2013-14 General Bulletin

frame image
frame image
Contact: Main contact information is listed separately under each Center.

The Division of General Medical Sciences was established in 1986 to provide an organizational home for units pursuing interdisciplinary research and education objectives. The division is the equivalent of an academic department, and its constituent units are characterized as Centers.  The Dean of the School of Medicine serves as the Chair of the division; each Center is led by a director.  The unique nature of each of the General Medical Sciences centers is described in the paragraphs below.  (Centers are listed in alphabetical order by full title, and associated academic programs including certificate, MS and PhD programs described in top navigation tabs).  

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center

Phone: 216.844.8797
http://cancer.case.edu
Stanton L. Gerson, MD, Director, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center
Anne M. Duli, MPA, Associate Director, Research Administration and Finance

The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center (Case CCC) is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country. The Case CCC integrates the cancer research activities of the largest biomedical research and health care institutions in Ohio - Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Cleveland Clinic - under a single leadership structure. The Center is internationally recognized for its discoveries in cancer cell signaling; cancer genetics in colon cancer, Barrett’s Esophagitis, leukemias and brain tumors; drug discovery and innovative therapeutics; stem cell research; GU malignancies; and cancer prevention and early detection.

The Case CCC has over 300 collaborating scientists and physicians who have successfully competed for over $119 million in annual funding. These investigators are organized into eight interdisciplinary scientific programs and have access to 14 Scientific Core Facilities. A unified clinical research effort consisting of 11 multidisciplinary clinical disease teams develop and prioritize clinical trials among the partner institutions. A certificate in clinical oncology for K12 participants is available (see Certificates). 

Research programs extend to CWRU affiliates MetroHealth Medical Center (the region’s county hospital) and Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Hospital and to 13 community medical centers operated by University Hospitals and Cleveland Clinic. As a consortium cancer center, the Case CCC has become a powerful example of the potential generated by complementary institutions coming together for the benefit of research and discovery, patient treatments and community impact. Through its partners, Case CCC programs extend throughout northern Ohio to offer residents access to cancer care and a wide range of clinical trials, and participation in community outreach, cancer prevention and cancer survivorship initiatives.

Center for Clinical Investigation

Phone: 216.368.3286
http://cci.case.edu/cci/index.php/Main_Page
Pamela Davis, MD, PhD, Director
James Spilsbury, PhD, Academic Development Core Director
Denise Babineau, PhD, Statistical Sciences Core Director
Guo-Qiang Zhang, PhD, Medical Informatics Division Chief

The Center for Clinical Investigation (CCI) was founded in 2007 and is part of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine’s Division of General Medical Sciences.  The CCI serves as the academic home of Cleveland’s Clinical & Translational Science Collaborative, a partnership of 4 local institutions (Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the MetroHealth System, and University Hospitals) and member of a national consortium of approximately 60 institutions funded by the National Institutes of Health to increase the efficiency and speed of clinical and translational research across the country. 

The CCI’s mission is to enhance clinical and translational research efforts across the Cleveland area by: (1) spurring advances in knowledge of risk factors, outcomes and treatment effectiveness in the population; (2) facilitating the transfer of scientific advances to the community; and (3) developing a new generation of clinical researchers equipped with the skills needed to efficiently design, implement and interpret novel studies that address important public health questions. To accomplish its mission, the CCI provides computer systems and applications support for basic science and clinical research activities and works closely with basic science and clinical investigators in the CWRU Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Dental Medicine, as well as the University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and MetroHealth System . The CCI has supported hundreds of clinical research and epidemiology projects, including local and national multicenter, longitudinal studies.  The CCI has three cores that work together to provide fully integrated research support to all investigators: Academic Development Core, Division of Medical Informatics, and Statistical Sciences Core.

The Academic Development Core manages the Master’s Degree Program in Clinical Research (Clinical Research Scholars Program - see "Clinical Research MS" tab above) as well as a newly created Certificate Program in Clinical Research. The Academic Development Core also delivers seminars and short courses in clinical research and works to coordinate educational activities in interdisciplinary clinical research across the CTSC’s institutional members. The programs target investigators and other key members of the research team, including data managers and study coordinators.  Training efforts in research design, research data management, statistical sciences, statistical software, and scientific communication are emphasized.

The Division of Medical Informatics is primarily charged with developing informatics solutions to many of the barriers clinical investigators face in efficiently processing, storing and sharing research data; and with providing informatics tools and infrastructure for the CCI and the larger research community. In order to meet these goals, the Division of Medical Informatics develops data standards for research database development and data management that aim to maximize the value (accuracy, completeness, availability, security) of research data, develops technological solutions and tools in support of the other CCI cores, develops tools and systems to facilitate understanding of research data (including data dictionaries, data sharing tools, and repositories for biological data) and conducts research in new methodologies for clinical research informatics, clinical and health informatics, comparative effectiveness research, information discovery, data integration, data mining, and translational research. The Division of Medical Informatics staff consists of research programmers and systems analysts with not only a wide range of technical expertise, but with experience using semantic web technology in support of clinical research.

The Statistical Sciences Core provides data management and statistical support on study design and data analysis. Members who provide data management consist of skilled data managers and programmers who consult and collaborate with investigators on data collection instrument development and coding, database development and administration, data cleaning and quality assurance, statistical programming, and dataset preparation. Members providing statistical support collaborate and consult with clinical investigators on proposal development, study design, study monitoring, and data analysis. The Statistical Sciences Core currently consists of 1 PhD biostatistician, 2 MS biostatisticians, and 1 data manager, each with several years of collaborative experience in an academic medical center. Statistical software packages that are supported by the CCI Statistical Sciences Core include SAS, SPSS, R/S-Plus, JMP, NCSS PASS, Minitab, and Stata.

 

Center for Global Health and Diseases

Phone: 216.368.6321
http://www.case.edu/orgs/cghd/index.html
James W. Kazura, MD, Director  

The Center for Global Health and Diseases links the numerous international health resources of the University, its affili­ated institutions, and the northern Ohio community in transdisciplinary programs of research and education related to global health. The scope of the Center's activities also includes education and service as these are related to molecular, clinical and population studies of human health and disease.

The Center is currently a national leader in National Institutes of Health-supported studies of the major infectious diseases of develop­ing countries. Cutting-edge approaches are implemented in order to examine the molecu­lar, genetic and immunologic basis of susceptibility to infectious diseases of public health significance - malaria, river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, schistosomiasis, HIV and other viral diseases such as Rift Valley fever. Clinical research in endemic countries is concerned with testing and implementing cost-effective public health interventions that are aimed at the control of malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases (worm infections of children, elimination of lymphatic filariasis).  The Center has ongoing research and educational collaborations with academic and governmental institutions in Papua New Guinea, Brazil, Kenya, Uganda, and several other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Educational programs sponsored by the Center include electives in interna­tional health, population biology, and genetics of infectious diseases (available to undergraduate, graduate and professional school students), a weekly World Health Interest Group (WHIG) seminar series, overseas rotations for graduate and professional school students, and training programs at the university and abroad for scholars from developing countries (with support from the Fogarty International Center at NIH).  

A certificate in Global Health is available (see Certificates).

Center for Medical Education

Phone: 216.368.6986
Megan McNamara, MD, Director, CAML

The Center for Medical Education, established in 2010, is currently being reorganized to better align with the needs of learners across the educational continuum – from students to residents to graduate students to faculty.  The Center for Medical Education (CMEd) provides an organizational home for teaching and learning programs in the School of Medicine and a supportive environment for those who want to develop special skills in medical education.

The Center for the Advancement of Medical Learning (“CAML”) operates its programs under the auspices of the CMEd. CAML supports and promotes the development of teaching and lifelong-learning skills among students, faculty, staff, residents, and alumni.  CAML pursues research into educational innovations to advance our knowledge of medical learning and teaching.  The Center offers workshops to faculty locally, regionally, and nationally to enhance faculty teaching, research and evaluation skills.  

The Center also sponsors faculty appointments, both full- and part-time, for some faculty whose roles are predominantly focused on teaching medical students.  These include community clinicians who welcome medical students into their clinics and practices.

Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics

Phone: 216.368.1490
http://proteomics.case.edu/default.aspx
Biomedical Research Building, Ninth Floor
Mark R. Chance, PhD, Director

The Case Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics was created, in part, to strengthen Cleveland's presence in modern proteomics and bioinformatics research to make the region a leader in the field. The vision for the Center has been shaped over the past several years by the leadership of the Center.s Director, Mark Chance, Ph.D, with over $60 million in grants awarded to the Center and its collaborators since its inception in February 2006. One of the primary goals of the CPB is to develop an infrastructure of sophisticated equipment that facilitates and maximizes shared equipment usage, as well as to offer a wide array of proteomics and bioinformatics services including 2D gel, mass spectrometry, protein expression/interactions, systems biology, and biostatistical analyses.

