptions are given here; complete information on all degrees is available from the department. Admission to each degree follows established guidelines of the School of Graduate Studies. Scores from the Graduate Record Examination are required for admission to programs in music history, musicology, and historical performance practice, and an audition is necessary for students interested in the historical performance practice program.

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Master of Arts Degree

The Master of Arts degree is offered in the fields of:

  1. music history and literature
  2. music education

Within music history and literature, students may choose concentrations in music history and literature or in historical performance practice. Master’s degree candidates in music education may also choose to add course work that will qualify them to take teaching licensure exams for the State of Ohio.

Master of Arts in Music History and Literature

The concentration in music history and literature emphasizes research, history, literature, and the theory of music. Within the 30 hours required, the following are minimum requirements:

Music History9
Research6-9
Theory-Analysis6
Electives6-9
Total Units27-33

The concentration in historical performance practice presupposes the same strong liberal arts training as the music history and literature concentration, plus a strong performance interest and background. Research and its application to music performance are stressed. Within the 27 hours required, the following are minimum requirements:

Bibliography and Research3
Performance Practice6
Notation Theory6
Lecture-Recital and Document6
Total Units21

In both concentrations, remaining hours are freely elected in music history and research with advisor’s approval. For students pursuing the degree in historical performance practice, however, at least two semesters of applied music (0 credits) are required, in addition to MUAP 651 M.A. Lecture - Recital and Document, near the completion of the degree program. Ensemble participation is also required for performance practice students but does not earn credit hours toward the degree.

Examinations include initial placement tests in history and theory, and a reading test in a foreign language pertinent to the student’s field. In addition, performance practice students must audition as part of the admissions process. At least 18 credit hours must be at the 400 level or higher.

Fast Track MA/PhD Program

Students in the MA in music history and literature program are eligible for a fast track option to the PhD in historical musicology. To qualify for this option, students must complete 36 hours in the MA program and are advised to pursue the thesis option. By the end of the third semester of study (prior to the completion of the 36 hours), the student must inform the director of graduate studies of his/her desire to enter the PhD program, and, in consultation with the director, must present a petition to the musicology faculty for candidacy. Once faculty consent is secured, all remaining requirements of the degree program, as detailed above, remain the same.

Master of Arts in Music Education

This degree is built on a set of foundation courses in philosophy, curriculum, psychology, research, evaluation, and musicianship. Additional courses and independent studies enable students to tailor programs to their interests and needs.

Three degree options are available. Students who choose Plan A (thesis option) write a thesis based on original research and defend the thesis in an oral examination. Students who choose Plan B (comprehensive exam option) complete a comprehensive examination in music education. Applicants for Plans A or B should have a bachelor’s degree in music education, an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better, and at least one year of successful music teaching experience, usually in the public schools.

Students seeking teacher licensure credentials pursue Plan C (MA for Licensure, or MAL). The program includes a core of graduate music education courses, graduate music courses, undergraduate music education methods courses, and one semester of student teaching. Applicants for MAL should have a bachelor’s degree in music (BA or BM), an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better, and some prior experience in working with children. The regulations for students in the BS program regarding advanced standing, grade point averages, and the Praxis II exam apply to graduate students in Plan C as well. Completion of the Plan C degree does not ensure that the State of Ohio music teacher license will be awarded.

Foundation courses for Plan A and Plan B include:

Music education core of philosophy, curriculum, and research12
Music core of history, theory, and applied music9-12
Electives0-9
Total Units21-33

Students in Plan A receive 6 credit hours for thesis research. Students in Plan B complete a comprehensive written examination at the conclusion of course work, whereas students in Plan C complete a comprehensive oral examination.

A minimum of 30 credit hours is required for Plans A and B. Plan C requires a minimum of 65 hours, including:

Music education licensure core35
Teacher licensure professional education core9
Graduate music education core12
Graduate music core9
Total Units65

To remain in Plan C’s MAL program, students must meet GPA and professional standards each year. For more information, contact the director of music education.

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Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in two fields: (1) musicology (with concentrations in music history and historical performance practice), and (2) music education.

Doctor of Philosophy in Musicology

The PhD in historical musicology is granted in recognition of superior scholarly ability and attainment. Award of the degree is based not only on computation of time or enumeration of courses, but also upon distinguished work. Highly qualified applicants may enter this program directly upon completion of a bachelor’s degree. All programs of study are formulated to suit the individual needs of the student and require the consent of the advisor.

Music History Concentration

The PhD requires 36 credit hours of course work and an additional 18 credit hours of dissertation research. Required course work includes MUHI 610 Bibliography and Research Methods in Music and MUTH 424 Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis as well as three doctoral seminars. In the first two years, students will be expected to take three courses (or 9 credits) per semester, for a total of 36 hours.

Students admitted to the program will take diagnostic examinations prior to the start of classes in their first year. Based on these examinations, students may be required to enroll in specific courses to address deficiencies; these course credits may be applied toward the degree requirements. At the end of the first year of study, the musicology faculty will conduct a formal review with each student. This process will include an evaluation of progress to date and advisement regarding the remainder of the program.

A written summary of this review, along with course grades and materials, will constitute the beginnings of the portfolio maintained by the director of graduate studies that will be the basis for considering each student’s advancement into the PhD program.

At the end of the second year of course work, students will be asked to submit a qualifying paper, which will be added to the portfolio. At the beginning of the fall in the third year of study, students will take comprehensive examinations, which will also function as qualifying exams for advancement to the PhD program. These examinations will consist of written and oral sections, and will be conducted and evaluated by the musicology faculty. Following the examinations, the faculty will review each student’s portfolio and, based on work contained therein, make a decision regarding advancement to candidacy in the PhD program. Students who do not advance but who have done satisfactory work will be eligible to receive the MA in music history at this juncture.

Students who advance to candidacy for the PhD will register for dissertation research credits and begin research for the dissertation. Working with a faculty advisor, each student will develop a proposal for the dissertation, which will be presented in writing to the faculty no later than the end of the third year of study. It is expected that the fourth and possibly fifth year of study will be devoted to work on the dissertation. Upon completion of the thesis, each student will present a formal defense to the musicology faculty.

Under the rules of the School of Graduate Studies, a student must complete the thesis no later than five years after registering for the first dissertation research (701) credits.

