2016-17 General Bulletin

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ACCT Courses

ACCT 101. Introduction to Financial Accounting. 3 Units.

Financial reports are the most significant means for an organization to communicate its management results to stockholders, creditors, and regulators. This course covers concepts, principles, and practices, including preparation and interpretation, of financial reports. The financial reporting system and basic internal controls for the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statements are discussed. A student may not receive credit for both ACCT 101 and ACCT 203.

ACCT 102. Management Accounting. 3 Units.

This course focuses on management accounting as a supporting system, helping managers to run businesses and other organizations. The course builds on knowledge of microeconomics, organizational design and behavior, production, and logistics as a foundation to explore how management accounting provides information for management planning, control and decision activities. Prereq: ACCT 101 or requisite not met permission.

ACCT 203. Survey of Accounting. 3 Units.

The course covers the principle of financial and managerial accounting for non-management students, including the framework that underlies financial and management accounting and how accounting information should be used by: (1) parties external to the firm, i.e., stockholders, creditors and government, to evaluate the financial performance of an organization; and (2) internal management to fulfill the planning, control and performance evaluation functions. Enrollment is limited to students who are neither management nor accounting majors nor enrolled in the Weatherhead School of Management. This course may be substituted for ACCT 101. A student may not receive credit for both ACCT 101 and ACCT 203. This course cannot be substituted for ACCT 102 without a waiver from the chairman. Offered as ACCT 203 and ACCT 403.

ACCT 207. Excel Applications and Modeling. 3 Units.

Through this course, the student will gain an understanding of how to create accounting models and how to leverage Microsoft Excel as an important tool. ACCT 207 combines classroom, lab and project work to complete assignments leveraging Microsoft Excel. Prereq: ACCT 101 or ACCT 203.

ACCT 300. Corporate Reporting I. 3 Units.

ACCT 300 is the first course in the Corporate Reporting sequence. This course examines the basic financial statements (balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows), the asset side of the balance sheet (from cash to inventory), accrual versus cash accounting, revenue recognition, time value of money, and profitability analysis. Also, this course will highlight some of the differences between GAAP and IFRS relative to the topics covered. Prereq: ACCT 101 or ACCT 203. Coreq: ACCT 102 and ACCT 207.

ACCT 301. Corporate Reporting II. 3 Units.

This course is the second of a 3 course sequence and covers financial accounting theory, generally accepted accounting principles and reporting practices. Areas of focus include: property plant and equipment, liability determination, long-term debt, derivatives, leases, pensions and other postretirement benefits, and investments. International (IFRS) aspects also are considered. Prereq: ACCT 300.

ACCT 302. Corporate Reporting III. 3 Units.

ACCT 302 continues the Corporate Reporting sequence as the third and final course. This course covers many of the most complex areas of accounting. These areas include issues of accounting for income taxes, shareholders equity, share based compensation, accounting changes and errors, the statement of cash flows, governmental accounting and not for profit accounting and notes prepared using U.S. GAAP accrual accounting. Deep understanding of these topics is essential for the CPA exam and for professional practice. In addition, this course covers the differences between GAAP and IFRS related to the accounting content in the course. Prereq: ACCT 300.

ACCT 304. Advanced Financial Reporting. 3 Units.

This course covers partnerships, consolidations, foreign exchange, international aspects of accounting, accounting for state and local governments and not-for-profit organizations, segment reporting and interim reporting. Prereq: ACCT 301.

ACCT 305. Income Tax: Concepts, Skills, Planning. 3 Units.

This course addresses U.S. Federal Income Taxation concepts and applications. The subject matter includes topics applicable to individuals, partnerships and corporations and various other entities required to file income tax returns. In addition the subject matter addressed includes a variety of business, legal and taxation concepts and practices related to effective tax planning. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the appropriate knowledge and skill levels to "speak the language of U.S. tax." Prereq: Sophomore Standing.

ACCT 306. Accounting Information Systems - Basic. 3 Units.

This course introduces the students to the major business cycles as they relate to Accounting Information Systems, including the revenue, procurement and conversion cycles. Additionally, students will be introduced to ERP systems and obtain hands-on experience using SAP's Enterprise Resource Planning System. Prereq: ACCT 102 or ACCT 203.

ACCT 314. Attestation and Assurance Services. 3 Units.

This course covers the role of the auditor, the audit process, the public accounting profession, audit risk and materiality, fraud, audit methods and techniques, audit planning, internal control, the effects of information technology on the audit, auditing revenue, receivables and inventories, professional ethics, legal responsibilities, emerging assurance services, and recent developments in the auditing profession. Prereq: ACCT 301.

ACCT 360. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Unit.


ACCT 401. Financial and Managerial Accountancy. 3 Units.

This course examines the underlying framework of financial and managerial accountancy, focusing on how financial information is used by: (1) parties external to the organization to evaluate financial performance, i.e., stockholders, creditors, and government agencies; and (2) internal management to plan, control, and evaluate the financial results of the organization. Prereq: Standard MBA, Cohort MBA - PT, or Cohort MBA - PT - Clev Clinic.

ACCT 401H. Accounting for Healthcare. 3 Units.

This course exposes MSM-Healthcare students to ways that accounting information helps managers monitor and improve the performance of organizations. After studying the nature and limitations of accounting information, we explore how financial, cost, tax, and regulatory accounting are used by various stakeholders. From this effort, students become comfortable evaluating accounting recognition, valuation, classification, and disclosure issues that arise in an executive's career. Finally, we study how accounting is a feedback loop that enables managers to assess consequences of past decisions and think about what should be done going forward. Feedback loops, in turn, can give rise to observer effects and/or unpredictable outcomes. Course content contributes to achieving the program goal of strengthening a student's ability to promote positive change in healthcare. Prereq: MSM Healthcare students only.

ACCT 403. Survey of Accounting. 3 Units.

The course covers the principle of financial and managerial accounting for non-management students, including the framework that underlies financial and management accounting and how accounting information should be used by: (1) parties external to the firm, i.e., stockholders, creditors and government, to evaluate the financial performance of an organization; and (2) internal management to fulfill the planning, control and performance evaluation functions. Enrollment is limited to students who are neither management nor accounting majors nor enrolled in the Weatherhead School of Management. This course may be substituted for ACCT 101. A student may not receive credit for both ACCT 101 and ACCT 203. This course cannot be substituted for ACCT 102 without a waiver from the chairman. Offered as ACCT 203 and ACCT 403.

ACCT 404. Advanced Financial Reporting. 3 Units.

ACCT 404 covers advanced financial reporting topics including financial statement consolidations, foreign currency translations and transactions, VIE's, (variable interest entities), partnership accounting, derivatives, segment reporting, and interim financial statement reporting. As a graduate course, a master's level project or paper will be required. Prereq: ACCT 301.

ACCT 405. Advanced Federal Taxes. 3 Units.

Corporate income taxes, estate and gift tax, fiduciary income taxes, partnerships, and hybrid forms of organization are covered. Prereq: ACCT 305.

ACCT 406. Auditor's Role in AIS Accounting. 3 Units.

ACCT 406 is a three hour class in which the students will combine classroom and project work to learn to use Accounting Information Systems in the performance of business process and financial statement audits, and to audit the Accounting Information Systems themselves. Students will leverage tools like SAP's Enterprise Resource Planning system, spreadsheets, and data analytics software. Prereq: ACCT 207 and ACCT 306.

ACCT 414. Corporate Reporting and Analysis. 3 Units.

This course provides a basis for evaluation of traditional and proposed uses of report and information for decision making in investment, credit and internal planning and control. Students are introduced to concepts and analytical techniques that can be used to critique and interpret the financial health of the organization. At a practical and theoretical level, the course integrates research in the areas of accounting, quantitative methods and finance which has proved useful in the financial analysis of organizations. Prereq: ACCT 300 or ACCT 401, MBAC 502 or MBAP 402 or requisites not met permission of instructor.

ACCT 431. Tax Practice: Analysis, Planning and Communications. 3 Units.

This course concentrates on teaching the identification of key U.S. tax issues, the analysis of fundamental tax concepts and the underlying interpretation and application of tax law through the use of appropriate authoritative sources. Both oral and written communication will be utilized to present tax planning research results. Actual court cases will be used as the basis for simulating practical client scenarios. Prereq: ACCT 305.

ACCT 444. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice. 3 Units.

This course examines auditing concepts and issues in depth. A special focus exists on audit evidence and how auditors make decisions. Some topic areas include ethics, analytical review, fraud, and the role of technology. Prereq: ACCT 314 or Requisites Not Met permission.

ACCT 480. Multi-Jurisdictional Taxation. 3 Units.

Multi-jurisdictional taxation is one of the most exciting and fastest growing areas of tax practice. This course examines the tax and business issues faced by businesses seeking to expand operations, both across state and local jurisdictions within the U.S. and across international boundaries. We consider the basic state sales, use, and income tax treatment of multi-state businesses; the U.S. tax treatment of businesses investing abroad; and the U.S. taxation of inbound foreign investment. A student will achieve a practical command of the tax issues, from an accountant's perspective, which are raised by international and multi-state U.S. transactions and how the U.S. and State tax laws resolve those issues. Prereq: ACCT 305.

ACCT 495A. Advanced Accounting Seminar (Audit). 1 Unit.

This seminar provides an opportunity to consider specialized technical financial reporting and attestation services (audit) topics of importance in the rapidly changing environment of professional accountancy. The specific topic and scope of the coverage will be defined by the course instructor and will be consistent with the Master of Accountancy Financial Reporting and Attestation Services (Audit) concentration. The development of writing and communication skills and in-depth discussion are expected attributes of seminar activity. Prereq: ACCT 314 or Requisites Not Met permission.

ACCT 495T. Advanced Accounting Seminar (Tax). 1 Unit.

This seminar provides an opportunity to consider specialized technical taxation topics of importance in the rapidly changing environment of professional accountancy. The specific topic and scope of the coverage will be defined by the course instructor and will be consistent with the Master of Accountancy U.S. Taxation (Tax) concentration. The development of writing and communication skills and in-depth discussion are expected attributes of seminar activity. Prereq: ACCT 305 or Requisites Not Met permission.

ACCT 501. Special Problems and Topics. 0 - 18 Units.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

ACCT 520. Advanced Accounting Theory. 3 Units.

This seminar studies contemporary issues in financial accounting theory and business reporting. Topics are considered from their historical development to contemporary circumstances. Academic and professional literatures are employed to gain a variety of perspectives on current matters. The development of communication skills, written and verbal, and use of support technology for presentations is emphasized throughout. Students are required to make several individual and team presentations, to conduct database and periodical research and to provide frequent written and oral research reports. Prereq: MAcc students only and ACCT 304. Prereq or Coreq: ACCT 404.

ACCT 540. Corporate Governance and Contemporary Accounting Policy. 3 Units.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX), passed in the wake of a series of corporate accounting scandals including Enron and WorldCom, was designed to strengthen Corporate Governance processes for all US publicly traded companies with an aim of "protecting investors by improving the accuracy and reliability of corporate disclosures." The contemporary implications of SOX for the accounting profession are immense. Students must understand these implications to successfully navigate the world of public company financial reporting. One implication is the role SOX gave to corporate board audit committees to oversee the independent auditors charged with auditing public company financial statements. This requires a fundamental understanding of corporate boards including why they exist and what are their more general responsibilities. Another implication is the establishment of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) to regulate the accounting profession. Thus, this seminar examines broad issues surrounding Corporate Governance including governance of public companies including investment companies, with strong contemporary connections to the accounting profession, including professional ethics, independence and quality control. Prereq: MAcc students only, ACCT 304, and ACCT 314. Prereq or Coreq: ACCT 404.

ACCT 601. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

ACCT 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

BAFI Courses

BAFI 341. Money and Banking. 3 Units.

This course emphasizes the importance of financial markets, the nature and role of the financial system, and the linkages between these--money and banking--and the economy. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical constructs, on major innovations and contemporary changes, and the closely intertwined condition of financial and economic systems with monetary and fiscal policy. Offered as BAFI 341 and ECON 341. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.

BAFI 342. Public Finance. 3 Units.

Government intervention is a pervasive feature of every modern economy. The goal of this course is to develop the economic tools for understanding and evaluating a wide range of government behaviors such as taxation and redistribution policy, the public provision of goods and services, and the regulation of private markets. ECON 342 begins by considering "market failures" that justify government intervention in a market economy. To respond to such failures, governments must raise revenues through taxation. Using the tools of microeconomic theory, we will develop a framework for thinking about the positive and normative effects of alternative forms of taxation. Particular attention will be paid to the individual income tax in the U.S., allowing students to understand the efficiency, distributional and behavioral implications of recent changes in the tax code. We will then turn to the expenditure side of the public sector. The economic principles used to evaluate public expenditures will be discussed and exemplified through the analysis of significant public programs. Of particular interest will be the effect of public programs on the incentives faced by workers and families. Offered as BAFI 342 and ECON 342. Prereq: ECON 102.

BAFI 355. Corporate Finance. 3 Units.

The basic goals of this course are to familiarize students with the concepts and tools used in financial management at both the corporate and personal levels. They include the notion of present value, securities valuation, risk and return analysis, and other financial analysis techniques. The concepts and techniques are, in turn, used to evaluate and make decisions regarding the firm's investments (capital budgeting) and the cost of capital. Prereq: Minimum sophomore standing; ACCT 101 or ACCT 203.

BAFI 356. Investments. 3 Units.

This course is about investing in securities. It provides a comprehensive introduction to security analysis and portfolio management. Investing is a rational decision-making process in which the investor seeks to select a package or portfolio of securities that meets a predetermined set of objectives. Descriptive, institutional and quantitative decision-making methods are arranged in a cohesive framework of analysis of interest to the informed investor. Topics include modern portfolio theory, the relation between risk and return, efficient markets, bonds, and options, among others. Prereq: BAFI 355.

BAFI 357. Financial Modeling, Analysis and Decision Making. 3 Units.

Firms try to create value. In their day-to-day operations, they are faced with numerous challenges: Should we accept trade credit or borrow? Will an acquisition create or destroy value? Should we introduce a new product line even if it cannibalizes an existing one? In each of these situations they try to quantify the impact on the value of their firm. The goal of this course is to develop your skills in financial modeling and valuation, so you can tackle issues like the ones described above. The course is designed to be "hands-on": You will learn to apply the theory and develop spreadsheet modeling skills through homework, case studies and a group project. By the end of the course you will have a good understanding of both the theory and practice of valuation, and possess a set of cutting-edge financial modeling skills. This course is designed for students who aspire to work in a regular company, a bank or a consulting firm in (i) corporate finance (including mergers and acquisitions); (ii) strategy; or (iii) equity and analysis. Prereq: BAFI 355.

BAFI 358. Intermediate Corporate Finance. 3 Units.

This is a rigorous second course in corporate finance (following BAFI 355) designed to lay the analytic foundation for careers in business. The objective is to strengthen students' theoretical and conceptual understanding of several important topics in finance, and to develop their problem-solving skills. Topics covered include economic cash flows and valuation, Long term financial planning and ratios analysis, Growth and external financing, Short term financial planning and Working capital management, Managerial options and valuation, Derivatives, Agency cost and asymmetric information, Capital structure and payout policy. Prereq: BAFI 355

BAFI 359. Cases in Finance. 3 Units.

This course applies the case study method applied to a variety of business situations that teaches students to think on their feet, develop presentation skills and hone business judgment. The objective of the course is to strengthen students' conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills. It is intended to complement the two course sequence in corporate finance (BAFI 355 and BAFI 358) by applying these concepts to real world problems. Topics covered include cash flow estimation and corporate valuation, financial planning and ratio analysis, financing using internal and external sources, capital budgeting and managerial options, capital structure, payout policy, financial strategy, public equity analysis (including initial public offerings), mergers and acquisitions and leveraged buyouts. The course envisages an extensive use of case studies and simulation exercises. Prereq: BAFI 355.

BAFI 360. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered for candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest. Permission of department chair required.

BAFI 361. Applied Financial Analytics. 3 Units.

This course is developed based on the feedback received from employers who have hired BS Management (finance) graduates in the past and will likely do so in future. The goal is to enable students to use financial econometrics to effectively analyze financial data. The course will draw on theoretical aspects of BAFI 355 but focus on developing financial analytic skills. The applied nature of the course comes from the use of real, rather than theoretical, data. In other words, in a real-world fashion, through the use of statistical methods to analyze real data, the student can address practical questions of high relevance to the Finance industry. The scope of the data as well as the quantitative methods used in such analysis often requires familiarity with computational environments and statistical packages. As such, another goal of the course is to familiarize the student with at least one such environment. Prereq: BAFI 355 and STAT 207 or OPRE 207.

BAFI 372. International Finance. 3 Units.

This course deals with open-economy macroeconomics and international financial markets, covering open-economy national income analysis, international macroeconomic policy coordination, exchange rate determination, foreign portfolio investment, and global financial crises. Offered as BAFI 372 and ECON 372. Prereq: ECON 103.

BAFI 402. Financial Management I. 3 Units.

In this course, students are introduced to the basics of corporate finance, including the objectives, tasks, and decisions made by corporate financial managers. The course covers discounted cash flows, bond and stock valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, asset risk and return, and short-term and long-term financial management. Coreq: ACCT 401.

BAFI 403. Financial Management. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the theory and application of additional models used in financial decision-making by corporations. Issues relating to efficient markets, dividend policy, capital structure, financing decisions, option pricing, leasing, and risk management are among the topics considered. In addition, special topics may include mergers and acquisitions, pension funds, and international financial management. Prereq: ACCT 401 or MBAC 502 or MBAP 402.

BAFI 404. Financial Modeling. 3 Units.

Firms try to create value. In their day-to-day operations, they are faced with numerous challenges; should we accept trade credit or borrow? Will an acquisition create or destroy value? Should we introduce a new product line even if it cannibalizes an existing one? In each of these situations they try to quantify the impact on the value of their firm. The goal of this course is to develop your skills in financial modeling and valuation, so you can tackle issues like the ones described above. The course is designed to be "hands-on": you will learn to apply the theory and develop spreadsheet modeling skills through homework, case studies and a group project. By the end of the course you will have a good understanding of both the theory and practice of valuation, and possess a set of cutting-edge financial modeling skills. This course is designed for students who aspire to work in a regular company, a bank or a consulting firm in (i) corporate finance (including mergers and acquisitions); (ii) strategy; or (iii) equity analysis. Prereq: BAFI 402 or MBAC 504 or MBAP 405 or student in the Global MBA program.

BAFI 420. Health Finance. 3 Units.

Exploration of economic, medical, financial and payment factors in the U.S. healthcare system sets the framework for the study of decisions by providers, insurers, and purchasers in this course. The mix of students from various programs and professions allows wide discussion from multiple viewpoints. Offered as BAFI 420 and HSMC 420.

BAFI 427. Green Finance. 3 Units.

Natural systems and resources are being depleted, degraded, and impaired at a rapidly increasing pace. Yet there are very few businesses that are paying adequate attention to the adverse impact of such changes on their future as well as on their survival. How do these changes affect corporate risks? What financial challenges do they create? How can policy changes help move firms in the right direction? What innovative products and strategies can companies use to deal with these challenges? How can companies assess sustainability risk? How can these strategies add sustainable value to firms? These are just a sample of the questions that we will address in this course. This course on Green Finance will provide you with a unique opportunity to understand and explore such questions, especially as they pertain to the role of senior financial managers as well as other members of the senior management team of companies across different industries. It will expose you to cutting edge practices in the area of green finance, providing you with the thought leadership that is essential for success in today's competitive world.

BAFI 428. Financial Strategy and Value Creation. 3 Units.

The intersection between the theory of perfect markets and the reality of market imperfections provides the basis for the exploration of value creation in this course. Opportunities in both product and financial markets are explored using case studies to develop a framework for strategic financial decisions.

BAFI 429. Investment Management. 3 Units.

This course explores the characteristics of financial investments and markets and develops modern techniques of investment analysis and management. The goal is to help students develop a level of analytical skill and institutional knowledge sufficient to make sensible investment decisions. Topics include: an overview of stock, debt and derivative asset markets, practical applications of modern portfolio theory, equilibrium and arbitrage-based approaches to capital market pricing, the debate over market efficiency, the term structure of interest rates, bond portfolio management, and uses of derivative assets in investment portfolios. Prereq or Coreq: BAFI 403 or MBAC 504 or MBAP 405 or GMBA 401A.

BAFI 430. Derivatives and Risk Management. 3 Units.

This course is intended to give students an understanding of options and futures markets both in theory and practice. The emphasis is on arbitrage and hedging. The course concentrates on listed common stock and index contracts as well as commodity markets. Various theories for trading strategies are studied. Prereq or Coreq: BAFI 403 or MBAC 504 or MBAP 405 or GMBA 401A or student in the Accelerated Global MBA program.

BAFI 431. Fixed Income Markets and Their Derivatives. 3 Units.

This class is concerned with fixed income securities, interest rate risk management, and credit risk. Fixed income securities account for about two thirds of the market value of all outstanding securities, and hence this topic is important. The course covers the basic products of fixed income markets including treasury and LIBOR products, such as interest rate swaps. Risk management and hedging strategies are covered as well as selected topics in credit risk models and mortgage-backed securities. Prereq: BAFI 430.

BAFI 432. Corporate Risk Management. 3 Units.

This is a unique strategic risk management course aimed at participants who wish to enhance their understanding of the risks faced by corporate firms, both financial and non-financial, learn techniques to identify and measure these risks, and understand how derivatives and risk management solutions can be used to manage these risks, create value, and advance the strategic goals of the firm. The course is designed in a manner such that it would be of use to executives of all corporations, financial and nonfinancial, across all functional areas. Prereq: BAFI 403 or MBAP 405 or MBAC 504 or MBAC 505.

BAFI 433. Quantitative Risk Modeling. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help students learn quantitative models for estimating risk in various financial settings for different types of financial institutions (banks, hedge funds, and others). It is a very hands-on course where students will become familiar with several state-of-the-art quantitative risk models as well as their detailed implementation procedure in the real world. The course uses several in-class Excel exercises to illustrate the models as well as their practical implementation using real financial data. Offered as BAFI 433 and MSFI 433.

BAFI 440. Financial Decisions, Contracting & Value. 3 Units.

The firm is a nexus of contracts among its various stakeholders (managers, shareholders, debt holders etc.). In this course, we will examine how value is created, and how real world conflicts between the various stakeholders of a firm lead to deviations from "perfect world" solutions. For instance, you may have learned in basic corporate finance courses that it is optimal to invest in positive NPV projects. Real-world conflicts can make it sub-optimal for shareholders do so. We will examine such issues and ways to mitigate them. In particular, we will examine Valuation, Asymmetric Information, Agency Cost, Incentive Contracts and Performance Metrics, and, time permitting, also discuss Regulation, Reputation and the role of certifiers and the economic crises. The takeaway learnings from this course are: (a) Understanding how Value can be created or destroyed, (b) Measuring Value, (c) Understanding the links between capital structure and: asymmetric information, market reactions and signaling, agency and management incentives, taxes, shareholder-bondholder conflicts etc., (d) Understanding the links between payout policy and: informational content, market reaction, stock returns and signaling, clientele effects etc., and (e) Understanding the need for and the design of incentive mechanisms. Case studies will be used to reinforce learning. We will emphasize on links to real-world events.

BAFI 444. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the issues of financial management and capital formation in new ventures. The course will address issues of estimation of cash requirements, development of pro forma financial plans, firm valuation and the process and tools used in raising debt and equity financing. Bootstrapping, angel investing, venture capital, strategic alliances and initial public offerings will be covered. The emphasis is on the entrepreneur and how he/she can assess financial needs and develop a sensible plan for acquiring financial resources in a manner that is consistent with their financial needs and other strategic goals. Offered as BAFI 444 and MSFI 444. Prereq: MBAC 504 or MBAP 405 or BAFI 402 or MSFI 403 or GMBA 401A.

BAFI 450. Mergers and Acquisitions. 3 Units.

This course examines the economic rationale and motivation for the different merger and acquisition and recapitalization activities undertaken by firms and individuals in the U.S. market. Emphasis is on the comparable publicly traded proxy company, comparable "change of control" transaction, and discounted cash flow methods of valuing a firm. The class will also review the different types of debt and equity capital employed to fund mergers and acquisitions and recapitalizations, how senior lenders and equity investors structure their loans and/or investments, and how investors realize the gains through different exit strategies. The legal and tax ramifications of various forms of M&A activity are also discussed. The course gives the student an excellent understanding of the role that senior commercial banks, insurance companies, pension funds, LBO funds, investment banking firms, and venture/growth capital investors play in mergers and acquisitions and will strengthen the students' ability to value a business enterprise. Prereq: BAFI 403 or MBAC 504 or MBAP 405 or GMBA 401A or student in the Accelerated Global MBA program..

BAFI 460. Investment Strategies. 3 Units.

This course provides a broad survey of some of the main strategies used by hedge funds today. Through exercises and projects, the hedge fund strategies will be presented using real data. Students will learn to use a methodology referred to as "back testing" in order to evaluate hedge fund strategies. The course will also cover institutional details related to short selling, liquidity, margin requirements, risk management, and performance measurement. Since hedge funds today use advanced modeling techniques, the course will require students to analyze and manipulate real data using mathematical modeling. The objective of the course is for students to gain practical knowledge about creating, back-testing, and implementing hedge fund trading strategies. Offered as BAFI 460 and MSFI 460. Prereq: BAFI 429 or MSFI 429.

BAFI 480. Global Banking & Capital Markets. 3 Units.

This course will expose students to Banking and Capital Market Structure, Practices, and Regulations in North America, Europe, as well as Asia. Students will learn about structure of the financial services industry in different parts of the world, the history and evolution of the regulatory frameworks in this industry, and its consequent impact on financial and economic development as well as risk. Several case studies are used to expose students to different issues and questions that arise in the day-to-day jobs of financial managers in this industry. Offered as BAFI 480 and MSFI 480. Prereq: MBAC 505 or MBAP 405 or BAFI 403 or MSFI 403 or GMBA 401A.

BAFI 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

BIOS Courses

BIOS 447. Regulatory Affairs for the Biosciences. 1.5 Unit.

This mini-course introduces students to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the laws and regulations it enforces. A scientific regulatory agency with far reaching enforcement authority, FDA is the most powerful consumer protection agency in the world. This course will familiarize students with FDA's mission, philosophy and organizational structure, as well as policy and procedure it uses to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the food, drugs, biologics, cosmetics, medical devices and radiation-emitting products it regulates. Recommended preparation: Enrollment in the MEM Biomedical Entrepreneurship Track. Offered as BIOS 447, HSMC 447, and IIME 447.