The CPB has expanded its vision to include education of graduate students in systems biology and bioinformatics. The Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics developed a graduate program in Systems Biology and Bioinformatics in collaboration with Schools and Departments across the campus. For more information regarding the SYBB graduate program please see "Systems/Bioinformatics" tab above.  You may also visit http://bioinformatics.case.edu/.

Proteomics entails the in depth structural analysis of individual proteins in human and animal cells. In studying proteins and their changes, bioinformatics enables researchers to take an integrated -omics approach for discovering networks involved in human disease. The School of Medicine has established the Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics to perform research to better understand the genetic and environmental bases of disease as well as provide new technologies to diagnose diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

New technologies in mass spectrometry are also allowing protein expression, localization, structure, post-translational modifications, and interactions to be studied in increasing detail and on a genome wide scale. The Center is also developing and applying state-of-the-art-structural proteomics technologies to understand the function and interactions of macromolecular complexes.

The CPB has three divisions: Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Bioinformatics, and Macromolecular Structure.

Proteomics and Genomics Division

The mission of the Division of Proteomics and Genomics is to support research in protein and gene expression analysis, protein and gene modifications, and protein interactions in a wide variety of biological contexts. The division also develops new tools in Proteomics and Genomics research. This includes multiple Proteomics Cores to support these activities.

Bioinformatics Division

The mission of the Division of Bioinformatics is to support interdisciplinary research and training in many areas of bioinformatics including analysis of DNA and protein sequences, protein interaction networks, linkage and association studies for simple and complex traits, and gene and protein expression profiles. This includes a Bioinformatics Core that provides research support for these activities.

Macromolecular Structure Division

The mission of the Division of Macromolecular Structure is to support interdisciplinary research in new methods of structure determination, the combination of computational and experimental structural biology approaches, and developing and maintaining infrastructure for macromolecular structure determination. The Division will work closely and coordinate their activities with faculty and Departments in the University who use structural information to understand function as well as other Centers that provide leadership in Structural Biology and Biophysics.

The CPB also offers a wide range of seminars, workshops, and possibilities for individual training. These activities are posted on the CPB Web site. For a list of services and to explore opportunities to collaborate, please visit the Web site: http://proteomics.case.edu/index.html  or e-mail: proteomics@case.edu.

Center for Psychoanalytic Child Development

The Center for Psychoanalytic Child Development is to be led by a child psychoanalyst affiliated with the Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development, located in Shaker Heights, Ohio. The Center’s goals include the development of courses, practica, and supervisory experiences appropriate for medical students, residents, and fellows.

The Center for RNA Molecular Biology

Phone: 216.368.1852
http://www.case.edu/med/rnacenter/home.htm
Timothy W. Nilsen, PhD, Director

The Center for RNA Molecular Biology is a free standing academic unit in the basic sciences within the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. The RNA Center was established in the mid-nineties as a core entity in recognition of the strong cadre of research laboratories devoted to studying post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene expression focusing on various aspects of RNA Biology.  The RNA Center is composed of 11 primary faculty members and 10 secondary members. 

The RNA Center contains the largest concentration of RNA molecular biologists in the nation.  Collectively, the faculty of the RNA Center cover almost every aspect of RNA research.  Current research in the Center focuses on several of these problems ranging from extremely basic questions such as the mechanism of RNA catalysis and how proteins interact with RNA to the roles of RNA processing in disease. Specific research interests include splicing and its regulation, RNA editing, tRNA maturation, mechanisms of translation regulation, RNA degradation, RNA trafficking, RNA interference and regulation of gene expression by microRNAs and non-coding RNAs. 

Collectively, the RNA Center provides a valuable resource for collaborative efforts within the University and its affiliated institutions the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and University Hospitals System.  In addition, the official journal of the RNA Society “RNA” was founded and continues to be housed in the RNA Center.  The RNA Center has also recently launched the “Core Facility for RNA Technology” which provides the CWRU community with the ability to incorporate RNA research into their programs.  This includes the technical expertise associated with next-generation sequencing and subsequent bioinformatic analysis. The members of the RNA Center have an excellent funding record and the research performed is regularly published in highly visible journals such as Science, Nature, Molecular Cell, NSMB, Molecular Cell, etc.   In addition, a comprehensive laboratory manual on RNA technology has been co-authored by the Center’s director, Dr. Nilsen. 

Center for Science, Health and Society                                          

Phone: 216.368.2059
http://casemed.case.edu/cshs/
Nathan A. Berger, MD, Director

Recognizing that the successful futures of Case Western Reserve University, the City of Cleveland, and Cuyahoga County are integrally related, the Center for Science, Health and Society (CSHS) was created in 2002 to focus the efforts of the University and the community in a significant new collaboration to impact the areas of health and healthcare delivery systems through community outreach, education, and health policy. The Center, based in the School of Medicine, with university wide associations is engaging the many strengths of the University and the community to improve the health of the community.

The Center has engaged the community at the level of the individual and the neighborhood, in public and private schools, at civic and faith-based organizations, and at the level of governmental agencies and community leadership to identify community problems, perceptions, assets and resources; advise the community of faculty skills, assets and expertise; and, catalyze that community service based scholarship that benefits community interests and promotes mutual enhancement. The Center coordinates the Scientific Enrichment Opportunity outreach program that brings Cleveland high school students on to the medical school campus in the summer to work along with our distinguished faculty in their research labs, to introduce and stimulate the students and help prepare them to enter careers in the health carieer professions and biomedical workforce. The Center also coordinates the Mini Medical School Program presented every Spring and Fall to educate the community in the latest developments in healthcare, particularly those developed at CWRU. The overall goal of these programs is to educate and empower the community to become better consumers of healthcare and more informed and stronger advocates for healthcare policy and legislation in their own interests.

Center for the Study of Kidney Biology and Disease

Phone: 216.778.4993
John R. Sedor, MD, co-director
Tyler Miller, MD, co-director
Donald E. Hricik, MD, co-director
Walter Boron, MD, PhD, co-director

Kidney disease is the ninth leading cause of death according to the Centers for Disease Control data. Health care costs for approximately 500,000 patients, who are being treated with dialysis [artificial kidney machine] or who received a kidney transplant, consumed almost 1% of the federal budget in 2008. Up to 26 million U.S. residents have evidence of serious kidney disease

The Center’s mission is to accelerate discovery and its translation for treatment and cure of kidney diseases in an interdisciplinary environment within the rich, research environment of the CWRU School of Medicine. The faculty is an accomplished and highly interactive group of investigators, based in the adult or pediatric Divisions of Nephrology in CWRU-affiliated hospitals and the Department of Physiology and other clinical and basic departments. Research interests of the faculty include glomerular development and disease, epithelial cell biology and ion transport, tubular physiology, genetic epidemiology, health services research, renal transplantation, health disparities research and clinical trials. Research faculty applies cellular, molecular biological, genetic, genomic and epidemiological methods to in vitro models, animal models and/or patients. Many projects by Center investigators use health data, culled from robust electronic health records, and biological samples from patients with kidney diseases in order to generate novel hypotheses, which can then tested with animal models and cell lines. Training opportunities are available for undergraduate, pre- and post-doctoral students. 


National Center for Regenerative Medicine

Phone: 216.368.3614
http://stemcellcenter.case.edu 
Stanton L. Gerson, MD, Director
Jeremy Rich, MD, PhD, Co-Director
Mariesa Malinowski, Executive Director

The Center for Regenerative Medicine is a multi-institutional center composed of investigators from Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, the Cleveland Clinic, Athersys, Inc., and The Ohio State University. Building on over 30 years of experience in adult stem cell research in northeast Ohio, the Center was created in 2003 with a $19.4 million award from the State of Ohio as a Wright Center of Innovation. An additional $8M award in 2006 from the State of Ohio's Biomedical Research and Commercialization Program (BRCP) was successfully completed and enabled 3 new clinical trials to enroll patients.  In 2009, $5M was awarded by the Ohio Third Frontier (OTF) Research Commercialization Program (RCP) which further validated the Center's ability to achieve its mission to utilize human stem cell and tissue engineering technologies to treat human disease. In 2010, $1M was awarded to the NCRM by the OTF Biomedical Program (OTFBP) to advance the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury, and a $2.1M OTF Wright Program Project (WPP) award was made to create a consortium of quantitative analysis imaging systems for stem cells.  