Historical Performance Practice Concentration

The PhD in historical musicology with a concentration in historical performance practice requires a minimum of 36 hours of course work, seminars, and tutorials, and an additional 18 credit hours of dissertation research. Course distribution is as follows:

Bibliography and research3
Performance practices9
Notation-theory9
Doctoral Seminars6
MUAP 751Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document I0 - 3
Total Units27-30

Remaining hours are freely elected in music history and research with the advisor’s approval. At least three semesters of applied music (0 credits) are required. Ensemble participation is also required for performance practice students but does not earn credit hours toward the degree.

For other musicology students, private lessons at the 500 level, although not required, may be counted up to a maximum of six credits, at the discretion of the advisor.

Examinations include initial placement tests in history and theory; reading tests in two foreign languages pertinent to the student’s field; and comprehensive examinations in history and theory, including written and oral sections, prior to admission to candidacy. Upon completion of the dissertation, an oral defense is held. In addition, performance practice students must audition as part of the admissions process. The candidate must teach a college-level course in music history and literature (or historical performance practice) under the supervision of a faculty member, or have had the equivalent experience before the dissertation is completed.

Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education

The doctorate in music education is offered to persons who have shown a strong and continuing dedication to music teaching and scholarship. Applicants must have completed at least three years of full-time music teaching, usually in the public schools. The degree is designed to prepare professionals to assume positions of leadership in elementary, secondary, and collegiate instruction. Prior to graduation, doctoral students demonstrate competency in teaching, research, and musicianship. Every effort will be made to plan a program based on individual student needs and interests while maintaining standards of musical and scholarly excellence. Electives, therefore, will be chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor in order to ensure a balance between individual interests and traditional graduate expectations. To remain in the program, students must meet GPA and professional standards each year. For more information, contact the director of music education.

A total of 60 credit hours is required for the doctoral degree beyond the master’s level. Courses include:

Music education: research, philosophy, cognition/psychology, curriculum, and assessment15
Music: theory, history, applied music9-12
Outside cognate6
Music education electives9-12
Dissertation18
Total Units57-63

A comprehensive examination follows the completion of course work, prior to beginning research for the dissertation. Upon completion of the dissertation, an oral defense is held. The dissertation topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty.

Doctor of Musical Arts in Historical Performance Practice

This doctorate is granted in recognition of outstanding performing ability in early music combined with superior scholarly ability in the field of historical performance practice. All programs are formulated to suit the needs of the individual student and require the consent of a faculty advisor.

A minimum of 36 hours of course work, seminars, and tutorials is required. Distribution is as follows:

Bibliography and Research3
Performance Practices6-9
Notation-Theory9
Doctoral Seminars3-6
MUAP 751Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document I0 - 3
MUAP 752Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document II3
Electives chosen from music history and research (with advisor approval)3
MUAP 753Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document III1 - 6
Total Units28-42

Applied music (0 credits) must be taken every semester the student is on campus. Ensemble participation is required but does not earn credit hours toward the degree.

Examinations include a performance audition; initial placement tests in history and theory; reading tests in two foreign languages pertinent to the student’s field; and a comprehensive examination with history, theory, performance practice, and oral sections. Exceptional students may be admitted to a combined MA/DMA degree program in early music.

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Applied Music

All Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degree students in the department must satisfy the applied music requirements specified in their degree programs. Graduate students who anticipate private lesson instruction in their programs should consult an advisor before registration. Students register for individual applied music instruction in courses titled Principal Performance Area and Secondary Performance Area.

MUAP Courses

MUAP 10. Progress Jury Examination. 0 Units.

Progress Jury Examination (All BA and BS Music Majors)

MUAP 11. Recital Class. 0 Units.


MUAP 121. Principal Performance Area I. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Recommended preparation: Entrance Jury/Audition

MUAP 122. Principal Performance Area II. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 003 and MUAP 121. Coreq: MUTH 003.

MUAP 131. Secondary Performance Area I. 1 - 2 Unit.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 132. Secondary Performance Area II. 1 - 2 Unit.

Open to all university students. Prereq: MUAP 131.

MUAP 133. Secondary Performance Area III. 1 - 2 Unit.

Open to all university students. Prereq: MUAP 132.

MUAP 134. Secondary Performance Area IV. 1 - 2 Unit.

Open to all university students. Prereq: MUAP 133.

MUAP 135. Secondary Performance Area V. 1 - 2 Unit.

Open to all university students. Prereq: MUAP 134.

MUAP 136. Secondary Performance Area VI. 1 - 2 Unit.

Open to all university students. Prereq: MUAP 135.

MUAP 20. Level 300 Applied Music Entrance Jury Exam. 0 Units.

Level Jury Examination

MUAP 221. Principal Performance Area III. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 107 or MUTH 101/105, MUAP 122, Passed Progress Jury. Coreq: MUTH 107 or MUTH 101/105.

MUAP 222. Principal Performance Area IV. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 108 or MUTH 102/106, MUAP 221, Passed Progress Jury. Coreq: MUTH 108 or MUTH 102/106.

MUAP 223. Principal Performance Area V. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 207 or MUTH 201/205, MUAP 222. Coreq: MUTH 207 or MUTH 201/205.

MUAP 224. Principal Performance Area VI. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 208 or MUTH 202/206, MUAP 223. Coreq: MUTH 207 or MUTH 202/206.

MUAP 225. Principal Performance Area VII. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUAP 224.

MUAP 226. Principal Performance Area VIII. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUAP 225.

MUAP 25. BA Exit Jury Examination. 0 Units.

BA Exit Jury Examination (Audio and General Music Concentrations)

MUAP 26. BA Exit Jury Examination. 0 Units.

BA Exit Jury Examination (Music History, Music Theory, and Early Music Performance Practice)

MUAP 30. BA Performance Exit Jury Examination. 0 Units.

BA Performance Exit Jury Examination

MUAP 321. Principal Level Performance Area V. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 108 or MUTH 102/106; MUAP 222, Passed Level Jury. Coreq: MUTH 108 or MUTH 102/106.

MUAP 322. Principal Level Performance Area VI. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUTH 208, or MUTH 202/206, MUAP 321. Coreq: MUTH 208 or MUTH 202/206.

MUAP 323. Principal Performance Area VII. 2 Units.

Limited to music performance and music education majors.

MUAP 324. Principal Performance Area VIII. 2 Units.

Limited to music performance and music education majors.

MUAP 35. BS Music Education Jury Examination. 0 Units.

BS Music Education Jury Examination

MUAP 421. Principal Level Performance Area VII. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUAP 322.