BIOS 448. Engineering Statistics for Biosciences. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to biostatistics, emphasizing experimental design, analysis of data, and special emphasis on statistical and financial aspects of randomized clinical trials for biomedical applications. There will be a final project involving development of a clinical trial protocol including the experimental design, recruitment and retention strategy, analysis plan and budget. Offered as BIOS 448, HSMC 448, and IIME 445.

BLAW Courses

BLAW 331. Legal Environment of Management. 3 Units.

This course is designed as a survey course in the area of basic business law. It covers the fundamental legal principles and laws that underlie any business decision. The major topics include: contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code (sales), torts, real and intellectual property, business organizations, Securities Regulation and Agency.

BLAW 411. Business and Law Colloquium. 3 Units.

This course will bring together law students, business students, mid-level attorneys and senior leaders in the legal field for a one-semester weekly colloquium. Offered as LAWS 5432 and BLAW 411. Even though women have represented approximately half of law-school graduates for a number of years, women represent only 16% of law firm equity partners and even fewer corporate General Counsels. This course aims to offer an introduction to the business skills that both women and men will need to rise to the highest levels of law practice and organizational leadership. Each week will focus on a different aspect of law and business. The curriculum will include sessions focused in financial management, business development, communication skills, and intercultural business and law practices.

BLAW 417. Legal Environment for Managers - M.B.A.. 3 Units.

This course will provide an overview of the legal environment in which business transactions take place. Through coverage of a number of topical areas, the student will be given a broad understanding of how the law impacts upon the daily decisions of managers. More specifically, the student will be better able to identify and understand how the legal issues facilitate or hinder the conduct of business. Topics covered will include contracts, property, products' liability, employment law, and corporate law. Special emphasis is placed on those regulatory areas of greatest interest to modern business.

ECON Courses

ECON 102. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to microeconomic theory, providing a foundation for future study in economics. In particular, it addresses how individuals and businesses make choices concerning the use of scarce resources, how prices and incomes are determined in competitive markets, and how market power affects the prices and quantities of goods available to society. We will also examine the impact of government intervention in the economy.

ECON 103. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Units.

While Microeconomics looks at individual consumers and firms, Macroeconomics looks at the economy as a whole. The focus of this class will be on the business cycle. Unemployment, inflation and national production all change with the business cycle. We will look at how these are measured, their past behavior and at theoretical models that attempt to explain this behavior. We will also look at the role of the Federal Government and the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States in managing the business cycle.

ECON 255. Economic History of the United States. 3 Units.

The growth of the American economy from the colonial period to the present. Competing explanations of economic growth; significant attention to the political and legal environment in which the U.S. economy developed; "lessons" of past experience for contemporary policy; some attention to inequality and the changing distribution of wealth and income. Offered as ECON 255 and HSTY 255.

ECON 307. Intermediate Macro Theory. 3 Units.

Macroeconomics studies aggregate indicators of the performance of an economy, most commonly measured in terms of GDP, unemployment rate and inflation rate. An important goal of macroeconomic researchers is to develop a model of an economy that is simple, yet powerful enough to explain the historical trends of these aggregate economic indicators. Needless to say, coming up with a good model has remained a very difficult task. So far, there is no single model that is good enough to coherently explain even the most prominent historical trends of aggregate economic indicators. But several models have been built, each offering insight into a certain aspect of the economy. Throughout the course model building is motivated by real world cases from the American economy. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.

ECON 308. Intermediate Micro Theory. 3 Units.

This course builds on ECON 102 to provide a deeper understanding of microeconomic theory, which forms a basis for much of economic analysis. The main focus of the class will be theoretical, in order to give you a solid foundation for future study in virtually any other field of economics. This includes the theory of how consumers decide what to consume and how firms decide when to stay in business, and how much to produce at what price. Note: a student cannot receive degree credit for both ECON 308 and ECON 309. Prereq: ECON 102 and (MATH 121 or MATH 125).

ECON 309. Intermediate Micro Theory: Calculus-Based. 3 Units.

This course builds on Economics 102 and provides a more in-depth analysis of the theory of the consumer, the theory of the firm, market equilibrium, market failure and government intervention in the market. We will use calculus to derive supply, demand and market equilibrium from first principles. You should come away from this course with a greater understanding of how consumers and firms make their decisions and how they interact in the market place. Note: a student cannot receive degree credit for both ECON 308 and ECON 309. Prereq: ECON 102 and (MATH 122 or MATH 126).

ECON 310. Marketing Analytics. 3 Units.

To appreciate, design, and implement data-based marketing studies for extracting valid and useful insights for managerial action that yield attractive ROI, five essential processes are emphasized: (a) making observations about customers, competitors, and markets, (b) recognizing, formulating, and refining meaningful problems as opportunities for managerial action, (c) developing and specifying testable models of marketing phenomenon, (d) designing and implementing research designs for valid data, and (e) rigorous analysis for uncovering and testing patterns and mechanisms from marketing data. Offered as MKMR 310 and ECON 310. Prereq: MKMR 201 and OPRE 207.

ECON 326. Econometrics. 4 Units.

Econometrics is the application of statistics to empirical economic analysis. One way of testing the validity of economic theories is to gather data and apply statistical tests to see if the data support the theory. These data are usually gathered by observing actual economies, firms and consumers, rather than by performing experiments in a laboratory. Because economic analysts lack the precision and control of the laboratory, they must compensate by adjusting their statistical procedures. In this class, we will concentrate on regression analysis, which is the basic tool of the economic researcher. We will study the assumptions commonly made in the application of this technique, the consequences of violating these assumptions, and the corrections that can be made. Students will have a chance to formulate and test their own hypotheses using econometric software available for personal computers. Recommended preparation: One semester of statistics or consent of instructor. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103 and (OPRE 207 or STAT 243 or STAT 312).

ECON 327. Advanced Econometrics. 3 Units.

This class builds on the foundations of applied regression analysis developed in ECON 326. The goal of the class is to equip students with the tools to conduct a causal analysis of a hypothesis in a variety of settings. Topics will include causality, panel and time series data, instrumental variables and quasi-experiments, semi- and non-parametric methods, and treatment evaluation. Offered as ECON 327 and ECON 427. Prereq: ECON 326.

ECON 328. Designing Experiments for Social Science, Policy, and Management. 3 Units.

Both economists and firms are increasingly relying on experiments to study the economic behavior of individuals and the effectiveness of policies in a wide range of settings. This course gives students the tools they need to design and critique experiments that answer a research or business question. A small part of the class will be devoted to important theoretical concepts in experimental design, such as treatments, factorial designs, randomization, internal and external validity, biases, and inference problems. The bulk will be devoted to learning about how these concepts come together by discussing exciting new experimental work on topics such as discrimination and identity, cooperation versus self-interest, and dishonesty and corruption. Prereq: ECON 102 and (OPRE 207, STAT 201, STAT 243, STAT 312, ANTH 319, or PSCL 282).

ECON 329. Game Theory: The Economics of Thinking Strategically. 3 Units.

The term "game theory" refers to the set of tools economists use to think about strategic interactions among small groups of individuals and firms. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of game theory and its applications. The class will stress the use of game theory as a tool for building models of important economic phenomena. The class will also include a number of experiments designed to illustrate the game theoretic results, and to highlight how reality may depart from the theory. The course will stress the value of thinking strategically and provide students with a framework for thinking strategically in their everyday lives. Rather than approaching each strategic situation they encounter as a unique problem, students will be taught to recognize patterns in the situations they face and to generalize from specific experiences. A paper on an application of game theory will be required for graduate students. Offered as ECON 329 and ECON 429. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 330. Economic Behavior and Psychology. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to Behavioral Economics, a growing field which incorporates insights from other disciplines--primarily psychology-- into microeconomic models. We will cover fundamental aspects of decision-making, such as how people respond to risk, how people make trade-offs between short-term and long-term rewards, and the ways in which people aren't as selfish as standard economic models suggest. We will cover novel economic models that can accommodate phenomena such as altruism, loss aversion, and self-control problems. We will discuss empirical applications of these concepts in areas ranging from personal finance and health to marketing and public policy. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 332. Economic Analysis of Labor Markets. 3 Units.

This course is about the economics of work and pay. We will take a comprehensive look at labor markets in the U.S. and other advanced countries and examine related social policy issues. This will include the effect of unions on wages, the underpinnings of the income distribution of the U.S., issues of poverty and welfare, discrimination and wage differential by gender and race, the relationship between work and family, education as a determinant of wages, and the way firms use wage and employment practices to motivate their employees to work productively. What makes labor economics special is that the commodity we examine is human labor, something that is central to the organization of our lives and the functioning of the economy. Labor economics thus applies the standard neoclassical model of demand, supply, and equilibrium to many areas that also have a profound human dimension. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 333. The Economics of Organizations and Employment Relationships. 3 Units.

Organizational Economics is the study of effective organizational design and management. It applies the powerful tools of modern economics to such questions as: what are the practices and structures that make for successful firms? Why are successful firms able to excel at some things (think Microsoft and word processors and spreadsheets) but not at other things (think Microsoft and web-based search)? Fundamentally organizations are human enterprises and their performance is driven by the people they employ. For this reason a good deal of organizational economics is concerned with how firms structure relationships with their employees. One of the important benefits students gain from studying organizational economics is a rigorous and logical framework for thinking about their jobs and careers. By applying this framework to many different real world settings, students become adept at translating general insights to their specific concerns. Organizational economics is built upon a hybrid approach to human behavior that draws from economics and social psychology. From economics, we take the idea that individuals can skillfully use the resources and information at their disposal to achieve their goals. From social psychology we take the idea that individual pursuit of their interests is complicated by the emotions, impulses, and cognitive biases built into human brains. The economic emphasis on goals implies that successful organizations must structure incentives and design jobs in ways that are consistent with the interests of employees. The psychological approach implies that successful organizations must also adopt motivational strategies that appeal to both the rational and non-rational drivers of human behavior. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 338. Law and Economics. 3 Units.

This course examines legal institutions and rules from an economic perspective. Students will learn when and how legal rules can be efficient. Topics will include property law (including intellectual property), tort (accidental) law, contracts, and crime. Offered as ECON 338 and ECON 438. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 341. Money and Banking. 3 Units.

This course emphasizes the importance of financial markets, the nature and role of the financial system, and the linkages between these--money and banking--and the economy. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical constructs, on major innovations and contemporary changes, and the closely intertwined condition of financial and economic systems with monetary and fiscal policy. Offered as BAFI 341 and ECON 341.

ECON 342. Public Finance. 3 Units.

Government intervention is a pervasive feature of every modern economy. The goal of this course is to develop the economic tools for understanding and evaluating a wide range of government behaviors such as taxation and redistribution policy, the public provision of goods and services, and the regulation of private markets. ECON 342 begins by considering "market failures" that justify government intervention in a market economy. To respond to such failures, governments must raise revenues through taxation. Using the tools of microeconomic theory, we will develop a framework for thinking about the positive and normative effects of alternative forms of taxation. Particular attention will be paid to the individual income tax in the U.S., allowing students to understand the efficiency, distributional and behavioral implications of recent changes in the tax code. We will then turn to the expenditure side of the public sector. The economic principles used to evaluate public expenditures will be discussed and exemplified through the analysis of significant public programs. Of particular interest will be the effect of public programs on the incentives faced by workers and families. Offered as BAFI 342 and ECON 342. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 346. Economic Perspectives. 3 Units.

This course examines important contemporary and historical issues from an economic perspective. It enables students to think about the world "like an economist." Possible topics of current interest include the transformation of Eastern Europe, ethnic and racial strife, environmental policy and sustainable development, and professional sports.

ECON 364. Economic Analysis of Business Strategies. 3 Units.

This course examines how companies compete against each other and interact with customers in an effort to increase profits. Topics include: pricing strategies, product differentiation, advertising, R&D strategies, bundling and tie-ins, entry barriers, mergers and acquisitions, collusion and cartels, the dynamics of network industries (e.g. information technology), and technology adoption and diffusion. The course will take two complementary perspectives. First, we will consider the point of view of companies, and ask how different business strategies can affect competitive success. Second, we will consider the perspective of consumers and policymakers: we will ask whether different firm strategies enhance or reduce social welfare, and will explore different policy options to increase welfare (e.g. antitrust policies, patent systems). The first part of the course will utilize a range of basic economic tools. In the second part of the course, we will apply what was learned in the first part to real examples of firms and industries, including both business and legal cases. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 368. Environmental Economics. 3 Units.

Economic models and reasoning provide a valuable lens through which to view many of the most intractable and perplexing environmental problems. The objective of this class is to apply the tools of a typical introductory or intermediate microeconomics course to topics involving the natural environment. That is, we will view environmental topics from the perspective of an economist. Topics that will be covered in this class include :Market failure in the case of externalities and public goods provision, Management of renewable resources, Cost-effective pollution control, and Energy use and global climate change. Perhaps the most exciting part of this course is that we will take tools from the classroom and apply them to ongoing environmental questions. lectures will include guest presentations from professionals who are actively working on environmental challenges. Offered as ECON 368 and ECON 468. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 369. Economics of Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help students identify, evaluate, and obtain control over technological opportunities so they may successfully understand the challenges of starting new companies. The course focuses on four themes: 1) the source, discovery and evaluation of technological opportunities; 2) the process of organizing a new firm to produce new technology that satisfies the needs of customers; 3) the acquisition of financial and human resources necessary to exploit technological opportunities; and 4) the development of mechanism to appreciate the returns from exploitation of technological opportunities. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 372. International Finance. 3 Units.

This course deals with open-economy macroeconomics and international financial markets, covering open-economy national income analysis, international macroeconomic policy coordination, exchange rate determination, foreign portfolio investment, and global financial crises. Offered as BAFI 372 and ECON 372. Prereq: ECON 103.

ECON 373. International Trade. 3 Units.

This course deals with international trade theories and policies, covering gains from and patterns of trade, immigration, foreign direct investment, protectionism, multilateral trade liberalization, regionalism and the costs and benefits of globalization within as well as among nations. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 374. Financial Regulation. 3 Units.

This course will provide students with an understanding of the economic underpinnings of financial regulation as it exists in the United States today. The course will highlight salient aspects of financial markets, such as asymmetric information and the chains of exposures linking financial market participants, that make financial regulation both necessary and yet problematic. Emphasis will be put on the difference between regulations on individual financial firms as compared with regulating for systemic financial stability. The course will be designed to: (1) provide enhanced understanding of financial markets to undergraduate students who have already taken ECON/BAFI 341 (Money and Banking); (2) provide institutional insight to master's level finance students; (3) illustrate the application of welfare analysis to financial regulation, and (4) teach all students to think critically about regulatory arbitrage and the dynamic evolution of regulated markets. Prereq: ECON 102, ECON 103 and (ECON 341 or BAFI 341).

ECON 375. Economics of Developing Countries. 3 Units.

This course focuses on international aspects of economic development. The term "developing country" is often defined as a country that exhibits low per capita income, high poverty level, low level of industrialization, or low life expectancy. In terms of size, the developing countries make up at least three-fourth of the world population. Why do we study those countries' economies separately from the industrialized economies? In fact, low economic growth, high unemployment, or high poverty rates also exist in many developed countries. The differences lie not in the types of problems but in the causes of these problems. In addition, differences in the kind of institutions that prevail in developing countries also lead to different policy prescriptions. Among developing countries, differences in historical experience, cultural practices, political institutions and economic conditions are also enormous. Illustrations and explanations of those differences are provided from a wide range of developing countries. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 376. Inside the Financial Crisis. 3 Units.

This is a case study in the events surrounding the 2007 global financial crisis. The course will build from fundamental economic concepts into a comprehensive analysis of the elements which led to the collapse and the contemporary policy debates about the recovery. The background for debate will come from an analysis of: Housing and housing finance, bank runs and Bear Sterns, mortgage backed securities and toxic asset purchases. The course will then examine major components of the Dodd-Frank Act and enable students to assess whether the act will address the causes of the 2007 crisis and more importantly establish the conditions to prevent a future crisis. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.

ECON 377. Topics in Monetary Policy. 3 Units.

The course will highlight developments taking place in the United States, but will also compare and contrast with developments in Japan, the United Kingdom, the European Central Bank, and other selected countries. Emphasis will be put on (1) how the financial crisis exposed weaknesses in the official oversight of financial systems, and the new roles being assigned to central banks to remedy these deficiencies; and (2) the extraordinary monetary policy responses of central banks in pursuit of economic stability during the Great Recession, and implications of these responses for the future conduct of monetary policy. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.

ECON 378. Health Care Economics. 3 Units.

The health care industry is the fastest growing sector of the U.S. economy, with expenditures on health care now accounting for over 14% of total GDP. Because of its complexity and sheer size, the health care industry affects virtually every facet of the economy including labor productivity, income distribution and international competitiveness. The goal of ECON 378 is to apply the tools of economic analysis to develop students' understanding of health care markets and related public policy issues. The course begins with an overview of the health care system in the U.S. with attention to disturbing statistics that have inspired calls for reform. The remainder of the course is approximately divided between analysis of the consumer side of the health care market and analysis of the provider side. Throughout the course, proposals for reforming the health care system will be described and discussed. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 386. Urban Economics. 3 Units.

Microeconomic theory as taught in principles (and even intermediate) does not usually take into account the fact that goods, people, and information must travel in order to interact. Rather, markets are implicitly modeled as if everyone and everything is at a single point in space. In the first part of the course, we will examine the implications of spatial location for economic analysis. In the second part of the class, we will use microeconomic tools to understand urban problems. Topics that we will cover include urban growth, suburbanization, land use, poverty, housing, local government, transportation, education, and crime. Prereq: ECON 102.

ECON 391. Advanced Topics and Writing in Economics. 3 Units.

This course is characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading from primary and secondary sources, and will include extensive practice in written and oral communication. The focus will be on contemporary economic issues and scholarship, and assumes a high level of ability in undergraduate economics training. Specifically, this course provides an avenue for an intellectual discourse on some of the most challenging present day economic issues, and we will rigorously think and write about how economic concepts can be applied to virtually any topic, issue and event in the social world. Students will be challenged throughout the course to think and write like an economist and see the world through the economist's lens. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: ECON 308 or ECON 309 and ECON 326 and junior or senior standing.

ECON 395. The Economy in the American Century. 3 Units.

This class provides an approved SAGES capstone experience for economics majors. It uses American economic history as an arena for a culminating application of the diverse knowledge and skills students have acquired during their undergraduate careers. The twentieth century American economy was shaped by a series of transformations that make our lives profoundly different from those lived by Americans in 1900. Attempting to understand these transformations has shaped the discipline of economics. Events and processes such as mass migration, the Great Depression, the growth of women's participation in the workforce, and suburbanization generated questions that economists developed theories and bodies of empirical evidence to answer. Students will synthesize knowledge accumulated in their prior undergraduate study to tackle big questions posed by the history of the American economy during the 20th century. These questions cover the spectrum of economic life and scholarship, from finance and technology to human capital and gender. Students form teams to tackle an important question developed in consultation with the instructor. Each team will be responsible for educating the class on their research findings through researching and delivering a class-length presentation and preparing readings and exam questions. Students will produce an individual final paper related to their team's topic that expresses their own scholarly perspective and interest. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: Junior or Senior standing.

ECON 397. Honors Research I. 3 Units.

All students admitted to the Honors Program will undertake an independent research project (Senior Thesis) under the guidance of a faculty member (Thesis Advisor). ECON 397 is used to define the topic, review relevant literature, formulate hypotheses, and collect appropriate data toward completing their research project. Students will have the responsibility of providing regular progress reports to their thesis advisor highlighting the work accomplished to date, the immediate challenges confronting them, and a plan to complete the project in the time remaining. Prereq: ECON 102, ECON 103, ECON 326 and ECON 308 or ECON 309; Junior standing and minimum GPA of 3.3 in ECON major and 3.0 overall.

ECON 398. Honors Research II. 3 Units.

This is the second course in a two course sequence to complete the Honors Research Program in Economics. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: A grade of B or higher in ECON 397.

ECON 399. Individual Readings and Research. 1 - 6 Unit.

Intensive examination of a topic selected by the students. Students must receive permission from the program administrator before the start of the term, and permissions will only be granted in cases where the students have a clear learning plan and objectives in using the independent readings/research option that cannot be met through available course offerings.

ECON 403. Economics for Management. 3 Units.

This course surveys of the basic principles of micro and macroeconomics. Topics covered in microeconomics include supply and demand, the theory of production and costs, market structures and factor markets. Macroeconomics topics are the national incomes accounts, the determination of national income, employment and inflation, fiscal and monetary policies and international trade.

ECON 421. Health Economics and Strategy. 3 Units.

This course has evolved from a theory-oriented emphasis to a course that utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and hospital mergers, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in health systems management. Offered as ECON 421, HSMC 421, and MPHP 421. Prereq: ECON 403 or MBAC 512 or MBAP 406 or GMBA 401A or MSM in Healthcare program.

ECON 427. Advanced Econometrics. 3 Units.

This class builds on the foundations of applied regression analysis developed in ECON 326. The goal of the class is to equip students with the tools to conduct a causal analysis of a hypothesis in a variety of settings. Topics will include causality, panel and time series data, instrumental variables and quasi-experiments, semi- and non-parametric methods, and treatment evaluation. Offered as ECON 327 and ECON 427.

ECON 429. Game Theory: The Economics of Thinking Strategically. 3 Units.

The term "game theory" refers to the set of tools economists use to think about strategic interactions among small groups of individuals and firms. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of game theory and its applications. The class will stress the use of game theory as a tool for building models of important economic phenomena. The class will also include a number of experiments designed to illustrate the game theoretic results, and to highlight how reality may depart from the theory. The course will stress the value of thinking strategically and provide students with a framework for thinking strategically in their everyday lives. Rather than approaching each strategic situation they encounter as a unique problem, students will be taught to recognize patterns in the situations they face and to generalize from specific experiences. A paper on an application of game theory will be required for graduate students. Offered as ECON 329 and ECON 429.

ECON 431. Economics of Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. 3 Units.

Students frequently enroll in a negotiation class with one thought in mind--negotiating a better job offer from an employer. They soon learn, however, that negotiation skills can do far more than improve a pay check. Negotiations occur everywhere: in marriages, in divorces, in small work teams, in large organizations, in getting a job, in losing a job, in deal making, in decision making, in board rooms, and in court rooms. The remarkable thing about negotiations is that, wherever they occur, they are governed by similar principles. The current wave of corporate restructuring makes the study of negotiations especially important for M.B.A.s. Mergers, acquisitions, downsizing and joint ventures call into question well established business and employment relationships. Navigating these choppy waters by building new relationships requires negotiation skills. The increased stress on quality and other hard-to-measure aspects of relationships with customers and suppliers makes the process of negotiation even more complex and subtle. For these reasons, negotiation classes have taken center stage in the study of management. Every major business school now offers classes in negotiation and these classes are overflowing with students. Offered as ECON 431 and LHRP 413.

ECON 438. Law and Economics. 3 Units.

This course examines legal institutions and rules from an economic perspective. Students will learn when and how legal rules can be efficient. Topics will include property law (including intellectual property), tort (accidental) law, contracts, and crime. Offered as ECON 338 and ECON 438.

ECON 468. Environmental Economics. 3 Units.

Economic models and reasoning provide a valuable lens through which to view many of the most intractable and perplexing environmental problems. The objective of this class is to apply the tools of a typical introductory or intermediate microeconomics course to topics involving the natural environment. That is, we will view environmental topics from the perspective of an economist. Topics that will be covered in this class include :Market failure in the case of externalities and public goods provision, Management of renewable resources, Cost-effective pollution control, and Energy use and global climate change. Perhaps the most exciting part of this course is that we will take tools from the classroom and apply them to ongoing environmental questions. lectures will include guest presentations from professionals who are actively working on environmental challenges. Offered as ECON 368 and ECON 468. Prereq: MBAC 512 or GMBA 403A.

ECON 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

EDMP Courses

EDMP 610. Culture and World Politics. 3 Units.

Religion, ethnicity, and nationalism have assumed major political significance in the post Cold-War and post-9/11 eras. The course examines ideas of political democracy and economic liberalism in relation to different cultural and religious ideas and explores relationships among social values, political structures, and economics. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 611. Theory and Practice of Collective Action. 3 Units.

The ability of autonomous and interdependent parties to coordinate actions, or to act cooperatively, affects a wide range of organizational and social problems. This course addresses the theory and practice of collective action in local, national and global contexts. Case studies of collective action problems, such as environmental protection, community revitalization, and the mobilization of interest groups will be discussed. Offered as EDMP 611 and MGMT 611. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 613. Leading Change. 3 Units.

Change is an enigma and yet sustained, desirable change (SDC) drives adaptation, growth and life itself. In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and What is the role of a leader? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad, team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. Leadership and its development will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to three major case studies: (1) yourself; (2) practice coaching with compassion; and (3) a major change project. This course will explore questions, such as: Who are effective leaders? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What is the role of emotional and social intelligence? How does a leader's mind, body, heart, and spirit affect their performance? For Doctor of Management Students.

EDMP 614. Business as an Evolving Complex System. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to provide a foundation for understanding how business systems evolve, why the business systems in the major advanced countries have evolved differently over the last 100 years or so, and what the underlying driving forces are. The focus is on transformation rather than economic growth. The course examines the evolution of business systems as a result of technological and organizational change. It deals with the role of history, culture and finance in generating business organizations in various countries. The course also studies the emergence of regional innovation systems and industry clusters, as well as how digitization and globalization are changing the "industrial logic." For Doctor of Management Students.

EDMP 616. Global Economic Systems and Issues. 3 Units.

This course provides a framework and analytical tools for understanding globalization and international economic relations in the context of the global political system. It analyzes the economic and political forces that are shaping global cooperation on economic matters, the role and impact of international economic institutions such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization, and evolving forms of regional governance, such as the European Union. It covers national and international policies and development and the causes and cures of international financial crises. The course revolves around concepts of efficiency, equality, power, and institutions in the making of public policy towards globalization of communications and transportation. Prereq: EDMP 665.

EDMP 617. Technology and Social System Design. 3 Units.

Managers are designers who shape the social and technical world we inhabit. This course explores the process of design and asks how managers can become better designers and interventionists who anticipate and evaluate the social, economic, and political consequences of existing and emerging products, processes, and organizational forms. For Doctor of Management Students.

EDMP 638. Qualitative Inquiry I. 3 Units.