Clinical Research Scholars Program (CRSP)

The Clinical Research program is designed for individuals with an existing degree in medicine, dentistry, nursing, or an allied science such as pharmacy or biomedical engineering. Moreover, a track has also been established for medical students interested in obtaining dual MD/MS degree. The program seeks individuals committed to a career in clinical investigation in an academic or related environment. The program consists of a total of 36 credits: 27 credit hours of coursework, 9 credit hours of mentored research and a formal oral thesis defense. The curriculum offers both focus and flexibility. Focus is provided through a core curriculum (13 credit hours) highlighting clinical research methods, the ethical conduct of research, and a seminar series that introduces the skills necessary for scholarly success. Students typically have special interests in a particular area of clinical research, both clinically and methodologically. This program facilitates pursuit of different methodological interests guided by seasoned CWRU research faculty and addressed partly with choice of appropriate electives (14 credit hours). Requirements for the dual MD/MS degree differ to reflect integration with the medical school curriculum. Most graduates of this program are currently working in academic medical settings, with smaller numbers located in research positions in the private sector or private practice.

CRSP Curriculum

36 credit hours are required for completion of this Master of Science in Clinical Research degree.

Core Courses and Thesis Requirement

CRSP 401Introduction to Clinical Research Summer Series3
CRSP 402Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods3
CRSP 412Communication in Clinical Research (Part 1)1
NURS 630Advanced Statistics: Linear Models3
CRSP 413Communication in Clinical Research (Part 2)1
CRSP 603Research Ethics and Regulation2
CRSP 651Clinical Research Scholars Thesis9
Total Units22


Recommended Courses

CRSP 406Introduction to R Programming2
CRSP 407Logistic Regression and Survival Analysis3
CRSP 500Design and Analysis of Observational Studies3
Total Units8

Each scholar is encouraged to develop his/her own area of concentration based on personal interests and needs.  Typical areas of concentration include: Clinical Research Trials, Health Services Research and Outcomes, and Multidisciplinary/Translational Clinical Research.  Please consult with CRSP faculty and your Research Mentor on which electives will best suit your needs.

The choices of electives include but are not limited to:

CRSP 410Independent Study in Clinical Research1 - 3
CRSP 501Working in Interdisciplinary Research Teams1
CRSP 502Leadership Development2
CRSP 503Innovation and Entrepreneurship1
CRSP 504Managing Research Records - A System's Approach2 - 3
CRSP 505Investigating Social Determinants of Health2 - 3
CRSP 510Health Disparities3
EPBI 411Introduction to Health Behavior3
EPBI 450Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies3
EPBI 458Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials3
EPBI 467Comparative and Cost Effectiveness Research1

 

MS Clinical Research, Plan of Study

Prep YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
CRSP Program starts in the Summer Term of First Year
Year Total:      
 
First YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Elective2-3    
Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods (CRSP 402)3    
Communication in Clinical Research (Part 1) (CRSP 412)1    
Advanced Statistics: Linear Models (NURS 630)3    
Communication in Clinical Research (Part 2) (CRSP 413)  1  
Design and Analysis of Observational Studies (CRSP 500)  3  
Elective  3  
Introduction to Clinical Research Summer Series (CRSP 401)    3
Introduction to R Programming (CRSP 406)    2
Year Total: 9-10 7 5
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Research Ethics and Regulation (CRSP 603)2    
Clinical Research Scholars Thesis (CRSP 651)3    
Elective3    
Clinical Research Scholars Thesis (CRSP 651)  3  
Clinical Research Scholars Thesis (CRSP 651)    3
Year Total: 8 3 3
 
Total Units in Sequence:   35-36

 

MD/MS Biomedical Investigation-Clinical Research Track

For information about Program Admission and MD requirements, please see MD Dual Degrees section. The Clinical Research track includes formal instruction in methods common to all fields of clinical investigation along with mentored research.  In addition to medical school credits, students must complete the track-specific courses and electives listed below.

All students in this track must complete the CRSP Core Curriculum or equivalents:

IBIS 434Integrated Biological Sciences in Medicine (**or IBIS 401 and 402)6
CMED 401Intro to Clinical Research and Scientific Writing3
or CRSP 401 Introduction to Clinical Research Summer Series
CMED 402Statistical Science for Medical Research3
CMED 403Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology3
or CRSP 402 Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods
CMED 404Clinical Research Seminars (*)1
or CRSP 412 Communication in Clinical Research (Part 1)
CMED 405Clinical Research Seminars (*)1
or CRSP 413 Communication in Clinical Research (Part 2)
CMED 450Clinical Trials3
or EPBI 450 Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies
CMED 458Statistical Modeling with Applications in Clinical Research3
or EPBI 458 Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials
CMED 500Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research0-1
or IBMS 500 On Being a Professional Scientist: The Responsible Conduct of Research
CMED 601Clinical Research Project18
IBIS 600Exam in Biomedical Investigation0

Program Advisors:  Dr. Dennis Stacey (College students) and Dr. William Merrick (University students).

Registration permits for all CMED courses can be obtained from Dr. Ticknor’s office.

Certificate in Global Health

Ronald Blanton, MD            
216.368.4814

The Certificate is the centerpiece of the Framework for Global Health Curricula comprised of faculty from across the Case Western Reserve University campus, whose objective is to promote education in global health issues.  Nearly every department at CWRU offers multiple educational activities in global health.  Rather than attempt to own all of these activities, the group at CWRU (representing Anthropology, Bioethics, Biology, Biostatics/Epidemiology, Mathematics, Medicine, Nursing, Engineering) elected to develop a structure within which each department could develop independently while taking advantage of what the others had to offer.  The organizing structure for this became the certificate program rather than a separate degree.  This approach recognizes that student's need to graduate within a recognized discipline as well as recognition of a student’s focus, time and effort in training. 

Each student in the Certificate program will be grounded in global health by a core course (INTH 301 Fundamentals of Global Health/INTH 401 Fundamentals of Global Health) that will allow them to understand concepts and vocabulary across disciplines and that will facilitate meaningful communication with others based in a different discipline.  In addition to the Certificate, the Framework for Global Health Curricula had identified and is annotating all global health related courses at CWRU.  It has supported the recent revival of Medical Spanish and new courses and electives in Global Health. 

Requirements for Certificate in Global Health:

Anthropology

Undergraduate:

INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
ANTH 215Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology3
ANTH 359Introduction to International Health3
And one elective selected from list of approved electives in the Anthropology Department

Graduate:          

INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
ANTH 459Introduction to International Health3
ANTH 511Seminar in Anthropology and Global Health: Topics3
And one elective selected from list of approved electives in the Anthropology Department

Contact: Janet McGrath, 216.368.2287

Bioethics         

INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
BETH 414International Health Research Ethics3
And complete one elective selected from list of approved electives in the Bioethics Department

Contact: Insoo Hyun, 216.368-8658

Epidemiology/Biostatics           

INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
EPBI 484Geographic Medicine and Epidemiology1 - 3
EPBI 494Infectious Disease Epidemiology1 - 3
And complete an epidemiology research project with global perspective (may be substituted with other course work).

Contact: Daniel Tisch, 216.368.0875

Math/Applied Math specialization: 

INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
or INTH 401 Fundamentals of Global Health
EPBI/ANAT/BIOL 431Statistical Methods I (A basic course in Epidemiology or Biostatistics)3
or EPBI 490 Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods
or EPBI 491 Epidemiology: Case-Control Study Design and Analysis
MATH 449Dynamical Models for Biology and Medicine3
or EECS 397/600 Special Topics
Complete a heal related modeling project with global perspective (may be substituted with other course work).