MUAP 422. Principal Level Performance Area VII. 2 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors. Prereq: MUAP 421.

MUAP 521. Principal Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors.

MUAP 522. Principal Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors.

MUAP 523. Principal Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors.

MUAP 524. Principal Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors.

MUAP 525. Principal Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors.

MUAP 526. Principal Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Limited to music and music education majors.

MUAP 531. Secondary Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 532. Secondary Performance Area X. 0 - 3 Units.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 533. Secondary Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 534. Secondary Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 535. Secondary Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 536. Secondary Performance Area IX. 0 - 3 Units.

Open to all university students.

MUAP 651. M.A. Lecture - Recital and Document. 3 - 6 Units.

M.A. Lecture - Recital for students in Historical Performance Practice.

MUAP 751. Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document I. 0 - 3 Units.


MUAP 752. Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document II. 3 Units.


MUAP 753. Doctoral Lecture-Recital and Document III. 1 - 6 Unit.


MUAR Courses

MUAR 151B. Case Audio Internship I. 1 Unit.

Development of recording engineering skills through professional level work in the Harkness audio service. Recommended preparation: Open only to audio recording majors.

MUAR 152B. Case Audio Internship II. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: MUAR 151B.

MUAR 153B. Case Audio Internship III. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: MUAR 152B.

MUAR 154B. Case Audio Internship IV. 1 Unit.

Recommended preparation: MUAR 153B.

MUAR 200. Audio Recording I. 2 Units.

A study of basic recording principles and systems and techniques of recording and editing. Recommended preparation: Audio recording majors only.

MUAR 201. Audio Recording II. 2 Units.

Further study of basic recording principles and systems with an introduction to digital recording. Recommended preparation: MUAR 200.

MUAR 251B. Case Audio Recording Internship I. 0 Units.

Professional level work in the Case Western Reserve University Harkness audio service.

MUAR 252B. Case Audio Recording Internship II. 0 Units.


MUAR 253B. Case Audio Recording Internship III. 0 Units.


MUAR 254B. Case Audio Recording Internship IV. 0 Units.


MUAR 300. Advanced Recording Techniques I. 2 Units.

A study of advanced microphone, recording, and monitoring systems and techniques with an emphasis on two track digital recordings of classical music and critical listening. Recommended preparation: MUAR 201.

MUAR 301. Advanced Recording Techniques II. 2 Units.

Further study of advanced microphone, recording, and monitoring systems and techniques, with an emphasis on two track digital recordings of large ensemble classical music. Recommended preparation: MUAR 300.

MUAR 302. Multitrack Recording Techniques I. 2 Units.

A study of multitrack recording and mixdown techniques. Recommended preparation: MUAR 301. Audio recording majors only.

MUAR 303. Multitrack Recording Techniques II. 2 Units.

Further study of multitrack recording and mixdown techniques, with an emphasis on synchronization to video. Recommended preparation: MUAR 302.

MUAR 310. Recording Studio Maintenance I. 1 Unit.

Study of techniques for optimizing professional recording equipment performance. Recommended preparation: MUAR 201. Audio recording majors only.

MUAR 311. Recording Studio Maintenance II. 1 Unit.

Study of techniques for optimizing professional recording equipment performance. Recommended preparation: MUAR 201.

MUAR 320. Acoustics of Music I. 1 Unit.

A seminar in the basic concepts of musical acoustics and research in this area. The students actively participate in experiments exploring various topics in musical acoustics.

MUAR 321. Acoustics of Music II. 1 Unit.

A seminar in the basic concepts of musical acoustics and research in this area. The students actively participate in experiments exploring various topics in musical acoustics.

MUAR 322. Recording Workshop I. 1 Unit.

Recording Workshop provides an increased level of hands-on intensive study of microphone placement. Each week a different instrument or group of instruments will be available for experimentation. Each class represents a recording session centered on a specific instrument, resulting in a comprehensive set of test recordings at the end of each semester. These will provide the basis of reference for future recording decisions. Recommended preparation: MUAR 200.

MUAR 323. Recording Workshop II. 1 Unit.

Recording Workshop provides an increased level of hands-on intensive study of microphone placement. Each week a different instrument or group of instruments will be available for experimentation. Each class represents a recording session centered on a specific instrument, resulting in a comprehensive set of test recordings at the end of each semester. These will provide the basis of reference for future recording decisions. Recommended preparation: MUAR 200.

MUAR 380. Junior Recording Techniques Thesis. 3 Units.


MUAR 385. Recording Studio Internship. 4 Units.


MUAR 390. Senior Recording Tech Thesis/Senior Capstone. 6 Units.

Students will originate, design, organize, and complete a project that will demonstrate and document proficiency with his/her accumulated audio recording technology skills. This project must include evidence of critical thinking, clear planning, and establishment of reasonable goals with an appropriate plan of action. There is a significant written component that requires regular submission of drafts, progress reports, evidence of project advancement, and a final written document. There must also be a public presentation of the project in a venue approved by the department. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

MUCP Courses

MUCP 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Unit.

Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.

MUCP 751. Composition Document-D.M.A.. 3 Units.


MUED Courses

MUED 200A. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Voice. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200B. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Guitar. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200C. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Upper Brass. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200D. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Lower Brass. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200E. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Clarinet and Saxophone. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200F. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Double Reeds and Flute. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200G. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Violin. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200H. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Strings. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 200P. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Percussion. 1 Unit.

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.

MUED 240. Foundations of Music Education. 3 Units.

An introduction to and overview of the music education profession. Philosophical, historical and psychological perspectives on music education in schools, including contemporary topics and trends. Introduction of Ohio academic content standards and curriculum model for music, along with K-12 National Music Standards. Observation of area music teachers and peer-teaching experience. Recommended preparation: Music education major or permission.

MUED 275. Elements of Conducting. 2 Units.

This course is designed to develop the physical tools, and philosophical and aesthetic ideologies necessary for students to conduct in an effective and appropriate manner. Students develop baton technique through systematic physical pattern exercises, and class and field conducting experiences (elementary through adult). Observations and written evaluations of Cleveland Orchestra rehearsals and concerts, along with video analysis/self-evaluation of personal conducting experiences are among the activities required in this course. Topics and content include: philosophical foundations for the conductor, considerations for selecting repertoire and creating a supportive learning environment; rehearsal techniques; planning for the rehearsal and record keeping; rehearsal management; group motivation; score analysis and preparation; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology for the conductor; and national, state, and professional standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.

MUED 276. Advanced Conducting. 2 Units.

