IBMS (IBMS)

IBMS 450. Fundamental Biostatistics to Enhance Research Rigor & Reproducibility. 1 Unit.

This is a required graduate level course for all first year PhD students in the School of Medicine biomedical PhD programs excluding Biomedical Engineering, Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Molecular Medicine and Clinical Translation Science. This course focuses on providing students with a basic working knowledge and understanding of best practices in biostatistics that can be applied to common biomedical research activities in numerous fields. Weekly sessions involve a combination of basic programming activities, lectures, exercises, hands-on data manipulation and presentation. Topics include experimental design and power analysis, hypothesis testing, descriptive statistics, linear regression, and others with an emphasis on when and in which experimental design a particular test is properly used. The overall goal of the course is to empower students to use these biostatistics to enhance the rigor of their experimental design and reproducibility of their primary data. The major focus is not on theory, but on a practical acquisition of a working knowledge of basic data processing analysis, interpretation, and presentation skills.

IBMS 453. Cell Biology I. 3 Units.

Part of the first semester curriculum for first year graduate students along with IBMS 455. This course is designed to give students an intensive introduction to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function. Topics include membrane structure and function, mechanisms of protein localization in cells, secretion and endocytosis, the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, cell signaling and the regulation of cell growth. Important methods in cell biology are also presented. This course is suitable for graduate students entering most areas of basic biomedical research. Undergraduate courses in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology are excellent preparation for this course. Recommended preparation: Undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology.

IBMS 455. Molecular Biology I. 3 Units.

Part of the first semester curriculum for first year graduate students along with IBMS 453. This course is designed to give students an intensive introduction to prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecular biology. Topics include protein structure and function, DNA and chromosome structure, DNA replication, RNA transcription and its regulation, RNA processing, and protein synthesis. Important methods in molecular biology are also presented. This course is suitable for graduate students entering most areas of basic biomedical research. Undergraduate courses in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology are excellent preparation for this course. Recommended preparation: Undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology.

IBMS 456A. Since You Were Born: Nobel Prize Biomedical Research in the Last 21 Years- Section A. 1 Unit.

This course is one of four sections that will cover major advances in biomedical research by review of Nobel Prize-winning topics from the past 21 years. Each section will cover 8 Nobel prize topics (1 topic/2 hour session/week for 8 weeks). Students will read critical research papers of the Nobel prize scientist(s) in preparation for guided in-class discussion led by the faculty mentor. The IBMS 456A section will cover Nobel Prizes related to the areas of Genetics & Genome Science, Systems Biology & Bioinformatics, and RNA Biology. These include: 1) 2012 Prize, J. Gurdon and S. Yamanaka: Mechanisms of pluripotent stem cell development and reprogramming; 2) 2010 Prize, R. Edwards: Development of in ,vitro fertilization; 3) 2009 Prize, E. Blackburn, C. Greider, andJ Szostack: Mechanisms of chromosome protection by telomeres and telomerase; 4) 2009 Prize, Y. Ramakrishnan, T. Steitz, and A. Yonath: Structure/function analysis of ribosomes; 5) 2007 Prize, M. Capecchi, M. Evans, and O. Smithies: Discovery/development of transgenic and gene-deletion methods in mice; 6) 2006 Prize, A. Fire and C. Mello: Discovery/development of RNA interference-gene silencing methods; 7) 2006 Prize, R. Kornberg: Mechanisms of eukaryotic transcription; 8) 1995 Prize, E. Lewis, C. Nusslein-Volhard, and W. Wieschaus: Mechanisms of genetic control in early embryonic development.

IBMS 456B. Since You Were Born: Nobel Prize Biomedical Research in the Last 21 Years- Section B. 1 Unit.

This course is one of four sections that will cover major advances in biomedical research by review of Nobel Prize-winning topics from the past 21 years. Each section will cover 8 Nobel prize topics (1 topic/2 hour session/week for 8 weeks). Students will read critical research papers of the Nobel prize scientist(s) in preparation for guided in-class discussion led by the faculty mentor. The IBMS 456B section will cover Nobel Prizes related to the areas of Molecular Biology & Microbiology, Molecular Virology, Pathology-Immunology, and Cell Biology. These include: 1) 2016 Prize, Y. Ohsumi: Mechanisms of Autophagy; 2) 2015 Prize, W. Campbell, S. Omura, and Y. Tu: Therapies against roundworms & malaria; 3) 2011 Prize, B. Beutler, J. Hoffman, and R. Steinman: Mechanisms underlying innate immunity and adaptive immunity; 4) 2008 Prize, H. zur Hausen, F. Barre-Sinoussi, and L. Montagnier: Discovery of human immunodeficiency virus and oncogenic papilloma viruses; 5) 2008 Prize, O. Shimomura, M. Chalfie, and R. Tsien: Discovery/development of green fluorescent protein for biological applications; 6) 2005 Prize, B. Marshall and J. Warren: Discovery of Helicobacter pyloris as pathogenic mechanism in peptic ulcers/gastritis; 7) 1999 Prize, G. Blobel: Mechanisms of protein sorting and subcellular trafficking; 8) 1996 Prize, P. Doherty and R. Zinkernagel: Mechanisms of cell-mediated immune defense.