 Contact: David Gurarie, 216.368.2857

Medicine

INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
Compete global health related project (may be student's thesis or may be substituted with other course work)

Contact: Ronald Blanton, 216.368.4814

Nursing

Undergraduate:

INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
NURS 372Health in the Global Community3
NURS 394Global Health Seminar3
Complete a global health related project (may be substituted with other course work)

Graduate:       

INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
NURS 394Global Health Seminar3
EPBI 484Geographic Medicine and Epidemiology ((Choose either one or another approved Epidemiology course))1-3
or EPBI 494 Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Complete a global health related project (may be substituted with course work)

 Contact: Elizabeth Madigan, 216.368.8532

Biology           

INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
or INTH 401 Fundamentals of Global Health
Approved electives Engineering related courses

Contact: Christopher Cullis, 216.368.5362

Engineering

INTH 301Fundamentals of Global Health3
or INTH 401 Fundamentals of Global Health
Approved electives Engineering related courses

Contact: N. Sree Sreenath, 216.368.6219

Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences           

INTH 401Fundamentals of Global Health3
Additional MSASS elective from approved list

Contact: Sharon Milligan, 216.368.2335

Certificate in Cancer Biology

216.844.5375 
Stanton Gerson, MD, Director
Lyn M. Haselton, MPATraining Program Manager
Case Comprehensive Cancer Center
http://cancer.case.edu/training

The Clinical Oncology Research Career Development Program (CORP) provides interdisciplinary training in clinical and translational oncology research for clinical oncology junior faculty physicians who are interested in pursuing academic research careers as physician scientists. This training addresses the need for clinician investigators to translate fundamental cancer research discoveries into medical care of cancer patients. Eligible candidates are physicians (MD, DO or MD/PhD) with a clinical training background in one of a number of oncology disciplines, including medical, surgical, pediatric, dermatological, gynecological and radiation oncology. Scholars select one of three areas of concentration:

  • Mechanism Based Therapeutics and Clinical Trials

  • Stem Cell Biology and Hematopoietic Malignancy Clinical Trials

  • Prevention, Aging and Cancer Genetics and Clinical Trials

The Scholars' individual training plan consists of a 2-year certificate program which includes a didactic curriculum designed to provide basic background and highly individualized advanced training in both clinical and methodological components of clinical and translational cancer research.

Each Scholar is co-mentored by both a basic or behavioral scientist and a clinical investigator. A mentoring committee comprised of faculty in the Scholar's focus of oncology research provides additional guidance and support. During the period of mentored laboratory training, the Scholars develop original hypothesis-based experiments related to disease mechanisms at a molecular or cellular level. As the Scholars build on their laboratory conclusions to create and implement clinical trials, they are mentored by clinical investigators. Clinical trials are aimed at developing new methods for diagnosis and testing promising ideas for novel therapeutic interventions. These components come together with the Scholar's presentations at a national conference, publications in peer review journals and application for independent funding as a physician scientist. 

This two-year certificate program is administered through the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. The overall goal of the K12 CORP certificate program is to foster interdisciplinary training in clinical and translational oncology therapeutic research for physicians. Upon completion of this 15-19 hour two year training, scholars will earn the K12 CORP Certificate.

The formal didactic program includes a course in responsible conduct IBMS 500 On Being a Professional Scientist: The Responsible Conduct of Research (0) or CRSP 603 Research Ethics and Regulation (2 hr); CNCR 501 Translational Cancer Research A (Translational Cancer Research Course (1 hr/semester); and one elective (1-3). Additional required activities include Clinical Protocol Tutorials, Intensive Mentored Research Project, Ongoing seminars, Meetings and Presentations; and applications for independent funding. 

Formal Didactic Curriculum Coursework *:

IBMS 500On Being a Professional Scientist: The Responsible Conduct of Research1-2
or CRSP 603 Research Ethics and Regulation
CNCR 501Translational Cancer Research A (All four modules required, one each semester of the program (501-1, 501-2, 501-3, 501-4))1

 *Additionally, choose one course from following core courses for credit towards certificate:

CRSP 401Introduction to Clinical Research Summer Series1 - 3
CRSP 402Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods3
EPBI 450Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies3
EPBI 458Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials3
BIOC 460Introduction to Microarrays3
CRSP 406Introduction to R Programming2
CRSP 413Communication in Clinical Research (Part 2)1
CRSP 412Communication in Clinical Research (Part 1)1
CRSP 500Design and Analysis of Observational Studies3
CRSP 501Working in Interdisciplinary Research Teams1
EPBI 411Introduction to Health Behavior3

 

Certificate in Clinical Research

James Spilsbury, PhD, Director
Natalie Milone, Education Manager, natalya.cheprakova-milone@case.edu
Center for Clinical Investigation
http://casemed.case.edu/CRSP
216.368.2601

The Clinical Research Certificate program is a four course, 11 credit hour program. Students who successfully complete the required coursework will receive a Certificate in Clinical Research issued by the Center for Clinical Investigation. Coursework includes: Introduction to Clinical and Translational Research; Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods; Advanced Statistics: Linear Models; and a course on Research Ethics and Regulation. 

Admissions will be administered by the Center for Clinical Investigation. Individuals who want to participate in the program will complete an application form that includes a brief personal statement describing the reason(s) for seeking clinical research training and a recent CV or resume. Per CWRU School of Graduate Studies requirements, individuals who are not already graduate-degree-seeking students at CWRU must submit to the School of Graduate Studies a completed non-degree application form. Individuals who are not faculty, staff, or employees of CWRU must also submit a transcript or copy of their diploma, documenting completion of a baccalaureate degree. Once accepted into the Certificate program, participants will register for the courses through the Student Information System. The program will have rolling admissions, and students will be able to start taking courses in the summer or fall semester. The coursework for the Certificate will be listed on the official CWRU transcript. However, the Certificate in Clinical Research will be issued by the Center for Clinical Investigation, not the University, and will not appear on the official CWRU transcript.

Performance Standards: A grade of B or higher in each graded course will be required for successful completion of the Certificate program. Enrollees will be responsible for keeping track of the courses they take.

Required Courses:

CRSP 401Introduction to Clinical Research Summer Series3
CRSP 402Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods3
NURS 630Advanced Statistics: Linear Models3
CRSP 603Research Ethics and Regulation2

Exit Standards: Students who complete all required coursework will submit a checklist to the Center for Clinical Investigation notifying the Center for Clinical Investigation’s Education Administrator/Manager that all coursework is completed. This administrator will verify with the registrar’s office that all requirements have been met and will then issue a certificate to the enrollee, documenting completion of the program.  

Systems Biology and Bioinformatics MS and PhD Programs

BRB 9th Floor Admin West, School of Medicine
http://bioinformatics.case.edu/
Phone: 216.368.1490
Mark Chance, PhD, Director

The Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics offers multidisciplinary training leading to a MS or PhD in Systems Biology and Bioinformatics (SYBB).  The program’s faculty cohort includes faculty from 12 departments and 4 schools across the CWRU campus. The fundamental core competencies of the SYBB program include: genes and proteins; bioinformatics and computational biology; and quantitative analysis and modeling with an emphasis on molecular systems biology.

The Systems Biology and Bioinformatics PhD program at CWRU offers trainees the opportunity to combine both experimental and computational or mathematical disciplines to understand complex biological systems. The SYBB program will train scientists who are able to generate and analyze experimental data for biomedical research and to develop physical or computational models of the molecular components that drive the behavior of a biological system. The goal of the program is to produce scientists who are familiar with multiple disciplines and equipped to conduct interdisciplinary research.

The Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) graduate program in Systems Biology and Bioinformatics (SYBB) has 4 tracks:

  • Translational Bioinformatics - Equips students to apply recent advances in genomics and proteomics to solve clinical problems in a cost-effective manner
  • Clinical Research Informatics - Prepares students to analyze large clinical data repositories to derive new knowledge pertaining to health and disease
  • Computational Molecular Biology - Provides students the cutting edge tools to tackle a variety of biological problems using computational approaches
  • Health Informatics - Students learn methods and technology to translate data to information to knowledge in the healthcare ecosystem.

Students can choose 1 of the 4 tracks for both the M.S. and Ph.D. programs.

The SYBB participating departments and centers include:

  • Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • Epidemiology and Biostatistics
  • Genetics and Genome Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Physiology and Biophysics
  • Pharmacology

Program Competencies

The specific academic requirements of the SYBB Program are intended to provide students with a required core curriculum in Systems Biology and a set of electives designed both to assure minimum competencies in three Fundamental Core Competencies and equip them for their particular thesis research discipline. Each trainee will be guided in a course of study by a mentoring committee to ensure the completion of training in the program competencies as well as maintenance of a focus on molecular systems theory.

Fundamental Core Competencies

  • Genes and proteins
  • Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
  • Quantitative Analysis and Modeling

Masters Degree Plan A Summary

The minimum requirements for the master’s degree under Plan A are 21 semester hours of course work plus a thesis equivalent to at least 9 semester hours of registration for 30 hours total. These must include SYBB 459 Bioinformatics for Systems Biology, SYBB 555 Current Proteomics, and SYBB 501 Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club, and a minimum of 9 hours of SYBB 651 Thesis MS. The curriculum plan must be approved by the program steering committee and include appropriate coverage of the core competencies in genes and proteins, bioinformatics, and quantitative modeling and analysis. At least 18 semester hours of course work, in addition to thesis hours, must be at the 400-level or higher.