This course explores ways to conceptualize an object of study and facilitates formulation of students' conceptual work and production of research reports at the end of the first year of the program. The course conveys how to generate research ideas by critically reviewing literature and developing ideas that contribute to a problem or issue of interest by working with theory and extending previous research. The practicality of conducting certain kinds of research is evaluated and length, intensity and ethical constraints of different research efforts are examined. Each student produces a report communicating and supporting a conceptualization of the phenomenon of interest involving independent, mediating and dependent variables. The paper defines a problem of practice, presents, both visually and in narrative form, concepts shaped by field experience and prior writing that promote understanding of the problem, and includes a research proposal describing sample, data collection and data analysis. Prereq: EDMP 665.

EDMP 640. Social Ethics: Contemporary Issues. 3 Units.

The course draws upon intellectual ancestors and current thinkers in moral philosophy and ethics to assist each student in identifying, analyzing, and discussing social and ethical questions pertaining to the definition and purpose of contemporary life, the need for moral coherence, and the meaning of life in a global society. The unifying theme of the course is Tolstoy's question, "How then shall we live?" The course does not seek to provide answers to the great questions of life. Rather, it tries to expand each student's capacity to grapple with such questions. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 641. Qualitative Inquiry II. 3 Units.

This course guides the student in conducting the qualitative research project that was proposed in EDMP 638. Fieldwork and initial analysis is conducted during the summer when data based on semi-structure interviews is collected and analysis begins using inductive coding techniques. A summer residency is held in mid-June to assess progress as final data collection and analysis continues. The aim of the fall semester is to prepare a formal research report on that project, which will be submitted to an academic research conference. The final report includes a revision of one's conceptual model, integrating new understandings and literature arising from the data collection and analysis. Prereq: EDMP 638.

EDMP 642. Directed Studies Seminar. 0 - 9 Units.

At different times during the Program, EDM students register for Directed Studies courses. The purpose of these courses is to recognize the work the students are doing to conduct and present their individualized research at a high quality level. Activities conducted under the Directed Studies courses are dedicated to the collection of qualitative or quantitative data and the preparation of research reports. Prereq: Must be enrolled in DM program or PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems track.

EDMP 643. Measuring Business Behaviors and Structures. 3 Units.

This course aims to develop the basic foundations and skills for designing and executing generalizable studies. It focuses on building competence in model building, construct measurement, research design, data collection methodologies, and application of analytical software commonly involved in quantitative inquiry. Covered topics include framing research questions, reliability and validity of measurement, quasi-experimental research design, and fieldwork for data collection. Classes are designed to balance between the theory and practice of quantitative research design, and will be linked to the participant's own research projects. Prereq: EDMP 641.

EDMP 645. Integration of Qualitative and Quantitative Inquiry. 3 Units.

Using the mixed method research toolkit developed in previous courses, this course focuses on critically analyzing selected pieces of published applied and policy research to develop a critical appreciation of issues and debates that have wide applicability and relevance. In particular, it offers students ways to integrate and triangulate using a mixed method approach, different forms of evidence, and related evidence. In addition, this course addresses common method choice and justification issues and related challenges of validity and theory formulation that typically arise during the students' execution of a series of individual research projects. Application of critical analysis and appreciation approach in justifying mixed methods designs to the student's own research work is encouraged and supported by sharing and discussing common research and methodology themes and problems. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 646. Advanced Analytical Methods for Generalizing Research. 3 Units.

This course addresses advanced topics in regression and structural equation modeling such as latent growth curve models, partial least squares, logit models, tests for various types of invariance, multiple-group analysis, multilevel analysis, and analyzing qualitative/categorical data. These analytical methods are intended to enhance the student's toolkit as to facilitate a strong bridge to the academic literature and the application to specific data based problems that arise in applied managerial research. For Doctor of Management Students.

EDMP 648. Causal Analysis of Business Problems I. 3 Units.

Model Building & Validation I introduces fundamental concepts in theory-based model building and validation. In this course students will develop, explore, refine and validate a range of models appropriate for addressing their problem of practice including classification models, process models, variance models, and articulating nomological networks. In particular, the course will focus on effective conceptualizations of causation, control, mediation, and moderation. Further, foundational statistical techniques such as tests of assumptions of the data, exploratory factor analysis, and regression and path analysis will be introduced. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 649. Causal Analysis of Business Problems II. 3 Units.

Building upon the first course in Model Building & Validation, this course will guide students through the theoretically-grounded variance models that are required for testing through structural equation modeling (SEM) in the quantitative portion of their research. Fundamental concepts in model testing will be reinforced using path analysis, and will include a deeper exploration of moderation by addressing topics such as moderated mediation and interaction effects. Beyond the analysis the course will emphasize precise and accurate formulation of theoretical models and associated reasoning, as well as careful interpretation of findings. The class will also delve into testing of data assumptions and prepare students for the model testing portion of their capstone assignments. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 664. Knowledge Dissemination to Influence Managerial Practice. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is twofold. First, it supports students organizing and writing their DM thesis overview or their PhD thesis proposal. Also discussed are ways to organize and communicate in scientific genres, their aims and their generic properties. Secondly, students become acquainted with scientific communication and publishing. Effective reviewing, criteria for judging articles and theses, management of review processes, and how to communicate and respond to reviews are topics discussed. The course also addresses publication strategies and ways of managing and communicating scientific and managerial knowledge to different stakeholders. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 665. Introduction to Research Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course begins participants' three-year research experience. Energized by one's personal passion and commitment to the topic, we seek for the work to be accomplished at a level that makes it worthy of widespread dissemination and influence as engaged scholars. The goal in this course is to prepare students to develop their minds as scholars by understanding the world of research; develop a research identity by identifying one's research domain; learn to read academic literature and write in a scholarly style; work with academic literature to identify and digest concepts and theories that inform research on that problem; begin to develop a conceptual model that abstracts how the world may be functioning in that problem domain and points to a research question that can guide the next stage of the research. The final deliverable for this course is to present the research topic with substantiation for its significance, relevance and timeliness in the management field. This would include the research question(s); the literature review; and proposed qualitative methodology and analytical approach(es). For Doctor of Management Students.

EDMP 671. Design and Sustainable Systems. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to introduce doctoral students to the nature and practice of design as a strategy of inquiry as well as a mode of action in addressing the problems of creating and managing sustainable human systems. The objectives are (1) to introduce the conceptual framework of design, (2) the nature of human interaction as seen from the perspective of design, (3) the intellectual and practical strategies of design, (4) the methods and techniques of design that are relevant to the study and design of sustainable human systems, and (5) the nature of "wicked problems" and the ethical issues of design, with special attention to the place of human dignity in the design of sustainable systems. The course will employ key elements of the literature of design, close reading and discussion, and exercises that explore the concepts and methods of design. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 672. Flourishing Enterprise: Creating Sustainable Value for Business and World Benefit. 3 Units.

This course is designed to galvanize new visions of business and society, as well as organizational leadership. The course is born of a conviction that the future of human society and the natural world is intimately linked to the future of the world economy, business enterprises, and management education. The course presentations, books, dialogues, and interview projects are organized around three themes: (1) the state of the world and the economics possibilities of our time, (2) the business case for understanding business as an agent of world benefit--how business performance can profit from current and future advances in sustainable design and social entrepreneurship; and (3) tools for becoming a change leader--including the methods of Appreciative Inquiry and new insights about "strength-based" change emerging from the science of human strengths. The overarching aim is to provide a powerful introduction to the many facets of sustainable value creation as a complete managerial approach. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 673. Understanding, Designing, Managing Complex Systems. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to provide a perspective on systems thinking and complex systems and aid PhD students in expanding the ideas in their research on systems, systems models, and complex systems. The work of the course will develop with increasingly difficult books on the subject of complex systems, a major case study in health care, and individual applications of the concepts to their potential research model and methods. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 677. Designing Sustainable Systems. 3 Units.

Students in teams will recognize and work in practice on a managerial problem that involves dimensions of sustainability and design. They will develop a set of solutions to the problem by generating alternative models and intervention strategies to address the problem. The project results in a short presentation and written communication of the solution in a form of a poster or prototype. The course will also include presentations of intervention and action research approaches and issues of inquiry validation and theory development. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 678. Effectiveness of Institutional, Individual and Organizational Decision Making. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to research on individual judgment and decision making. Drawing insights from research in economics, political science, psychology, management, and sociology, behavioral decision making and judgment is the study of how-why-when people make decisions. Sessions introduce and explore the discipline. Along with a historical review of the literature, the general topics of emotion, experience, self control, and motivation are introduced. Behavioral finance is a topic specifically used as the lens through which individual, group, and firm decision making and judgment are analyzed. Designed to expose the student to a number of academic theories which may be incorporated into their second year paper, this course will also allow the student to experience a deeper dive into the particulars of academic literature including research design, literature reviews, discussion and dissemination, etc. This course will employ an integrated learning format. Lectures, group projects, written assignments, etc. will be used throughout this semester. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 680. Conflict & Cooperation in the Global Arena. 3 Units.

The global arena is described by some as a realm of perpetual conflict. Others argue that given the right institutions and incentives, international actors can find ways to achieve cooperation, peace and increased global prosperity. Still others suggest that the international political and economic arena is "what you make of it"--emphasizing the role of norms, identities and ideas in shaping international outcomes. This course will examine both theoretical and policy perspectives regarding the question of international conflict and cooperation, with a specific emphasis on drawing on insights from collective action theory and international relations scholarship. Prereq: Must be enrolled in the DM Program.

EDMP 699. Applied Research Project Continuation. 1 - 9 Unit.

Program participants who have not successfully completed their Applied Research Projects before the start of the fall semester following their third year of enrollment in the E.D.M. Program will have seven years from the date of their initial matriculation into the Program to complete degree requirements. If their work continues beyond the normal 54 credit hours of designed courses, they will register for Applied Research Project Continuation. Continuation credits may also be used for students enrolling in the Program after August 2000, who have not completed their required course work and research requirements within the Program's required 54 semester credit hours. Prereq: EDMP 665.

EMBA Courses

EMBA 417. TEAMS. 0 Units.

This course enables the formation of E.M.B.A. study groups and classroom learning environment by introducing participants to their adult learning styles, models of group decision-making, theories of team development and rules of engagement for effective learning teams. Prereq: E.M.B.A. students only.

EMBA 430. Health Informatics, Analytics & Decision Making. 2.5 Units.

Increasingly in today's healthcare environment, those aspiring to succeed in leadership positions are expected to know and do more than their primary discipline traditionally required. They are also expected to transform their organizations - whether they are departments or IDS's - to a higher state of quality, effectiveness, efficiency and competitiveness. To meet this expectation they must be able to harness the interrelated power of information, analytics and decision support to plan, evaluate, improve, and control their organization. This course is for executives in health care delivery, health planning, regulatory, or accrediting organizations who will be involved with, be responsible for, or oversee: The use and/or management of health or organizational information, and analytic and decision processes; The improvement / innovation of their organization's operations and decision processes; and/or The design, acquisition, implementation, and/or evaluation of health information technologies (HIT). The course is intended to develop competence and confidence in the participant's ability to understand and manage the complex information, analytics and decision environment. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 436. Accounting for Business Executives. 2.5 Units.

This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting, rather than a course in introductory accounting. This course is designed for the business professional and is intended to prepare the student to use the information prepared by accountants. It will not dwell in detail on the technical aspects of accounting or bookkeeping. In addition, this course is designed to help the student become an effective user of cost information, from the perspective of parties internal to the firm. This aspect of accounting is a compilation of techniques rather than a set of rules. Since the information is for private use, the goal is to create the most meaningful and useful data for use by managers. Assignments will be designed to develop the student's ability to analyze and interpret accounting data and to more effectively utilize accounting data in day to day business decisions. Finally, this course is intended to strengthen abilities to identify problems and opportunities, to search out and analyze desired information leading to a well-reasoned conclusion, and to perform sensitivity analysis around that conclusion, using financial information. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 437. Economic Analysis for Managers. 2.5 Units.

This course, which is limited to students in the Executive M.B.A. program, explores the basic elements of the economic system which the executive needs to know in order to understand how the firm interacts with the system and how economic factors affect decision making. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 437B. Economic Analysis for Managers. 1.5 Unit.

This course, which is limited to students in the Executive M.B.A. program, explores the basic elements of the economic system which the executive needs to know in order to understand how the firm interacts with the system and how economic factors affect decision making. Prereq: EMBA 437A

EMBA 438A. Business Statistics and Quantitative Analysis. 1.25 Unit.

In this course, students study the use of modern quantitative and business statistics to support the executive decision-making process. With the help of computer software, the models examined assist in describing and analyzing problems and suggesting possible managerial actions. The techniques discussed include tools for decision making under uncertainty including regression analysis. This course is part of a two (2) course sequence. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 438B. Business Statistics and Quantitative Analysis. 1.25 Unit.

In this course, students study the use of modern quantitative and business statistics to support the executive decision-making process. With the help of computer software, the models examined assist in describing and analyzing problems and suggesting possible managerial actions. The techniques discussed include tools for decision making under uncertainty including regression analysis. This course is part of a two (2) course sequence. Prereq: EMBA 438A

EMBA 439. Corporate Finance. 2.5 Units.

The central organizing principle of this course is to familiarize the class with the basics of valuation. This first course in finance introduces the tools and methods employed in valuation of projects and corporate securities. Valuation involves the determination of (i) cash flows of the firm, project or financial assets and (ii) the discount rates that are used to compute the present values of the cash flows. Asset pricing models provide the underpinnings for the development of the discount rates. The material is synthesized in capital budgeting exercises which are cost-benefit analyses of capital project cash flows to evaluate whether they are value enhancing. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 439B. Corporate Finance. 1.5 Unit.

The central organizing principle of this course is to familiarize the class with the basic of valuation. The first course in finance introduces the tools and methods employed in valuation of projects and corporate securities. Valuation involves the determination of (i) cash flows of the firm, project or financial assets for (ii) the discount rates that are used to compute the present values of the cash flows. Asset pricing models provide underpinnings for the development of the discount rate. The material is synthesized in capital budgeting exercises which are cost-benefit analyses of capital project cash flows to evaluate whether they are value enhancing. Prereq: EMBA 439A

EMBA 441. Leading Change: Self. 2.5 Units.

The primary objective of Leading Change: Self is to learn a method for assessing your knowledge, abilities, values, and interests relevant to leadership and executive management so that you will be able to develop and implement a plan for enhancing your leadership and executive capability throughout your career and life. The enabling objectives are: (a) To systematically identify your current and desired capability (i.e., knowledge, abilities, values, and interests); (b) To develop an individualized learning agenda and plan for the next 3-5 years; and (c) To explore techniques to assist others in doing the same. This course will explore questions, such as: Who are effective leaders? How are they different than mangers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? How can people help others become effective leaders? What type of leader do I want to be? And, what can I do to become that type of leader? Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 441A. Leading Change: Self. 2 Units.

The primary objective of Leading Change: Self is to learn a method for assessing your knowledge, abilities, values, and interests relevant to leadership and executive management so that you will be able to develop and implement a plan for enhancing your leadership and executive capability throughout your career and life. The enabling objectives are: (a) To systematically identify your current and desired capability (i.e., knowledge, abilities, values, and interests); (b) To develop an individualized learning agenda and plan for the next 3-5 years; and (c) To explore techniques to assist others in doing the same. This course will explore questions, such as: Who are effective leaders? How are they different than managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? How can people help others become effective leaders? What type of leader do I want to be? And, what can I do to become that type of leader? This course is part of a two (2) course sequence. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 441B. Leading Change: Self. 1 Unit.

The primary objective of Leading Change: Self is to learn a method for assessing your knowledge, abilities, values, and interests relevant to leadership and executive management so that you will be able to develop and implement a plan for enhancing your leadership and executive capability throughout your career and life. The enabling objectives are: (a) To systematically identify your current and desired capability (i.e., knowledge, abilities, values, and interests); (b) To develop an individualized learning agenda and plan for the next 3-5 years; and (c) To explore techniques to assist others in doing the same. This course will explore questions, such as: Who are effective leaders? How are they different than managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? How can people help others become effective leaders? What type of leader do I want to be? And, what can I do to become that type of leader? The course will take place over two semesters. This course is part of a two (2) course sequence. Prereq: EMBA 441A.

EMBA 442. Innovation. 2.5 Units.

Organizations are under continuous pressure to be efficient and productive in order to generate (often short-term) profit. At the same time they must innovate to remain competitive in the long-term. Innovation involves the generation, development, and delivery of new products, processes, or businesses. Intrapreneurs are those who can successfully bring new ideas to fruition in established organizations. Innovation in the context of an established organization requires that intrapreneurs fundamentally understand the dynamics of innovation and innovation management. This course introduces fundamental concepts associated with innovation in the context of an established organization. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 443. Supply Chain Management. 2.5 Units.

Operations managers, ranging from supervisors to vice presidents, are concerned with the production of goods and services. More specifically, they are responsible for designing, running, controlling and improving the systems that accomplish production. This course is a broad-spectrum course with emphasis on techniques and information that are helpful to the practice of management in general and at any level. We will discuss commonly occurring application problems such as process analysis, inventory control, quality management, just-in-time concepts, etc. The field of operations management was originally concerned with manufacturing systems. But many of the same ideas apply, and the same trade-offs are present, in service organizations like health care, insurance, hotel-management, airlines and government related operations. Several manufacturing and non-manufacturing environments will be discussed explicitly, and the emphasis will be on the fundamentals of the operations function in an organization. Also we will explore the interface of operations management with other functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, etc. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 443B. Supply Chain Management and International Experience. 1.5 Unit.

Operations managers, ranging from supervisors to vice presidents, are concerned with the production of goods and services. More specifically, they are responsible for designing, running, controlling and improving the systems that accomplish production. This course is a broad-spectrum course with emphasis on techniques and information that are helpful to the practice of management in general and at any level. We will discuss commonly occurring application problems such as process analysis, inventory control, quality management, just-in-time concepts, etc. The field of operations management was originally concerned with manufacturing systems. But many of the same ideas apply, and the same trade-offs are present, in service organizations like health care, insurance, hotel-management, airlines and government related operations. Several manufacturing and non-manufacturing environments will be discussed explicitly, and the emphasis will be on the fundamentals of the operations function in an organization. Also we will explore the interface of operations management with other functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, etc. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 445. Expanding Boundaries. 2.5 Units.

This course will help you understand the keys to successful corporate development-competitive advantage in every business in which a firm is involved. In particular, the course will help the participants to understand the following: -Corporate development strategy through capabilities and leveragable capabilities -Before venturing into a new business, the firm has to have a clear understanding of the critical capabilities required for success in the new business. -Firms can increase the odds of success if they can leverage (parts of ) existing capabilities to new businesses. -Corporate development strategies-adapting to a market -Analyze the industry environment in order to select the competitive battlefield to increase the odds of success by leveraging some of your existing capabilities - sometimes also known as core competencies. This is a relatively low risk strategy. We will develop methodologies that will allow you to identify markets (segments) where your current capabilities are leveragable. -Shaping a market usually requires developing a completely new set of capabilities - very risky. We will develop concepts to understand techniques to mitigate these risks. -Acquisitions as one of the means for corporate development -Approximately half of the class sessions will be devoted to the specific case of acquisitions as a means to expand the boundaries of a firm. We will explore both how acquisitions contribute to competitive advantage and the selection process and integration of the acquired entity. Less emphasis will be placed on strict financial valuations and negotiations. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 446. Managing Risk and Real Options. 2.5 Units.

The course seeks to help corporate managers understand how financial design can be used to advance the goals and strategies of the firm. In the Finance course, you concentrated almost exclusively on the firm's capital expenditure decision. You studied in great detail the discounted cash flow model, NPV, how you get your cash flows, and how you discount according to risk. Now we move to the other side of the balance sheet to look at how the firm can finance these expenditures. The first part of this class provides the basic building blocks of financial engineering which begins with call and put options. The course focuses on using derivatives (calls and puts) to change a firm's risk profile with respect to equity, interest rate, foreign exchange, credit, and commodity risks. We look at capital structure decisions and securitization issues and discuss what it means to create optimal structures. Almost immediately we will tie this to our financial crisis and obtain an appreciation for financial designs that could be setup so as to enhance firm value, mitigate systemic risks, or accomplish specific sustainable goals in a global economy. The second part of the class is geared towards real options and its relationship to strategic planning. In competitive markets, no one expects to formulate a detailed long-term plan and follow it mindlessly. As soon as we start down the path, we begin learning about business conditions, competitors' actions, and so forth and we need to respond flexibly to what we learn. Unfortunately, the financial tool most widely relied on to estimate the value of strategy, DCF, assumes that we follow a predetermined plan, regardless of how events unfold. A better approach to valuation would incorporate both the uncertainty inherent in business and the active decision making required for strategy to succeed. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 449. Contemporary Issues in Management. 2.5 Units.

This course is intended to address the contemporary issues in management to be decided by faculty and student interest. With the current global economic crisis, this year the course will focus on International Finance and Economics. In subsequent years, the topics will evolve as the global business climate changes. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 450. Managerial Marketing. 2.5 Units.

This course is designed with three overarching objectives. The first is an emphasis on decision making in a broad range of market contexts. The second objective builds on the notion that decision making is dynamic; that is, market situations demand not just one good decision but a series of them as a situation unfolds (providing new and varied information for each subsequent decision). Integrating concepts from a number of the courses that you are taking concurrently into decision-making about markets is a final objective. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 451. Business Model Design. 2.5 Units.

In most companies the process of designing business models is an ad hoc process and in my opinion an inefficient process. In this course you will learn a systematic but iterative process to do this. We will expose you to some broad categories of business models and internalize the basic logic of how to make money in each of these categories. The first step is to recognize which of these categories is most applicable to your business. The second step is to customize these broad patterns to the specifics of the business at hand. This seems easy because everything is in English and there are no hard formulas to figure out. However, unless you discipline yourself to systematically go through a structured process (there are other equally valid processes than the ones you'll be exposed to) it is very easy to fall into the ad hoc trap. You will internalize this process by applying it over a wide range of business situations that will give you confidence in its applicability to any business opportunity. After the completion of this course you should be quickly able to draw the outline of a business model for any business opportunity that you're considering. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 458. Healthcare Financial Management. 2.5 Units.

This course will consider basic financial concepts, techniques, and strategies for institutions and companies in the U.S. health care delivery system. Note that this may differ from the influences one would find in a different country since the payment system and ownership structures vary widely around the world. These basics include relevant factors in the economic, medical, and financial environment that shape an intelligent financial decision. Therefore, although the course is directed towards financial management decisions in health delivery organizations, it may also be useful for those who supply the industry (equipment, drugs and services), purchase services from it (employers, third party administrators, health plans) or finance these (insurance, banking, investors). Public policy and the structure of the industry also play an important role in the course. However, the general approach is from the point of view of a decision-maker in a health care organizational setting dealing with issues with important economic or financial dimensions. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 459. Health Economics and Strategy. 2.5 Units.

The central goal of this course is for students to master essential economic concepts and their application to critical issues in the U.S. healthcare economy. After taking this course, students should be able to: 1. Understand basic microeconomic theory as it applies to firm and consumer behavior in healthcare and health insurance markets. 2. Understand the role of market forces (including market failures) and public policy in determining the price and allocation of medical services. 3. Understand the underlying causes of "changing market conditions" and the challenges and opportunities they create for healthcare organizations. 4. Converse fluently and accurately about the economic forces at play in the healthcare economy. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 464. Legal Environment. 2.5 Units.

This course provides a brief overview of the legal system that managers face, with an emphasis on contracts, corporate law, property rights and the modern regulatory apparatus of government. Contracts include full coverage of the Uniform Commercial Code. Corporate law is the capstone of the consideration of other forms of business organizations such as partnerships. Regulatory areas include employment law and environmental law. Property coverage includes modern struggles over intellectual ownership claims (patents, copyrights, etc.). Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 472. Leading Change: The Organization. 2.5 Units.

Participants in this course will be challenged to enhance their leadership capacity by assessing and analyzing the knowledge, abilities, values and interests relevant to executives. The course will also explore the art of reading and understanding organizations in ways that help us imagine, design, and develop organization excellence. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 473. Leading Change: Teams. 2.5 Units.

Sustainability of effective leadership is necessary for adaptive, resilient organizations and for the health and functioning of the leader. Chronic stress results in diminished cognitive functioning, as well as poor health and a contagion of negative mood in organizations. The latest advances in social neuroscience and endocrinology will be used to develop an understanding how someone in a leadership position can renew themselves and mitigate the ravages of chronic stress. The short course will focus on how to coach others toward renewal and sustainability. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 473B. Leading Change in Dyads and Teams and Beyond. 1.5 Unit.

Sustainability of effective leadership is necessary for adaptive, resilient organizations and for the health and functioning of the leader. Chronic stress results in diminished cognitive functioning, as well as poor health and a contagion of negative mood in organizations. The latest advances in social neuroscience and endocrinology will be used to develop an understanding how someone in a leadership position can renew themselves and mitigate the ravages of chronic stress. Examining leadership in dyads, the course will focus on how to coach others toward renewal, sustainability, and effective leadership. In the context of an International Change Theory and complexity concepts, the course will also examine in detail how to lead and develop teams to be effective. Prereq: EMBA 473A.

EMBA 475. International Tour. 3 Units.

This course is designed to present first-hand issues in international management. It accomplishes this by means of readings, a written assignment and, most importantly, an international trip designed to witness different management cultures, styles and environments for business in the international community. Faculty responsibility rests with the Faculty Director of the E.M.B.A. Program as well as a "Resident -Faculty" specific to each field trip. Such faculty are drawn from the Weatherhead community and vary by the design and destination of the trip. In addition, the course is staffed by an administrative assistant from the complement of Dively CMDR staff. Occasionally and where appropriate, there is also "in-tourist" assistance in some of our foreign locations Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 476. Corporate Governance. 2.5 Units.

The course structure is grounded in the following themes: -The role of the board of directors; -The CEO relationship to the firm's principal stakeholders (shareholders, board of directors, employees, customers) and the CEO's responsibility to give back (time and money) to the community; -CEO role in developing and maintaining the organization's vision, values and corporate culture. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 477. Behavioral Economics. 1.5 Unit.

This class develops practical, actionable insights into how people make economic decisions in the real world. Standard economics proposes that decisions are motivated by a rational response to financial incentives and information. Behavioral economics expands the standard approach by incorporating and understanding the systematic biases and errors we make in interpreting information and making decisions. This expanded toolbox will help the student to improve their own decisions and to understand and motivate behavior in employees, customers, and others. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 478A. Leading Design in Organization. 1.25 Unit.