IBMS 456C. Since You Were Born: Nobel Prize Biomedical Research in the Last 21 Years- Section C. 1 Unit.

This course is one of four sections that will cover major advances in biomedical research by review of Nobel Prize-winning topics from the past 21 years. Each section will cover 8 Nobel prize topics (1 topic/2 hour session/week for 8 weeks). Students will read critical research papers of the Nobel prize scientist(s) in preparation for guided in-class discussion led by the faculty mentor. The IBMS 456B section will cover Nobel Prizes related to the areas of Biochemistry, Nutrition, Pharmacology, and Pathology-Cancer. These include: 1) 2015 Prize, T. Lindahl, P. Modrich, and A. Sancar: Mechanisms of DNA Repair; 2) 2014 Prize, E. Betzig, S. Hell, W. Moerner: Development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy; 3)2012 Prize, R. Lefkowitz and B. Kobilka: Structure/function analysis of G protein-coupled receptors; 4) 2004 Prize, A. Ciechanover, A. Hershko, and I. Rose: Mechanisms of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation; 5) 2003 Prize, P. Lauterbur and P. Mansfield: Development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods; 6) 2002 Prize, S. Brenner, H.R. Horvitz, and J. Sulston: Mechanisms for genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death: 7) 2002 Prize, J. Fenn, K. Tanaka, and K. Wuthrich: Development of mass spec and NMR methods for biological macromolecules; 8) 2001 Prize, L. Hartwell, T. Hunt, and P. Nurse: Mechanisms of cell cycle regulation.

IBMS 456D. Since You Were Born: Nobel Prize Biomedical Research in the Last 21 Years- Section D. 1 Unit.

This course is one of four sections that will cover major advances in biomedical research by review of Nobel Prize-winning topics from the past 21 years. Each section will cover 8 Nobel prize topics (1 topic/2 hour session/week for 8 weeks). Students will read critical research papers of the Nobel prize scientist(s) in preparation for guided in-class discussion led by the faculty mentor. The IBMS 456D section will cover Nobel Prizes related to the areas of Neuroscience, Physiology & Biophysics, and Pathology-Molecular Basis of Disease. These include: 1) 2014 Prize, J. O'Keefe, M-B. Moser, and E. Moser: Mechanisms of nerve cell spatial positioning in the brain; 2) 2013 Prize, J. Rothman, R. Scheckman, and T. Sudhof: Mechanisms of intracellular vesicle trafficking and biomolecule secretion; 3) 2004 Prize, R. Axel and L. Buck: Structure/function of odorant receptors and organization of olfactory system; 4) 2003 Prize: P. Agre and R. MacKinnon:Structure/function analysis of channel proteins in cell membranes; 5) 2000 Prize, A. Carlsson, P. Greengard, and E. Kandel: Mechanisms of signal transduction in the nervous system; 6) 1998 Prize, R. Furchgott, L. Ignarro, and F. Murad: Discovery/mechanisms of nitric oxide as signaling molecule in cardiovascular system; 7) 1997 Prize, S. Prusiner: Discovery/prions as new biological principle of infection in neurological disease; 8) 1997 Prize, P. Boyer, J Walker, and J. Skou: Mechanisms of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and Na, K-ATPase pump function.

IBMS 500. On Being a Professional Scientist: The Responsible Conduct of Research. 1 Unit.

The goal of this course is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to think through their professional ethical commitments before they are tested, on the basis of the scientific community's accumulated experience with the issues. Students will be brought up to date on the current state of professional policy and federal regulation in this area, and, through case studies, will discuss practical strategies for preventing and resolving ethical problems in their own work. The course is designed to meet the requirements for "instruction about responsible conduct in research" for BSTP and MSTP students supported through NIH/ADAMHA institutional training grant programs at Case. Attendance is required.

IBMS 501. Responsible Conduct of Research for Advanced Trainees. 0 Unit.

The life of a professional scientist is complicated, and it is not always easy to know how to "do the right thing" with regard to their data, colleagues, and subjects. Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) is an essential component of research knowledge. Active thought about the issues of RCR should occur throughout a scientist's career. Instruction in RCR should be appropriate to the career stage of the individuals receiving training. All doctoral students in the School of Medicine receive initial RCR training in their second semester and NIH requires another intense exposure if doctoral students are four years beyond their initial training. The goal of this course is to provide fifth year biomedical doctoral students with additional RCR training by exposing them to a variety of research ethics topics through lectures and small group discussions led by professional scientists and ethicists. Students will be brought up to date on the current state of professional policy and federal regulation regarding research (where these exist), and will discuss practical strategies for preventing and resolving ethical problems in their own work. This course is designed for predoctoral graduate students that are in their fifth year of graduate studies and MSTP students that are in their fourth year of their PhD phase of study. These sessions are also appropriate for postdoctoral trainees.