Each student must prepare an individual thesis that must conform to regulations concerning format, quality, and time of submission as established by the dean of graduate studies. For completion of master’s degrees under Plan A, an oral examination (defense) of the master’s thesis is required, where the examination is conducted by a committee of at least three members of the university faculty.

Masters Degree Plan B Summary

The minimum requirements for the master’s degree under Plan B are 30 semester hours of course work (with at least 18 semester hours of course work at the 400 level or higher) and a written comprehensive examination or major project with report to be administered and evaluated by the program steering committee. The coursework must include SYBB 459 Bioinformatics for Systems Biology, SYBB 555 Current Proteomics,  and SYBB 501 Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club. The curriculum plan must be approved by the program steering committee and include appropriate coverage of the core competencies in genes and proteins, bioinformatics, and quantitative modeling and analysis.

Sample Plan of Study for MS Degree in Translation Bioinformatics Track

 

Plan of Study includes required courses as well as electives. 

Plan of Study Grid

First YearUnits
FallSpring
Cell Structure and Function (PHOL 432)3  
Proteins and Nucleic Acids (PHOL 456)3  
Introduction to Bioinformatics (EECS 458)3  
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)0  
Bioinformatics for Systems Biology (SYBB 459)  3
Current Proteomics (SYBB 555)  3
Thesis MS (SYBB 651)  3
Year Total: 9 9
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
Statistical Methods I (EPBI 431)3  
Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes for Biology (BIOL 419)3  
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)0  
Thesis MS (SYBB 651)3  
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)  0
Thesis MS (SYBB 651)  3
Year Total: 9 3
 
Total Units in Sequence:  30

 

PhD Program Summary

 

The Systems Biology and Bioinformatics program differs from current CWRU programs in the comprehensive requirement for an understanding of biological systems, bioinformatics, and quantitative analysis & modeling. The program includes a set of required core courses including (SYBB 459 Bioinformatics for Systems Biology) and (SYBB 555 Current Proteomics), (SYBB 501 Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club), and an individualized course of study that includes at least six additional courses, a course in the Responsible Conduct of research (IBMS 500 On Being a Professional Scientist: The Responsible Conduct of Research), a qualifier exam, a PhD Thesis, and oral defense consistent with CWRU requirements.  The total credits required for the PhD is at least 54 credits (24 grade graduate courses, 12 pre-dissertation research credits, and at least 18 dissertation research credits) and is consistent with a traditional graduate program.  Admissions to this program may be obtained through the integrated Biomedical Sciences Training Program, by direct admission to the department or via the Medical Scientist Training Program.  

Sample Plan of Study for PhD Degree

§

  Please also see Graduate Studies Academic Requirements for Doctoral Degrees

Plan of study includes required courses as well as electives.  Visit www.bioinformatics.case.edu for information regarding Plan of Study for all SYBB Tracks.

Plan of Study Grid for Translational Bioinformatics Track

First YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Cell Structure and Function (PHOL 432)*3    
Proteins and Nucleic Acids (PHOL 456)*3    
Introduction to Bioinformatics (EECS 458)3    
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)0    
Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research (SYBB 601)1-9    
Current Proteomics (SYBB 555)  3  
Bioinformatics for Systems Biology (SYBB 459)  3  
Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research (SYBB 601/651)  1-9  
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)  0  
Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research (SYBB 601)  3  
On Being a Professional Scientist: The Responsible Conduct of Research (IBMS 500)    1
Year Total: 10-18 10-18 1
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Structural Biology (BIOL 434)3    
Protein Biophysics (PHOL 475)3    
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)0    
Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research (SYBB 601)3    
Advanced Methods in Structural Biology (BIOC 430)  3  
Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club (SYBB 501)  0  
Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research (SYBB 601)  6  
Year Total: 9 9  
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Dissertation PhD (SYBB 701)1-9    
Dissertation PhD (SYBB 701)  1-9  
Year Total: 1-9 1-9  
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Dissertation PhD (SYBB 701)1-9    
Dissertation PhD (SYBB 701)  1-9  
Year Total: 1-9 1-9  
 
Fifth YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
Dissertation PhD (SYBB 701)1-9    
Dissertation PhD (SYBB 701)  1-9  
Year Total: 1-9 1-9  
 
Total Units in Sequence:   45-109

 

Footnotes

*

Students admitted into program via BSTP would take BSTP 400 for research rotations; students admitted via MSTP would take MSTP 400 for research rotations 

 

Required Core Courses for MS and PhD programs

Course List

SYBB 459Bioinformatics for Systems Biology3
SYBB 555Current Proteomics3
SYBB 501Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club0
SYBB 601Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research1 - 18
SYBB 651Thesis MS (For MS Students only)1 - 18
SYBB 701Dissertation PhD (For PhD students only)1 - 18

  

Elective Courses for MS and PhD programs

 

Genes and Proteins Courses  

Course List

EPBI/GENE/MPHP 451Principles of Genetic Epidemiology3
CLBY 555/BIOC 555/PATH 555
PHOL/CHEM/PHRM/BIOC/NEUR 475Protein Biophysics3
PHOL 432Cell Structure and Function3
PHOL 456Proteins and Nucleic Acids3
PHOL 480Physiology of Organ Systems4
CBIO 453Cell Biology I4
CBIO 455Molecular Biology I4

 

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Courses 

Course List

EPBI 415Statistical Programming3
BIOL/EECS 419Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes for Biology3
PHRM/PHOL/CHEM/BIOC 430Advanced Methods in Structural Biology1 - 6
EECS 458Introduction to Bioinformatics3
NEUR 478/BIOL 378/COGS/MATH 378/BIOL 478/EBME 478Computational Neuroscience3
GENE 508Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics3

 

Quantitative Analysis and Modeling 

Course List

EPBI 431Statistical Methods I3
EPBI 432Statistical Methods II3
EPBI 471Statistical Aspects of Data Mining3
EPBI 473Integrative Cancer Biology3
MATH 441Mathematical Modeling3
EBME 300/MATH 449Dynamics of Biological Systems: A Quantitative Introduction to Biology3

 

 

CMED Courses

CMED 401. Intro to Clinical Research and Scientific Writing. 3 Units.

This seminar brings in numerous experts to cover a variety of essential issues and concepts in clinical research and scientific writing. The overarching goal is for students to produce a short but well-crafted research proposal. Topics for reading and discussion include general principles of research design and proposal development; key concepts and issues in biostatistical science for study planning, data management, analysis, interpretation, and presentation; modern medical library informatics; ethical issues in clinical research and necessary rigmarole; technical writing emphasizing research proposals; designing studies of diagnostic tests; outcomes research and medical decision making; clinical genomics research.

CMED 402. Statistical Science for Medical Research. 3 Units.

A rigorous, practical introduction to core concepts and methods in statistical planning, managing, and analyzing data, and interpreting and communicating biostatistical information. Seminar sessions: discuss readings, work through realistic examples using popular commercial software. Project sessions: individuals in small groups discuss their own examples and receive on-the-spot feedback, Topics: types of data and common distributions; database and statistical software; understanding and describing data with simple statistics and effective tables and graphics; statistical transforms (log, logit) and what they imply, basic inference tests, confidence intervals, and related sample-size analyses involving categorical data (analyzing proportions), ordinal data (analyzing ranks), continuous data (analyzing means), and time-to-event data with censoring. A substantial introduction to statistical modeling unifies seemingly diverse methods to induce a cohesive, flexible, and broad understanding of biostatistics. Medical students enrolled in CRSP must complete CCLCM Introduction to Clinical Research, IBIS 431 and IBIS 490 to satisfy the CRSP 401, 402 and 403 series. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine.

CMED 403. Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology. 3 Units.

Using multiple learning modalities, including case-based seminars, computer-based interactive learning, journal club, and readings from texts as well as contemporary clinical literature, students will receive a rigorous introduction to methods of research in clinical epidemiology. Topics to be covered will include human subjects protections; legal and ethical components of clinical research; measures of disease frequency; basics of clinical study design; nature of and analysis of risk factors; cohort study design and analysis; case-control study design and analysis; confounding; interaction; bias; survey research; diagnostic tests; disease screening; design, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials; meta-analysis; decision analysis; cost-effectiveness analysis; and a brief introduction to health services research. Medical students enrolled in CRSP must complete CCLCM Introduction to Clinical Research, IBIS 431, and IBIS 490 to satisfy the CRSP 401, 402, and 403 series. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine.

CMED 404. Clinical Research Seminars. 1 Unit.