This course explores the ideas and methods of design as a new approach to management practices that is well suited to the changing environment that organizations face in contemporary culture and the emerging economic environment in the United States and abroad. It is a studio course as well as a seminar, because it is designed around a project that each student brings to the EMBA program, a project that is grounded in the issues and operations of the student's organization or in the kind of organization that the student wishes to explore. In addition to the yearlong project, the course will also include important readings in management and organizational literature that are relevant to the new direction of strategic thinking. Finally, the course will draw on the expertise of other faculty at the Weatherhead School of Management who will be called upon to share their practical expertise and theoretical knowledge in the development and execution of the student's management design project, whether in the area of vision and strategy, new product development of goods and services, operations, organizational design and configuration, or related topics. This is the first part of a two semester course. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 478B. Leading Design in Organizations. 1.25 Unit.

This course explores the ideas and methods of design as a new approach to management practices that is well suited to the changing environment that organizations face in contemporary culture and the emerging economic environment in the United States and abroad. It is a studio course as well as a seminar, because it is designed around a project that each student brings to the EMBA program, a project that is grounded in the issues and operations of the student's organization or in the kind of organization that the student wishes to explore. In addition to the yearlong project, the course will also include important readings in management and organizational literature that are relevant to the new direction of strategic thinking. Finally, the course will draw on the expertise of other faculty at the Weatherhead School of Management who will be called upon to share their practical expertise and theoretical knowledge in the development and execution of the student's management design project, whether in the area of vision and strategy, new product development of goods and services, operations, organizational design and configuration, or related topics. This is the second part of a two semester course. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

EMBA 479. Leading Change: Society. 2.5 Units.

This course explores a proposition: that business, the motor of our society has the opportunity to be a new creative force on the planet, a force that could contribute to the well being of many. Our exploration and search is for "business as an agent of world benefit" and the questions are many: what does it look like, where is it happening, what are the market, societal and leadership enablers, and what are the results? Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.

ENTP Courses

ENTP 301. Entrepreneurial Strategy. 3 Units.

This course is designed to show students how to identify potential business opportunities, determine what constitutes a good business model, and to strategically implement a business proposal. Topics of focus include an overview of the entrepreneurial process, determinants of venture success in high tech and other business environments, and strategies for industry entry and venture growth. Prereq: ACCT 101 or ACCT 203. Coreq: At least sophomore standing.

ENTP 310. Entrepreneurial Finance - Undergraduate. 3 Units.

This course explores the financing and financial management of entrepreneurial new ventures. The course will focus on issues of financial management of new ventures (forecasting cash flows, cash flow management, capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure) and the various financial methods and mechanisms available to entrepreneurs (bootstrapping, angel investors, venture capitalists, IPOs). Prereq or Coreq: ACCT 101 or ACCT 303 or consent of instructor.

ENTP 311. Entrepreneurship and Wealth Creation. 3 Units.

This course explores all aspects of the creation of a new venture from idea through startup, growth, and beyond. Students will learn how to evaluate opportunities, develop strategies, create a business plan and acquire financing for a new venture. In this course students will develop a business plan for a new venture.

ENTP 312. Senior Seminar in Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

The main objective of this course is to meet the advanced needs of our students in honing their entrepreneurial skills. This objective will be achieved through readings and case instruction, presentations by entrepreneurs who are actively engaged in starting new ventures and the commercialization of new technologies, and the successful completion of a research project for an entrepreneurial venture. These projects will be graded by the professor and presented to the class and to the client entrepreneur. Prereq: ENTP 310 and ENTP 311.

ENTP 428. Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 3 Units.

In all companies, new and old, large and small, innovation and entrepreneurship are important ways economic value is created. Whether a person wants to found their own company or work in an existing one, and whether one wants to run a business or simply work in one, it is difficult to go through one's career without needing to engage in innovation or entrepreneurship. The purpose of this course is to equip students to think about how to manage innovation and entrepreneurship. The course will provide frameworks and tools for understanding four important dimensions of innovation and entrepreneurship: (1) Identifying and evaluating opportunities for the new products, processes, ways of organizing, materials, and markets; (2) assessing the needs of customers for new products and services and developing products and services that fulfill those needs; (3) creating strategies to financially benefit from investing in innovation and entrepreneurship; and (4) designing groups and organizations to be innovative and entrepreneurial.

ENTP 450. Entrepreneurial Marketing-M.B.A.. 3 Units.

This course addresses the entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial process of commercializing an idea for a market opportunity. Students select an opportunity and develop a deployable, one-year market entry program and a five-year strategic marketing program. Emphasis is on the entrepreneurial marketing decision process, including defining the business, defining the market, specifying customer perceived value, assessing competitive capability and advantage, identifying and properly using secondary and primary information, and deploying marketing programs throughout the organization and the supply chain.

ENTP 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.


HSMC Courses

HSMC 410. The American Healthcare Landscape and Statistics for Healthcare. 3 Units.

The goal of this courses are (i) to establish a common understanding of the roles played by various institutions and players in the health care system, and (ii) to ensure competency in basic statistical tools utilized in empirical analyses. These are considered "foundational" topics for students in the MSM-Healthcare program, helping facilitate more effective and efficient delivery of material covered in subsequent courses. Prereq: Students in MSM-Healthcare or requisites not met permission.

HSMC 412. Lean Services Operations. 3 Units.

The course will be delivered over four modules: 1) Service Process Blueprints, 2) Managing Capacity in Service Systems, 3) Mapping the Value Stream (current and future state), and 4) Inventory Management in Service Systems. The topics considered are viewed in the context of healthcare management, financial services, insurance firms, call centers, back-office operations, and other applications. Through these topics, the participants will be trained in tools that help them understand customers' expectations and needs and to identify service system characteristics that can meet these needs. We will learn how to identify errors in service and troubleshoot these problems by identifying the root causes of errors. Subsequently, we will discuss how one can modify the product or service design so as to prevent defects from occurring. Finally, we will establish performance metrics that help evaluate the effectiveness of the Lean system in place. These efforts will result to improved quality. This course is not oriented toward specialists in service management. Its goal is to introduce you to the environments and help you appreciate the problems that operations managers are confronted with. Then, we will typically discuss some system specifics and emphasize the principles and issues that play key role in their management. Offered as HSMC 412 and OPMT 412.

HSMC 420. Health Finance. 3 Units.

Exploration of economic, medical, financial and payment factors in the U.S. healthcare system sets the framework for the study of decisions by providers, insurers, and purchasers in this course. The mix of students from various programs and professions allows wide discussion from multiple viewpoints. Offered as BAFI 420 and HSMC 420. Prereq: ACCT 401 or ACCT 401H.

HSMC 421. Health Economics and Strategy. 3 Units.

This course has evolved from a theory-oriented emphasis to a course that utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and hospital mergers, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in health systems management. Offered as ECON 421, HSMC 421, and MPHP 421.

HSMC 425. Dialogues in Health Care Management. 3 Units.

Dialogues in Healthcare Management is designed to serve students in the MSM-Healthcare management program. The course seeks to educate students of the intricacies related to specific management challenges that arise in the context of healthcare delivery. This is accomplished through a process of facilitated dialogs with experienced healthcare management professionals. Drawing on the experiences and deep contextual knowledge of these professionals, the course provides students an opportunity to synthesize and apply their prior coursework to better understand the challenges and opportunities that managers face to improve organizational performance. Prereq: MSM Healthcare Students only.

HSMC 427. Health Law 1. 3 Units.

Health Law 1 and Health Law 2 are the core courses in the Health Law curriculum and both courses are required for the Health Law Concentration. The subject matter of the courses spans the entire field of health law, including (1) the history, structure, financing, and operation of the U.S. medical system; (2) legal and ethical rules and regulations governing physicians and other health care professionals; the patient-physician relationship; institutional providers of care such as hospitals, nursing homes, and laboratories; and drug and device manufacturers; (3) regulation of health insurers and managed care organization; (4) medical malpractice law; (5) confidentiality and electronic medical records; (6) fraud and abuse; (7) antitrust law; (8) employer health plans; (9) medical research; and (10) public health. The courses will be taught by a team of full-time and adjunct law professors and will include significant experiential exercises and opportunities. Grading will be based on periodic quizzes, memos, performance on experiential exercises, and final exams. Offered as HSMC 427 and LAWS 227.

HSMC 432. Health Care Information Systems. 3 Units.

This course covers concepts, techniques and technologies for providing information systems to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of health care organizations. Offered as HSMC 432 and MPHP 532.

HSMC 446. Models of Health Care Systems. 1.5 Unit.

This course is for professionals who will pursue their careers in, or associated with, the health care industry; and therefore, need to understand the structure, operations and decision influences in the health care delivery system. The course is intended to develop competence and confidence in the participant's ability to understand and operate in the industry. the largest and, perhaps, the most complex in the United States. It is applicable to the private and public, profit and not-for-profit sectors. In this course students are introduced to: the different systems of care delivery; their organization and operations; their markets and the nature of the demand for their services; and the dynamics of their interoperation among themselves and with other entities in the industry (e.g., payors/insurers, regulators and accreditors, technology and pharmaceuticals suppliers). Offered as HSMC 446 and IIME 446.

HSMC 447. Regulatory Affairs for the Biosciences. 1.5 Unit.

This mini-course introduces students to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the laws and regulations it enforces. A scientific regulatory agency with far reaching enforcement authority, FDA is the most powerful consumer protection agency in the world. This course will familiarize students with FDA's mission, philosophy and organizational structure, as well as policy and procedure it uses to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the food, drugs, biologics, cosmetics, medical devices and radiation-emitting products it regulates. Recommended preparation: Enrollment in the MEM Biomedical Entrepreneurship Track. Offered as BIOS 447, HSMC 447, and IIME 447.

HSMC 448. Engineering Statistics for Biosciences. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to biostatistics, emphasizing experimental design, analysis of data, and special emphasis on statistical and financial aspects of randomized clinical trials for biomedical applications. There will be a final project involving development of a clinical trial protocol including the experimental design, recruitment and retention strategy, analysis plan and budget. Offered as BIOS 448, HSMC 448, and IIME 445.

HSMC 456. Health Policy and Management Decisions. 3 Units.

This seminar course combines broad health care policy issue analysis with study of the implications for specific management decisions in organizations. This course is intended as an applied, practical course where the policy context is made relevant to the individual manager. Offered as HSMC 456 and MPHP 456.

HSMC 457. Health Decision Making & Analytics. 3 Units.

The goals of this course are to: (1) introduce the sources of data healthcare that managers can exploit to improve decision-making in their organizations; (2) examine health decision making styles, approaches and impediments; (3) provide a framework for medical informatics and how information technology can be exploited to pursue organizational goals;; and (4) examine the analytic tools necessary for turning "raw data" into actionable information. The course is pragmatic, covering such issues as the current state and emerging trends in medical informatics (MI), information principles, decision models and analytics approaches, as well as the impact of emerging health legislation, information systems and processes on decisions and analytics. Prereq: MSM Healthcare students only.

HSMC 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

LHRP Courses

LHRP 360. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered for candidates undertaking reading or independent research in a field of special interest.

LHRP 431. Negotiations for Managers. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is to enhance individual as well as organizational performance and competitive advantage through "principled negotiation", "win-win bargaining", and collaborative as opposed to competitive approaches to team problem solving. The context crosses all types of business, government and non-governmental organizations. Concepts, strategies, and models of negotiation are drawn from social psychology, economics, labor relations, and legal literature. Students will also be introduced to mediation (both as mediators and negotiators); to the complex art of advocacy and to the latest alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques. There is heavy reliance on simulations and role play to enhance student understanding of key course concepts. Although immediate skill enhancement through practice is a goal, students understanding of key concepts will enable them to continuously improve their insights and skills long after the course is concluded. There is no prerequisite for the course.

LHRP 501. Special Problems and Topics. .5 - 18 Units.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking individual reading or research projects in a field of special interest.

LHRP 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

MBAC Courses

MBAC 504. Corporate Finance. 3 Units.

This is a MBA core finance course. In this course, students are introduced to the basics of corporate finance, including the objectives of and the decisions made by corporate financial managers. Topics covered include time value of money, stock and bond valuation, cost of capital and risk and return, investment decision rules, cash flows and free cash flows, cash flow projections and planning, working capital management and short-term financing, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, efficient markets, and macroeconomic/industry analysis and valuation. The course envisages extensive use of spreadsheets, case studies, data analysis, and an intensive workshop. The course envisages extensive use of spreadsheets as well as an intensive workshop involving data analysis. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 506. Marketing Management. 3 Units.

MBAC 506 (Marketing Management) and MBAC 507 (Operations and Supply Chain Management) are an integrated presentation of the process of marketing, operations and supply chain management. Thus, they must be taken in numerical sequence or concurrently. Through lecture, discussion, cases and/or simulations you will learn theory and practice of how firms develop processes to understand, create and deliver "triple bottom line" value (i.e., economic, social and environmental) to business and/or consumer markets. In systems theory these continual-input-transformation-output stages comprise value chains. Specifically in this course, we will introduce you to and help you to practice the ways managers think about and employ information, processes, tools and skills in order to 1. understand and target value from the customer's perspective, 2. build marketing programs that attract, retain satisfied customers, and 3. evaluate brand equity based on customer lifetime value to the firm. Throughout both courses (see MBAC 507 for its specific content) we will address the integrated process of managing ongoing long-term relationships with customers, distribution partners and suppliers to assure long-term customer satisfaction and achievement of the organization's economic, social and environmental goals. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 507. Operations and Supply Chain Management. 3 Units.

MBAC 506 (Marketing and Supply Chain Management) and MBAC 507 (Operations and Supply Chain Management) are an integrated presentation of the process of marketing, operations and supply chain management. Thus, they must be taken in numerical sequence or concurrently. Through lecture, discussion, cases and/or simulations you will learn theory and practice of how firms develop processes to understand, create and deliver "triple bottom line" value (i.e., economic, social and environmental) to business and/or consumer markets. In systems theory these continual-input-transformation-output stages comprise value chains. Specifically, in this course, we will introduce you to, and help you to practice, the ways managers forecast demand, establish production processes for the product or service, manage inbound resource flows, and manage outbound distribution so the customer can get the product or service the way he or she wants (i.e., place, form, time and "experience" utility). Throughout both courses (see MBAC 506 for its specific content) we will address the integrated process of managing ongoing long-term relationships with customers, distribution partners and suppliers to assure long-term customer satisfaction and achievement of the organization's economic, social and environmental goals. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 508. Strategic Issues and Applications. 3 Units.

Strategic management deals fundamentally with the ways firms build and sustain superior competitive positions and profitability. Successful strategy design and implementation requires an understanding of a firm's external environment, its internal resources and capabilities. It also requires an integrative view of the firm that spans functional areas such as operations, marketing and finance. Strategic analysis draws on a number of academic disciplines including economics, psychology, political and management science. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 511. Statistics and Decision Modeling. 3 Units.

This course provides the foundations of statistical and operations research methodologies for managerial decision-making. Topics covered include making inferences for populations from sample data via (a) estimation with confidence intervals, (b) hypothesis tests, and (c) forecasting with simple and multiple regression. Decision modeling of organizational systems uses mathematical and computer models to provide a quantitative approach to analyzing and solving complex decision problems. This course includes an introduction to linear programming models and applications, queuing models, and simulation models. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 512. Economics. 3 Units.

In this short class you will be introduced to the basics of modern microeconomic and macroeconomic thinking. Topics include consumers, firms, markets, the role of the government, information and public choice. This class will also focus on the economy as a whole: business cycle, statistics used to measure the economy, fiscal and monetary policy, international trade and development. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 515. Leading People and Organizations. 3 Units.

Using the behavioral and social sciences as a basis, this course examines concepts relevant to the effective management of oneself, other people and organizations. In this course, students will learn and engage in a process of personal development and growth. This will include receiving feedback by engaging in a 360-feedback session, and receiving individual coaching that culminates in a personal vision statement and development plan. Students will also gain a better understanding of working in a team by learning about group and team dynamics. In order to be better managers and more effective leaders, they will also gain a better understanding of working in a team by learning about group and team dynamics. In order to be better managers and more effective leaders, they will also study various aspects of organizational life such as culture; motivation and reward systems; power, politics and influence; and social capital and social networks. A variety of methods, including self-assessments, experiential and interactive activities, case studies, and other types of media are used to study these topics. Students are encouraged to reflect on their experiences throughout the course. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 517. Management Perspectives and Dialogues. 3 Units.

This course serves as a vehicle to exercise critical thinking and integration skills. While much is learned by attending to the various functions of a business, effective management requires that you be able to integrate these to better understand the whole (organization, supply chain, market, industry, etc.). The course addresses that objective in three ways. First, we will bring in teams of senior managers for you to engage in dialogue about issues they have recently addressed, expect to address in the near future and how they function as leaders of their organizations. Next, are several modules that explore a couple of particular perspectives on management--that managers are designers and that businesses play a critical role in shaping a sustainable world. These are viewed as lenses for integrating the skills you are developing in the functional courses. Finally, we will have sessions in which you will practice thinking on your feet about how to approach business problems and situations. These are structured to help you in job interviews and to help you stand out in your early days in new work environment. The goal of this course is pragmatic. You can help by actively engaging with us in a dialogue about which elements work in helping you achieve these objectives and which do not. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 520A. Design and Sustainability. 3 Units.

In the fall semester (MBAC 520A - Design & Sustainability, a 3cr.hr course) students are introduced to sustainability which creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for the building sustainable value and "turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities. In the spring semester(MBAC 520B - Design Thinking in Management, a 3 credit hour course) students are introduced to Design which is giving form to an idea to conceive of a more desirable product, service, process or organization and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firm's operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization's plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis in ways that are integrative and inventive, and through it managers create opportunities and means of attaining them. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAC 520B. Design Thinking in Management. 3 Units.

Design Thinking in Management is a 3cr.hr course. In the fall semester(MBAC 520A - Design & Sustainability, a 3cr.hr course) students are introduced to sustainability which creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for the building sustainable value and "turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities. In the spring semester(MBAC 520B - Design Thinking in Management) students are introduced to Design which is giving form to an idea to conceive of a more desirable product, service, process or organization and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firm's operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization's plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis in ways that are integrative and inventive, and through it managers create opportunities and means of attaining them. Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MBAP Courses

MBAP 401. Leadership Assessment and Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed to increase competitive attractiveness in the marketplace and maximize the added value of the M.B.A. program. The objective of the course is to have students learn a method for assessing and developing in themselves the knowledge and abilities relevant to management throughout their careers. This is accomplished by helping students develop an individualized learning plan to enhance their level of knowledge in 11 fields and 22 abilities. Students engage in a number of assessment activities, then receive feedback and interpret it. This occurs in the context of an Executive Action Team (i.e., students and a facilitator) in which students help each other assess their current capability and future development needs. This course is limited to students in the Part-time Cohort M.B.A. program. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program only.

MBAP 403. Statistics and Decision Modeling. 3 Units.

This course provides the foundations of statistical and operations research methodologies for managerial decision-making. Business statistics focuses on statistical thinking as one of the fundamentals of effective management. Topics covered include sampling and the normal distribution, making inferences from data via confidence intervals and hypothesis tests, and analyzing relationships between samples. Decision modeling of organizational systems uses mathematical and computer models to provide a quantitative perspective on identifying, analyzing and solving complex decision problems. This course includes an introduction to linear programming models and applications, simulation techniques in decision-making, and project management. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program.

MBAP 404. Managing People and Organizations. 3 Units.

Examines the behavioral sciences relevant to the effective management of people and the effective design of human resources system, structure and policies. Topics include leadership, change management, motivation and pay systems, team dynamics, staffing, decision making, organizational communications, employee participation, performance appraisal, conflict management, negotiation, work design, organizational design, and organizations culture. A variety of methods, including experiential and interactive learning methods, are used to study these topics. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or MSM Healthcare program only.

MBAP 405. Financial Management I. 3 Units.

This is a Corporate Finance course that deals with investment theory and financial value. The course materials cover discounted cash flows, bond and stock valuation, capital budgeting, applications of real options in investment analysis, asset's risk and return, cost of capital, market efficiency and capital structure. The tools, problem solving techniques, and ways of thinking that you develop in this course have broad applicability to all areas of business. They also form the basis for sensible personal decisions in the areas of investments, borrowing, and financial planning. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program.

MBAP 406. Economics for Managers. 3 Units.

This course surveys the basic principles of micro and macroeconomics. Topics covered in microeconomics include supply and demand, the theory of production and costs, market structures and factor markets. Macroeconomics topics are the national incomes accounts, the determination of national income, employment and inflation, fiscal and monetary policies and international trade. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program only.

MBAP 407. Managerial Marketing. 3 Units.

This course focuses on managing marketing as a process of creating value and mutually desirable exchanges of values. That is the foundation of a customer orientation and a central theme of market-driven management. Methods for strategic marketing planning, understanding buyer behavior, market analysis, segmentation and devising integrated marketing programs are introduced. Creating customer value and competitive advantage in worldwide markets is the central theme. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program, Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program or MSM in Healthcare only.

MBAP 408. Operations Management. 3 Units.

Operations management deals with the design of products and processes, the acquisition of resources, the conversion of inputs to outputs, and the distribution of goods and services. It is central to a firm's ability to compete effectively. As global competition in both goods and services increases, the management of operations is becoming more and more important. This course provides a broad overview of the managerial issues associated with production and delivery of goods and services. It includes the use of quantitative modeling using computers as a central methodology. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program, Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program, or MSM in Healthcare only.

MBAP 409. Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

This course creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for building sustainable value and "turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities." Case studies of leading mainstream companies are used to analyze how business value is created for a range of social and environmental initiatives. Students will look at sustainability business strategies that reduce risks, drive down costs, create new revenue streams, serve new markets, and position companies to take advantage of changing societal expectations. Environmental issues such as climate change are covered along with social issues such as global poverty. Students acquire the competencies required to make effective business decisions based on integrating sustainability into the core of a company's value added activities. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program only.

MBAP 410. Strategic Issues and Applications. 3 Units.

This course wraps up the M.B.A. core by providing an integrative experience of applying the full range of managerial skills addressed throughout the core in a comprehensive case exercise. Students develop, document, and present comprehensive, implementable strategic and tactical actions programs in groups. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or Cleveland Clinic Part-time Cohort MBA Program only.

MBAP 411. Identifying Design Opportunities. 3 Units.

Designing is giving form to an idea for a more desirable product, service, process or organization, and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firms' operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization's plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis to create opportunities for improvement and means of attaining them. Viewed this way, designing is a core competence of a successful entrepreneur or innovative leader. Design analysis is the systematic review of the four orders of design found in every firm--namely, the firm's communications, products, interactions and environments--and the creation of opportunities to increase firm value by improving each. Students will identify ill-defined, ill-structured problems within organizations. Such problems are ones for which there are no definitive formulations and for which the formulation chosen affects the solutions available. For such problems, there is no explicit way of knowing when you have reached a solution, and solutions cannot necessarily be considered correct or incorrect. But finding innovative solutions to such problems can provide unique opportunities to create exceptional value. A major outcome of the semester's inquiry is a presentation of the design problem and proposed design solution. Prereq: This course is for students in the Part-time Cohort MBA Program or MSM in Healthcare only.

MGAB Courses

MGAB 501. Study Abroad. 1 - 15 Unit.

Place holder for students studying abroad, to be replaced with actual course work taken at Exchange location once course work is completed and a transcript is sent to CWRU.

MGMT Courses

MGMT 1. Supervised Professional Practicum - Semester 1. 0 Units.

A professional practicum is a workplace experience, the primary goal of which is the intellectual, personal and professional growth of the student. It occurs under the sponsorship or supervision of a mentor in the workplace who is committed to seeing that it is an educational as well as a work venture. It requires skills appropriate to the student's year in college and provides students with new skills, insights and experiences that are transferable back to the academic setting and/or to a future position in the workplace. (Only available to declared Weatherhead Accounting or Management majors.) Prereq: Junior standing or higher.

MGMT 2. Supervised Professional Practicum - Semester 2. 0 Units.

A professional practicum is a workplace experience, the primary goal of which is the intellectual, personal and professional growth of the student. It occurs under the sponsorship or supervision of a mentor in the workplace who is committed to seeing that it is an educational as well as a work venture. It requires skills appropriate to the student's year in college and provides students with new skills, insights and experiences that are transferable back to the academic setting and/or to a future position in the workplace. (Only available to declared Weatherhead Accounting or Management majors.) Prereq: Junior standing.

MGMT 201. Contemporary Business and Communication. 3 Units.

This course is designed to survey business topics, issues, and practices. Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of business, including accounting, finance, marketing, operations, business intelligence, and human resources management. The course is designed to help students appreciate the interrelationship of these business functions and, more generally, the role and context of business in society. Other topics considered include: the economic and legal environment of business, the globalization of markets, workforce diversity, leadership and entrepreneurship. To convey course content, lectures, in-class discussions, exercises, simulations, and guest speakers are used. Weekly discussions and a high level of student interaction amplify on class materials and concepts by focusing on contemporary issues of actual businesses.

MGMT 315. International Management Institute. 3 Units.

The course provides undergraduate students with a unique overseas visitation, language orientation, and management subject experiences during periods such as Spring Break, or during interims immediately following the end of the semester. Opportunities for diverse cultural and language experiences which result from the institute are added benefits of these programs.

MGMT 360. Special Topics and Issues in Management. 1 - 9 Unit.

This course option is available to qualified students who are undertaking special projects in a management related field.

MGMT 395. Advanced Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar, for undergraduate students with junior class standing or above, provides an opportunity to consider topics of importance in the community of ideas and activities related to the professional and managerial world. The development of writing and communication skills and in-depth discussion are expected attributes of seminar activity. The topic and scope of the coverage will be defined by the course instructor as consistent with the seminar approach to learning of the University. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Prereq: Declared ACCT or MGMT Major and At Least Junior Standing.

MGMT 397. Undergraduate Research Project. 3 - 6 Units.

This course provides a supervisory structure for students completing and a capstone research project in the Weatherhead School of Management. Arrangements should be made by consultation with a faculty member selected and the Senior Capstone Committee of the School of Management. Open to all management and accounting majors and other qualified students with instructor approval. A written report, presentation to the faculty department most closely related to the student's topic, and an approved public presentation are required. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone.

MGMT 398. Action Learning. 6 Units.