This course continues in-depth development of the physical tools, and philosophical and aesthetic ideologies presented in MUED 275. Students develop baton techniques (with experiences in complex and changing time signatures) through systematic physical/pattern exercises, along with continuous evaluations, from their class and field conducting experiences (elementary through adult), observations and written evaluations of Cleveland Orchestra Rehearsals and Concerts, written critiques from historically significant Master Conductors (from videos in the University's Music Library), along with video analysis of personal class and field conducting, are among the activities required in this course. Topics and content include: philosophical foundations for the conductor, considerations for selecting repertoire and creating a supportive learning environment; rehearsal techniques; planning for the rehearsal and record keeping; rehearsal management; group motivation; score analysis and preparation; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology for the conductor; and national and state standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.

MUED 305. World Music in Education. 3 Units.

This course acquaints students with the use of world music, or multicultural music, in the music education classroom. Students are given an overview of the history of world music within American music education, discuss topics related to world music in education, research diverse world music practices, and lead lessons based on this research. Topics and content include: definitions of world/multicultural music; philosophical basis for world music in education; diversity in our Cleveland community; authenticity; ethnomusicology; informal/formal music learning; international perspectives; pedagogical approaches; addressing the State and National Standards through world music in education; and the development of culturally informed music pedagogy based on the study of diverse music. Throughout the course students will become acquainted with the music of diverse cultures and people groups; these will be chosen in part based on student's own research interests. In addition to the musical cultures chosen by students for study and presentation, the music of The Gambia, West Africa; the Caribbean; and India will be highlighted during in-class activities and lessons. Recommended preparation: MUED 240. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

MUED 310. Instrumental and Choral Arranging. 3 Units.

Techniques of writing and arranging for instruments of the band and orchestra and voice. Study of scoring problems for school instrumental and vocal groups of all ages and abilities.

MUED 320. Technology Assisted Music Teaching and Learning. 3 Units.

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in music teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to electronic musical instruments, MIDI sequencing, music notation software, computer-assisted instruction, digital media, the Internet, information processing, computer systems, and lab management as they relate to music education in K-12 schools. Recommended preparation: MUED 240. Offered as MUED 320 and MUED 420.

MUED 350. General Music Methods A. 3 Units.

General Music A introduces student to methods and materials for planning and implementing general music experiences for all ages, with concentration on Pre-K through sixth grade children. Topics of the course include: multiple meanings of music for children; characteristics/needs of young children and creating a supportive learning environment; theories of music learning and teaching; learning styles and collaborative learning; assorted teaching methods, rhythm, pitch, listening, movement, performing, composing; curriculum design; technology for music instruction; multicultural music; music for exceptional children; integrating music with the arts and other curricula; motivation and classroom management; lesson planning and record keeping; developing a personal philosophy of music education; national, state, and professional standards; and assessment. Clinical/Field experiences (Clinical-all ages; Field-focus on Pre-K through elementary) required.

MUED 352. Instrumental Methods and Materials. 3 Units.

This course acquaints students with effective ways to develop, organize and maintain a successful instrumental program for any age group, based on a comprehensive instrumental music education model. Students are given a "womb to tomb" view of the instrumentalists' development, including physiological development and age appropriate instrumental exceptions. Topics and content include: philosophical basis for music education, considerations for selecting repertoire including multicultural music; rehearsal techniques; assessment and record keeping; planning for the rehearsal; recruitment, auditioning, and placement; motivation and classroom management; team teaching and collaborative learning; managing an instrumental program; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology in the instrumental program; philosophy; and national, state, and professional standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.

MUED 353. Choral Methods and Materials. 3 Units.

This course acquaints students with effective ways to develop a successful choral program for any age group, based on a comprehensive choral music education model. Students are given a "womb to tomb" view of the singing voice, including physiological development, age appropriate vocal expectations, and establishing and maintaining vocal health. Topics include: philosophical basis for vocal music education; the child voice, the adolescent voice, and the adult voice; vocal tone; considerations for selecting repertoire including ensemble assessment, music evaluation, and multicultural music; rehearsal techniques, collaborative learning, and motivation; planning for the rehearsal; developing conducting technique; recruitment, auditioning, placement, score analysis and preparation; classroom management; managing a choral program; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology in a choral program; and national state, and professional standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required. Recommended preparation: MUED 276.

MUED 355. Instructional Design in Music Education. 3 Units.

This Music Education Department Seminar brings together all strands of the Music Education program by focusing on curriculum as the organizational element of instruction. Topics and content include: understanding the issues presented by special learners; techniques for integrating special learners into the music teaching environment; developing learning outcomes; designing instruction; planning classroom experiences; defining assessment and measurement; assessment techniques and instruments for the music classroom; and exploring elements of school music program organization and administration. Professional writing and clinical and field experiences will be a large part of the activities in this course. This course is presented in a seminar format that provides for discussions of classroom topics and commentary on field experiences. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

MUED 391. Music in Early Childhood. 3 Units.

The goal of the course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of music in early childhood and approaches to music education with young children. Students will experience an overview of selected theories of musical development of young children, discuss the importance of music to various areas of child development, explore cultural perspectives and influences on musical development, evaluate curricular materials and methods used in early childhood music education, observe children's music making in early childhood classrooms, and develop teaching skills for early childhood music settings. Topics and content of this course include: music's role in early childhood development; music aptitude and its measurement; theories of early childhood music learning; early childhood making; evaluating curricular materials for early childhood music; the importance of play in early childhood musical development; incorporating State and National Music Education Standards; designing instruction for early childhood music settings; assessment in early childhood music; cultural perspectives on music in early childhood; cultural influences on musical development; music therapy with young children; benefits of family interaction in music; the role of listening in early childhood musical development; and formal music instruction with young children The class will participate in a weekly service learning project providing music instruction for young children and parents or caregivers from an underserved population. Offered as MUED 391 and MUED 491.

MUED 396A. Student Teaching in Music Education. 9 Units.

Teaching music in both elementary and secondary schools, full-time five days a week for 15 weeks. Closely supervised field experiences of all types with a wide variety of students. Emphasis on planning lessons and organizing materials, teaching methodologies, motivation, and student assessment. Topics addressed include communications and the arts, technology in learning, interdisciplinary learning, collaborative learning and teaching, creating a supportive environment, and professional development. Development of skills needed for self-assessment as well as student assessment. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 396B. Offered as MUED 396A and MUED 496A. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: EDUC 255 and MUAP 323 and MUAP 35.