The Clinical Research Seminars series is intended to give students a broad exposure to issues unique to clinical research as well as career development. Students attend seminars on relevant clinical research topics offered either on the Case or CCF campuses, and will write a short summary of each seminar attended. A total of 12-14 one-hour seminars per semester is required for successful completion of the course. Students are expected to take two semesters. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine and consent of CCLCM Office.

CMED 405. Clinical Research Seminars. 1 Unit.

The Clinical Research Seminars series is intended to give students a broad exposure to issues unique to clinical research as well as career development. Students attend seminars on relevant clinical research topics offered either on the Case or CCF campuses, and will write a short summary of each seminar attended. A total of 12-14 one-hour seminars per semester is required for successful completion of the course. Students are expected to take two semesters. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine and consent of CCLCM Office.

CMED 406. Introduction to Database Programming Base SAS. 0 Units.

Using the SAS Data Step as a programming language. Creating temporary and permanent SAS datasets, exchanging datasets with other software (e.g. Excel, Jmp, R), checking and manipulating data, sorting and merging, producing reports, Effective programming style. This is not a course in statistical analysis. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the School of Medicine and consent of CCLCM Office.

CMED 407. Basic Research Ethics. 3 Units.

Examine the ethical issues of clinical research involving human subjects. Topics include research versus clinical practice, informed consent, therapeutic misconception, risk reduction, vulnerability and subject selection, recruitment and inducement.

CMED 450. Clinical Trials. 3 Units.

Design, organization and operation of randomized controlled clinical trials and intervention studies. Topics include legal and ethical issues in design; application of concepts of controls; masking and randomization; steps required for quality data collection; monitoring for evidence of adverse or beneficial treatment effects; elements of organizational structure; sample size calculations and data analysis procedures and mistakes. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine.

CMED 458. Statistical Modeling with Applications in Clinical Research. 3 Units.

Statistical modeling methods and strategies for analyzing data in clinical research, including randomized and non-randomized clinical trials. Standard Normal-theory, logistic, and Cox proportional hazard regression methods, emphasizing that these tools provide a unified schema to use linear models for continuous and categorical predictors of outcomes that are continuous, binary, or time-to-event with censoring. Repeated measures analysis using summary measures versus modern mixed models. Spline models for non-linear relationships. Extending the logistic model for ordinal outcomes. Propensity analysis. Software: R. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine and consent of CCLCM Office.

CMED 460. Foundations of Clinical Medicine. 3 Units.

Students meet weekly to learn, examine, and discuss issues related to their future societal and professional roles as physicians. Topics covered include population health, medical errors and patient safety, cultural competence, health care disparities, quality improvement, pain management, ethical and legal issues in medicine, leadership, and professionalism. Prereq: Must be enrolled in School of Medicine and consent of CCLCM Office.

CMED 499. Independent Study in Clinical Trials. 3 Units.

A survey of the various aspects of clinical trial investigation to provide the student a first-hand perspective on the day-to-day conduct of clinical investigation from the perspective of investigating physicians, clinical trial coordinators, compliance and regulatory officers, and core laboratory personnel. Students will develop a specific plan with the course directors that will total 40-50 hours of discussion and direct participation. Prereq: CMED 450. Must be enrolled in the School of Medicine and consent of CCLCM Office.

CMED 500. Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research. 0 Units.

This course covers a wide variety of topics in ethics for biomedical researchers including Institutional Review Boards for human and animal experimentation, requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), informed consent, and de-identification of patient data in research databases. Issues of data ownership, responsibilities of authorship, and conflicts of interest are also discussed. Prereq: Enrolled in School of Medicine. Must have completed 1.5 years.

CMED 601. Clinical Research Project. 9 Units.

Clinical research project leading toward the completion of a type B Masters of Science in Biomedical Investigation - CRSP.

CNCR Courses

CNCR 460. Introduction to Microarrays. 3 Units.

Microarray technology is an exciting new technique that is used to analyze gene expression in a wide variety of organisms. The goal of this course is to give participants a hands-on introduction to this technology. The course is intended for individuals who are preparing to use this technique, including students, fellows, and other investigators. This is a hands-on computer-based course, which will enable participants to conduct meaningful analyses of microarray data. Participants will gain an understanding of the principles underlying microarray technologies, including: theory of sample preparation, sample processing on microarrays, familiarity with the use of Affymetrix Microarray Suite software and generation of data sets. Transferring data among software packages to manipulate data will also be discussed. Importation of data into other software (GeneSpring and DecisionSite) will enable participants to mine the data for higher-order patterns. Participants will learn about the rationale behind the choice of normalization and data filtering strategies, distance metrics, use of appropriate clustering choices such as K-means, Hierarchical, and Self Organizing Maps. Course Offered as BIOC 460, PATH 460, CNCR 460.

CNCR 501. Translational Cancer Research A. 1 Unit.

In this course Case K12 Paul Calabresi Scholars will learn about the steps to receive an IRB approval for their research proposal and clinical trials; how to design and conduct clinical trials-designing a protocol, developing a research question, the purpose of the LOI, funding and budge issues, working with pharmaceutical companies; essential writing skills for successfully submitting a manuscript for publication in a peer reviewed journal. The class will discuss Social Intelligence and the Biology of Leadership by Goleman and Boyatzis; the scholars will learn about the Case Cancer Center Core Facilities services and resources which are available for their research projects. Topics also include the expectations of the K12 CORP program and essential elements for advancing their academic and research career. Recommended preparation: Acceptance to Case K12 Clinical Oncology Career Development Training Program as Paul Calabresi Research Scholar.

CNCR 502. Translational Cancer Research B. 1 Unit.

In this course Case K12 Paul Calabresi Scholars will learn how to manage clinical trials; including staffing, multi or single site, contracting issues, translation and incorporation of laboratory research/correlative science into clinical trials design, getting involved with ECOG. The scholars will learn about mentored and independent funding resources, how to select the appropriate mechanism, and strategies for successful grant submissions and resubmissions. They will learn how to present research and clinical trials progress orally and written to peers/faculty for evaluation my making two PowerPoint presentations: on to the class and their two K12 mentors and a second to the K12 CORP Advisory Committee for written evaluation. Both of these sections will be videotaped and a copy of the tape will be reviewed with the scholar. Each scholar will also provide a written summary of their research to date along with their goals for the next 12 months on April 1. Recommended preparation: Acceptance to Case K12 Clinical Oncology Career Development Training Program as Paul Calabresi Research Scholar.

CNCR 503. Translational Cancer Research C. 1 Unit.

In this course each Case K12 Paul Calabresi Scholar will present a summary of their experience from attending either the ASCO/AACR or ASH Clinical Trial Protocol Writing Workshop; two sessions will cover how to write a research proposal-hypothesis, specific aims, methods, and study design. Each scholar will write a sample research proposal which will be critiqued by the other members of the class; two sessions will cover the organization and analysis of biostatistic data used in research. One of these sessions will be a working session based on the scholar's own data. The scholars will learn about the essential components and issues in developing a successful career in clinical and translational research. Recommended preparation: Acceptance to Case K12 Clinical Oncology Career Development Training Program as Paul Calabresi Research Scholars.

CNCR 504. Translational Cancer Research D. 1 Unit.

In this course Case K12 Paul Calabresi Scholars will discuss an article on essential components of leadership in an academic and clinical setting; how to advance their clinical research career to the level that they can present at the ASCO national conference; learn how to present research and clinical trials progress orally and written to peers/faculty for evaluation by making two PowerPoint presentations: one to the class and their two K12 mentors and a second to the K12 CORP Advisory Committee for written evaluation. Both of these sessions will be videotaped and a copy of the tape will be reviewed with the scholar. Each scholar will also provide a written summary of their research and date along with their goals for the next 12 months on April 1. Recommended preparation: Acceptance to Case K12 Clinical Oncology Career Development Training Program as Paul Calabresi Research Scholar.

CRSP Courses

CRSP 401. Introduction to Clinical Research Summer Series. 1 - 3 Unit.

This course is designed to familiarize one with the language and concepts of clinical investigation and statistical computing, as well as provide opportunities for problem-solving, and practical application of the information derived from the lectures. The material is organized along the internal logic of the research process, beginning with mechanisms of choosing a research question and moving into the information needed to design the protocol, implement it, analyze the findings, and draw and disseminate the conclusion(s). Prereq: M.D., R.N., Ph.D., D.D.S., health professionals.

CRSP 402. Study Design and Epidemiologic Methods. 3 Units.