This is an experiential course built around consulting projects in local organizations. Each project is focused on solving a business problem or pursuing a business opportunity. Each student will work in a team to analyze the current situation and identify related problems/opportunities, conduct research, analyze findings, creatively envision alternatives, and recommend an appropriate course of action and next steps. Throughout the semester students will receive instruction and coaching on the problem solving approach used in the course. Counts as SAGES Senior Capstone. Prereq: ACCT 102, BAFI 355 and MKMR 201, Senior Standing, and Declared ACCT or MGMT major.

MGMT 403. Leadership Assessment and Development. 3 Units.

This course is designed to increase competitive attractiveness in the marketplace and maximize the added value of the M.B.A. program. The objective of the course is to have students learn a method for assessing and developing in themselves the knowledge and abilities relevant to management throughout their careers. This is accomplished by helping students develop an individualized learning plan to enhance their level of knowledge in 11 fields and 22 abilities. Students engage in a number of assessment activities, then receive feedback and interpret it. This occurs in the context of an Executive Action Team (i.e., students and a facilitator) in which students help each other assess their current capability and future development needs. This course is limited to students in the M.B.A. program.

MGMT 413. Human Value in Organizations. 3 Units.

Examines the behavioral sciences relevant to the effective management of people and the effective design of human resources system, structure and policies. Topics include leadership, change management, motivation and pay systems, team dynamics, staffing, decision making, organizational communications, employee participation, performance appraisal, conflict management, negotiation, work design, organizational design, and organizations culture. A variety of methods, including experiential and interactive learning methods, are used to study these topics.

MGMT 418. Curricular Practical Training. 0 Units.

This course is intended for graduate business students who wish to gain curricular practical training in support of career goals. The experience developed in an internship will complement academic experience gained in Weatherhead classes.

MGMT 419. Corporate Field Research. 1 - 3 Unit.

This course is intended for the graduate business student who wishes to gain applied/practical business experience based on his/her intended career path and/or with an organization. This course will assist building required skills and bridge the gap between the classroom and real world application.

MGMT 440. Leadership Assessment and Development II. 0 Units.

The exit assessment course (MGMT 440) is aimed at assessing how students' career goals, values and abilities may have changed since the program began. The course meets for one mandatory half day seminar in the Spring Semester and carries o units of credit. In the MGMT 403 course, students were provided the tools and opportunities for self-assessment and career planning. In the very first semester, they completed several assessment instruments (LSI, POQ, 360-Feedback (ECI-U), ASI, My Values, Career Anchors and others). They had to identify their top values, set a career vision and created an individualized learning plan. The ultimate goal was to assure that their personal development and preparation was relevant to, and in alignment with, the emergent requirements of today's business management careers. This course is specifically designed to identify if a student's prior learning plan (completed in the MGMT 403 course) still fits with his/her current career reality and to also identify what has changed for him/her. The activities in the course will include: Viewing the current reality of today's business environment; Revisiting their experience in the MBA program including any internships/jobs;; Determining if a student's values, vision and learning plan still fill; Retaking the 360-Feedback (Emotional Intelligence Competencies) to identify development of competencies; Identifying relevant areas of personal development; Committing to a refined learning plan and goals. Through a highly interactive and team based process, students will be able to reflect on their current reality, get feedback on your personal growth and discover what changes would enhance their professional career journey.

MGMT 458. International Institute. 3 Units.

The International Institute involves semester-long study of a particular region, followed by a class trip to an area within that region. The preparatory coursework varies depending on the region selected for that particular semester; however, it typically consists of research about cultural, financial, political, and economic topics. The trip consists of daily research meeting with organizations within the region being studied. Upon return, a summary exercise is required to complete the coursework. The class trip is a mandatory component of the course.

MGMT 460. Managing in a Global Economy. 3 Units.

Managers need new skills to enable them to manage effectively in what is increasingly a global economy. They need a deeper understanding of cultural differences and how these differences may influence communications with foreign employers, employees, customers, suppliers or partners. They need a better understanding of the economic and political mechanics of the world business system. They need to learn how to find out more about potential opportunities and threats that lie outside the United States. This course is designed to address these needs.

MGMT 464. Business Ethics. 3 Units.

This course is built around two core learning tracks. The first is extended analyses of case studies, which identifies ethical problems, diagnoses import, and develops strategic programs to address them. The second learning track uses short pieces of fiction to explore issues of ethical character, leadership, and organizational responsibility. Each student keeps an ethics journal over the course of the semester to reflect on ethical issues, both inside and outside the classroom. In addition, small student groups are formed to write case studies focusing on a business ethics problem.

MGMT 465. Perspectives in European Management. 3 Units.

The European Institute provides an introduction to international business through a unique combination of class meetings and an excursion to Europe. While in Europe, students meet with local business people, consulate officials, and university professors to learn the prerequisites for doing business in the region. The trip features site visits to local companies.

MGMT 467. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management. 3 Units.

This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates (in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. During this course, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two laws students, two MBA students and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, and technology-transfer office. Please visit the following website for more information: fusioninnovate.com. Offered as LAWS 5341, MGMT 467, GENE 367, GENE 467, EBME 467 and EECS 467. Prereq: MBAC 508.

MGMT 470. Corporate Governance. 3 Units.

This course is geared to enabling students to accelerate their careers and to rise to the very top echelons of management. Top CEOs from prominent regional businesses will share what they look for when they hire MBAs and they will suggest strategies for advancing through entry level and middle management to senior management. Improving your interviewing technique will be featured. The course will give students a top down look at career success. The role of the board of directors will also be explored. The best practices learned will be applicable to for-profit businesses and non-profit organizations, including health care.

MGMT 495A. AMES Business Model. 3 Units.

AMES BUSINESS MODELS is an experiential 2nd year MBA course built around the challenge of developing a business model for a company or organization. Students will have the opportunity to work on teams on three distinct projects across two semesters. The first project will involve helping develop the core business model for a start-up company or a newly commercialized technology coming out of CWRU. The second project will focus on business models for existing product lines within mature companies (small, medium or large enterprises). The third project will involve the business model of a company located outside of the United States. The first semester will enable "enterprise wide" learning from various local, startup organizations is broken into two segments with the first semester of in class research and analysis of organizations and will teach students to capture the gestalt of a company and its issues relating to its business with case studies. This semester will also involve sharing practitioner and academic approaches to developing strategic business models such as Alexander Osterwalder's business model canvas as well as design approaches. Student teams will engage in three business model projects across the two semesters. They will come up with a set of hypotheses with the teaching staff and sponsors and then test their assumptions through a customer discovery and user research process. Students will work in teams to analyze the current situation and identify related problems/opportunities, conduct research, creatively envision alternatives, and recommend an appropriate course of action and next steps around the specified business model. Student projects will take place with companies or organizations in Cleveland or outside of the region (including international projects). Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MGMT 495B. AMES Business Models II. 3 Units.

AMES BUSINESS MODELS is an experiential 2nd year MBA course built around the challenge of developing a business model for a company or organization. Students will have the opportunity to work on teams on three distinct projects across two semesters. The first project will involve helping develop the core business model for a start-up company or a newly commercialized technology coming out of CWRU. The second project will focus on business models for existing product lines within mature companies (small, medium or large enterprises). The third project will involve the business model of a company located outside of the United States. The first semester will enable "enterprise wide" learning from various local, startup organizations is broken into two segments with the first semester of in class research and analysis of organizations and will teach students to capture the gestalt of a company and its issues relating to its business with case studies. This semester will also involve sharing practitioner and academic approaches to developing strategic business models such as Alexander Osterwalder's business model canvas as well as design approaches.Student teams will engage in three business model projects across the two semesters. They will come up with a set of hypotheses with the teaching staff and sponsors and then test their assumptions through a customer discovery and user research process. Students will work in teams to analyze the current situation and identify related problems/opportunities, conduct research, creatively envision alternatives, and recommend an appropriate course of action and next steps around the specified business model. The scope of potential projects is expected to be quite broad ranging from helping develop the core business model for a start-up company or a newly commercialized technology coming out of CWRU to business models for existing product lines within mature companies. Student projects will take place with companies or organizations in Cleveland or outside of the region (including international projects). Prereq: Full-time MBA program only.

MGMT 497. Action Learning Project. 3 Units.

This course allows teams of students to integrate functional, core knowledge and apply analysis and strategic management skills in a real-world setting. Students will be evaluated by the instructor and the project managers at the client organizations. Prereq: MSM Healthcare students only.

MGMT 499. Strategic Issues and Applications. 3 Units.

This course wraps up the M.B.A. core by providing an integrative experience of applying the full range of managerial skills addressed throughout the core in a comprehensive case exercise. Students develop, document, and present comprehensive, implementable strategic and tactical actions programs in groups. Prereq: ACCT 401 and BAFI 402.

MGMT 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

MGMT 560. Theoretical Perspectives in Management. 3 Units.

This seminar exposes students to management theories from a variety of disciplines. The goal of the course is to help students learn to synthesize and contrast theories to develop hypotheses of their own. Prereq: Ph.D. standing or consent of instructor.

MGMT 571. Measurement Theory and Method. 3 Units.

This doctoral seminar focuses on the theoretical and methodological issues involved in social science measurement. Specifically, the course will cover topics in basic principles of measurement including Classical Test Theory, Reliability, Validity, and Item Response Theory, as well as related tools for measurement analysis including Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor analysis. In addition, the course will expose students to analytical methods that model measurement error in simultaneous equations including models with mediation and moderation effects. This course involves extensive use of statistical packages including SPSS, LISREL, and EQS. Prereq: Ph.D. standing.

MGMT 573. Applied Multivariate Data Analysis. 3 Units.

The objectives of the seminar are to provide students with an understanding of the substantive and methodological issues involved in applied multivariate data analysis. The seminar aims to expose students to the assumptions, principles and applications of a selected set of multivariate techniques including Logistic Regression, MANOVA/Discriminant, Profile, Multilevel and Latent Growth Model analysis. This course involves extensive use of statistical packages including SPSS, LISREL, and EQS. Prereq: Ph.D. standing.

MGMT 575. Doctoral Research Project. 3 Units.

The objective of the course is to produce a stand-alone piece of scholarship in the academic discipline pursued by the student. The paper or project should be of publishable quality as judged by the instructor. The work of the student is to be accomplished on the independent study basis under the direction of a faculty member. Although there are no specific course prerequisites, the understanding is that all other coursework should have been completed to be admitted into the class. Prereq: Ph.D. standing.

MGMT 601. Special Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

MGMT 602. Advanced Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This is a course of flexible design to meet advanced theoretical and/or methodological needs of doctoral students. Approval is needed from the instructor, and it requires a letter grade.

MGMT 610. Culture and World Politics. 3 Units.

Religion, ethnicity, and nationalism have assumed major political significance in the post Cold-War and post-9/11 eras. The course examines ideas of political democracy and economic liberalism in relation to different cultural and religious ideas and explores relationships among social values, political structures, and economics. Prereq: Only for students in PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems, or by permission of the Program Director.

MGMT 611. Theory and Practice of Collective Action. 3 Units.

The ability of autonomous and interdependent parties to coordinate actions, or to act cooperatively, affects a wide range of organizational and social problems. This course addresses the theory and practice of collective action in local, national and global contexts. Case studies of collective action problems, such as environmental protection, community revitalization, and the mobilization of interest groups will be discussed. Offered as EDMP 611 and MGMT 611. Prereq: Must be enrolled in Ph.D in Management: Designing Systems track.

MGMT 614. Business as an Evolving Complex System. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to provide a foundation for understanding how business systems evolve, why the business systems in the major advanced countries have evolved differently over the last 100 years or so, and what the underlying driving forces are. The focus is on transformation rather than economic growth. The course examines the evolution of business systems as a result of technological and organizational change. It deals with the role of history, culture and finance in generating business organizations in various countries. The course also studies the emergence of regional innovation systems and industry clusters, as well as how digitization and globalization are changing the industrial logic. Prereq: Must be enrolled in PhD in Mgt: Designing Sustainable Systems.

MGMT 616. Global Economic Systems and Issues. 3 Units.

This course provides a framework and analytical tools for understanding globalization and international economic relations in the context of the global political system. It analyzes the economic and political forces that are shaping global cooperation on economic matters, the role and impact of international economic institutions such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization, and evolving forms of regional governance, such as the European Union. It covers national and international policies and development and the causes and cures of international financial crises. The course revolves around concepts of efficiency, equality, power and institutions in the making of public policy towards globalization of communications and transportation. Prereq: Must be enrolled in Ph.D in Management: Designing Systems track.

MGMT 617. Technology and Social System Design. 3 Units.

This course explores the process of design to become a better designer and interventionist who anticipates and evaluates the social, economic, and political consequences of existing and emerging products, processes, and organizational forms. Prereq: Must be enrolled in PhD in Management: Designing System Systems track.

MGMT 640. Social Ethics: Contemporary Issues. 3 Units.

The course draws upon intellectual ancestors and current thinkers in moral philosophy and ethics to assist each student in identifying, analyzing, and discussing social and ethical questions pertaining to the definition and purpose of contemporary life, the need for moral coherence, and the meaning of life in a global society. The unifying theme of the course is Tolstoy's question, "How then shall we live?" The course does not seek to provide answers to the great questions of life. Rather, it tries to expand each student's capacity to grapple with such questions. Prereq: Students in PhD Management program or requisites not met permission.

MGMT 641. Qualitative Res Methods II. 3 Units.

This course guides the student in conducting the qualitative research project that was proposed in EDMP 638. Fieldwork and initial analysis is conducted during the summer when data based on semi-structure interviews is collected and analysis begins using inductive coding techniques. A summer residency is held in mid-June to assess progress as final data collection and analysis continues. The aim of the fall semester is to prepare a formal research report on that project, which will be submitted to an academic research conference. The final report includes a revision of one's conceptual model, integrating new understandings and literature arising from the data collection and analysis. Prereq: Only for students in PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems, or by permission of the Program Director.

MGMT 643. Measuring Bus Behav & Struc. 3 Units.

This course aims to develop the basic foundations and skills for designing and executing generalizable studies that measure business behaviors and structures. It focuses on building competence in building of measurement systems, construct measurement, research design, data collection methodologies, and application of analytical software commonly involved in quantitative inquiry. Covered topics include framing research questions, reliability and validity of measurement, quasi-experimental research design, and fieldwork for data collection. Classes are designed to balance theory and practice through quantitative research design and will be linked to the participant's own research project. Prereq: Only for students in PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems, or by permission of the Program Director.

MGMT 645. Integration of Qualitative and Quantitative Inquiry. 3 Units.

Using the mixed method research toolkit developed in previous courses, this course focuses on critically analyzing selected pieces of published applied and policy research to develop a critical appreciation of issues and debates that have wide applicability and relevance. In particular, it offers students ways to integrate and triangulate using a mixed method approach, different forms of evidence, and related evidence. In addition, this course addresses common method choice and justification issues and related challenges of validity and theory formulation that typically arise during the students' execution of a series of individual research projects. Application of critical analysis and appreciation approach in justifying mixed methods designs to the student's own research work is encouraged and supported by sharing and discussing common research and methodology themes and problems. Prereq: Students in PhD Management program or requisites not met permission.

MGMT 646. Advanced Analytical Methods for Generalizing Research. 3 Units.

This course addresses advanced topics in regression and structural equation modeling such as latent growth curve models, partial least squares, logit models, tests for various types of invariance, multiple-group analysis, multilevel analysis, and analyzing qualitative/categorical data. These analytical methods are intended to enhance the student's toolkit as to facilitate a strong bridge to the academic literature and the application to specific data based problems that arise in applied managerial research. Prereq: Students in PhD Management program or requisites not met permission.

MGMT 648. Causal Analy of Bus Prob I. 3 Units.

Causal Analysis of Business Problems I introduces fundamental concepts in theory-based model building and validation. In this course students will develop, explore, refine a range of models appropriate for addressing their problem of practice including classification models, process models, variance models, and articulating nomological networks. In particular, the course will focus on effective conceptualizations of causation, control, mediation, and moderation. Further, foundational statistical techniques such as tests of assumptions of the data, exploratory factor analysis, and regression and path analysis will be introduced to analyze concepts of causation, control, mediation and moderation. Prereq: Only for students in PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems, or by permission of the Program Director.

MGMT 649. Causal Analy of Bus Prob II. 3 Units.

Building upon the first course in Causal Analysis of Business Problems, this course will guide students through the theoretically-grounded variance models that are required for testing through structural equation modeling (SEM) in the quantitative portion of their research. Fundamental concepts in model testing will be reinforced using path analysis, and will include a deeper exploration of moderation by addressing topics such as moderated mediation and interaction effects. Beyond the analysis the course will emphasize precise and accurate formulation of theoretical models and associated reasoning, as well as careful interpretation of findings. The class will also delve into testing of data assumptions and prepare students for the model testing portion of their capstone assignments. Prereq: Only for students in PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems, or by permission of the Program Director.

MGMT 664. Knowledge Dissemination to Influence Managerial Practice. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is twofold. First, it supports students organizing and writing their DM thesis overview or their PhD thesis proposal. Also discussed are ways to organize and communicate in scientific genres, their aims and their generic properties. Secondly, students become acquainted with scientific communication and publishing. Effective reviewing, criteria for judging articles and theses, management of review processes, and how to communicate and respond to reviews are topics discussed. The course also addresses publication strategies and ways of managing and communicating scientific and managerial knowledge to different stakeholders. Prereq: Students in PhD Management program or requisites not met permission.

MGMT 671. Design and Sustainable Systems. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to introduce doctoral students to the nature and practice of design as a strategy of inquiry as well as a mode of action in addressing the problems of creating and managing sustainable human systems. The objectives are (1) to introduce the conceptual framework of design, (2) the nature of human interaction as seen from the perspective of design, (3) the intellectual and practical strategies of design, (4) the methods and techniques of design that are relevant to the study and design of sustainable human systems, and (5) the nature of "wicked problems" and the ethical issues of design, with special attention to the place of human dignity in the design of sustainable systems. The course will employ key elements of the literature of design, close reading and discussion, and exercises that explore the concepts and methods of design. Prereq: Students in PhD Management program or requisites not met permission.

MGMT 672. Flourishing Enterprise: Creating Sustainable Value for Business and World Benefit. 3 Units.

This course is designed to galvanize new visions of business and society, as well as organizational leadership. The course is born of a conviction that the future of human society and the natural world is intimately linked to the future of the world economy, business enterprises, and management education. The course presentations, books, dialogues, and interview projects are organized around three themes: (1) the state of the world and the economics possibilities of our time, (2) the business case for understanding business as an agent of world benefit--how business performance can profit from current and future advances in sustainable design and social entrepreneurship; and (3) tools for becoming a change leader--including the methods of Appreciative Inquiry and new insights about "strength-based" change emerging from the science of human strengths. The overarching aim is to provide a powerful introduction to the many facets of sustainable value creation as a complete managerial approach. Prereq: Must be a student in the PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems track.

MGMT 673. Understanding, Designing, Managing Complex Systems. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to provide a perspective on systems thinking and complex systems to aid PhD students in expanding the ideas in their research on systems, systems models, and complex systems. The work of the course will develop with increasingly difficult books on the subject of complex systems, a major case study in health care, and individual applications of the concepts to their potential research model and methods. Prereq: Students in PhD Management program or requisites not met permission.

MGMT 677. Designing Sustainable Systems. 3 Units.

Students in teams will recognize and work in practice on a managerial problem that involves dimensions of sustainability and design. They will develop a set of solutions to the problem by generating alternative models and intervention strategies to address the problem. The project results in a short presentation and written communication of the solution in a form of a poster or prototype. The course will also include presentations of intervention and action research approaches and issues of inquiry validation and theory development. Prereq: Only for students in PhD in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems.

MGMT 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Must be enrolled in Ph.D. in Management: Designing Sustainable Systems and have predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

MIDS Courses

MIDS 301. Introduction to Information: A Systems and Design Approach. 3 Units.

Managers must design business systems and flows of information that enable an organization to operate successfully in changing environments. This course will explore what "design," "systems," "information" and "environment" really mean in this context. You will develop a systems and design perspective on information and organizations that will inform your future work as a manager and leader. You will learn how to model organizations and their environments to reveal how they reflect foundational concepts of information theory, cybernetic control and complexity. You will also learn to evaluate multiple levels of information design, including communication design, product design, experience design and organization design, as an integral part of your management skills. In addition, you will study the strategic use of contemporary information technologies (e.g., enterprise systems, cloud computing, crowd sourcing, viral marketing, distributed innovation, and social media) to understand how they have changed the competitive landscape of business. Throughout the course, you will be challenged to develop new skills for analyzing organizations, environments and systems, and for using design concepts and methods to create information environments that will enable successful organizations.

MIDS 360. Independent Study. 1 - 18 Unit.


MIDS 409. System and Design Thinking. 3 Units.

For over a half-century, the field of information systems has been learning about the design, development, testing, and use of complex systems. Computers are just the start. The networks that connect them to create a massive communications grid, the software that runs on them, and the impact of these artifacts on organizations have all generated large bodies of knowledge. Two modes of thinking have proven particularly valuable in making sense of these developments--system thinking and design thinking. While this course applies concepts from system thinking and design thinking to problems related to using information in organizations, the techniques are widely applicable to managing.

MIDS 420A. Design in Management: Concept and Practices. 3 Units.

Designing is giving form to an idea to conceive of a more desirable product, service, process or organization and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firm's operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization's plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis in ways that are integrative and inventive, and through it managers create opportunities and means of attaining them. Viewed this way, designing is a core competence of a successful entrepreneur or innovative leader. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence. Design analysis is the systematic review of the four orders of design found in every firm--namely, the firm's communications, products, interactions and environments--and the creation of opportunities to increase firm value by improving each. Students will identify ill-defined, ill-structured problems within organizations. Such problems are ones for which there are no definitive formulations and for which the formulation chosen affects the solutions available. For such problems, there is no explicit way of knowing when you have reached a solution, and solutions cannot necessarily be considered correct or incorrect. But finding innovative solutions to such problems can provide unique opportunities to distinguish organizations and to create exceptional value. A major outcome of the semester's inquiry is a presentation of the challenges and opportunities discovered during the design analysis of the client organization. The presentation will include a conceptualization of the client's current situation and opportunities, along with a statement of their design requirements. It is successful to the extent that it demonstrates learning by creating unexpected value to the client.

MIDS 420B. Design in Management: Concept and Practices. 3 Units.

Designing is giving form to an idea to conceive of a more desirable product, service, process or organization and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firms' operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization's plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis in ways that are integrative and inventive, and through it manages to create opportunities and means of attaining them. Viewed this way, designing is a core competence of a successful entrepreneur or innovative leader. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence. Design analysis is the systematic review of the four orders of design found in every firm--namely, the firm's communications, products, interactions and environments--and the creation of opportunities to increase firm value by improving each. Students will identify ill-defined, ill-structured problems within organizations. Such problems are ones for which there are no definitive formulations and for which the formulation chosen affects the solutions available. For such problems, there is no explicit way of knowing when you have reached a solution, and solutions cannot necessarily be considered correct or incorrect. But finding innovative solutions to such problems can provide unique opportunities to distinguish organizations and to create exceptional value. A major outcome of the semester's inquiry is a presentation of the challenges and opportunities discovered during the design analysis of the client organization. The presentation will include a conceptualization of the client's current situation and opportunities, along with a statement of their design requirements. It is successful to the extent that it demonstrates learning by creating unexpected value to the client. Prereq: MIDS 420A.

MIDS 440. Design of Disruptive Business Models. 3 Units.

This course will explore the design of business models that disrupt traditional or established business patterns. With the shift toward services and human interactions as the foundation of many new companies, this course will focus on methods of inventing and developing business models that use digital technology, information, and service concepts to meet new needs in areas of retail, medical care, and other areas of business opportunity.

MIDS 461. Change Management. 3 Units.

Change is an inherent dimension of organizational life-new policies, regulations, technologies, people, products, competitors, markets, processes, physical facilities...the list goes on. Consequently, the abilities to adapt to and manage technical and organizational changes are critical managerial competencies. This course aims to provide a framework for planning, analyzing, and managing those changes over which you as a manager will have some control. Though our discussions will focus on technology-enabled and technology-related change, the intention is to equip you with a process model, tools, and guiding principles that can be applied more generally to other change processes.

MIDS 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

MIDS 527. Seminar in MIDS. 3 Units.

This seminar addresses topics of current interest with a strong emphasis on research. It is intended primarily for the faculty and doctoral students of the MIDS Department.

MIDS 601. Special Topics in MIDS. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

MIDS 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

MKMR Courses

MKMR 201. Marketing Management. 3 Units.

This is an introductory marketing course designed to provide students with the concepts and theories necessary for understanding the fundamental principles of marketing and its role in any organization. Students will learn concepts such as marketing orientation, marketing-mix, relationship marketing and service logic, as well as behavioral theories of customer response and strategic frameworks of customer brand management. Students develop capabilities for understanding marketing issues in real world situations and to create and implement basic marketing plans. Prereq: At least Sophomore standing.

MKMR 304. Brand Management. 3 Units.

Successful innovation and management of brands and products creates customer, firm, and societal value. This course is designed to help students understand the principles of product and brand development and management such as understanding evolving customer needs; creating and delivering the right products, services, and experiences; and managing the process to enhance brand equity and customer satisfaction. Through text, cases, and simulation this engaging class will cover the branding process from new brand and product development; brand communication and promotion, and brand equity measurement. The course will also discuss specific topics such as global brands, brand extensions, brand revitalization, and social responsibility. Prereq: ACCT 102, ECON 102 and MKMR 201.

MKMR 308. Measuring Marketing Performance. 3 Units.

Evaluation and control are important strategic marketing processes and without effective and consistent measurement, these processes cannot be performed adequately. In recent years, marketing budgets have been challenged by top managers as the value of these expenditures to an organization's financial well being is not often clear. Marketing activities such as advertising, sales promotions, sales force allocation, new product development, and pricing all involve upfront investments and making these investments now require increasing scrutiny. This course will be about knowing and understanding what to measure, how to measure, and how to report it so the link between marketing tactics and financial outcomes is clearer. The course will include lecture by the instructor, readings, cases, computer based data exercises, and guest lectures. There will also be a team project requirement. Prereq: ACCT 101 or 203, ECON 102 and MKMR 201

MKMR 310. Marketing Analytics. 3 Units.