MUED 396B. Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education. 3 Units.

This is the SAGES Senior Capstone requirement for students majoring in Music Education. Taken at the same time as the student teaching experience (MUED 396A/496A), this seminar will guide students through preparation for entering the professional world of music education, and mentor them in their preparation of their Senior Capstone Project and Presentation. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 496A. Offered as MUED 396B and MUED 496B. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

MUED 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Unit.

Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.

MUED 400. Clinical/Field Experience. 3 Units.

This provides clinical/field experiences with all ages of students in all teaching areas. Students from a variety of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds are encountered. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.

MUED 420. Technology Assisted Music Teaching and Learning. 3 Units.

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in music teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to electronic musical instruments, MIDI sequencing, music notation software, computer-assisted instruction, digital media, the Internet, information processing, computer systems, and lab management as they relate to music education in K-12 schools. Recommended preparation: MUED 240. Offered as MUED 320 and MUED 420.

MUED 441. Philosophical Foundations of Music Education. 3 Units.

In this course, students explore major aesthetic philosophies that have influenced contemporary music education, and discuss current issues central to our field. Among topics included: basic views about art/music; creating art/music; meaning in art/music, experiencing art/music; music and aesthetic education; criticism in music; multicultural music; and critical theories and inquiry regarding music education. Students are asked to assess their own roles in music education, as well as their obligations and potential capacities for leadership in the profession. Students will work toward development of a personal professional philosophy of music education.

MUED 442. Curriculum and Assessment in Music Education. 3 Units.

This course is designed to give graduate music education students thorough knowledge of the overarching role of curriculum and assessment as the organizational elements of instruction. In depth coverage of such topics as: the role of assessment and measurement in teaching; epistemology; scope and sequence; backward design; instructional goals; validity; reliability; performance assessments; measuring assessment; curriculum design; and teaching for understanding. These concepts and procedures will be explored in depth to give daily music instruction a global framework in the larger organizational structure of profession, state, national, and accreditation standards for P-12 and college music settings.

MUED 443. Music Cognition and Learning. 3 Units.

Survey and critical review of the literature as it relates to music teaching and learning, and music performance. Specific topics may include basic psychoacoustical processes, auditory perception, cognitive organization of musical sound, tonal and musical memory, neuromusical research, affective and physiological responses to music, learning theory, musical aptitude, developmental processes, and motivation.

MUED 444. Research in Music Education. 3 Units.

Paradigms and methods in music education research. Specific topics and assignments include research-related resources, tools and materials; research problems; research literature; research procedures, research proposals; qualitative and quantitative research studies; computer-assisted data analysis; and empirical research reports.

MUED 446. Sociology of Music Education. 3 Units.

In this course, students explore philosophical, social, cultural, and theoretical issues regularly encountered by music educators in classroom and rehearsal settings. Topics covered include: local, state, and national issues and policies intersecting with music education; social challenges and classroom realities facing music educators; social and cultural diversity issues in music education; and the role(s) of music education in society. Recommended preparation: MUED 444, Research in Music Education.

MUED 491. Music in Early Childhood. 3 Units.

The goal of the course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of music in early childhood and approaches to music education with young children. Students will experience an overview of selected theories of musical development of young children, discuss the importance of music to various areas of child development, explore cultural perspectives and influences on musical development, evaluate curricular materials and methods used in early childhood music education, observe children's music making in early childhood classrooms, and develop teaching skills for early childhood music settings. Topics and content of this course include: music's role in early childhood development; music aptitude and its measurement; theories of early childhood music learning; early childhood making; evaluating curricular materials for early childhood music; the importance of play in early childhood musical development; incorporating State and National Music Education Standards; designing instruction for early childhood music settings; assessment in early childhood music; cultural perspectives on music in early childhood; cultural influences on musical development; music therapy with young children; benefits of family interaction in music; the role of listening in early childhood musical development; and formal music instruction with young children The class will participate in a weekly service learning project providing music instruction for young children and parents or caregivers from an underserved population. Offered as MUED 391 and MUED 491.

MUED 496A. Student Teaching in Music Education. 9 Units.

Teaching music in both elementary and secondary schools, full-time five days a week for 15 weeks. Closely supervised field experiences of all types with a wide variety of students. Emphasis on planning lessons and organizing materials, teaching methodologies, motivation, and student assessment. Topics addressed include communications and the arts, technology in learning, interdisciplinary learning, collaborative learning and teaching, creating a supportive environment, and professional development. Development of skills needed for self-assessment as well as student assessment. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 396B. Offered as MUED 396A and MUED 496A. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: EDUC 255.

MUED 496B. Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education. 3 Units.

This is the SAGES Senior Capstone requirement for students majoring in Music Education. Taken at the same time as the student teaching experience (MUED 396A/496A), this seminar will guide students through preparation for entering the professional world of music education, and mentor them in their preparation of their Senior Capstone Project and Presentation. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 496A. Offered as MUED 396B and MUED 496B. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

MUED 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 18 Unit.


MUED 544. Advanced Research in Music Education. 3 Units.

Advanced studies in models and methods of music education research. Research projects using data analysis. In-depth examination of selected quantitative and/or qualitative research designs according to student interests. Discussion of thesis and dissertation proposal format process. Recommended preparation: MUED 444.

MUED 591. Music Education Seminar in Conducting. 3 Units.

In this course, students focus on advanced score study, preparation, and analysis. In depth conducting techniques on contemporary music and mixed meter compositions, along with the development of a comprehensive conducting bibliography are the major components in this seminar. Historical research, analytical evaluation, and the practical elements of the physical techniques required for one to conduct a chosen composition are all addressed for each composition studies. Seminar discussions include aesthetic and philosophical ideologies, and the practical issues a conductor faces when put in control of the advanced ensemble.

MUED 601. Special Readings (Ph.D./D.M.A.). 1 - 18 Unit.


MUED 651. Thesis (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 6 Unit.


MUED 696. College Teaching Practicum. 0 Units.


MUED 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

MUEN Courses

MUEN 324. Case Percussion Ensemble. 0 - 2 Units.

The Case Percussion Ensemble is open to all interested Case-affiliated individuals who seek to continue their musical development by performing percussion ensemble literature. Membership is contingent on an audition that demonstrates moderate percussion ability and the ability to read music. Audition materials can be acquired through the director. Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 355. Miscellaneous Ensembles. 0 - 2 Units.