This course will cover the methods used in the conduct of epidemiologic and health services research and considers how epidemiologic studies may be designed to maximize etiologic inferences. Topics include: measures of disease frequency, measures of effect, cross-sectional studies, case-control studies, cohort studies, randomized controlled trials, confounding, bias, effect modification, and select topics. Recommended preparation: CRSP 401 or permission of instructor.

CRSP 406. Introduction to R Programming. 2 Units.

This course will introduce students to programming with R. Major topics will include session management, R data structures, indexing and conditional selection, combining and restructuring data frames, data aggregation, reading and writing data, basic statistical functions, and R traditional graphics. Students will also learn R programming conventions as they relate to preparing data for statistical analysis. Small research datasets will be used in class examples and in homework assignments. Each class will include a demonstration of new concepts followed by a computer lab with exercises designed to reinforce the concepts introduced.

CRSP 407. Logistic Regression and Survival Analysis. 3 Units.

This course introduces two commonly used statistical modeling techniques found in the medical, epidemiologic, and public health research fields; logistic regression and survival analysis. The course emphasizes summarizing and analyzing binary and time-to-event outcomes. The focus is on establishing a foundation for when and how to use these modeling techniques as well as an understanding of interpreting results from analyses. Two course projects will involve problem specification, data collection, analysis, and presentation. Students will use R statistical software extensively. Planned topics include contingency tables, logistic regression models and diagnostic measures, analyzing ordinal outcomes, estimating of the survival curve, Cox proportional hazard regression models and diagnostic measures, and sample size estimation. Software: R version 2.9.1 installed on the student's lap top. Prereq: CRSP 403 and CRSP 406.

CRSP 410. Independent Study in Clinical Research. 1 - 3 Unit.

Independent Study in Clinical Research enables the student to undertake study of advanced topics in clinical research that are not offered as standing courses at Case Western Reserve University. The student(s) and a member of the Clinical Research Scholars Program faculty, or another faculty member at CWRU, submit a 1-2 page proposal for independent study to the CRSP Program Director. The proposal should include a descriptive title (e.g., research method or clinical topic area) to be studied; a list of up to 5 student-centered objectives of the study; how the subject matter will be learned; and how success in achieving the objectives will be measured (e.g., manuscript, essay, grant proposal, or other written product; examination, etc.). It is expected that there will be at least one contact hour per week for each credit hour requested.

CRSP 412. Communication in Clinical Research (Part 1). 1 Unit.

Sound research only has strong impact when communicated effectively to various types of readers, listeners, and viewers. This requires knowing what receivers need and expect. CRSP 412 focuses on writing. CRSP 413 deals with preparing and delivering oral, poster, and online presentations, mock grant reviewing (to learn what reviewers expect), and modern statistical graphics and tables. Prereq: CRSP 401 or equivalent.

CRSP 413. Communication in Clinical Research (Part 2). 1 Unit.

Sound research only has strong impact when communicated effectively to various types of readers, listeners, and viewers. This requires knowing what receivers need and expect. CRSP 412 focuses on writing. CRSP 413 deals with preparing and delivering oral, poster, and online presentations, mock grant reviewing (to learn what reviewers expect), and modern statistical graphics and tables. Prereq: CRSP 401 or equivalent.

CRSP 500. Design and Analysis of Observational Studies. 3 Units.

An observational study investigates treatments, policies or exposures and the effects that they cause, but it differs from an experiment because the investigator cannot control assignment. We introduce appropriate design, data collection and analysis methods for such studies, to help students design and interpret their own studies, and those of others in their field. Technical formalities are minimized, and the presentations will focus on the practical application of the ideas. A course project involves the completion of an observational study, and substantial use of the R statistical software. Topics include randomized experiments and how they differ from observational studies, planning and design for observational studies, adjustments for overt bias, sensitivity analysis, methods for detecting hidden bias, and focus on propensity score methods for selection bias adjustment, including multivariate matching, stratification, weighting and regression adjustments. Recommended preparation: a working knowledge of multiple regression, some familiarity with logistic regression, with some exposure to fitting regression models in R. Offered as CRSP 500 and EPBI 500.

CRSP 501. Working in Interdisciplinary Research Teams. 1 Unit.

This course will assist learners to understand why and how different professional disciplines, each representing a body of scientific knowledge, must work together to develop and disseminate knowledge. Learners will develop a set of skills specific to being an effective member and leader of an interdisciplinary research team, including working with different value and knowledge sets across disciplines, running effective meetings, managing conflict, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making techniques. Using the small group seminar approach and case studies, learners will practice individual and group communication, reflective and self-assessment techniques, and engage in experiential learning activities regarding effective teamwork in interdisciplinary research teams. Techniques to increase group creativity and frame new insights will be discussed. Recommended preparation: K grant Appointment or permission of instructor.

CRSP 502. Leadership Development. 2 Units.

Leadership Assessment and Development is for participants to learn a method for assessing their knowledge, abilities, and values relevant to management; and for developing and implementing plans for acquiring new management related knowledge and abilities. The major goals of this course include generating data through a variety of assessment methods designed to reveal your interests, abilities, values, and knowledge related to leadership effectiveness; learning how to interpret this assessment data and use it to design/plan developmental activities; small group sharing of insights from the various assessments. Recommended preparation: K grant appointment or consent of instructor.

CRSP 503. Innovation and Entrepreneurship. 1 Unit.

The purpose of this module is to acquaint and ultimately engage clinical researchers with the business of innovation and entrepreneurship. Goals include: (1) to provide researchers with many of the skills that they would need to translate academic research into commercial uses; (2) to sensitize clinical researchers to the goals of the business community and facilitate their ability to work with the private sector on technology development; and (3) to make clinical researchers aware of the processes of academic technology development and transfer. Sessions consist of lectures and case discussion facilitated by the instructor. Some sessions include members of the business community as guest lecturers. As an example, students will discuss the financing of new companies with local venture capitalists. Student products include the evaluation of the commercial potential of a university technology in which they apply their new knowledge about commercialization of scientific discoveries.

CRSP 504. Managing Research Records - A System's Approach. 2 - 3 Units.

This course will provide an approach to managing data for research studies. Major topics include a discussion of a research study system including database design and development, data management, and clinical data management; how to evaluate the data needs of a study including the impact of required regulations; summary of key regulations; the role of the data manager including protocol review, development of a data management plan, CRF design, data cleaning, locking studies and ensuring best practices. Each session will include a lecture, class discussion, and student presentation.

CRSP 505. Investigating Social Determinants of Health. 2 - 3 Units.

The biopsychosocial model highlights the inter-related roles that biological, psychological, and social factors play in health and illness. This course is geared towards clinical research scholars who would like to incorporate aspects of the "social context" in their research. The course will examine the conceptualization, measurement, and effects of several key socio-cultural determinants of health and illness. Sample studies that incorporate social determinants of health will be reviewed. The course will also consider strategies and techniques to conduct clinical research involving social factors in socially and ethnically diverse settings. Students will be encouraged to develop a prototypical study design to incorporate social determinants in their research. To earn an optional third credit hour for this course, students will be required to complete additional assignments tailored to the students' research needs and interests upon mutual agreement with the instructor at the beginning of the course. Recommended preparation: CRSP 401.

CRSP 510. Health Disparities. 3 Units.

This course aims to provide theoretical and application tools for students from many disciplinary backgrounds to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The course will be situated contextually within the historical record of the United States, reviewing social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to disparities in general, with a central focus on health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities among other subgroups (e.g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed. Students will be expected to develop a research proposal (observational, clinical, and/or intervention) rooted in their disciplinary background that will incorporate materials from the various perspectives presented throughout the course, with the objective of developing and reinforcing a more comprehensive approach to current practices within their fields. Offered as CRSP 510, EPBI 510, MPHP 510, NURS 510, and SASS 510.

CRSP 603. Research Ethics and Regulation. 2 Units.

This course is designed to introduce students to the ethical, policy, and legal issues raised by research involving human subjects. It is intended for law students, post-doctoral trainees in health-related disciplines and other students in relevant fields. Topics include (among others): regulation and monitoring of research; research in third-world nations; research with special populations; stem cell and genetic research; research to combat bioterrorism; scientific misconduct; conflicts of interest; commercialization and intellectual property; and the use of deception and placebos. Course will meet once per week for 2 hours throughout the semester. Grades will be given based on class participation and a series of group projects and individual short writing assignments. Offered as BETH 503, CRSP 603 and LAWS 603.

CRSP 651. Clinical Research Scholars Thesis. 1 - 18 Unit.

CRSP Thesis M.S.

INTH Courses

INTH 301. Fundamentals of Global Health. 3 Units.