To appreciate, design, and implement data-based marketing studies for extracting valid and useful insights for managerial action that yield attractive ROI, five essential processes are emphasized: (a) making observations about customers, competitors, and markets, (b) recognizing, formulating, and refining meaningful problems as opportunities for managerial action, (c) developing and specifying testable models of marketing phenomenon, (d) designing and implementing research designs for valid data, and (e) rigorous analysis for uncovering and testing patterns and mechanisms from marketing data. Offered as MKMR 310 and ECON 310. Prereq: MKMR 201 and OPRE 207.

MKMR 311. Customer Relationship Management. 3 Units.

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is the strategic process of building and maintaining profitable, sustainable customer relationships through co-creation of value with customers in both business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) markets. This course starts with understanding the relationship between an organization's strategic goals and the structure and dynamics of organization-customer relationships. Topics include assessing CRM system design, implementation and management; the fundamentals of customer profitability analysis; customer portfolio management; B2B relationship management; sales force management and automation; and designing services programs to optimize customer experiences; and expanding customer relationships through services. Additionally, students will explore how one-to-one marketing and social networks enhance customer relationships. Learning will be accomplished through lecture and discussion, critical discussion of case studies and contemporary marketing issues, and interaction with experienced CRM marketing professionals. Prereq: MKMR 201.

MKMR 312. Selling and Sales Management. 3 Units.

Selling and sales management are keys to implementing an organization's marketing program and customer relationships. This course emphasizes developing an understanding of basic marketing concepts, selling principles, interrelationships among sales force management and other business functions, appropriate strategy for managing a sales force and measurement of sales force productivity. We will use theories of work motivation and explore how individual difference variables influence the choices of sales managers. This course uses a synthesis of sales research and leading practices to focuses on both a strategic and a tactical perspective. Strategic issues include: entrepreneurial strategy, the sales force's role in company strategy, customer relationship and strategic account management, sales force size and organization and career paths to sales management. Tactical issues include: effective approaches to selling, finding and retaining top sales talent, motivating and compensating the field force, evaluating performance, and aligning sales territories. Prereq: MKMR 201 or MKMR 301.

MKMR 348. Strategic Internet Marketing. 3 Units.

This course aims to prepare business students to think strategically and make effective marketing decisions in networked business environments. Given the increasing strategic significance of the internet across a broad spectrum of industries, it is imperative that business students develop a deep understanding of the emerging digital marketplace. The course will focus on the following topics: The emerging digital world; individuals and firms online; network technologies; business models on the internet; online branding; customer relationship management and loyalty in electronic markets; internet's impact on innovation and product management; online retailing; business-to-business e-commerce; multi-channel management; sustainable competitive advantage in the digital marketplace; legal, ethical, and public policy issues related to digital technologies; organizing for online marketing. Prereq: MKMR 201.

MKMR 350. Entrepreneurial Marketing. 3 Units.

You have a great idea. This courses helps you achieve your goals for it - whether they are commercial, societal, environmental, public policy/ political or a combination of the four. The course addresses the conceptually creative and data-driven entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial process of conceiving and implementing an operational program for realizing the goals of a market opportunity. Students select an opportunity and develop a deployable, one-year market entry program and five-year strategic marketing program. Emphasis is on the entrepreneurial marketing decision process, including defining the business model, selecting performance objectives and measures, specifying customer perceived value, assessing competitive capability and advantage, defining and analyzing the value chain and evaluating market space structure and dynamics, and complementing the players in the value chain. Identifying and properly using both secondary and primary information in management decision making is a major focus of the course. Offered as MKMR 350 and MKMR 450. Prereq: Sophomore standing.

MKMR 355. Communications Management in a Digital Marketplace. 3 Units.

In a marketplace where consumer touchpoints have gone digital and new digital methods of connecting with the consumers are emerging, this course provides a sound understanding of management of an organization's total marketing communications. The focus is on identifying appropriate strategy and tactics for effectively communicating with end consumers and other stakeholders/public in both conventional ways and also in new and emerging ways. Students examine the roles of advertising, sales promotion and public relations, along with below the line methods like direct response advertising, and Internet based methods including display and search advertising, affiliate marketing and viral campaigns. They work with developing and managing these elements as part of an overall, synergistic communications strategy. Perspectives and metrics for evaluation of the effectiveness of marketing communications are also introduced and discussed. Prereq: MKMR 301.

MKMR 360. Independent Study. 1 - 3 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading and research in an area of their special interest.

MKMR 403. Managerial Marketing. 3 Units.

This course focuses on managing marketing as a process of creating value and mutually desirable exchanges of values. That is the foundation of a customer orientation and a central theme of market-driven management. Methods for strategic marketing planning, understanding buyer behavior, market analysis, segmentation and devising integrated marketing programs are introduced. Creating customer value and competitive advantage in worldwide markets is the central theme. Prereq: ACCT 401.

MKMR 405. Business Marketing. 3 Units.

This course focuses on concepts and practices of business-to-business marketing of products and services. It also examines how rapid technological change impacts industrial markets. Topics covered include: buyer-seller relationship building, competitive bidding, developing markets for new materials and value-based pricing strategies. Marketing to the government, marketing of intellectual property and marketing-R&D-manufacturing interface issues will also be explored. Prereq: MKMR 403 or MBAP 407 or MBAC 506 or (GMBA 401A and GMBA 402A and GMBA 403A and GMBA 401B and GMBA 402B and GMBA 403B).

MKMR 408. Marketing Metrics. 3 Units.

Evaluation and control are important strategic marketing processes and without effective and consistent measurement, these processes cannot be performed adequately. In recent years, marketing budgets have been challenged by top managers as the value of these expenditures to an organization's financial well being is not often clear. Marketing activities such as advertising, sales promotions, sales force allocation, new product development and pricing all involve up-front investments and making these investments now require increasing scrutiny. This course will be about knowing and understanding what to measure, how to measure and how to report it so the link between marketing tactics and financial outcomes is clearer. The course will include lecture by the instructor, readings (no textbook), cases, computer based data exercises and guest lectures. There will also be a team project requirement. Prereq: MBAC 506 or MKMR 403 or MBAP 407 or GMBA 401A.

MKMR 410. Marketing Insight Management. 3 Units.

To appreciate, design, and implement data-based marketing studies for extracting valid and useful insights for managerial action that yield attractive ROI. Five essential processes are emphasized: (a) making observations about customers, competitors, and markets, (b) recognizing, formulating, and refining meaningful problems as opportunities for managerial action, (c) developing and specifying testable models of marketing phenomenon, (d) designing and implementing research designs for valid data, and (e) rigorous analysis for uncovering and testing patterns and mechanisms from marketing data. Prereq: MKMR 403 or MBAC 506 or MBAP 407.

MKMR 411. Customer Relationship Management. 3 Units.

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is the strategic process of building and maintaining profitable customer relationships through co-creation of value with customers. This course starts with understanding the relationship between an organization's strategic goals and customer relationships, including assessing CRM systems, management and implementation, in both B2B and B2C markets. Students will learn the fundamentals of customer profitability analysis, customer portfolio management, B2B relationship/sales force management and automation, designing services to optimize customer experiences, as well as expanding customer relationships through services. Additionally, students will explore how one-to-one marketing and social networks enhance customer relationships. Learning will be accomplished through critical discussion of case studies and contemporary marketing issues, and hands-on group project and presentation, and interaction with experienced CRM marketing professionals. Prereq: MKMR 403 or MBAP 407 or MBAC 506 or (GMBA 401A and GMBA 402A and GMBA 403A and GMBA 401B and GMBA 402B and GMBA 403B).

MKMR 412. E-Marketing. 3 Units.

Using a combination of lectures, cases, and hands-on projects, the course examines how the Internet influences all the key aspects of marketing, including marketing strategy, pricing, advertising, segmentation, marketing research, retailing, distribution channels, and international marketing. Additionally, the course will cover more Internet specific topics such as privacy, wireless web, sales force automation, and emarketplace models. The course incorporates both business-to-business and business-to-consumer outlooks.

MKMR 421. Marketing Value Creation. 3 Units.

Marketing value creation is the process of creating and managing successful brands through continuous innovation. Successful brand innovation and management requires understanding evolving customer needs; creating and delivering the right products, services, and experiences; and managing the process to enhance brand equity and customer satisfaction. Through text, readings, cases, high-profile guest lectures and team projects, this engaging class will cover the innovation and branding process from discovery of unmet needs, brand and product development, to brand promotion and advertising and brand equity measurement. A sustainability thread will weave through the course, covering topics such as brand's ecological footprint, product safety, eco-friendly branding, the ethics of advertising, the impact of pricing on consumers and corporate social responsibility. The result of proper sensitivity to customer needs, social concerns and the environment is integral to the process of value creation for customers, companies and society. Prereq: MKMR 403 or MBAC 506 or MBAP 407 or GMBA 403A.

MKMR 450. Entrepreneurial Marketing. 3 Units.

You have a great idea. This courses helps you achieve your goals for it - whether they are commercial, societal, environmental, public policy/ political or a combination of the four. The course addresses the conceptually creative and data-driven entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial process of conceiving and implementing an operational program for realizing the goals of a market opportunity. Students select an opportunity and develop a deployable, one-year market entry program and five-year strategic marketing program. Emphasis is on the entrepreneurial marketing decision process, including defining the business model, selecting performance objectives and measures, specifying customer perceived value, assessing competitive capability and advantage, defining and analyzing the value chain and evaluating market space structure and dynamics, and complementing the players in the value chain. Identifying and properly using both secondary and primary information in management decision making is a major focus of the course. Offered as MKMR 350 and MKMR 450.

MKMR 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading or a project in a field of special interest.

MKMR 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

MPOD Courses

MPOD 413A. Foundations of Positive Organization Development and Change. 3 Units.

This course explores and develops the art of reading and understanding social systems in ways that help us imagine, design and develop organization excellence. First it seeks to show how many of our conventional ideas about organizations are based on discourse and metaphors that lead us to see and understand organizations in partial and often limiting ways. Growing research from the domains of Positive Psychology and Positive Organization Scholarship and the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry will be explored to show how we can create new and more positive, strength-based ways of designing and developing social systems. Includes presentations, guest lectures and panel discussions on current topics of interest for the Masters in Positive Organization Development and Change (MPOD) candidates. Led by a faculty member of the Department of Organization Behavior, these dialogues and seminars will be presented in several of the six main residencies of the MPOD program. Reflective essays and integrative papers will enable participants to explore their practice of OD, leadership capacity, application of learnings from the program and deeply held values related to current issues and opportunities in the domain of human systems change and development. Part One of Two. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 413B. Foundations of Positive Organization Development and Change. 1 Unit.

This course explores and develops the art of reading and understanding social systems in ways that help us imagine, design and develop organization excellence. First it seeks to show how many of our conventional ideas about organizations are based on discourse and metaphors that lead us to see and understand organizations in partial and often limiting ways. Growing research from the domains of Positive Psychology and Positive Organization Scholarship and the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry will be explored to show how we can create new and more positive, strength-based ways of designing and developing social systems. Includes presentations, guest lectures and panel discussions on current topics of interest for the Masters in Positive Organization Development and Change (MPOD) candidates. Led by a faculty member of the Department of Organization Behavior, these dialogues and seminars will be presented in several of the six main residencies of the MPOD program. Reflective essays and integrative papers will enable participants to explore their practice of OD, leadership capacity, application of learnings from the program and deeply held values related to current issues and opportunities in the domain of human systems change and development. Part Two of Two. Prereq: MPOD 413A.

MPOD 414. Organization Design for a Knowledge World. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to familiarize participants with the theory and technique of organization design and corporate change with particular emphasis on helping leaders understand and implement the latest forms of organizing in a customer-focused, electronically mediated and knowledge-driven world. Frameworks presented will be used to explore the impact of the information revolution on organization design and change, and the evolution of traditional vertically integrated and multi-divisional enterprises toward spider web structures, trans-organizational networks and communities of practice. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 416A. Leadership, Executive Assessment and Development. 1 Unit.

Leadership with emotional intelligence will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to two major case studies: 1) a CEO; and 2) yourself. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. This course will explore questions such as: Who are effective leaders? Are they different from effective managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What and how can people (you) help/coach others develop their competencies to become more effective leaders? (Part one of a three-section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 416B. Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development. 1 Unit.

Leadership with emotional intelligence will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to two major case studies: 1) a CEO; and 2) yourself. This course will explore questions such as: Who are effective leaders? Are they different from effective managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What and how can people (you) help others develop their competencies to become more effective leaders? (Part two of three) Prereq: MPOD 416A.

MPOD 416C. Leadership, Executive Assessment and Development. 1 Unit.

Leadership with emotional intelligence will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to two major case studies: 1) a CEO; and 2) yourself. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. This course will explore questions such as: Who are effective leaders? Are they different from effective managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What and how can people (you) help/coach others develop their competencies to become more effective leaders? (Part three of a three-section course.) Prereq: MPOD 416B.

MPOD 418. Sustainability for Strategic Advantage. 2 Units.

Sustainability is introduced as a movement in business to create value by responding to social and environmental problems in ways that meet current needs without reducing future capacity. Students are introduced to systems thinking skills, such as whole system mapping, causal loop modeling, emergent hypotheses, stakeholder analysis and engaging productive dialogues. Emphasis is placed on use of these skills as methods for working with clients to create actionable knowledge, thereby integrating reflection with action to leave the client system stronger. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 431. Experiential Learning for Individuals, Teams, and Organizations. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the theory of experiential learning and its application at the individual, team, and organizational levels of analyses. This course offers the chance for students to gain insight into their individual learning and adaptive styles, and how such styles impact the way they interact and have consequence for team. The course also explores how teams and organizations learn, and the effect that cultural determinants have on learning and adaptability. In addition, the course examines how learning theory can be applied to focused institutional development projects and educational processes. The course uses presentations, lectures, research findings, interactive activities, and class discussion. The current topics of interest are for the Masters in Positive Organization and Change (MPOD) candidates. It is led by a faculty member of the Department of Organization Behavior. Reflective essays and integrative papers will enable participants to explore their learning styles and that of their organizations and teams to strengthen the practice of OD and human systems change and development. Prereq: MPOD students only.

MPOD 431B. Experiential Learning for Individuals, Teams, and Organizations. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the theory of experiential learning and its application at the individual, team, and organizational levels of analyses. This course offers the chance for students to gain insight into their individual learning and adaptive styles, and how such styles impact the way they interact and have consequence for team. The course also explores how teams and organizations learn, and the effect that cultural determinants have on learning and adaptability. In addition, the course examines how learning theory can be applied to focused institutional development projects and educational processes. The course uses presentations, lectures, research findings, interactive activities, and class discussion. The current topics of interest are for the Masters in Positive Organization and Change (MPOD) candidates. It is led by a faculty member of the Department of Organization Behavior. Reflective essays and integrative papers will enable participants to explore their learning styles and that of their organizations and teams to strengthen the practice of OD and human systems change and development. Part two of two. Prereq: MPOD 431A.

MPOD 432. Interpersonal Skills Building. 2 Units.

The objective of this course is to hone the participant's abilities to use themselves as instruments of change and development in relationships with colleagues and clients. This requires comfort with and practice in intervening in a broad range of interpersonal and group dynamics, and knowledge of how one's unique personal style and character serve as both strengths and weaknesses in dealing with others in a helping relationship. Participants will explore theories of adult development, interpersonal and group dynamics, diagnose their interpersonal needs and styles, and practice techniques for developing generative relationships with clients across the OD (organization development) cycle and as process consultants in group settings. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 435. Practicum in Appreciative Inquiry and Positive OD. 3 Units.

This course develops participants' consultative skills. Competence in role entry and development, data collection, intervention and evaluation is gained through class exercises and field projects. The focus is on developing a problem-centered approach to intervening in organizations that minimizes reliance on programmed techniques and maximize collaborative innovation and learning between client and consultant. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 439A. Individual Field Project. 2 Units.

The objective of this course is to plan and execute a significant organization development, change and/or analysis project with an ongoing client or employer. Emphasis is placed on the craft of developing projects that are consistent with one's current skills, career plans and developmental needs, combined with the needs, opportunities, readiness, and resources of the client organization. This course is limited to candidates for the MPOD program. (Part one of a two section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 439B. Individual Field Project. 2 Units.

The objective of this course is to plan and execute a significant organization development, change and/or analysis project with an ongoing client or employer. Emphasis is placed on the craft of developing projects that are consistent with one's current skills, career plans and developmental needs, combined with the needs, opportunities, readiness, and resources of the client organization. This course is limited to candidates for the MPOD program. (Part two of a two-section course.) Prereq: MPOD 439A.

MPOD 470A. Leading Change from a Complexity Perspective. 1 Unit.

In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad, team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. Prereq: MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 470B. Leading Change from a Complexity Perspective. 2 Units.

In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader? Concepts form complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad , team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. Prereq: MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 479. Foundations of Strategic Thinking. 3 Units.

This course will define what constitutes strategic change and what does not. Students will be introduced to a variety of strategic interventions and models from which to interpret, understand and achieve positive organizational change. Opportunity will be provided to apply selected models to the student's organization and other cases in order to gain insight and appreciation for financial and non-financial factors that influence fundamental organizational growth and development. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 480. Dynamics of Effective Consulting Strategies. 3 Units.

This course will: 1) highlight the major current trends and changes that affect the nature of managerial work; 2) describe how OD practitioners and consultants need to factor such trends into their consulting strategies; 3) differentiate between types of interventions, the circumstances in which they apply and their unique strengths; 4) provide background theories that explain the challenges inherent in mobilizing positive change; 5) describe ways to bridge the gap between knowing and doing in order to build organization resilience; and 6) introduce a variety of consulting techniques and skills that the students can add to their repertoire. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MPOD 498. Global Citizenship and Multi-Cultural OD: International Study Tour. 3 Units.

This course will broaden perspectives and knowledge of how OD principles and technologies are generated and applied in contexts and cultures outside of North America. Selected literature representing global perspectives on the practice of OD and field experiences will provide support and background for personal experience and reflection on cross-cultural issues in organizing. The primary learning context will be an intense, 10-day study tour to some country outside of North America to provide the participants with opportunities for: 1) comparative studies of OD practices in different cultural settings; 2) in-depth experiences with OD practitioners and students in a different national, regional and cultural context; 3) co-inquiry with non-North American students also involved in developing OD knowledge and skills; and 4) on-site organization visits outside of North America to observe and learn about on-going dynamic change efforts. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

MSFI Courses

MSFI 401. Financial Orientation. 1.5 Unit.

This is a mandatory preparatory/refresher course for all entering MSM-Finance students. It will cover several basic topics in statistics, financial accounting and in financial management, so that all students can hit the road running with the other MSM-Finance core courses in the first semester. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 403. Corporate Finance. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the theory and application of additional models used in financial decision-making by corporations. Issues relating to efficient markets, dividend policy, capital structure, financing decisions, option pricing, leasing, and risk management are among the topics considered. In addition, special topics may include mergers and acquisitions, pension funds, and international financial management. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 404. Financial Modeling. 3 Units.

Firms try to create value. In their day-to-day operations, they are faced with numerous challenges: Should we accept trade credit or borrow? Will an acquisition create or destroy value? Should we introduce a new product line even if it cannibalizes an existing one? In each of these situations they try to quantify the impact on the value of their firm. The goal of this course is to develop your skills in financial modeling and valuation, so you can tackle issues like the ones described above. The course is designed to be "hands-on": You will learn to apply the theory and develop spreadsheet modeling skills through the homework, case studies and a group project. By the end of the course you will have a good understanding of both the theory and practice of valuation, and possess a set of cutting-edge financial modeling skills. This course is designed for students who aspire to work in a regular company, a bank or a consulting firm in (I) corporate finance (including mergers and acquisitions); (II) strategy; or (III) equity analysis. This course is for MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 421. Corporate Financial Analysis. 3 Units.

This course is designed to lay the analytic foundation for careers in corporate finance, banking, consulting, and investment banking. The objective of the course is to strengthen students' conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills, and teach them how to think on their feet. Topics covered include Economic cash flows and valuation, Valuation methods, Long term financial planning and ratios analysis, Growth and external financing, Managerial options and valuation, Capital structure, and Payout policy. Topics covered may change from semester to semester. The course envisages use of spreadsheets and case studies, and will emphasize on links to real-world events. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 428. Financial Strategy and Value Creation. 3 Units.

The intersection between the theory of perfect markets and the reality of market imperfections provides the basis for the exploration of value creation in this course. Opportunities in both product and financial markets are explored using case studies to develop a framework for strategic financial decisions. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 429. Investment Management. 3 Units.

This course explores the characteristics of financial investments and markets and develops modern techniques of investment analysis and management. The goal is to help students develop a level of analytical skill and institutional knowledge sufficient to make sensible investment decisions. Topics include: an overview of stock, debt and derivative asset markets, practical applications of modern portfolio theory, equilibrium and arbitrage-based approaches to capital market pricing, the debate over market efficiency, the term structure of interest rates, bond portfolio management, and uses of derivative assets in investment portfolios. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 430. Derivatives and Risk Management. 3 Units.

This course is intended to give students an understanding of options and futures markets both in theory and practice. The emphasis is on arbitrage and hedging. The course concentrates on listed common stock and index contracts as well as commodity markets. Various theories for trading strategies are studied. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 431. Fixed Income Markets and Their Derivatives. 3 Units.

This class is concerned with fixed income securities, interest rate risk management, and credit risk. Fixed income securities account for about two thirds of the market value of all outstanding securities, and hence this topic is important. The course covers the basic products of fixed income markets including treasury and LIBOR products, such as interest rate swaps. Risk management and hedging strategies are covered as well as selected topics in credit risk models and mortgage-backed securities. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 432. Corporate Risk Management. 3 Units.

This is a risk management course aimed at developing an understanding of the risks faced by financial and nonfinancial firms, learning techniques to identify and measure these risks, and understanding how financial engineering (especially derivatives) can be used to manage these risks and advance the strategic goals of the firm. Main topics include Value-at-Risk (VaR) techniques and implementation of VaR systems (RiskMetrics, Delta-normal, Historical Simulation, Structured Monte-Carlo); financial risk measurement and management using forwards, futures, options, swaps, and exotics; and credit risk management, including implementing various credit risk and credit VaR models, estimating capital at risk, and using credit derivatives for managing credit risk. Several classes are devoted to discussing recent risk management debacles and relating them to theory. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 433. Quantitative Risk Modeling. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help students learn quantitative models for estimating risk in various financial settings for different types of financial institutions (banks, hedge funds, and others). It is a very hands-on course where students will become familiar with several state-of-the-art quantitative risk models as well as their detailed implementation procedure in the real world. The course uses several in-class Excel exercises to illustrate the models as well as their practical implementation using real financial data. Offered as BAFI 433 and MSFI 433. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 434. Financial Econometrics. 3 Units.

MSFI 434 represents a rigorous study of the latest developments in the area of financial econometrics. The class assumes no prior knowledge of econometrics. It assumes that you have had a basic statistics class and that you have had regression analysis. It is taught using economic motivations and examples from the financial world. The course concerns modern econometric topics like time-series forecasting, volatility modeling, and panel data analysis. Various concepts and approaches in the course will be subjected to real world data. Students are expected to have basic knowledge of the fundamentals of corporate finance and statistics. The course aims at providing a lasting conceptual framework for model building using modern applied econometric techniques commonly employed in finance. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 435. Empirical Finance. 3 Units.

MSFI 435 provides an introduction to empirical analysis and research in finance. This involves the management of empirical datasets and the aspects of quantitative applications of finance theory. The goal is to enable the student to deal with the need to analyze complex and large financial and economic datasets that is present in many fields of the financial profession. The scope of the data as well as the quantitative methods used in such analysis often requires familiarity with robust computational environments and statistical packages. As such, another goal of the course is to familiarize the student with at least one such environment. Applications are conducted using real financial and economic data. The course draws on the theoretical aspects of the subjects covered, but mainly focuses on the practical matters required to undertake an empirical analysis of financial topics--e.g., the definition of the research question, the datasets required, the computational needs, and, then, the implementation. The course enables the student to evaluate outstanding financial research as well as to conduct his or her own research. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 436A. Individual, Team and Career Development. .75 Units.

This course is designed to focus on three areas of development critical to students' personal and professional success: 1) Individual; 2) Team; and 3) Career. The individual and team aspects include developing self and other awareness through exploration of learning styles, process skills, and building communication and presentation competencies. Career development includes a focus on strategies for success such as networking, resume building, and learning from executives through intensive and interactive seminars. The course involves use of assessments, group discussions, presentations and experiential activities. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 436B. Individual, Team and Career Development. .75 Units.

This course is designed to focus on three areas of development critical to students' personal and professional success: 1) Individual; 2) Team; and 3) Career. The individual and team aspects include developing self and other awareness through exploration of learning styles, process skills, and building communication and presentation competencies. Career development includes a focus on strategies for success such as networking, resume building, and learning from executives through intensive and interactive seminars. The course involves use of assessments, group discussions, presentations and experiential activities. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 440. Financial Decisions, Contracting & Value. 3 Units.

The firm is a nexus of contracts among its various stakeholders (managers, shareholders, debt holders etc.). In this course, we will examine how value is created, and how real world conflicts between the various stakeholders of a firm lead to deviations from "perfect world" solutions. For instance, you may have learned in basic corporate finance courses that it is optimal to invest in positive NPV projects. Real-world conflicts can make it sub-optimal for shareholders do so. We will examine such issues and ways to mitigate them. In particular, we will examine Valuation, Asymmetric Information, Agency Cost, Incentive Contracts and Performance Metrics, and, time permitting, also discuss Regulation, Reputation and the role of certifiers and the economic crises. The takeaway learnings from this course are: (a) Understanding how Value can be created or destroyed, (b) Measuring Value, (c) Understanding the links between capital structure and: asymmetric information, market reactions and signaling, agency and management incentives, taxes, shareholder-bondholder conflicts etc., (d) Understanding the links between payout policy and: informational content, market reaction, stock returns and signaling, clientele effects etc., and (e) Understanding the need for and the design of incentive mechanisms. Case studies will be used to reinforce learning. We will emphasize on links to real-world events. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 444. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Units.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the issues of financial management and capital formation in new ventures. The course will address issues of estimation of cash requirements, development of pro forma financial plans, firm valuation and the process and tools used in raising debt and equity financing. Bootstrapping, angel investing, venture capital, strategic alliances and initial public offerings will be covered. The emphasis is on the entrepreneur and how he/she can assess financial needs and develop a sensible plan for acquiring financial resources in a manner that is consistent with their financial needs and other strategic goals. Offered as BAFI 444 and MSFI 444. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 450. Mergers and Acquisitions. 3 Units.