MUEN 356. University Circle Wind Ensemble. 1 Unit.

Designed for the most advanced woodwind, brass, and percussion players. Stresses the single-performance concept utilizing only players needed for a given piece. Audition required.

MUEN 357. New Music Ensemble. 1 - 2 Unit.


MUEN 365. Case Chamber Music. 0 - 1 Units.

This course will utilize wind instruments in different combinations, performing chamber music dating from the Renaissance to the 21st Century. The creation of new works and the adaptations of other repertoire will also be encouraged for unique/non-standard instrumentations. All combinations of Woodwinds, Brass, Voice, Strings, Guitar, Harp, Percussion, and Keyboard instruments will be considered; repertoire will be determined by available instrumentation. Membership is contingent on an audition that demonstrates moderate proficiency and the ability to read music. Audition materials can be acquired through the director.

MUEN 370. Popular Music Ensemble. 0 - 1 Units.

This course will utilize music instruments in different combinations, performing popular music. The creation of new works and the adaptations of other repertoire will also be encouraged for unique/non-standard instrumentations. Membership is contingent on an audition that demonstrates moderate proficiency and the ability to read music. Placement audition required.

MUEN 373. Jazz Ensemble I. 0 - 1 Units.

Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 374. Jazz Ensemble II. 0 - 1 Units.


MUEN 382. Case Concert Choir. 0 - 1 Units.

This select choral group performs a wide variety of a cappella and accompanied choral works. Membership is gained only through an audition with the director. Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 383. Symphonic Winds. 0 - 1 Units.

Performance of advanced symphonic band repertoire. Open to all Case students, faculty and staff. Audition required for part placement only.

MUEN 384. Spartan Marching Band. 0 - 1 Units.


MUEN 385. Case/University Circle Orchestra. 0 - 1 Units.

The orchestra is comprised of Case students, faculty, staff and community players who play strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion. Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 386. Case Camerata Chamber Orchestra. 0 - 1 Units.

This chamber string ensemble is open to all interested Case affiliated individuals who seek to continue their music development by performing orchestral literature. Each person is required to audition to determine initial placement, section assignment, and seating. All members are required to perform a minimum of 2 concerts per academic year. Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 387. University Singers. 0 - 1 Units.

Chorus performing a wide variety of traditional and popular choral works. Open to all Case students. No audition required.

MUEN 389. Keyboard Ensemble. 0 - 1 Units.

Intensive study of the repertory for keyboard instruments, including solo literature, chamber music, and other collaborative genres. Master class format with regular performances by enrolled students. Enrollment limited to CWRU keyboard majors. Must be enrolled in applied lessons.

MUEN 393. Baroque Chamber Ensembles. 0 - 1 Units.

Designed for students interested in exploring baroque music in a chamber setting on historical instruments. Prereq: Audition required.

MUEN 394. Baroque Dance Ensemble. 0 - 1 Units.

This course allows musicians and dancers alike to explore historical dance steps and notation. History of dance and its relationships to music will be emphasized as students learn and perform historical dances. Prereq: MUHI 342 or MUHI 442 or permission of Instructor.

MUEN 395. Collegium Musicum. 0 - 1 Units.

Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 396. Early Music Singers. 0 - 1 Units.

Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 397. Baroque Orchestra. 0 - 1 Units.

Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUEN 398. Cleveland Orchestra Chorus. 0 - 1 Units.

Recommended preparation: Audition required.

MUGN Courses

MUGN 201. Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I. 3 Units.

A flexible approach to the study of the materials and literature of music. Aural and analytical skills primarily for classical music.

MUGN 202. Introduction to Music: Listening Experience II. 3 Units.

Application of the skills developed in MUGN 201 to the understanding of historical and stylistic content of Western music. Focus is on particular works in context of the era of composition. Recommended preparation: MUGN 201 or consent of department.

MUGN 250. Topics in Music for non-majors. 3 Units.

Close study of a theme, a work, or aspect of music such as "Music and Gender", "Music in Vienna", or "Instruments of Music." The course is intended as an exploration of diverse aspects of music in society, both historical and modern, and is primarily for non-majors as a follow-up to MUGN 201 or 202.

MUGN 308. Digital Music: Composition and Production. 3 Units.

Course focuses on digital music creation and composition using audio sequencing software. Topics include song writing, synthesizers, recording, editing, mixing, and film scoring. Course is open to music majors, minors, and non-majors with sufficient musical background. Emphasis on group work, creativity, and imagination. All work done on Macintosh computers in The Core, the Department of Music's multimedia classroom.

MUGN 309. Audio Production in Pro Tools. 3 Units.

Audio Production in Pro Tools. Practical training in contemporary audio production methods using the industry standard software, Pro Tools. Also covers the use of Pro Tools for musical analysis and evaluation of music copyright issues.

MUGN 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Unit.

Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.

MUGN 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 18 Unit.


MUGN 651. Thesis: (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 6 Unit.


MUGN 751. Recital Document I-D.M.A.. 1 - 3 Unit.


MUGN 752. Recital Document II - D.M.A.. 1 - 3 Unit.


MUHI Courses

MUHI 301. History of Western Music I. 3 Units.

Developments in Western music from early Christian times to c1700. Recommended preparation or concurrent enrollment: MUTH 102, MUTH 104, or MUTH 108.

MUHI 302. History of Western Music II. 3 Units.

Developments in Western music from c1700 to c1900. Recommended preparation: MUTH 102, MUTH 104, or MUTH 108.

MUHI 303. History of Western Music III. 3 Units.

Music of the twentieth century, covering history, analysis, and aesthetic issues. Recommended preparation: MUHI 301 or MUHI 302, MUTH 104 or MUTH 108.

MUHI 310. Music Cultures of the World: Music of Asia and Africa. 3 Units.

A one-semester introduction to musics of Asia and Africa, focusing on the relationship of musical traditions and practices to culture and society. Recommended preparation: MUTH 106. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

MUHI 311. Music Cultures of the World II: Music of the Americas. 3 Units.

Introduction to selected multicultural musics of North America and Latin America, focusing on the relationship of musical traditions and practices to culture and society. Recommended preparation: MUTH 106. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

MUHI 312. History of Rock and Roll: The Deep View. 3 Units.