This course seeks to integrate the multiple perspectives and objectives in global health by investigating how the disciplines of Biology, Medicine, Anthropology, Nursing, Mathematics, Engineering analyze and approach the same set of international health problems. Students will develop a shared vocabulary with which to understand these various perspectives from within their own discipline. The focus sites will emphasize issues related to the health consequences of development projects, emergency response to a health care crisis and diseases of development in presence of underdevelopment. Offered as INTH 301 and INTH 401. Prereq: Junior or senior.

INTH 401. Fundamentals of Global Health. 3 Units.

This course seeks to integrate the multiple perspectives and objectives in global health by investigating how the disciplines of Biology, Medicine, Anthropology, Nursing, Mathematics, Engineering analyze and approach the same set of international health problems. Students will develop a shared vocabulary with which to understand these various perspectives from within their own discipline. The focus sites will emphasize issues related to the health consequences of development projects, emergency response to a health care crisis and diseases of development in presence of underdevelopment. Offered as INTH 301 and INTH 401. Prereq: Graduate student.

INTH 447. Global Health: Outbreak Investigation in Real-Time. 3 Units.

This course provides a trans-cultural, trans-disciplinary, multimedia learning experience by analyzing historical and real-time data from the annual dengue endemics and sporadic epidemics in Puerto Rico and Brazil. A rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases using real-time and historical surveillance data of endemic and epidemic Dengue in Bahia, Brazil. This is an advanced epidemiology course in which core material will be primarily taught through reading assignments, class discussion, group projects, and class presentations. The course will utilize the online web-based communication and learning technology to create a single classroom between the CWRU and international partners with unique and complementary skills. In addition to joint classroom lectures across sites, student groups will also perform smaller-scale videoconference meetings for assigned group projects, thus creating strong international connections for the students, faculty, and our institutions. Note: Due to the complexities of time zones for this international course, the course will begin at 8:00a.m. until the U.S.A. adjusts clocks for Daylight Savings Time (unlike Brazil). Therefore, classes after the second week of March will begin at 9:00a.m. Offered as: EPBI 447, INTH 447, and MPHP 447.

INTH 484. Geographic Medicine and Epidemiology. 1 - 3 Unit.

This course provides a rigorous problem-centered training in the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of infectious diseases and, more generally, global health. This is an advanced epidemiology course in which core material will be primarily taught through reading assignments, class discussion, group projects, and class presentations. By taking this course, students will develop a framework for interpreting, assessing, and performing epidemiologic research on issues of global importance. The course will be divided into three team-taught modules: 1) epidemiologic concepts and survey of health topics, 2) helminth epidemiology, and 3) the global health care workforce. Each module is worth 1 credit hour and may be taken separately. Each module will have a separate project and/or exam. The final exam time will be used for group presentations and panel discussion. Active class participation is required through discussions, case studies, and group projects. Course Goal: To master the application of epidemiologic methods to the field of global health. Offered as EPBI 484, INTH 484, and MPHP 484.

INTH 494. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. 1 - 3 Unit.

This course is a follow-up to EPBI 484: Geographic Medicine and Epidemiology, and focuses on tuberculosis (TB), HIV, and dengue epidemiology. This is an advanced course, focusing on methods and approaches in epidemiology. It will be taught in three 1-credit modules, and students may take each module separately or all 3 together. Each module will have a separate project and/or exam. Module I: Tuberculosis epidemiology. Module II: HIV epidemiology. Module III: Dengue epidemiology. Offered as EPBI 494, INTH 494, and MPHP 494. Prereq: EPBI 490.

INTH 551. World Health Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar (also called the World Health Interest Group) examines a broad range of topics related to infectious disease research in international settings. Areas of interest are certain to include epidemiology, bioethics, medical anthropology, pathogenesis, drug resistance, vector biology, cell and molecular biology, vaccine development, diagnosis, and socio-cultural factors contributing to or compromising effective health care delivery in endemic countries. Speakers will include a diverse group of local faculty, post-doctoral and graduate student trainees, as well as visiting colleagues from around the world.

SYBB Courses

SYBB 421. Clinical Informatics at the Bedside and the Bench (Part I). 3 Units.

This two semester series provides students with an overview of the field of clinical informatics, focusing on the content areas outlined by the American Medical Informatics Association (Kulikowski et al. 2012); the first semester will emphasize the use of informatics in clinical settings (i.e. "the bedside"), and the second semester will emphasize the use of informatics in public health, epidemiology, and translational informatics (i.e. "the bench"). Through lectures and readings, students will learn to approach problems in clinical medicine through the lens of "informatics," the science of information, with a focus on applications over theory. The weekly topics introduced through this course will serve as a basis for in-depth readings of current literature in the field during the corequisite weekly journal club, SYBB 502. Students will also be introduced to basic programming in the R language through weekly homework assignments and a semester-long project. Coreq: SYBB 502

SYBB 422. Clinical Infomatics at the Bedside and the Bench (Part II). 3 Units.

This two semester series provides student with an overview of the field of clinical informatics, focusing on the content areas outlined by the American Medical Informatics Association (Kuilkowski et al. 2012); the first semester (SYBB 421) will emphasize the use of informatics in clinical settings (i.e. "the bedside"), and the second semester (SYBB 422) will emphasize the use of informatics in public health, epidemiology, and translational bioinformatics (i.e. "the bench"). Through lectures and readings, students will learn to approach problems in clinical medicine through the lens of "informatics", the science of information, with a focus on application over theory. The weekly topics introduced through this course will serve as the basis for in-depth readings of current literature in the field during the corequisite weekly journal club, SYBB 502. Students will also be introduced to basic programming in the R language through weekly homework assignments and a semester-long project. Coreq: SYBB 502

SYBB 459. Bioinformatics for Systems Biology. 3 Units.

Description of omic data (biological sequences, gene expression, protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions, protein expression, metabolomics, biological ontologies), regulatory network inference, topology of regulatory networks, computational inference of protein-protein interactions, protein interaction databases, topology of protein interaction networks, module and protein complex discovery, network alignment and mining, computational models for network evolution, network-based functional inference, metabolic pathway databases, topology of metabolic pathways, flux models for analysis of metabolic networks, network integration, inference of domain-domain interactions, signaling pathway inference from protein interaction networks, network models and algorithms for disease gene identification, identification of dysregulated subnetworks network-based disease classification. Offered as EECS 459 and SYBB 459.

SYBB 501. Biomedical Informatics and Systems Biology Journal Club. 0 Units.

The purpose of this journal club is to provide an opportunity for students to critically discuss a wide variety of informatics and systems biology topics and to present their works in progress. A wide range of informatics and systems theory approaches to conducting biomedical research will be accomplished through the guided selection of articles to be discussed during the club. Potential articles will be chosen from scientific journals including: Nature, Science, BMC Bioinformatics, BMC Systems Biology, the Journal of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, and the Journal for Biomedical Informatics. During journal presentations, trainees will be expected to lead a discussion of the article that leads to the critical evaluation of the merit of the article and its implication for biomedical informatics and systems biology. The Journal Club will also provide a forum for trainees to present proposed, on-going, and completed research. Trainees will attend and participate in the Journal Club throughout their tenure in the program. The Journal Club will meet twice a month and each trainee will be required to present one journal article and one research in progress presentation yearly. The Journal Club will also include sessions where issues related to the responsible conduct of research are reviewed and extended.

SYBB 502. Clinical Informatics Journal Club. 0 Units.

The Clinical Informatics Journal Club serves as a forum for students to present current research in the field of clinical informatics. Students are required to coregister for SYBB 421 or SYBB 422; weekly lectures in SYBB 421/422 will introduce topics for discussion in the journal club Coreq: SYBB 421 or SYBB 422

SYBB 555. Current Proteomics. 3 Units.

This course is designed for graduate students across the university who wish to acquire a better understanding of fundamental concepts of proteomics and hands-on experience with techniques used in current proteomics. Lectures will cover protein/peptide separation techniques, protein mass spectrometry, bioinformatics tools, and biological applications which include quantitative proteomics, protein modification proteomics, interaction proteomics, structural genomics and structural proteomics. Laboratory portion will involve practice on the separation of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, molecular weight measurement of proteins by mass spectrometry, peptide structural characterization by tandem mass spectrometry and protein identification using computational tools. The instructors' research topics will also be discussed. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455. Offered as PHRM 555 and SYBB 555.

SYBB 600. Special Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

Offered as EECS 600 and SYBB 600.

SYBB 601. Systems Biology and Bioinformatics Research. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.)

SYBB 651. Thesis MS. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.)

SYBB 701. Dissertation PhD. 1 - 18 Unit.

(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.