This course examines the economic rationale and motivation for the different merger and acquisition and recapitalization activity undertaken by firms and individuals in the U.S. market. Emphasis is on the different three (3) methods of valuing a firm, the various forms of debt and equity capital employed to fund mergers and acquisitions and recapitalizations, how lenders and investors structure their loans and/or investments, and how investors realize the gains through different exit strategies. The course gives the student an excellent understanding of the role that senior commercial banks, insurance companies, pensions funds, LBO funds, investment banking firms, and venture/growth capital investors play in mergers and acquisitions. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 460. Investment Strategies. 3 Units.

This course provides a broad survey of some of the main strategies used by hedge funds today. Through exercises and projects, the hedge fund strategies will be presented using real data. Students will learn to use a methodology referred to as "back testing" in order to evaluate hedge fund strategies. The course will also cover institutional details related to short selling, liquidity, margin requirements, risk management, and performance measurement. Since hedge funds today use advanced modeling techniques, the course will require students to analyze and manipulate real data using mathematical modeling. The objective of the course is for students to gain practical knowledge about creating, back-testing, and implementing hedge fund trading strategies. Offered as BAFI 460 and MSFI 460. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 470. Financial Models Using Big Data. 3 Units.

This course is focused on developing models in investments using financial big data. A strong theoretical base will be developed and then relevant empirical analyses using real data will be used for testing models, via individual assignments and group projects. In the projects, groups of students will be immersed in collecting, analyzing, and interpreting financial big data sets. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 471. Applications in Financial Big Data. 3 Units.

This course is project-based and focused on solving real-life problems using financial big data. Groups of students will collect/use data, estimate parameters, and conduct appropriate validation tests. Not only do the members have to work together, but they also have to be professional, make interim reports, and communicate effectively with each other. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 480. Global Banking & Capital Markets. 3 Units.

This course will expose students to Banking and Capital Market Structure, Practices, and Regulations in North America, Europe, as well as Asia. Students will learn about structure of the financial services industry in different parts of the world, the history and evolution of the regulatory frameworks in this industry, and its consequent impact on financial and economic development as well as risk. Several case studies are used to expose students to different issues and questions that arise in the day-to-day jobs of financial managers in this industry. Offered as BAFI 480 and MSFI 480. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 490. Projects in Corporate Finance. 3 Units.

This course is focused on engaging groups of students in identifying, analyzing and making decisions on real-world corporate financial problems. Teams of students will be assigned to a specific client situation drawn from one of three general areas: (i) mergers and acquisitions (involving corporations and/or leveraged buyout firms), (ii) public equities (IPOs and/or equity research) and (iii) corporate financial policies and transactions. This course is structured to be a capstone experience that allows students to leverage the broad range of skills, tools and approaches introduced throughout the program. It is intended to provide an important bridge from work in the classroom to the unstructured, chaotic nature of real world business. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSFI 491. Projects in Risk Management. 3 Units.

This course is focused on engaging groups of students in identifying, analyzing and making decisions on real-world risk management financial problems. Teams of students will be assigned to a specific client situation drawn from one of two general areas: (i) investments and hedge funds, equity and portfolio management, fixed income and foreign exchange and (ii) risk management with derivatives, credit risk management, risk analytics, regulatory capital, asset liability bank management. This course is structured to be a capstone experience that allows students to leverage the broad range of skills, tools and approaches introduced throughout the program. It is intended to provide an important bridge from work in the classroom to the unstructured, chaotic nature of real world business. Prereq: For MSF-MSM and ACL-MSF students only.

MSOR Courses

MSOR 400. Linear Algebra. 1 Unit.

The objective of this one-credit hour course is to provide a basic working knowledge of material in linear algebra that is relevant to the MSM-OR/SC program. This background material includes geometric and algebraic properties of vectors and matrices together with operations that can be performed on them. The use of vectors and matrices in solving systems of linear equations is taught. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 402. Stochastic Models with Applications. 1.5 Unit.

This course surveys fundamental methods and models in operations research and operations management that incorporate random elements. Topics discussed will include basic results from the theory of stochastic processes, especially Markov chains; an introduction to stochastic dynamic programming; and models in the control of queues and inventories. Offered as OPRE 402 and MSOR 402. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 406. Operations Management. 3 Units.

Operations managers, ranging from supervisors to vice presidents, are concerned with the production of goods and services. More specifically, they are responsible for designing, running, controlling and improving the systems that accomplish production. This course is a broad-spectrum course with emphasis on techniques helpful to the practice of management at the analyst level. Its goal is to introduce you to the environments, to help you appreciate the problems that operations managers are confronted with, and provide you with the tools to address these problems. Operations Management spans all value-adding activities of an organization including product and process design, production, service delivery, distribution network and customer order management. As global competition in both goods and services increases, a firm's survival depends upon how well it structures its operations to respond quickly to changing consumer needs. Thus, it is essential for all business managers to acquire an understanding of operations management to maintain their competitive advantage. This course provides students with the basic tools needed to become an analyst in Supply Chain and Operations Management. This course provides an overview of Process analysis, Capacity management, Queuing system, analysis, Forecasting, Quality management, Material Requirements planning, Inventory management, and Supply Chain management. The emphasis of the course is on both real world applications and technical problem solving. Several manufacturing and non-manufacturing environments will be discussed explicitly, like health care, insurance, hotel-management, airlines and government related operations. Also we will explore the interface of operations management with other functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, etc. This coursework includes individual and group assignments, case analyses and experiential learning through simulations and educational games. Offered as: MSOR 406 and MSBA 406. Prereq: Course limited to students in Program=OPRMS, Plan=ORSC-MSM.

MSOR 407. Managerial Marketing. 3 Units.

This course will emphasize how to analyze data to support and guide strategic and tactical marketing decisions relevant for supply chain managers for understanding and contributing to marketing decision-making within the firm. Many firms have extensive information, but far fewer have the expertise to act intelligently on such information. Data must be synthesized, analyzed, and interpreted before sound marketing strategies and tactical plans can be developed. The course will emphasize three key themes: (1) Market Opportunity Analysis including competitive analysis, context assessment, and customer analytics (e.g. customer profitability and lifetime value, retention and loyalty), (2) Marketing Mix Analytics including test marketing, pricing, segmentation, and response modeling, and (3) Marketing ROI including the impact of marketing decisions and plans on fundamental financial measures such as return on marketing investment and net contribution to profit. The course uses a combination of lectures, cases, and exercises. Prereq: For students only in the MSM-OR/SC program.

MSOR 410. Financial Management for Supply Chain. 3 Units.

This course focuses on learning the language of business, how basic accounting information is reported and analyzed, and how basic financial principles can be applied to understanding how value is created within an enterprise. This course is intended for individuals who have a limited background in accounting, finance and business. Most of the exercises will involve evaluating and building models in Excel. Teaching objectives are fairly straightforward: 1. Provide you with a basic understanding of the key principles of accounting and finance. We will quickly cover material that is typically covered in a three-course sequence (Introductory Accounting and Finance I and II). We will fly at a fairly high level, but we want to make sure you understand the basic concepts. 2. Apply these concepts to real (but straightforward) business situations, to gain a better understanding of how companies utilize accounting and financial information. 3. Time permitting, explore how these concepts can be applied to securities, mergers and acquisitions and leveraged buyout transactions, with a specific emphasis on how these concepts are likely to surface in your role in such transactions. Prereq: Course limited to students in Program=OPRMS, Plan=ORSC-MSM.

MSOR 411. Optimization Modeling. 3 Units.

The first half of the course provides a practical coverage of linear programming, a special type of mathematical model. The art of formulating linear programs is taught through the use of systematic model-building techniques. The simplex algorithm for solving these models is developed from several points of view: geometric, conceptual, algebraic, and economic. The role and uses of duality theory are also presented. Students learn to obtain and interpret a solution from a computer package and how to use the associated output to answer "What-happens-if..." questions that arise in post-optimality analysis. Specific topics include: problem formulation, geometric and conceptual solution procedures, the simplex algorithm (phase 1 and phase 2), obtaining and interpreting computer output, duality theory, and sensitivity analysis. The second half of this course provide a practical approach to formulating and solving combinatorial optimization problems in the areas of networks, dynamic programming, project management (CPM), integer programming, and nonlinear programming. The art of formulating problems, understanding what is involved in solving them, and obtained and interpreting the solution from a computer package are shown. A comparison with formulating and solving linear programming problems is provided as a way to understand the advantages and disadvantages of some of these problems and solutions procedures. Recommended preparation: Knowledge of Excel, one semester each of undergraduate linear algebra and undergraduate calculus (derivatives); or consent of instructor. Offered as MSOR 411 and OPRE 411. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 420. Six Sigma and Quality Management. 3 Units.

The Six Sigma process is the standard for quality improvement in organizations around the globe. In this course, we study the details of the five steps in the Six Sigma process: DEFINE, MEASURE, ANALYZE, IMPROVE, and CONTROL (DMAIC). Many tools, concepts, and processes that are often an integral part of Six Sigma projects in companies are included in the course content. They range from the very basic tools of quality (such as cause-and-effect diagrams for brainstorming) to complete processes (such as benchmarking, quality function deployment, failure mode and effects analysis-FMEA). Statistical concepts with software applications that are central to Six Sigma including statistical process control and introduction to design of experiments are also included. Once the Six Sigma process and its various components are understood, we study quality management including quality control, quality planning, quality improvement, strategic quality management, and quality strategy. A major requirement of the course is an action learning component in which the students are assigned in groups to work on unpaid real projects of Six Sigma in local industries. Students meeting the required standards of performance will earn a Green Belt Certification in Six Sigma and Quality Management from the Weatherhead School of Management. Offered as MSOR 420 and OPMT 420. Prereq: MSOR 406 and MSOR 433 and enrolled in OPRMS Program/ORSC-MSM Plan or requisites not met permission.

MSOR 422. Lean Operations. 3 Units.

In this course, students will be taught how to identify inefficiencies associated with overproduction, waiting, transport, extra processing, inventory, motion and defects. One-by-one, areas of inefficiencies are to be identified and improved while educating the workforce towards continual improvement. Similarly, participants will be trained to reduce lead times in areas such as engineering design, order entry, purchasing, order fulfillment, receiving, production, packaging, shipping, invoicing and collection. The above improvements will lead to cost reductions. Students will be trained in costing techniques, target pricing, and cost maintenance. The course will be delivered along the following themes: 1) Mapping the Value Stream (current and future state) 2) Workplace Organization: 5S & Safety, 3) Defect Reduction and Error Proofing, 4) Quick Changeover, 5) Standard Operations, 6) Total Productive Maintenance, 7) Visual management, 8) One-piece flow, 9) Lean Metrics. This course is not oriented toward specialists in operations management. Its goal is to introduce you to the environments and help you appreciate the problems that operations managers are confronted with and the key issues in their management. Offered as MSOR 422 and OPMT 422. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 432. Computer Simulation. 3 Units.

Computer Simulation is a process of designing and creating a computerized model that mimics an existing or proposed system so as to better understand the behavior of the system. Many studies have shown that in Industry, simulation is most frequently used Operations Research tool due to its ability to deal with complex systems. The first half of this course is designed to give students a basic idea of simulation methodology with the aid of population simulation software. The emphasis of the course is in simulating business processes, however, the versatility of the technique will be demonstrated with applications from finance, health care, etc. The second half of the course covers the statistical design and analysis of simulation models. The topics include random number generation, input data analysis, statistical analysis of simulation outputs, variance reduction techniques, and design of simulation experiments. Offered as OPRE 332, OPRE 432, and MSOR 432. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 433. Foundations of Probability and Statistics. 3 Units.

Data of many kinds are typically available in practice, but the challenge is to use those data to make effective professional decisions. This software-intensive course begins with useful descriptions of data and the probability theory foundation on which statistics rests. It continues to statistics, including the central limit theorem, which explains why data often appear to be normally distributed, and the Palm-Khintchine theorem which explains why data often appear to have a Poisson distribution. The remainder of the course focuses on regression and forecasting, including detecting and overcoming some of the deadly sins of regression, and the surprising flexibility of regression models. Recommended preparation: One semester of undergraduate calculus or consent of instructor. Offered as: MSOR 433, OPRE 433 and MSBA 433. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 435B. Integrated Problem Solving in OR and SC. 1.5 Unit.

This project-oriented course uses a variety of software to involve the student in the complete problem-solving process in OR and OM. This process includes problem definition and formulation, data collection, and storage in a database, connecting the database to the solution algorithm, designing and implementing an appropriate user interface, and presenting the final solution. Offered as OPRE 435B and MSOR 435B Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 450. Project Management. 3 Units.

Project management is concerned with the management and control of a group of interrelated tasks required to be completed in an efficient and timely manner for the successful accomplishment of the objectives of the project. Since each project is usually unique in terms of task structure, risk characteristics and objectives, the management of projects is significantly different from the management of repetitive processes designed to produce a series of similar products or outputs. Large-scale projects are characterized by a significant commitment of organizational and economic resources coupled with a high degree of uncertainty. The objective of this course is to enhance the ability of participants to respond to the challenges of large-scale projects so that they can be more effective as project managers. We study in detail up-to-date concepts, models, and techniques useful for the evaluation, analysis, management, and control of projects. Offered as MSOR 450, OPRE 350 and OPMT 450. Coreq: MSOR 433 or requisites not met permission.

MSOR 475. Supply Chain Logistics. 3 Units.

The focus of this course is on the effective management of a firm's downstream processes in the supply chain that deliver goods and services to customers. Concepts, methods, and strategies are presented that can lower supply chain costs while maintaining or improving customer service. In addition, ideas for using the supply chain for competitive advantage leading to revenue enhancement are discussed. Adding value for customers is the objective. Key topics include transportation planning, inventory management, network design, and customer service goal setting. Offered as MSOR 475 and OPMT 475. Prereq: MSOR 406 and MSOR 433 and enrolled in OPRMS Program/ORSC-MSM Plan or requisites not met permission.

MSOR 476. Strategic Sourcing. 3 Units.

The primary purpose of the course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to supply issues in manufacturing and service organizations. Procurement and supply management has evolved as a strategic function across various industries. Recent volatility in commodity prices has further enhanced the challenges in procurement. This course explores sourcing strategies in global supply chains to reduce cost and enhance the competitiveness of the firm. This course will provide you with a framework for thinking about strategic sourcing and tools to procure commodities and services efficiently. Offered as MSOR 476 and OPMT 476. Prereq: For students in OPRMS Program/ORSC-MSM plan.

MSOR 477. Enterprise Resource Planning in the Supply Chain. 3 Units.

Enterprise resource planning is the dominant system by which companies translate the needs from their customers into the detailed plans that the company must perform to meet the customer needs, and the resulting support the company will need from its suppliers. As such, it is a central player in the process of supply chain management. In this course, we study both the quantitative and qualitative concepts and techniques to help manage a company's operations to perform these important translation and planning tasks in order to help the company be successful. The quantitative analysis will be supported by microcomputer software available in the Weatherhead computer lab. Student teams complete a series of integrated case studies from the same company to vividly see the relationships between various planning and control activities. A major emphasis during the course is the design of processes and procedures (algorithms) for solving very complex (wicked) problems as a part of both class discussions and while working on case studies, as well as critiquing the designs so as to clearly understand their limitations. Offered as MSOR 477, OPMT 377 and OPMT 477. Prereq: MSOR 411 and MSOR 433 and enrolled in OPRMS Program/ORSC-MSM Plan or requisites not met permission.

MSOR 485A. Individual Development. 1.5 Unit.

This course is unique in the sense that its primary focus is on the student as an individual. In this course the student will get to know themselves better by completing assessments and making sense of them, having group discussions, presenting to a group as individuals, engaging in various experiential activities, conducting career interviews, attending various individual development programs and participating in two individual coaching sessions. Offered as: MSOR 485A and MSBA 485A. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

MSOR 485B. Team Development. 1.5 Unit.

This course is unique in the sense that its primary focus is on the student working in teams. In this course the student will assess their team interaction based on team assignments simulated and action learning type projects, presenting to the class as a team, engaging in various experiential activities, participating one team coaching session, working with a team, and expanding their knowledge of team leadership and membership skills and abilities. They are also expected to engage with projects external to the university (similar to an action learning project). Offered as: MSOR 485B and MSBA 485B. Prereq: For ORSC-MSM students only.

OPMT Courses

OPMT 350. Project Management. 3 Units.

Project management is concerned with the management and control of a group of interrelated tasks required to be completed in an efficient and timely manner for the successful accomplishment of the objectives of the project. Since each project is usually unique in terms of task structure, risk characteristics and objectives, the management of projects is significantly different from the management of repetitive processes designed to produce a series of similar products or outputs. Large-scale projects are characterized by a significant commitment of organizational and economic resources coupled with a high degree of uncertainty. The objective of this course is to enhance the ability of participants to respond to the challenges of large-scale projects so that they can be more effective as project managers. We study in detail up-to-date concepts, models, and techniques useful for the evaluation, analysis, management, and control of projects. Offered as MSOR 450, OPRE 350 and OPMT 450.

OPMT 377. Enterprise Resource Planning in the Supply Chain. 3 Units.

Enterprise resource planning is the dominant system by which companies translate the needs from their customers into the detailed plans that the company must perform to meet the customer needs, and the resulting support the company will need from its suppliers. As such, it is a central player in the process of supply chain management. In this course, we study both the quantitative and qualitative concepts and techniques to help manage a company's operations to perform these important translation and planning tasks in order to help the company be successful. The quantitative analysis will be supported by microcomputer software available in the Weatherhead computer lab. Student teams complete a series of integrated case studies from the same company to vividly see the relationships between various planning and control activities. A major emphasis during the course is the design of processes and procedures (algorithms) for solving very complex (wicked) problems as a part of both class discussions and while working on case studies, as well as critiquing the designs so as to clearly understand their limitations. Offered as MSOR 477, OPMT 377 and OPMT 477.

OPMT 405. Operations Management. 3 Units.

Operations management deals with the design of products and processes, the acquisition of resources, the conversion of inputs to outputs, and the distribution of goods and services. It is central to a firm's ability to compete effectively. As global competition in both goods and services increases, the management of operations is becoming more and more important. This course provides a broad overview of the managerial issues associated with production and delivery of goods and services. It includes the use of quantitative modeling using computers as a central methodology. Prereq: QUMM 414.

OPMT 412. Lean Services Operations. 3 Units.

The course will be delivered over four modules: 1) Service Process Blueprints, 2) Managing Capacity in Service Systems, 3) Mapping the Value Stream (current and future state), and 4) Inventory Management in Service Systems. The topics considered are viewed in the context of healthcare management, financial services, insurance firms, call centers, back-office operations, and other applications. Through these topics, the participants will be trained in tools that help them understand customers' expectations and needs and to identify service system characteristics that can meet these needs. We will learn how to identify errors in service and troubleshoot these problems by identifying the root causes of errors. Subsequently, we will discuss how one can modify the product or service design so as to prevent defects from occurring. Finally, we will establish performance metrics that help evaluate the effectiveness of the Lean system in place. These efforts will result to improved quality. This course is not oriented toward specialists in service management. Its goal is to introduce you to the environments and help you appreciate the problems that operations managers are confronted with. Then, we will typically discuss some system specifics and emphasize the principles and issues that play key role in their management. Offered as HSMC 412 and OPMT 412.

OPMT 420. Six Sigma and Quality Management. 3 Units.

The Six Sigma process is the standard for quality improvement in organizations around the globe. In this course, we study the details of the five steps in the Six Sigma process: DEFINE, MEASURE, ANALYZE, IMPROVE, and CONTROL (DMAIC). Many tools, concepts, and processes that are often an integral part of Six Sigma projects in companies are included in the course content. They range from the very basic tools of quality (such as cause-and-effect diagrams for brainstorming) to complete processes (such as benchmarking, quality function deployment, failure mode and effects analysis-FMEA). Statistical concepts with software applications that are central to Six Sigma including statistical process control and introduction to design of experiments are also included. Once the Six Sigma process and its various components are understood, we study quality management including quality control, quality planning, quality improvement, strategic quality management, and quality strategy. A major requirement of the course is an action learning component in which the students are assigned in groups to work on unpaid real projects of Six Sigma in local industries. Students meeting the required standards of performance will earn a Green Belt Certification in Six Sigma and Quality Management from the Weatherhead School of Management. Offered as MSOR 420 and OPMT 420. Prereq: (MSOR406 or MBAP408 or MBAC507) and (MSOR433 or OPRE433 or MBAC511 or MBAP403) or Requisites Not Met permission.

OPMT 422. Lean Operations. 3 Units.

In this course, students will be taught how to identify inefficiencies associated with overproduction, waiting, transport, extra processing, inventory, motion and defects. One-by-one, areas of inefficiencies are to be identified and improved while educating the workforce towards continual improvement. Similarly, participants will be trained to reduce lead times in areas such as engineering design, order entry, purchasing, order fulfillment, receiving, production, packaging, shipping, invoicing and collection. The above improvements will lead to cost reductions. Students will be trained in costing techniques, target pricing, and cost maintenance. The course will be delivered along the following themes: 1) Mapping the Value Stream (current and future state) 2) Workplace Organization: 5S & Safety, 3) Defect Reduction and Error Proofing, 4) Quick Changeover, 5) Standard Operations, 6) Total Productive Maintenance, 7) Visual management, 8) One-piece flow, 9) Lean Metrics. This course is not oriented toward specialists in operations management. Its goal is to introduce you to the environments and help you appreciate the problems that operations managers are confronted with and the key issues in their management. Offered as MSOR 422 and OPMT 422. Prereq: Not available to ORSC-MSM students.

OPMT 430. Sustainable Operations. 3 Units.

This course takes a business approach to environmental and social issues to answer "what do I need to know about environmental and social issues to make my company more successful, and how can I act on that knowledge profitably?" We summarize important environmental and social issues facing business (and all of society), such as global climate change, pollution, economic development, hunger, and social unrest. Drawing on most areas of the MBA program, we examine environmental and social issues associated with product design and component commonality, recycling materials, product packaging, process design and remanufacturing, facility location and design (including green building), reverse logistics and closed-loop supply chains, and global supply chains.

OPMT 450. Project Management. 3 Units.

Project management is concerned with the management and control of a group of interrelated tasks required to be completed in an efficient and timely manner for the successful accomplishment of the objectives of the project. Since each project is usually unique in terms of task structure, risk characteristics and objectives, the management of projects is significantly different from the management of repetitive processes designed to produce a series of similar products or outputs. Large-scale projects are characterized by a significant commitment of organizational and economic resources coupled with a high degree of uncertainty. The objective of this course is to enhance the ability of participants to respond to the challenges of large-scale projects so that they can be more effective as project managers. We study in detail up-to-date concepts, models, and techniques useful for the evaluation, analysis, management, and control of projects. Offered as MSOR 450, OPRE 350 and OPMT 450. Coreq: MSOR 433 or MBAC 511 or MBAP 403 or requisites not met permission.

OPMT 475. Supply Chain Logistics. 3 Units.

The focus of this course is on the effective management of a firm's downstream processes in the supply chain that deliver goods and services to customers. Concepts, methods, and strategies are presented that can lower supply chain costs while maintaining or improving customer service. In addition, ideas for using the supply chain for competitive advantage leading to revenue enhancement are discussed. Adding value for customers is the objective. Key topics include transportation planning, inventory management, network design, and customer service goal setting. Offered as MSOR 475 and OPMT 475. Prereq: (MSOR406 or MBAP408 or MBAC507) and (MSOR433 or OPRE433 or MBAC511 or MBAP403) or requisites not met permission.

OPMT 476. Strategic Sourcing. 3 Units.

The primary purpose of the course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to supply issues in manufacturing and service organizations. Procurement and supply management has evolved as a strategic function across various industries. Recent volatility in commodity prices has further enhanced the challenges in procurement. This course explores sourcing strategies in global supply chains to reduce cost and enhance the competitiveness of the firm. This course will provide you with a framework for thinking about strategic sourcing and tools to procure commodities and services efficiently. Offered as MSOR 476 and OPMT 476. Prereq: Not available to Operations Research MSM students.

OPMT 477. Enterprise Resource Planning in the Supply Chain. 3 Units.

Enterprise resource planning is the dominant system by which companies translate the needs from their customers into the detailed plans that the company must perform to meet the customer needs, and the resulting support the company will need from its suppliers. As such, it is a central player in the process of supply chain management. In this course, we study both the quantitative and qualitative concepts and techniques to help manage a company's operations to perform these important translation and planning tasks in order to help the company be successful. The quantitative analysis will be supported by microcomputer software available in the Weatherhead computer lab. Student teams complete a series of integrated case studies from the same company to vividly see the relationships between various planning and control activities. A major emphasis during the course is the design of processes and procedures (algorithms) for solving very complex (wicked) problems as a part of both class discussions and while working on case studies, as well as critiquing the designs so as to clearly understand their limitations. Offered as MSOR 477, OPMT 377 and OPMT 477. Prereq: MBAC 511 or MBAP 403 or requisites not met permission.

OPMT 490. Independent Study in Operations Management. 1 - 15 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

OPMT 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

OPRE Courses

OPRE 207. Statistics for Business and Management Science I. 3 Units.

Organizing and summarizing data. Mean, variance, moments. Elementary probability, conditional probability. Commonly encountered distributions including binomial. Poisson, uniform, exponential, normal distributions. Central limit theorem. Sample quantities, empirical distributions. Reference distributions (chi-square, z-, t-, F-distributions). Point and interval estimation: hypothesis tests. Prereq: MATH 121 or MATH 125.

OPRE 301. Operations Research and Supply Chain Management. 3 Units.

Operations research (OR) or management science, is the discipline of applying advanced quantitative methods to make better decisions. Techniques covered include linear programming, queuing models and simulation. The second part of the course focuses on how OR tools are used in managing various aspects of Supply Chain. Topics covered include demand forecasting, design of distribution systems, capacity planning, and inventory management. Recommended preparation: one semester of statistics or consent of instructor. Prereq: STAT 207 or OPRE 207.

OPRE 332. Computer Simulation. 3 Units.

Computer Simulation is a process of designing and creating a computerized model that mimics an existing or proposed system so as to better understand the behavior of the system. Many studies have shown that in Industry, simulation is most frequently used Operations Research tool due to its ability to deal with complex systems. The first half of this course is designed to give students a basic idea of simulation methodology with the aid of population simulation software. The emphasis of the course is in simulating business processes, however, the versatility of the technique will be demonstrated with applications from finance, health care, etc. The second half of the course covers the statistical design and analysis of simulation models. The topics include random number generation, input data analysis, statistical analysis of simulation outputs, variance reduction techniques, and design of simulation experiments. Offered as OPRE 332, OPRE 432, and MSOR 432.