This course surveys American popular song from the 1890s to the present, with an emphasis on rock 'n' roll and pop music of the last sixty years. The relationship of popular song to important currents in American life and culture will be examined. The origins of various styles of song in the cultures of different ethnic and national groups will be discussed, along with the subsequent diffusion and transformation of such music through mass mediation. The characteristics and meanings of music, lyrics, and images will be discussed with the aid of sound recordings, music videos and films. Students taking this course may not receive credit for MUGN 212. Prereq; For Music Majors only.

MUHI 313. American Popular Song to 1950. 3 Units.

Survey of popular music practices from the nineteenth century until the emergence of rock and roll.

MUHI 315. History of Jazz and American Popular Music. 3 Units.

Musical styles and structures of jazz and American popular music; emphasis on music since 1900. Recommended preparation: MUTH 202 or MUHI 302.

MUHI 320. Global Pop. 3 Units.

Exploration of popular music practices, particularly rock, pop, and hip hop, outside the United States.

MUHI 341. Introduction to Historical Performance Practice. 3 Units.

Summary and perspective of the problems and issues associated with the field of historical performance practices. Offered as MUHI 341 and MUHI 441. Prereq: MUHI 301 and MUHI 302.

MUHI 342. Seminar in Historical Performance Practice. 3 Units.

Seminar in a specific instrument and/or vocal area of historical performance practices, such as baroque vocal, instrumental, or keyboard practices. May be repeated because topics vary. Offered as MUHI 342 and MUHI 442. Prereq: MUHI 341 or MUHI 441

MUHI 350. Topics in Music History. 3 Units.

Close study of a theme or aspect of music such as "Music and Gender," "Symphonies of Mahler," and "Wagner's Ring." Offered as MUHI 350 and MUHI 450.

MUHI 390. Undergraduate Seminar in Music History. 3 Units.

An intensive research seminar in music history for music majors. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar.

MUHI 395A. Capstone for Music Majors A. 1 Unit.

Not required for the music major, but intended for music majors in concentrations other than Audio Recording who choose to complete a capstone project in music. Course consists of projects varying according to the students' area of study and interests, but each must include a document of appropriate length and scope and must be presented publicly in an appropriate forum. MUHI 395A guides students through the preliminary stages of the project and preparation of a formal Capstone proposal. Prereq: Successful completion of two of the following courses: MUHI 301, MUHI 302 or MUHI 303; and successful completion of SAGES Writing Portfolio.

MUHI 395B. Capstone for Music Majors B. 2 - 5 Units.

Not required for the music major, but intended for music majors in concentrations other than Audio Recording who choose to complete a capstone project in music. Course consists of projects varying according to students' area of study and interests, but each must include a document of appropriate length and scope and must be presented publicly in an appropriate forum. MUHI 395B guides students through completion of the project, including the document and public presentation. Prereq: Successful completion of MUHI 395A.

MUHI 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Unit.

Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.

MUHI 401. Methodologies of Music History. 3 Units.

Introduction to the scholarly study of music, including principles of music bibliography, techniques of library research, and evaluation of editions. Special emphasis given to the relationship between musical performance and research in the history and criticism of music. Attention will also be given to design of program notes and essays. Required of first-year students in the Master of Music degree program.

MUHI 430. Music History for Educators. 3 Units.

Examines the intersections of composers' musical output as it overlaps with theories of general education, music education, and pedagogy.

MUHI 431. Medieval Music: Early Christian to 1425. 3 Units.

The mass, liturgical drama, and early polyphony through the Ars Nova.

MUHI 432. Music of the Renaissance. 3 Units.

Vocal polyphonic music from the Burgundian school through the Elizabethan madrigal.

MUHI 433. Music of the Baroque. 3 Units.

Musical developments from Monteverdi to Bach and Handel.

MUHI 434. Viennese Classicism. 3 Units.

Development of the symphony, concerto, chamber music, and opera in the works of the Mannheim composers, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.

MUHI 435. Nineteenth Century Music. 3 Units.

Romanticism and other 19th century trends in music up to impressionism.

MUHI 436. Twentieth Century Music. 3 Units.

Critical and analytical study of music since 1900. Examination and discussion of stylistic characteristics and aesthetic aims of contemporary composers.

MUHI 437. Popular Music Studies. 3 Units.

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of popular music studies, with emphasis on musicological approaches. Analysis of musical signification within the complex cultural contexts shaped by place, history, commerce, and technology.

MUHI 441. Introduction to Historical Performance Practice. 3 Units.

Summary and perspective of the problems and issues associated with the field of historical performance practices. Offered as MUHI 341 and MUHI 441.

MUHI 442. Seminar in Historical Performance Practice. 3 Units.

Seminar in a specific instrument and/or vocal area of historical performance practices, such as baroque vocal, instrumental, or keyboard practices. May be repeated because topics vary. Offered as MUHI 342 and MUHI 442. Prereq: MUHI 341 or MUHI 441

MUHI 443. Medieval/Renaissance Notation. 3 Units.

Theory of chant, modal, mensural, and tablature notations. Practice in making literal transcriptions, editing, and preparing scores for performances.

MUHI 450. Topics in Music History. 3 Units.

Close study of a theme or aspect of music such as "Music and Gender," "Symphonies of Mahler," and "Wagner's Ring." Offered as MUHI 350 and MUHI 450.

MUHI 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 18 Unit.


MUHI 590. Seminar in Musicology. 3 Units.

Problems in musical criticism, aesthetics, and analysis, as well as interdisciplinary methodologies.

MUHI 601. Special Readings Ph.D./D.M.A.. 1 - 18 Unit.


MUHI 610. Bibliography and Research Methods in Music. 3 Units.

Seminar in research methods and techniques, stressing the analytic and functional approaches to bibliography.

MUHI 611. Doctor of Musical Arts Seminar. 3 Units.

Recommended preparation: MUHI 610.

MUHI 612. Analysis for Music Historians. 3 Units.

This seminar will be required of all first-year graduate students in Musicology and Historical Performance Practices. It seeks to develop the analytical skills of music historians, deepening their earlier technical training and teaching them how to approach repertories (music before 1700, after 1900, popular music) they are unlikely to have studied in depth previously. In contrast to the instruction offered at CIM, this seminar will present a range of ways in which to bridge between the details of a musical composition and the historical context within which it first appeared. The seminar deals with five case studies, one representative of each of the following repertories: Before 1700 (e.g. Josquin motets, Monteverdi madrigals, Frescobaldi toccatas) 1700-1820 (e.g. Rameau keyboard suites, Beethoven sonatas, Schubert string quartets) 1820-1910 (e.g. Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique, Brahms symphonies, Mahler songs) After 1910 (e.g. Stravinsky Sacre du Printemps, Webern Symphony, Ruth Crawford Seeger String Quartet, Ligeti Etudes) Popular Music (e.g. 12-bar blues, "rhythm changes", "Round Midnights") Of these, most students will have received training only in the analysis of music 1700-1820, and that training will have concentrated strictly on harmony and structure, without engagement with cultural context. Each unit of this seminar will proceed from basic grammatical norms for the repertory in question to formal criticism to cultural interpretation.

MUHI 651. Thesis (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 6 Unit.


MUHI 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 18 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

MUHI 751. Recital Document I-D.M.A.. 1 - 3 Unit.


MUHI 752. Recital Document II - D.M.A.. 1 - 3 Unit.


MUHI 753. Recital Document III-D.M.A.. 1 - 6 Unit.


MUPM Courses

MUPM 212. History of Rock and Roll. 3 Units.

This course surveys the musical practices of the rock and roll era, broadly defined to include much popular music since the 1950s. Music majors are to enroll in MUHI 312. Prereq: For Non-Music Majors only.

MUPM 215. History and Styles of Jazz. 3 Units.

Musical styles and structures of jazz and American popular music since 1900. Recommended preparation: MUGN 201.

MUPM 319. Jazz Skills I. 3 Units.

This class is designed to teach students basic skills in jazz improvisation, jazz keyboard, arranging/composition and pedagogy. Basic theory is required. Students will eventually arrange their own composition for big band, which will feature them as the improvising soloist. Prereq: (MUTH 102 and MUTH 106) or MUTH 108 or permission of instructor.

MUPM 320. Jazz Skills II. 3 Units.

This course will build on the foundational skills developed in Jazz Skills I, providing a more intensive study of jazz harmony, improvisation and melodic construction. It is designed to give students an advanced experiential understanding of the theory and performance of jazz.

MUTH Courses

MUTH 101. Harmony-Keyboard I. 2 Units.

Scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, and their inversions. Harmonization of melodies and basses, chorale study, modulation, analysis. Creative use of material. Correlated and taken concurrently with MUTH 105 and 106. Both aspects of the course must be passed in order to complete requirements.

MUTH 102. Harmony-Keyboard II. 2 Units.

(See MUTH 101.)

MUTH 103. Theory I. 3 Units.

Music theory for the nonmusic major. Intervals, scales, rhythmic drill, sight singing, eartraining, keyboard work, and harmony through inversions of triads and seventh chords. Not open to music majors.

MUTH 104. Theory II. 3 Units.

(See MUTH 103.) Recommended preparation: MUTH 103 or consent of department.

MUTH 107. Theory for Music Majors I. 4 Units.

This course is the first of four semesters of music theory requirements for Case music majors. It will include the study of harmony, analysis, eartraining, and keyboard skills. Recommended preparation: Placement exam through department.

MUTH 108. Theory for Music Majors II. 4 Units.

This course is the second of four semesters of music theory for Case music majors. It includes further study of harmony, analysis, eartraining, sightsinging, and keyboard. Recommended preparation: MUTH 107 or placement exam through department.

MUTH 201. Harmony-Keyboard III. 2 Units.

Continuation of MUTH 101 and 102. Chromatically altered triads and 7th chords; 9th, 11th, 13th. Neapolitan and augmented 6th chords, regular and irregular solutions. Correlated and taken concurrently with MUTH 205 and 206. Both aspects of the course must be passed in order to complete requirements. Students cannot earn credit for both MUTH 201/205 and MUTH 207. Recommended preparation: MUTH 102 or placement examination.

MUTH 202. Harmony-Keyboard IV. 4 Units.

(See MUTH 201.) Recommended preparation: MUTH 102 or placement examination.

MUTH 207. Theory for Music Majors III. 4 Units.

This course is the third of four semesters of music theory for music majors. Continued study of harmony, analysis, eartraining, sightsinging, and keyboard, including use of dissonance and chromaticism, diatonic modulation. Students cannot earn credit for both MUTH 201/205 and MUTH 207. Recommended preparation: MUTH 108 or placement exam through department.

MUTH 208. Theory for Music Majors IV. 4 Units.

This course is the fourth of four semesters of music theory for CWRU music majors. Continued study of harmony, analysis, ear-training, sight-singing, and keyboard. Use of dissonance and chromaticism, chromatic voice leading technique, tonal and post-tonal topics. Recommended preparation: MUTH 207 or placement exam through department.

MUTH 311. 16th Century Counterpoint. 2 Units.

Sixteenth century modal counterpoint. Exercises in the five species. Writing of short compositions and motets in two, three and four voices. Recommended preparation: MUTH 202 or MUTH 206.

MUTH 312. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. 3 Units.

Analysis and writing of inventions in two parts, and fugues in three and four parts. Recommended preparation: MUTH 202 or MUTH 206.

MUTH 320. Form and Analysis. 3 Units.

Aural and visual analysis of structural and stylistic features of 16th through 20th century music. Prereq: MUTH 202 and MUTH 206, or MUTH 208.

MUTH 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies. 1 - 3 Unit.

Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.

MUTH 400A. Review of Musical Structure. 3 Units.

Instruction of fundamentals of form, counterpoint, and four-part harmony. Designed for graduate students; credit not applicable toward degree requirements.

MUTH 400B. Sightsinging and Eartraining Review. 2 Units.

Background in fundamentals of sight singing in four clefs; melodic and harmonic dictation including chromatic harmony and modulation. Designed for graduate students; credit not applicable toward degree requirements.

MUTH 416. Pre-common Practice Theory and Analysis. 3 Units.

An exploration of treatises and analytical methods appropriate to music of the Medieval and Renaissance eras.

MUTH 422. Musical Analysis for Educators. 3 Units.

Musical Analysis for Educators is designed to strengthen the analysis skills of music educators and explore practical application of these skills. Recommended preparation: Placement exam.

MUTH 423. Analysis of Musical Styles. 3 Units.

Analysis of selected musical compositions from various periods of the common practice era. Emphasis on traditional structures, stylistic features, and the relationship of analysis and performance.

MUTH 424. Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis. 3 Units.

An introduction to the theories of Heinrich Schenker and their application to the analysis of tonal music. Intensive analytical work and selected readings. Recommended preparation: MUTH 400 competency.

MUTH 495. Seminar in Music Theory. 3 Units.


MUTH 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.). 1 - 18 Unit.