OPRE 345. Decision Theory. 3 Units.

This course provides an understanding of the principles, basic concepts, and methodology of engineering economics. It develops proficiency with these methods and with the process for making rational decisions regarding situations likely to be encountered in professional practice.

OPRE 402. Stochastic Models with Applications. 1.5 Unit.

This course surveys fundamental methods and models in operations research and operations management that incorporate random elements. Topics discussed will include basic results from the theory of stochastic processes, especially Markov chains; an introduction to stochastic dynamic programming; and models in the control of queues and inventories. Offered as OPRE 402 and MSOR 402. Prereq: OPRE 433 or OPRE 433A and OPRE 433B.

OPRE 411. Optimization Modeling. 3 Units.

The first half of the course provides a practical coverage of linear programming, a special type of mathematical model. The art of formulating linear programs is taught through the use of systematic model-building techniques. The simplex algorithm for solving these models is developed from several points of view: geometric, conceptual, algebraic, and economic. The role and uses of duality theory are also presented. Students learn to obtain and interpret a solution from a computer package and how to use the associated output to answer "What-happens-if..." questions that arise in post-optimality analysis. Specific topics include: problem formulation, geometric and conceptual solution procedures, the simplex algorithm (phase 1 and phase 2), obtaining and interpreting computer output, duality theory, and sensitivity analysis. The second half of this course provide a practical approach to formulating and solving combinatorial optimization problems in the areas of networks, dynamic programming, project management (CPM), integer programming, and nonlinear programming. The art of formulating problems, understanding what is involved in solving them, and obtained and interpreting the solution from a computer package are shown. A comparison with formulating and solving linear programming problems is provided as a way to understand the advantages and disadvantages of some of these problems and solutions procedures. Recommended preparation: Knowledge of Excel, one semester each of undergraduate linear algebra and undergraduate calculus (derivatives); or consent of instructor. Offered as MSOR 411 and OPRE 411.

OPRE 427. Convexity and Optimization. 3 Units.

Introduction to the theory of convex sets and functions and to the extremes in problems in areas of mathematics where convexity plays a role. Among the topics discussed are basic properties of convex sets (extreme points, facial structure of polytopes), separation theorems, duality and polars, properties of convex functions, minima and maxima of convex functions over convex set, various optimization problems. Offered as MATH 327, MATH 427, and OPRE 427. Prereq: MATH 223 or consent of instructor.

OPRE 432. Computer Simulation. 3 Units.

Computer Simulation is a process of designing and creating a computerized model that mimics an existing or proposed system so as to better understand the behavior of the system. Many studies have shown that in Industry, simulation is most frequently used Operations Research tool due to its ability to deal with complex systems. The first half of this course is designed to give students a basic idea of simulation methodology with the aid of population simulation software. The emphasis of the course is in simulating business processes, however, the versatility of the technique will be demonstrated with applications from finance, health care, etc. The second half of the course covers the statistical design and analysis of simulation models. The topics include random number generation, input data analysis, statistical analysis of simulation outputs, variance reduction techniques, and design of simulation experiments. Offered as OPRE 332, OPRE 432, and MSOR 432. Prereq: OPRE 433 or OPRE 433A and OPRE 433B or requisites not met permission.

OPRE 433. Foundations of Probability and Statistics. 3 Units.

Data of many kinds are typically available in practice, but the challenge is to use those data to make effective professional decisions. This software-intensive course begins with useful descriptions of data and the probability theory foundation on which statistics rests. It continues to statistics, including the central limit theorem, which explains why data often appear to be normally distributed, and the Palm-Khintchine theorem which explains why data often appear to have a Poisson distribution. The remainder of the course focuses on regression and forecasting, including detecting and overcoming some of the deadly sins of regression, and the surprising flexibility of regression models. Recommended preparation: One semester of undergraduate calculus or consent of instructor. Offered as: MSOR 433, OPRE 433 and MSBA 433. Prereq: For MSM in Business Analytics students only.

OPRE 434. Regression and Forecasting. 1.5 Unit.

The first part of this course covers the fundamentals of multiple linear-regression analysis and logistic regression models emphasizing understanding and forecasting relationships between variables in a variety of data settings. The second part includes time series analysis and forecasting. Using case studies and commonly used state-of-the-art statistical software (e.g., SPSS, SAS, etc.) students learn to summarize relationships and measure how well these relationships fit data, and how to make meaningful statistical inferences and forecasts. Prereq or coreq: OPRE 433B or QUMM 414.

OPRE 435B. Integrated Problem Solving in OR and SC. 1.5 Unit.

This project-oriented course uses a variety of software to involve the student in the complete problem-solving process in OR and OM. This process includes problem definition and formulation, data collection, and storage in a database, connecting the database to the solution algorithm, designing and implementing an appropriate user interface, and presenting the final solution. Offered as OPRE 435B and MSOR 435B Prereq or Coreq: OPRE 411 or MSOR 411 or requisites not met permission.

OPRE 454. Analysis of Algorithms. 3 Units.

This course covers fundamental topics in algorithm design and analysis in depth. Amortized analysis, NP-completeness and reductions, dynamic programming, advanced graph algorithms, string algorithms, geometric algorithms, local search heuristics. Offered as EECS 454 and OPRE 454. Prereq: OPRE 435A and OPRE 435C.

OPRE 490. Independent Study in Operations Research. 1 - 15 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

OPRE 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 36 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

OPRE 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

This course is limited to candidates for the Ph.D. degree who are preparing dissertations in some field of operations research. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

ORBH Courses

ORBH 250. Leading People (LEAD I). 3 Units.

The principal goals of this course are to help students learn about the context in which managers and leaders function, gain self-awareness of their own leadership vision and values, understand the options they have for careers in management based on their own aptitudes, orientations and expertise, and develop the fundamental skills needed for success in a chosen career. Through a series of experiential activities, assessment exercises, group discussions, and peer coaching, based on a model of self-directed learning and life-long development, the course helps students understand and formulate their own career and life vision, assess their skills and abilities, and design a development plan to reach their objectives. The course enables students to see how the effective leadership of people contributes to organizational performance and the production of value, and how for many organizations, the effective leadership of people is the driver of competitive advantage. This is the first course in a two course sequence. Prereq: At least sophomore standing.

ORBH 251. Leading Organizations (LEAD II). 3 Units.

The principal goal of this course is to help students enhance their leadership skills by understanding how organizations function through the lenses of structure, culture, and power/politics. The course enables students to discern how leaders function effectively as they integrate goals, resources and people within these constraints. Students learn about these organizational lenses while developing their own leadership and professional skills. Prereq: ORBH 250 or MGMT 250 and at least sophomore standing.

ORBH 303. Leading Teams through Interpersonal Relationships. 3 Units.

This course is designed for students who want to increase their understanding of interpersonal and team dynamics. It is designed to help you to build more open and effective relationships and to improve your ability to cooperate with and lead others to work effectively in today's increasingly team-oriented organizations. The emphasis of this course is on learning about oneself in the context of others based on the here-and-now experience of the group. Prereq: At least sophomore standing.

ORBH 360. Independent Study. 1 - 6 Unit.

This course is set up individually upon conference between student and Organizational Behavior faculty member designed in consult with the student's advisor if necessary in order to engage and challenge student with topics in organizational behavior.

ORBH 370. Women and Men as Colleagues in Organizations. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to succeed in the workforce by understanding and exploring the opportunities and challenges of work across the lifespan and developing necessary skills to be effective. The course broadens understanding of gender dynamics and gendered structures in the workplace, intersections of gender with other identities, and the leadership and managerial issues affecting women and men in work organizations. The course helps students create a personal framework for how to develop a successful, happy and integrated work life in the global economy. Offered as ORBH 370 and WGST 370. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

ORBH 380. Managing Negotiations. 3 Units.

Negotiation is the art and science of securing agreements between two or more interdependent parties. Negotiation skills are critical to influencing others and thus to effective leadership. The good news is that negotiation is a skill that can be developed. In this interactive course, you will learn how to be a more effective negotiator by learning about the theory and processes of negotiation, participating in negotiation simulations, reflecting on your own and others' negotiation experiences and completing assignments designed to help you hone your negotiation skills. This will be done through a variety of means, including: understanding the theory and processes of negotiation, participating in negotiation simulations, reflecting on your own and others' negotiation experiences and completing assignments designed to help you hone your negotiation skills. Prereq: At least sophomore standing.

ORBH 391. Leadership in Diversity and Inclusion: Towards a Globally Inclusive Workplace. 3 Units.

This course addresses workforce diversity issues from individual, group, and organizational perspectives. The focus is on innovative ways of utilizing today's culturally expanding workforce. Emphasis is on the "what and how" for managers in developing a corporate culture that embraces diversity, helping them in learning to work with, supervise and tap the talent of diverse employees within their organizations. Included are methods for modifying systems to attract, retain, develop, and capitalize on benefits of the new workforce demographics.

ORBH 403. Developing Interpersonal Skills for Managers. 3 Units.

This course is intended to sharpen students' skills in the art of relating successfully to other individuals and groups. The course uses an intensive group experience to make students more aware of how their actions affect others, more capable of giving and receiving interpersonal feedback, and more cognizant of processes through which groups work. Several Saturday classes.

ORBH 412. Appreciative Inquiry. 3 Units.

This course studies organizational analysis through appreciative inquiry. It explores multiple frame works for understanding the complexity of organizational life. Students form teams and conduct appreciative studies across industries. This course also addresses questions of organizational change (how to move from theory/ideal to practice). Learning is experiential in nature.

ORBH 413. Economics of Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. 3 Units.

Students frequently enroll in a negotiation class with one thought in mind--negotiating a better job offer from an employer. They soon learn, however, that negotiation skills can do far more than improve a pay check. Negotiations occur everywhere: in marriages, in divorces, in small work teams, in large organizations, in getting a job, in losing a job, in deal making, in decision making, in board rooms, and in court rooms. The remarkable thing about negotiations is that, wherever they occur, they are governed by similar principles. The current wave of corporate restructuring makes the study of negotiations especially important for M.B.A.s. Mergers, acquisitions, downsizing and joint ventures call into question well established business and employment relationships. Navigating these choppy waters by building new relationships requires negotiation skills. The increased stress on quality and other hard-to-measure aspects of relationships with customers and suppliers makes the process of negotiation even more complex and subtle. For these reasons, negotiation classes have taken center stage in the study of management. Every major business school now offers classes in negotiation and these classes are overflowing with students. Offered as ECON 431 and LHRP 413.

ORBH 425. Developing Emotional Intelligence. 3 Units.

Although helping or stimulating individuals to change, learn, and develop is considered a responsibility of the human resource function in an organization, every professor, manager, consultant, and helping professional spends most of their time trying to provoke, evoke, or catalyze a change in others. This course will examine the processes by which individuals change and the methods often used to facilitate this change. How and what a person chooses to change (i.e., select their change goals) will be explored, as well as factors affecting the extent to which he/she changes. The efficacy and ethics of various approaches to individual change as part of human resource and organization development efforts will be discussed. Prereq: MGMT 403.

ORBH 430A. MBA Institute In Sustainable Value and Social Entrepreneurship I. 3 Units.

The MBA Institute in Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship involves 6 credits divided up into two "courses". The first course--phase one--creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for the building sustainable value and "turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities." The second course in an applied sustainability field experience where teams work with companies and communities or real-life sustainability and social entrepreneurship opportunities. The foundations course is a prerequisite to the applied field project phase.

ORBH 430B. MBA Practicum in Sustainable Value and Social Entrepreneurship II. 3 Units.

The MBA Institute in Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship involves 6 credits divided up into two "courses." The first course--phase one--creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for the building sustainable value and "turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities." The second course is an applied sustainability field experience where teams work with companies and communities or real-life sustainability and social entrepreneurship opportunities. The foundations course is a pre-requisite to the applied field project phase. Prereq: ORBH 430A.

ORBH 450. Executive Leadership. 3 Units.

This course explores answers to questions such as: Who are leaders? Are they different than managers, heroes and heroines? How do the effective ones think and act? What situations create leaders, foster their emergence or provide opportunities? What makes us want to follow them? What are the personal pits of being a leader (i.e., sex, drugs, alcohol, insomnia, ulcers, etc.)? How are leaders developed? Case studies, self-study and at-work projects will be the primary methods used in the course.

ORBH 451. Alternative Dispute Resolution. 3 Units.

Students will examine the processes of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) through reading materials, videotapes, guest lectures, and simulation exercises. Particular emphasis will be given to the interaction of lawyers and clients in business negotiations and in litigation. Negotiation, arbitration, mediation, and the mini-trial will be examined. The class will also cover impediments to ADR, such as lack of understanding or hostility on the part of clients or lawyers.

ORBH 460. Women in Organizations. 3 Units.

This course addresses important leadership and management issues concerning women in organizations. The course provides complex understandings of issues pertinent to professional women and work such as sex role typing, sex-based discrimination, equal pay, sexual harassment, work-family balance, women's leadership and women's career issues and development. The course helps students increase self-knowledge about their own values and practices as well as enhance their capabilities as leaders and managers. We will examine the opportunities, challenges, trade-offs, and organizational dynamics experienced by women in work settings, as well as the interpersonal, organizational, and societal structures and processes impacting women in organizations. Through a variety of course methods, students gain greater awareness of the gendered nature of work and organizations and learn effective strategies for women's career progress and effective participation in organizations.

ORBH 470A. Leading Change from a Complexity Perspective. 1 Unit.

In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad, team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.

ORBH 470B. Leading Change from a Complexity Perspective. 2 Units.

In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad, team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. Prereq: ORBH 470A.

ORBH 491. Leadership in Diversity and Inclusion: Towards a Globally Inclusive Workplace. 3 Units.

This course addresses workforce diversity issues from individual, group, and organizational perspectives. The focus is on innovative ways of utilizing today's culturally expanding workforce. Emphasis is on the "what and how" for managers in developing a corporate culture that embraces diversity, helping them in learning to work with, supervise and tap the talent of diverse employees within their organizations. Included are methods for modifying systems to attract, retain, develop, and capitalize on benefits of the new workforce demographics. A retreat experience is part of this course and is required of all participants.

ORBH 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

ORBH 510. Organizational Behavior Department Seminar. 1.5 Unit.

The OB Department Seminar is organized and managed by the first year PhD students. Seminar sessions will alternate between first year meetings and gatherings of the ORBH community of students, faculty and friends. Community sessions will be organized around research presentations of PhD Qualifying Papers, Dissertation Proposals and Dissertation Defense. Seminar Objectives: 1. To create and sustain an appreciative, intellectually nourishing learning space for the ORBH community that will support, inspire and empower us to explore the frontiers of scholarship in our field; 2.To provide a forum for sharing the ongoing research and scholarship of the department; 3. To develop productive collaborative research relationships; 4. To increase our collective knowledge of the current state of the art in OB and to develop productive collaborative research relationships; 4. To increase our collective knowledge of the current state of the art in OB and related fields.

ORBH 511. Micro Organizational Behavior. 1.5 Unit.

Examines the field of micro-organizational behavior. Specifically, the study of individuals and groups within an organizational context and the study of internal processes and practices as they affect individuals and groups. Major topics include individual characteristics such as beliefs, values and personality. Individual processes such as motivation, emotions, commitment, group and team processes, such as decision-making; organizational processes and practices such as goal setting, performance appraisal and rewards, and the influence of all of these on such individual, group and organizational outcomes as performance, job satisfaction, citizenship behaviors, turnover, justice, absenteeism and employee engagement.

ORBH 513. Appreciative Inquiry and Strength-Based Change. 1.5 Unit.

This course explores and develops the art of understanding social systems in ways that help us imagine, design and develop organization excellence. It seeks to show how many of our conventional ideas about organizations are based on discourse and metaphors that lead us to see and understand organizations in partial and often limiting ways. Growing research from the domains of Positive Psychology and Positive Organization Scholarship and the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry will be explored to show how we can create new and more positive, strength-based ways of designing and developing social systems.

ORBH 516. The Scholarship of Coaching. 1.5 Unit.

Coaching is a helping relationship in which one person assists another with change with respect to a person's behavior, attitudes, mental models, dreams of the future, etc. The popularity of the practice of coaching began to dramatically increase at least 20 years before scholars designed studies to test its efficacy. In this course, we will examine scholarly work in the coaching domain that has emerged. Prereq: Limited to ORBH PhD students only.

ORBH 520. Group and Interpersonal Analysis. 1.5 Unit.

This course is a review of major concepts and research in group dynamics and interpersonal relations. Topics concern face-to-face social interaction such as communication patterns, power, hierarchy, leadership, norms, goals, productivity, social theories of personality, and personal change through group methods. The course combines cognitive emphasis and personal experience-based learning.

ORBH 523. Design for Sustainable Value. 1.5 Unit.

The relationship between business and society--and the search for mutually beneficial advances between industry and the world's most pressing global issues--has become one of the defining issues of the 21st century. Throughout the world, immense entrepreneurial energy is finding expression, energy whose converging force is in direct proportion to the turbulence, crises, and the call of our times. Factories and buildings are being designed in ways that, surprisingly, give back more clean energy to the world than they use. Bottom-of-the-pyramid strategies and micro-enterprise models are demonstrating how business can eradicate poverty through profitability. Companies are designing products that leave behind no waste--only "food" that becomes input into their biological or technological cycles. And macrowikinomics--everything from telepresence to megacommunity--is rebooting our capacity for human cooperation and global action. Prereq: Limited to ORBH PhD students only.

ORBH 525. Leading Change from a Complexity Perspective. 1.5 Unit.

Change is an enigma and yet sustained, desirable change (SDC) drivers adaptation, growth and life itself. In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader, including their emotional and social intelligence? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, as well as case studies and longitudinal studies including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad, team, organization (including family business), community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. Prereq: Limited to ORBH PhD students only.

ORBH 528. The Dynamics of Managing Effective Change. 1.5 Unit.

This course explores and develops an understanding of how individuals actually effect positive change and outcomes within an organization without the requisite authority or decision making power to do so. It seeks to show how managing a change process appears to follow a path of cumulative activities that in time produce a punctuated equilibrium--one that triggers a step up in performance. Such activities seem to be small episodes or learning cycles geared at converting inert knowledge into action; increasing awareness; reinforcing accountability, and/or attaining results. These findings will be compared and contrasted to existing change models and theories. Prereq: Limited to ORBH PhD students only.

ORBH 533. The Practice Turn in Organizational Research. 1.5 Unit.

In this course, doctoral students will develop an understanding of the role of practice and performativity in organizing. This involves exploring the link between doing and thinking by and between individuals in an effort to address larger issues of group- and organizational-level behavior. Students will examine elements of human behavior in organizational endeavors such as embodied cognition, and the enactment of structures and routines. Methods of "capturing" practice in organizing will also be discussed. By the end of the course, students will be expected to articulate how the practice perspective relates to their own research interests and future projects. Prereq: Limited to ORBH PhD students only.

ORBH 538. Research and Theory on Dynamical Behavior in Groups. 1.5 Unit.

This seminar exposes student to a variety of conversations in the study of group dynamics. Major topics include work on commons dilemmas, communal and exchange relationships, social facilitation, social loafing, social combination, and social creativity drawing deeply on our historical roots. It will also focus on current topical issues such as demographic faultlines, transactional memory, and issues of time and transition. Prereq: Limited to ORBH PhD students only.

ORBH 540. Social Exchange, Social Networks, and Social Capital in Organizations. 1.5 Unit.

In this course we will examine the nature of social exchange relationships in organizations. We will explore how individual perceptions regarding the quality of the relationship they have with their immediate supervisor, their work group, and the organization as an entity can impact their workplace attitudes and behaviors. Additionally, we will learn how the examination of networks of relationships can enhance our understanding of how individuals experience organizational life. The course will also provide a brief introduction to the theory, methods and procedures of social network analysis with an emphasis on applications to individual and organizational social capital.

ORBH 541. Organizational Systems. 1.5 Unit.

This course covers the use of general systems theory as a conceptual base for examining organizations from the macro-perspective. The course examines organizational structure and technology, organizations and interorganizational networks in interaction with their societal environments, and large-scale problems of organizational and social power, conflict and change. It is designed to present a large-scale perspective on organization theory and behavior that is complementary to the micro-perspective of organizational behavior.

ORBH 550. Team and Small Group Research. 1 Unit.

This seminar is designed to focus primary on understanding the state of team research from 1950s to the present. The seminar will include in-depth reviews and critical analysis on the philosophical and methodological perspectives of team researchers. The seminar will also include topics, research design and methods (including analytical approaches) used in team research. Students will be expected to develop a research design and analysis proposal for a team research project using both qualitative and quantitative approaches.

ORBH 560. Research Methods I. 3 Units.

This course concerns itself with issues associated with the conduct of social research. The primary focus is on learning the "craft" of research and its associated technologies. Among the topics that are addressed are: scientific method; research terminology and definitions; search design; laboratory experiments; simulations; field experiments; field studies; measurement, reliability and validity; and sampling. This course is intended to help students acquire the skills necessary in undertaking dissertation-related research.

ORBH 565. Research in Gender and Diversity in Organizations. 1.5 Unit.

This course will provide a full range of feminist research methods exploring relationships between feminism and methodology involving a plurality of perspectives for conducting research and creating knowledge with an emphasis on collecting and interpreting qualitative materials. Particular attention is paid to understanding gender and diversity related phenomenon that occurs in the workplace. Classic feminist research from a variety of historical, societal, economic, interpersonal and organizational paradigms are incorporated. Coreq: ORBH doctoral students only.

ORBH 570. Learning and Development. 1.5 Unit.

This course provides an exploration of the learning and development paradigm underlying the human potential development approach to human resource development. The origins of this approach in the naturalist epistemologies John Dewey's pragmatism, Kurt Lewin's gestalt psychology, the work of James, Follett, Emerson, Piaget, Maslow, Rogers, and others and current research in adult development, biology and brain/mind research, artificial intelligence, epistemology, moral philosophy and adult learning will be considered. The course will focus on applications of these ideas to current issues in human resource development such as adult learning in higher education, advanced professional development, and large system learning and development. Coreq: ORBH doctoral students only.

ORBH 601. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

ORBH 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

PLCY Courses

PLCY 399. Business Policy. 3 Units.

This course uses case analysis to develop perspective and judgment on business problems through the integration of functional areas. Formulation, development, and implementation of organization goals and policies, the development of strategy in relation to the competitive environment, and applications of quantitative and behavioral decision-making techniques are examined. Prereq: Senior standing.

PLCY 419. Entrepreneurship and Personal Wealth Creation. 3 Units.

Course explores the accumulation of personal wealth utilizing entrepreneurial strategies. The underlying competencies of successful entrepreneurs are identified and applied to individual lives of students. Active entrepreneurs will be studied, and original case studies of start-ups and acquisitions provide the basis for class exercises. Offered as PLCY 419 and IIME 419.

PLCY 425. Chief Executive Officer. 3 Units.

This course is designed for students who aspire to become a chief executive officer. The unique role, responsibilities, and requirements of the CEO will be explored. Students will benchmark CEO best practices through exposure to leading chief officers, study the paths to and preparation for the top job, and develop a personal career strategy to increase their chances of becoming a CEO. Offered as PLCY 425 and IIME 424.

PLCY 474. Innovation for Competitive Advantage. 3 Units.

In this course, we will develop frameworks to identify new value propositions for the customer. We will then apply these frameworks to three types of innovations that we see in practice--incremental, disruptive and white space--and more importantly understand business model innovations that go beyond just a product or process innovation. The course will also explore techniques of focused brainstorming and creative problem solving techniques. Prereq or Coreq: MGMT 499.

PLCY 490. Corporate Strategy. 3 Units.

This course is an advanced strategy course that explores the determinants of successful corporate strategy. In Strategy Issues and Applications you were exposed to the basic frameworks for developing successful competitive or business unit level strategy. Corporate strategy takes you to the next level and provides the frameworks you need to be able to be successful in multiple businesses. At its core corporate strategy constitutes any and all decisions that change the core business model of a firm. Examples are vertical integration, new but related product lines, entering new markets with existing products and entering new or existing markets with unrelated products. The fundamental premise of the course is that successful corporate strategy is rooted in competitive advantage arising from capabilities residing at the business unit level. Starting from analyzing business level strategies of very simple firms, the course successively builds frameworks towards more complicated business level strategies. Next, the course develops frameworks to discuss corporate strategy based around the concept of core competencies and market entry strategies. Finally, the course develops the concepts that are useful in greenfield entries, alliances and acquisitions as part of an overall corporate strategy. Prereq: MGMT 499 or MBAC 508 or MBAP 410 or GMBA 403B.

PLCY 494. Managerial Consultancy. 3 Units.

Students will learn to match consulting methodologies with client needs and employ a step by step strategy development process applied to actual companies which are semester-long clients of the class. Accelerated career strategies in the consultancy business are featured as well as tactics for getting hired in the first place. The course views consultancy as a role rather than career and conceptualizes consultancy as a process of optimizing an organization's value creation potential and competitive advantage. Students should be able to apply the concepts regardless of career choice. Exposure to senior practicing consultants is featured.

PLCY 496. Strategic Planning and Control Systems for Strategy Implementation. 3 Units.

This course introduces the principal tools of strategy implementation, namely the design of organization structures, the use of formal planning and control systems, and the design of measurement and reward systems. The importance of organizational context (small vs. large, for profit vs. not-for-profit, manufacturing vs. service, etc.) and the need to tailor systems to the context of the organization are emphasized. New and emergent organizational forms and their role in strategy development and implementation are reviewed. Cases and readings are the principal pedagogical methods utilized. Students work in small project teams, study the operation and effectiveness of systems for strategic control in organizations, and present the results of their analysis in class presentations.

PLCY 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

PLCY 701. Dissertation Ph.D.. 1 - 9 Unit.

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

QUMM Courses

QUMM 414. Statistics and Decision Modeling. 3 Units.

This course provides the foundations of statistical and operations research methodologies for managerial decision-making. Business statistics focuses on statistical thinking as one of the fundamentals of effective management. Topics covered include sampling and the normal distribution, making inferences from data via confidence intervals and hypothesis tests, and analyzing relationships between samples. Decision modeling of organizational systems uses mathematical and computer models to provide a quantitative perspective on identifying, analyzing and solving complex decision problems. This course includes an introduction to linear programming models and applications, simulation techniques in decision-making, and project management.

QUMM 501. Special Problems and Topics. 1 - 18 Unit.

This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.